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Posts Tagged ‘Long Beach planters’

Monday, 1 July 2019

I was pleased to find two callistemons in bloom in my garden.

Callistemon viridiflorus is still rather stressed from its move from Klipsan Beach Cottages to here eight months ago, but it is blooming.

Woodlanders Red seems very happy.

Long Beach

Before the watering rounds, we weeded the resurgence of horsetail out of Fifth Street Park’s NW quadrant and then mulched with two bales of Gardner and Bloome Soil Conditioner.

before

It had only taken since Thursday’s weeding for the horsetail to return.

also before
after
Above: That’s Captain Bob in the doorway of his chowder house.

In spring, we had removed tired and sickly old catmints and replaced them with santolina for a nice edging because the park had been rather dry.  Then the sprinklers were readjusted (I think) and now it is very wet, making the horsetail ever so happy and the centerpiece sanguisorba all floppy.  At least it may look better for this weekend.  I’m not at all happy with it.

Our other non-watering mission was to trim back the edge all along the street side of the Bolstad beach approach garden.  The Toy makes this much easier than it used to be.  Allan’s photos:

some weeding, too

We saw a little boy with his dad.  The boy had a nice bouquet of gaillardias and coreopsis.  We gently pointed out that there are not many flowers to pick in that garden and that if everyone did, blah blah blah, closing with, “I wouldn’t even say this to you if there were a million trillion flowers out here.”  Both dad and boy looked thoughtful.

Someone had pulled up coreopsis by the roots and left them to die.  There are not many of those in the garden, either.  

Still more coreopsis.  Not happy.

I took them home in a bucket of water and potted them up at end of day.

Onward we went with watering the street trees and planters.

a would-be great escape

(I re-home snails in areas of rough grass far from planters and gardens.)

Cosmos ‘Sonata’
I like parsley used ornamentally.
I do like a symmetrical planter.

The tree that we wish did not have accidental rugosa roses actually looks great right now.

Allan’s weekly struggle with the tree watering, illustrated: He thinks a mole filled up the valve from the bottom as the soil was soft.

He spotted a rock….

…inside this old Hebe ‘Boughton’s Dome’.

These pink oenotheras always remind me of my first ever attendance of a gardening lecture, when Ann Lovejoy said we could just ask for the pink evening primrose instead of remembering “ee-noth-era”.

another symmetrical planter

The weather was perfect, grey (which I prefer to sunshine) and not windy.

Sanguisorba ‘Pink Elephant’ (Allan’s photo)
Pacific tree frog! (Allan’s photo)
Long Beach Tavern’s flowers (Allan’s photo)
the much too invasive variegated vinca under a tree, to my regret (Allan’s photo)

When I pulled bindweed at the police station and at the little park behind Lewis and Clark Square, two little birds had much to say about their nest or their fledgings (which I did not see).

This little twining weed in a planter is quite pretty. But what is it?

I remembered to get some cuttings of Dianthus ‘Charles Musgrave’ from one of the planters—my favourite dianthus.

Dianthus ‘Charles Musgrave’

Ilwaco

While Allan watered the street trees and planters, the post office and fire station gardens, I potted my cuttings (my grandma would have called them “slips”), weeded the Norwood and J’s gardens and almost finished the monthly billing.

Norwood garden
Berberis darwinii berries hanging over into the J’s garden from next door

At the fire station, Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ is the only original plant in the revamped garden.

volunteer garden at the fire station

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Thursday, 27 June 2019

I got a plant delivery from Digging Dog Nursery, including a new Molinia ‘Transparent’.  Skooter dug up the one I got last year!

Although we still felt like we had the stuffing kicked out of us from the shingrix shot, watering wouldn’t wait.  On the way to work, realizing we did not have much longer to see it, we toured the current exhibit just three blocks west at

Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum.

There, I found information about the Narcissa Garden Club, whose plaque is on a memorial at Black Lake.

A museum staffer and I spoke of how in recent years, the little garden in front has had only plastic flowers.  Allan and I thought we might try to revive it after we semi-retire.  At the very least, we could plant it up with some narcissi.

I found this memorial to be deeply moving.

Also, books for troops.

I wish that the Spirit of Peace would prevail.

The Spirit of Peace, by Joe Knowles
having a pleasant confab with a friend from Ocean Park

On we went to our gardening rounds.

The Depot Restaurant

One of the restaurant staff came by and said he was amazed that the garden was already this tall from having looking like nothing when he started (in early spring when the perennials were all cut back).

An interesting rig parked for a few minutes nearby.  It appeared to be a trailer made of old trunks.  Or perhaps it was just an intriguing collection of old trunks.

On the way to Long Beach, Allan picked up his new shirt from Rip Tide Threads. He says he was tickled to get it and felt he had “moved up a social class”.

Long Beach

We plodded through the watering of the Long Beach planters.

found a rock
a nicely colored Cosmos ‘Sonata’
Sanguisorba ‘Pink Elephant’

Under one of two trees where the water does not work, the plants are distressed.  The only way to water it is to carry heavy buckets for a quarter of a block. So it never gets enough without rain.

finger blight of the day

We attended to some rampant blackberries popping out of the Heron Pond salal garden.  No time for horsetail patrol here.

During horsetail patrol in Fifth Street Park, I resolved to buy some GOOD bagged mulch for the quadrant that I so far cannot get to look good this year.

Allan’s Long Beach photos:

in the only planter that still has all its alliums
Allium christophii

A gentleman from Dooger’s Restaurant wanted to know the ID of the pretty little dianthus (pinks) growing in the restaurant garden.

Even though we so did not have energy for the planters out on Sid Snyder Drive, they needed water and attention. So we attended to them.

This one has to have water hauled to it in buckets.

Ilwaco

I watered the boatyard garden while Allan bucket watered the street trees and planters.

It was another challenging watering session because of hoses going up into boats.

I had to call for Allan’s help to unhook that hose from the faucet and hook another one up. I had found this partly burst fabric hose that I could take to various faucets.

Then I hooked up the boat hose again and left all as it was before.

The horsetail, both the big kind and the even more difficult little scrimmy kind, is coming back.

No time to deal with it today.

By the way, once upon a time, years ago, I put sprinkler hoses all along this garden so that I could water by hooking them up and then weeding while watering.  They were all stolen within a few weeks.  Because I water from behind the fence, I can’t do much weeding at the same time.

The garden is not too bad.

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

I could see the spot above, to the lower right, where someone had picked themselves a blue flowered stem.

sweet pea success
red poppies for remembrance

We must remember to take red poppy seeds to the WWI Memorial.

I watered the fire station garden while Allan watered the post office garden.

Allan’s Ilwaco photos:

We love that the Peninsula Sanitation office has someone who waters the planter. (No one knows who planted those gladioli.)

We now have three days off, thank goodness!

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Monday, 24 June 2019

at the post office

I had been worrying (as is my wont) for several days about the effects of our second Shingrix shot, scheduled for tomorrow.  The first shot of the shingles vaccine had knocked us, and especially Allan, out of commission for a few days.  The timing for the second one was certainly not ideal, but with a nationwide shortage we had to get it when it was offered.  So we jammed as much work into today as we could.

The Red Barn

We weeded and watered, and I doted on Cosmo the barn cat.

Allan’s photo

Cosmo hopped into the van, atop the pile of different weights of clothing for constantly changing weather.

Allan’s photo

The Tootlepedal blog has been inspiring me to do more flower close ups.

Diane’s garden

I did not pull the fireweed in the roadside garden (rosebay willowherb) because it is so pretty.

It is always a thrill to work on the roadside garden.

penstemon
Diane’s pea patch, better than any kitchen garden thing I’ve grown

The raised box garden is filling in.

When I grew Caribbean Cocktail nasturtiums last year, the flowers were all maroon and cream combos.

It has some of that this year…

…but also this orange, which is most definitely not supposed to be in Diane’s garden.

It is good that a vast sweep of reseeded California poppies stayed cream and not orange, but I fear they may have buried some perennials.

Allan’s photo
Brodiaea ‘Rudy’

Long Beach

We watered the planters and the 18 street tree gardens.

traveling sharpener
agastache
a meadowy tree garden
a Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ that escaped the Chelsea chop.

I know it is now officially Hylotelephium telephium ‘Autumn Joy‘ but…please.

As I watered, some folks were herding their two children toward a van. Each carried a kite they had made at the kite museum. The little boy, maybe 7 or 8 years of age, wailed, “Why do we have to go HOME? Why do we have to go FRICKING HOME? I don’t want to go HOOOME!”  He leaned his head against the van and wept.  In 1991 I felt the same while vacationing here.  And look what happened.

Allan’s Long Beach photos:

red hardy gladiolus

tree water hook up
tThe city crew had cleaned out this blocked one.
a tater bug convention
bindweed on a lily, before untwining

Ilwaco

While I dragged hose and watered along the port, Allan bucket watered the Ilwaco trees and planters.  The amount of watering we do of gardens that were not planned with any irrigation is pretty ridiculous.

The weather had been perfect all day.  Not too hot, not too cold, not too windy.  It could only have been more perfect had it poured rain all night so we did not have to water.

I love my santolinas. I must shear these wax myrtles soon.

Eremurus (Foxtail Lily)
my favourite bed

Dragging hose down the port definitely gets one’s heart rate up.

Our Jenna (Queen La De Da) was painting Don’s gallery.

The port office garden still looks too empty. I resolved to remember to bring some more plants for it.

I fretted over the western and easternmost beds which had not been watered for awhile.  We did not have time.

Allan’s photos: Peninsula Sanitation has been diligent in watering in between our visits which helps keep it healthy and bright.

The boatyard had been string trimmed inside the fence, even sparing some flowers that had reseeded.

We finished with Allan watering at the post office and me watering at the fire station.

fire station garden

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Thursday, 28 March 2019

We’d had this much rain.

The new water feature still has a slow leak.  The bow seat is still under water; the stern seat is exposed.

We drove by the Ilwaco fire station garden on the way to work…

…and then deadheaded Long Beach planters.

The welcome sign did not needs its narcissi deadheaded quite yet.

There was plenty of deadheading here and there on the main street (Pacific).

Allan’s before

and after

by Cottage Bakery

some primulas that I transplanted, blooming by Mostly Hats

Fritillaria meleagris

a bit of a color clash

I found a frog hopping along the curb.  It went into a tree garden drain pipe that I know will be parched dry this summer.  So I nabbed it, and even though I had sworn I was going to wait till frogs discovered our new pond, we took a break from work and drove froggie to our garden.

I hope it will like this better than a drainpipe next to a parking place.

Bentley, my friend next door, has had a haircut.

Allan’s photos

biscuit time

Bentley always has much to say, often in vocalizations other than barking.

 

Back to Long Beach…. We finished our deadheading.

By Malai Thai, our main patch of primroses

Fifth Street Park. NW quadrant

Fifth Street Park, NE quadrant

Allan’s photo

by fun rides

Tulipa sylvestris along the edge of a planter

The very pale Muscari is ‘Valerie Finnis’

Allan’s photos:

I rarely use double narcissi; they look splodgy to me.

Cerinthe major purpurascens

On to the Boreas Inn, where we finished mulching the lower and upper lawn beds.  I got an assortment of California poppies planted. Allan took all the photos:

deer tracks in bed mulched last time

before

before

after (two different beds)

I had brought my little red wheelbarrow, which I find easier to maneuver with a load of mulch.

old dahlia bed, before

so weedy; Allan tackled it while I planted poppies.

after

At home, sweet peas are erased the work board along with the poppies for the Boreas. We still need to get some mulch to the front entry garden at the Boreas.

 

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Friday, 15 March 2019

Before work, I had an exciting delivery from Gossler Farms, a Stachyurus praecox.  I have been looking for this plant since I left my old garden and had to leave a large one behind.  (It probably got crushed when the new owner had some danger trees felled from the slope above it.)  It is a winter blooming shrub that I adore.

Allan’s photos

It is gorgeous.  Now I just have to figure out how to squeeze it in to a garden bed that I can see from my living room desk in early spring.

I dug up several clumps of Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ and one clump each of a couple of more special sedums (“Strawberries and Cream’ and one with more glaucous foliage whose name I forget) to plant as the new center plant in the

Ilwaco planters.

Allan took most of the photos for this first part of the day.

in the boatyard

My hope is to make the small round easily-baked-in-the-sun planters need watering only once a week…or even just once every five days, or even four, would be an improvement.  We had removed the winter battered Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ which have been the centerpieces for years.

loads of snails in a planter near the boatyard

under a street tree

I admired both the south facing window and the garden bed below it at the Col Pacific Motel.

One of three erysimums that we had left because they looked ok looked so bad close up that I was sorry I had left it.

A variegated sedum had been taken over by a green reversion.  I axed all the green parts off and I do hope it will stay the handsome variegated form.

Just look how much it had reverted!  I had all but forgotten that it was anything but the plain green form.

The offending green parts in a bucket will be welcome elsewhere.

Long Beach

We began with a quick check up and some tidying at the city hall garden….

a corner at city hall before…

and after

The old lavatera in the west side garden beds that were planted by Gene and Peggy Miles has become so worn that this is probably its last year.  I will need to plant something low there because the office staff likes to be able to see out the window.

And then we trimmed santolinas and did some other grooming on the planters on the Sid Snyder approach and the six downtown blocks.

Sid Snyder Drive

The trimming will inspire the santolinas to have a nice round shape instead of getting raggedy.

before…this one took a lot of hand trimming rather than the speedy Stihl trimmer….

…because it was so intertwined with narcissi.

Allan took on the truly horrid job of clipping the rugosa roses that volunteered itself under one of the trees and then weeding it for the first time this year.

before

after

I walked back and forth between planters and street trees, heading north and trimming santolinas as I went.

This is the planter that started it all, one of four that I did back in about 1998 when they were all done by different volunteers.  The city administrator at the time said it was “magnificent”.  It still has the original santolinas.

before

A few years ago, I got so bored while hand trimming the furthest one that I suddenly cut it back to the trunk! It took it two years to come back.  I am glad I have The Toy now which makes the job fun rather than high pressure and tedious.

after (I blocked part of the photo with my thumb, oops)

Allan caught up to me halfway through town and removed the protective old leaves from the Fifth Street Park gunnera…

…and then trimmed a couple of blocks of planters himself.

The carousel is back, a sure sign of the tourist season.

I love small cupped narcissi.

I realized I would not have the satisfaction of erasing santolinas from the work board because we still have the ten or so planters on Bolstad beach approach to trim.  At five o clock, I was too exhausted to do it even though in past years I’d have gone on till dark to get it done.  I blamed the after effects of the Shingrix vaccine (whose side effects can last 3-5 days) rather than aging.

I did not even think I could muster the energy for the last two untrimmed planters north of the stoplight that I saw when we were on our way to dump debris. But I did (which means Allan did, too) because those blocks would be more crowded on a Saturday.

one of the last two planters

The downtown santolina trimming used to take all day, with sore hands from clipping afterwards.  The Toy made it take just the afternoon.

The work board tonight:

 

 

 

 

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Monday, 18 February 2019

Long Beach

We would have started at the Heron Pond had there been a parking place.  Instead, we began with the City Hall gardens.

I was so pleased with how the Stihl trimmer (The Toy) worked on the ornamental grasses on the west side that this is the only photo I took there.

I did not ask my phone to make its photo all artsy black and white.

Allan did better with before and after photos on the east side of city hall.

before
after

I channeled Gardeners’ World’s Carol Klein by putting some cuttings of Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ into a plastic baggie to keep them fresh till I can pot them up.  I had forgotten to bring a baggie but had fortuitously found one in the gutter (lord knows what was once in it).

Before we had quite finished cleaning up, Allan espied a parking space by the pond, a block away, and hightailed the van over there to snag it, then came back for the wheelbarrow and tools.

While he tidied and weeded and clipped around the pond, I did the same for the north two blocks worth of planters, therefore missing the traditional photo of Allan crossing the little waterfall without falling in.

His work location could have been viewed on the Heron Cam, shown here the following afternoon…

…so someone would surely see if he lost his balance.

My planter photos:

Erysiumum ‘Bowles Mauve’

The Toy works wonderfully at trimming small stems in the planters, and I believe it has already saved me hours of clipping.

Before:

a messy golden oregano

after (with hand clipping around the bulb foliage):

I helped Allan finish the last bit of work around the pond.

our audience

Allan’s Heron Pond photos:

before
after
before
after

before
after

Note how the underwear shows on the way across to the waterfall (and around the edges). I want to avoid this with our pond.

Next came Veterans Field and the Police Station rugosa roses, with only an hour clipping before time to clean up and dump debris.

Neither area allowed for use of The Toy; both required big loppers and the cutting of individual stems.

Police station (Allan’s photos):

before
after

Veterans Field flag pavilion, before…

Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies” has very tough stems.

The great big mess (Allan’s photo) had me fearing we would not get done by dark.

We prevailed. (I left the Salvia ‘Hot Lips’ unclipped because we are still due for some cold nights.)

Way over by that white car, below, is the little corner garden.

Because I did not get that far, I cannot erase Vet Field from the work list.  We did make an excellent dent today and also scored a gorgeous bookshelf from a “free” pile on our way home.

This morning:

This evening:

None of these work accomplishments are refined and perfect weeding jobs, just the somewhat rough first clean up.

Tuesday, 19 February 2019

I spent the next day in the greenhouse at home, avoiding the rain by potting up some plants for my sale and rearranging my room to accommodate the new book shelf.  This meant that I actually emptied out my ancient and ugly filing cabinet, the one full of old letters from friends and of sorted articles (on non-gardening topics) that I have been collecting since the 70s.  Putting the files into two cardboard boxes does not mean that I can erase “filing cabinet” from my at home list.

I have a plan for the old filing cabinet.  More on this later.

Allan’s outing included taking some of his boating book to Time Enough Books (where it had sold out!) and a quick tidy of the post office garden.

Ilwaco Post Office, before
after

I even booted up my computer to write this post instead of writing from the depths of my comfy chair.  With rain due tomorrow as well, there may be a blog break.  I feel more comfortable and less pressured when the blog is running at least three days behind.

 

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Thursday, 11 October 2018

Long Beach

At last we had time to do a project that had been weighing on my mind: dig out the wire vine, Muehlenbeckia axillaris, from the planter in front of Stormin’ Norman’s.

I planted it years ago, thinking it was a cute little trailing house plant that would not make it through the winter.  After a very few years, it had done this:

before: a great splodge of Muehlenbeckia axillaris (wire vine)

It had been cute and then had gone suddenly berserk.

We dug it out, but did not take all the soil out because we thought we could control any wire vine that popped out from pieces of root. (And oh, how we had tried to sift through and get all those pieces.)

Today:

before

The wire vine has returned throughout the planter despite semi-diligent attempts at control.

We were incredibly lucky during the digging out stage to get a parking spot right next to the planter.

Allan moves the trailer closer in.

such a lucky spot!

Before:

Allan’s photo

cleaning the perennials

After all the plants were out, as Allan removed the soil in the wire vine planter, I pulled the Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ from the next planter.

before

after

Most merchants don’t like tall plants in front of their shops. The Wind World Kites guy loves the crocosmia and jokes that he now has nowhere to hide.

After much digging and removing all the soil and the tattered years-old landscape fabric that separates soil from gravel, we found roots down IN the gravel.  This is ominous.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

We hauled the heavy debris to city works and dumped it in an inhospitable spot and returned with buckets of the last of the mulch pile and some landscape fabric from the works shop.  It was utterly exhausting, heavy work, especially because this time we had to park half a block away and haul everything

My back was panging, so I answered some garden questions while standing straight against a wall.  Part of the job is to be friendly to tourists.

The woman in blue was from England and had lived there till 1958.  I asked her if she had heard of garden writer Marion Cran.  She had not.

with new fabric to keep the soil from migrating into the rock

I had had rather a stroke of genius; we also brought the last two hanging basket innards and used that soil to extend what we had.

Allan’s photos

putting plants back in

Allan deadheaded a block worth of planters while I re planted.

Allan’s photo

Upon his return, the planter was done.  Many bulbs were also replanted.

Last week:

Stormin’ Norman’s

Today, after:

I was able to salvage all the perennials by carefully inspecting their roots.  I will be watching closely for any sign of wire vine emerging from them; if it does, out they will come.

Across the street is a planter I quite like (even though the matching santolina was stolen).

I have enjoyed Cosmos ‘Xanthos’.

pink gaura

I used the pink gaura to replace the bad agastaches in the Agastache Catastrophe (a batch with diseased leaves).  The gaura has been good and has bloomed longer, with no deadheading, than the agastache does.  I will use it again next year, along with perhaps the shorter white one, ‘So White’.

colourful Long Beach

After our project, we deadheaded and tidied a few more planters.

chrysanthemums

a rogue white flower stem

Geranium ‘Rozanne’ and yellow chrysanths

pink chrysanthemums starting to fade

I love the chrysanthemums that have perennialized in some of the planters.  They take up too much room to have them in every one.

The Shelburne Hotel

We had time to tidy up the back garden at the Shelburne.  Chef Casey had found akebia fruits on the south fence.  I sought them out under cover of the vine.

the akebia vine that I planted years ago

akebia fruits…I saved one to try out but I have forgotten to do so.

(I did try it a couple of days later.  The insides have a sweet pulp that is so full of seeds that there is little food to offer.)

Asian pears on the west fence

Someone had filled the bird bath with bean seeds. (Allan’s photo)

The beans in pots are well past their prime.

I picked off some moldy old beans….

…and then realized I remembered the hotel’s Halloween event and realized I should leave them till after Halloween.   I then decided to leave the old Joe Pye Weed and some other plants to add a spookier ambiance to the front garden.

spooky Joe Pye weed

“Get ready to sit, sip, and talk to the spirits at the Shelburne Hotel. Will be having Chariot reading Tarot cards by appointment (starting at 6pm on 10/26), Adrift Distillers Amaro release (10/27 from 5pm-7pm), seasonal cuisine, and cocktails that represents the spirits at the hotel.

Will be playing the Shining in the Inglenook both nights as well.

COSTUMES ENCOURAGED.

So join us for our haunted gathering at the Shelburne. Dine and drink with the ghost…maybe even say hello?”

The Shelburne’s sister hotel, Adrift, suggests something about a ghost in the garden!

Hmmm.  I’m not saying whether or not I have ever seen Annie May in the garden.

front garden, looking north

and south

Halloween is a good reason to leave the long, draping wisteria till November before a preliminary pruning.

We rewarded ourselves for an exhausting day with a tasty meal and drink in the Shelburne pub.

As diners arrived at the pub, Brian O’ Connor began to sing, as he does every Thursday.  You can sit in the living room to listen and dine, or sit in the pub with the music as ambiance.

His deep and distinctive voice has an emotional quality that draws a regular audience on Thursday nights.

We heard part of the performance during our relaxing meal.

chop salad with fried chicken, fish and chips, cranberry cosmo

The bartender and I agreed that even though we are not usually fans of fried chicken, the version offered at the pub is delectable.  (I get it as a side on the salad.)

so good

fish and chips (Allan’s photo)

My favourite dessert on the peninsula these days is the pub’s cheesecake tart with blackberry topping.

On the way home, we checked out some Halloween decorations in Ilwaco.

Lake Street

Spruce Street

Lake Street (Pirate Lucy Dagger’s house)

We have accomplished all our little work board projects other than mulching.

accomplishments still don’t include the indoor at home projects left over from last winter

I enjoyed the partial emptiness for a moment before adding Bulb Time.

That list is even missing two small job.

Tomorrow, the bulbs come and the sorting begins, a rather dreaded task that hurts my brain.

 

 

 

 

 

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