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Posts Tagged ‘Long Beach (Washington)’

Monday, 12 November 2019

Skooter wakes up.

After our days of skiving off work for Halloween (but not resting), we buckled down to the fall clean up tasks.

Here is a mystery cat, a photo taken by Allan…somewhere along the way to work.  Unfortunately for me, I missed seeing it.

The Depot Restaurant

It was high time to clip the hops off of the dining deck lattice.  In fact, sous chef Jamie told us that they had just taken in the outdoor seating and had wondered when the hops would be removed.  I do like to stay one step ahead so that no one has to ask us to do things, thus we were just in time.

I trimmed from the outside, while Allan trimmed from the inside.

before

north side of dining deck

after

I like to leave some perennials standing.

Allan’s photos:

We cleaned up along the east wall of the restaurant and put some river rock in a low spot where the edging logs got shifted..

Now we wait for a hard frost to take down the window box annuals, and we try to remember to put some water on the window boxes once a week.

north side

still blooming, planted by Roxanne from Basket Case Greenhouse

Long Beach

I started a clean up of the NW quadrant garden, putting in about an hour of work.

Before:

Because birds are still enjoying the seeds, I left some tall perennials in place even though I think some passersby will find it messy.

seeds on Solidago ‘Fireworks” and sanguisorba

after

before

an hour later

before

after

The pale pink hesperantha, either Mrs. Hegarty or Viscountess Byng, is such a runner that we pulled much of it last spring.  A large amount that evaded us has been blooming beautifully in the autumn.  I find that if we pull a massive amount, then about the perfect quantity of blooms remain.

Meanwhile, Allan string trimmed an impossible-to-weed bed (dank, wet, rooty) in the SE quadrant across the street.

before

There is talk of removing this bed, trees and all.  The trees themselves are not healthy because of the wet soil.

With all that work done, I took this photo, below, and then ate my lunch whilst Allan ran the blower on the pavement.

We drove to Ilwaco and checked on the south garden by the Port of Ilwaco office—still with the cosmos that will not die.

just before sunset

It was not till we got home that Allan realized, while unloading debris, that the string trimmer and rake had been left behind on the bench in Fifth Street Park.  He hared back there.  Before he had arrived, I got a message from Cathy of Captain Bob’s chowder that a Long Beach local had noticed the tools and had alerted Cathy, who was holding them for us in the restaurant.  Whew.  We know other public gardeners who lost some power equipment by leaving it behind and having it gone by the time they returned and looked for it. The next time we saw our rescuer, Allan gave him a tip for saving us some stress and money.

Being home by five meant I had a nice relaxed evening for writing up the Halloween blogs at last.

 

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Thursday, 12 September 2019

Long Beach

The main tourist season ends when the hundreds of visiting Rod Runners leave.  The day when we tidy Long Beach planters after the Rod Run feels like our annual end of the tourist season.  Town was still busy today with an older and quieter sort of tourist, now that most children over four are back in school.  

When Rod Run used to coincide with Labor Day weekend and had an official parade of cars that closed the road in Long Beach, the planters would get turned to mush by planter sitters and standers.  I think the year 1999 might have been the last year before the event was moved to the weekend after to cut down on the dangerous traffic gridlock which made aid cars and fire trucks unable to get through.  The parade was shortened so it just goes around Ocean Park area.  The vehicles show off through Long Beach, though, but the planter damage is minimal in comparison to days of yore.

We started with the welcome sign.

Because watering the planters would freshen them up, we did so.

Someone stood in this one hard enough to break off the Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’.

This planter at the Bolstad light got sat upon so hard that Rozanne was smashed and the santolina was disarranged.

I decided to go ahead and trim the santolina.

If I cut back Rozanne hard, it would revive and rebloom, but the planter would look barren for too long while there are still tourists in town.

On the other side of the street, the roses had mostly protected the fuchsia…

…but I still want the rose dug out because it never does anything pretty.

Looking across the street at the planter I had just trimmed, today…

My theory that people would not sit on Geranium ‘Rozanne’ that was trailing well over the edge was proven wrong.

I pulled the Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ stems out from the tree by the bakery.  Most of them were lying sideways from being stood in.

It is time anyway.  Two more parks, two planters, another tree, city hall, the beach approach have them still.

I had The Toy™ with me because I knew I faced a lot of trimming.  When I used the loo next to the police station, I hoped no one would steal it.

I saw myself reporting such a theft by walking into the police station saying, “Someone stole my toy!”

The police station planter had Geranium ‘Rozanne’ trailing down on both ends last week. I had to trim it today because of the sitting and smashing. One of the center agastaches was also a casualty.

A particular smashed up planter at the SW corner of Third, by a park with plenty of seating:

Across the street, Rozanne was still trailing beautifully.

Delightfully, my favourite planter this year was just fine.

Allan’s photos while watering and tidying the southern blocks of planters:

 

We have been seeing isolated infestations of black aphids on cosmos, just a stem here and there.

We pulled two of the three batches of sweet peas out of Fifth Street Park. The one in front of Captain Bob’s got to stay.

horsetail patrol
Allan’s photo, with hesperantha coming on

I reflected upon how different the parks look from the more manicured ones in Castle Rock.  Mine are more like amateur home gardens, with mingling plants and a lot of experimentation.  I think many will welcome if a more standard park look happens after we semi retire.

We had left the northern two blocks for last so that Allan could pull the tatty old erysimums while I did the watering. His photos:

Boreas Inn

Susie had been so thrilled with her mulch that she had asked us to mulch some more by the west side of the inn.

Upon arriving, we saw the deer next door.

That tarp is covering a future garden bed next door.

I was this close.

They jumped the neighbors’ fence to eat apples.

Honestly, is that maybe even more attractive than having a deer proof fenced garden?

Bill came out to have a chat with them.

Allan’s photo

The west lawn beds have been deciminated by the deer this year, even plants that should be resistant.  More lavender next year!

I have known deer to eat rue and eucalyptus and other plants that thoroughly surprised me.

After our mulching, during which Allan continued for fifteen minutes longer than me, while I went off the clock to sit on the deck and chat with Susie and longtime friends who were staying at the inn, we went home and then joined them all at

Salt Pub.

I had my favorite, the delicious tuna melt.

We don’t get out to dinner as much as we used to, partly because we are trying to be more frugal. Twice in one week was a treat, especially for Chef Allan.

Skooter, lounging next door, had something to say when we returned home.


a book: Save Me the Plums by Ruth Reichl

I have read all of Reichl’s memoirs, and tonight I finished the most recent one.  My favourite bits.

She describes how years before she became the Editor in Chief at Gourmet magazine, she had Thai food for the first time.

This took me back to my first Thai meal at a Seattle restaurant (1982?) with my significant other, Bryan, and our group of friends.  I felt the same, such a thrill, at the food I had been looking for my whole life.

It was news to me that Gourmet had once published such great writers:

Oh, look, we have some phobias in common!

I did not know that lambs quarters are edible.

These few takeaways may imply that the book did not offer me much.  Not so, I loved every minute of it and it made me want to reread her other memoirs, especially Garlic and Sapphires, about her years as a food critic. Oh, how I long for reading season, which will begin in mid November, after bulb time.

 

 

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Monday, 8 July 2019

Despite a forecast of rain, we did our usual watering rounds.  We cannot depend on rain, especially when the forecast calls for anything between one tenth and one half inch.

Long Beach

Allan watered the street trees and ten planters and I did the rest.

Photos taken as I walked up one side of the street and then down the other…

My second planter had a catastrophe: one of my gauras had disappeared, ruining my symmetry.

I found half of the plant left, bent sideways.

I had to trim the remainder of the right hand one by half and then had to cut the other one by half to match.  The joys of public gardening.  I hope people know that my intentions were better than what they get to see.

Cosmos ‘Xanthos’

In two planters, the knautias that used to be the variegated ‘Thunder and Lightning’ are too big and sprawling.

One variegated leaf has come back in the messy middle.

Perhaps in the autumn, I will remember to dig these out and put them under a street tree or in a park.

Last week’s mulch has slowed down the horsetail in Fifth Street Park.

I had some sweet pea success, although some of the leaves look ominously on the verge of mildew.

California poppies
Allium christophii tied into a bundle

I had begged some string from Captain Bob’s Chowder but did not take enough for the second trio of alliums.

Veronica is regrowing where I sheared it back hard.

The dampest corner of Fifth Street Park:

No one has cut into the biggest lavender yet!

lavender abuzz

The lilies in Fifth Street Park and in my own garden are shorter than usual this year.

Allan’s photos while watering:

Sanguisorba ‘Pink Elephant’

rugosa rose
a couple getting a photo in front of the blooming ‘Super Dorothy’ rose

Ilwaco

I tidied up the planters while Allan bucket watered them.

Someone planted sunflowers in this one.

Maybe a bird did it.

view of the boatyard

The deer spray (Liquid Fence) is preventing the sedums from getting munched.

Someone who came to my plant sale at the end of May told me to look for a little garden behind a building.  I remembered today.

very nice indeed

The annoying perennial sweet pea looks pretty right now.

We did not plant it.

City Hall

We finished by watering our volunteer gardens at the post office and fire station.

fire station garden
east side, new this year

It was 71 degrees as we finished watering.

At home, my next door neighbour was feasting on bindweed.

I potted up a big comfrey that we had dug up, with permission, from a garden near the boatyard.

Skooter helped.

 

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Monday, 24 June 2019

at the post office

I had been worrying (as is my wont) for several days about the effects of our second Shingrix shot, scheduled for tomorrow.  The first shot of the shingles vaccine had knocked us, and especially Allan, out of commission for a few days.  The timing for the second one was certainly not ideal, but with a nationwide shortage we had to get it when it was offered.  So we jammed as much work into today as we could.

The Red Barn

We weeded and watered, and I doted on Cosmo the barn cat.

Allan’s photo

Cosmo hopped into the van, atop the pile of different weights of clothing for constantly changing weather.

Allan’s photo

The Tootlepedal blog has been inspiring me to do more flower close ups.

Diane’s garden

I did not pull the fireweed in the roadside garden (rosebay willowherb) because it is so pretty.

It is always a thrill to work on the roadside garden.

penstemon
Diane’s pea patch, better than any kitchen garden thing I’ve grown

The raised box garden is filling in.

When I grew Caribbean Cocktail nasturtiums last year, the flowers were all maroon and cream combos.

It has some of that this year…

…but also this orange, which is most definitely not supposed to be in Diane’s garden.

It is good that a vast sweep of reseeded California poppies stayed cream and not orange, but I fear they may have buried some perennials.

Allan’s photo
Brodiaea ‘Rudy’

Long Beach

We watered the planters and the 18 street tree gardens.

traveling sharpener
agastache
a meadowy tree garden
a Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ that escaped the Chelsea chop.

I know it is now officially Hylotelephium telephium ‘Autumn Joy‘ but…please.

As I watered, some folks were herding their two children toward a van. Each carried a kite they had made at the kite museum. The little boy, maybe 7 or 8 years of age, wailed, “Why do we have to go HOME? Why do we have to go FRICKING HOME? I don’t want to go HOOOME!”  He leaned his head against the van and wept.  In 1991 I felt the same while vacationing here.  And look what happened.

Allan’s Long Beach photos:

red hardy gladiolus

tree water hook up
tThe city crew had cleaned out this blocked one.
a tater bug convention
bindweed on a lily, before untwining

Ilwaco

While I dragged hose and watered along the port, Allan bucket watered the Ilwaco trees and planters.  The amount of watering we do of gardens that were not planned with any irrigation is pretty ridiculous.

The weather had been perfect all day.  Not too hot, not too cold, not too windy.  It could only have been more perfect had it poured rain all night so we did not have to water.

I love my santolinas. I must shear these wax myrtles soon.

Eremurus (Foxtail Lily)
my favourite bed

Dragging hose down the port definitely gets one’s heart rate up.

Our Jenna (Queen La De Da) was painting Don’s gallery.

The port office garden still looks too empty. I resolved to remember to bring some more plants for it.

I fretted over the western and easternmost beds which had not been watered for awhile.  We did not have time.

Allan’s photos: Peninsula Sanitation has been diligent in watering in between our visits which helps keep it healthy and bright.

The boatyard had been string trimmed inside the fence, even sparing some flowers that had reseeded.

We finished with Allan watering at the post office and me watering at the fire station.

fire station garden

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Friday, 12 April 2019

Long Beach

We checked on the Long Beach welcome sign, where the vole damage does not seem to have increased at all, thank goodness.

I did not examine the tulips closely.  Ignorance is bliss.

We deadheaded two blocks worth of planters downtown.

I don’t think I have grown Tulip ‘Suncatcher’ before.

Suncatcher…very showy.

Allan’s photo

The tulips and the tulip foliage look great despite all the rain.

in front of Stormin’ Norman’s

We then took last time’s debris to city works and picked up a buckets-load of Soil Energy mulch.

Allan’s photo

And then, out to the beach approach to see how far we could get with the mulch on the sections we had already weeded.

We barely had enough for the first (westernmost) long section, the longest of all of them.  Then, on to weeding, hoping to get at least one half section done.

a thorny job

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo (telephoto; we were far from that close to the background hotel)

This week is spring break so the town is full of happy tourists.

Rain came, steaming on the road.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

We only got one half section done…

Allan’s photo

…and we still have this far to go.

Vehicle above is on the wrong side of the road to politely avoid us, unlike many who cut it very fine as they pass us, despite our traffic cones and Allan’s safety vest.

We dumped today’s debris and finished deadheading the other four blocks of downtown planters.

Tulip ‘Akebono’ is one of my favourites.

I love Akebono’s green sepals and delicate, thin red edge (which does not seem as visible on these).

Allan’s camera picked up the red edge, on the yellow, behind the red tulip.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Tulip ‘Green Star’ (Allan’s photo)

Tulip ‘Green Star’ (Allan’s photo)

I am partial to all the viridiflora tulips.

‘Akebono’ (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

😦 Allan’s photo

more Green Star (Allan’s photo)

I’m thrilled to see buds on my asphodeline.

I was not thrilled to find evidence of finger blight by Fifth Street Park.

Some flowers were just picked and dropped; perhaps someone yelled at the thief?

broken, not clipped with secateurs

And some were downright taken.  There should be five or six orange tulips in each of these clumps.

The ones across the street were as they should be.

The weather had become pleasant again after the rain and wind that drove us off the beach approach, and so we did a big tidy up of the northwest quadrant of Fifth Street Park.

our audience (Allan’s photo)

before (Allan’s photo)

There was way too much Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’, hesperantha, and the ever maddening horsetail (the little scrimmy one) and some kind of belligerently spreading skinny allium.

after (Allan’s photo)

after

I might use some kind of annual along the front, so that it can be cleaned more easily of weeds in the autumn and winter.

Unfortunately, we had much more to do so no time to have a late lunch at Captain Bob’s Chowder.

camassia in the southwest quadrant

We deadheaded the last two blocks….

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

…and the Sid Snyder beach approach planters, where we saw two darling dogs…

…and a remarkably cute goat.

We deadheaded at the Kite Museum and almost got stuck dumping our debris at City Works.

Allan’s photo

Shelburne Hotel

While Allan did our grocery shopping across the street, I deadheaded at the Shelburne and noted an influx of weeds, mostly sorrel and creeping buttercup, that must be dealt with by next weekend.  I resolved that the next nice day would be partly spent there.

hmmmmm….what happened here?

I put down Sluggo all along the fence where I had planted sweet peas.  I could see a few of them, tiny and threadlike, emerging.

looking north

looking south

Looking south from the north end….In the distance, walking away, is Seaview Sara’s spouse and their dog, Jet; I had finally met the lovely dog for the first time.

Tulip ‘Akebono’ again

only one tiny hint of the red edge

Tulip ‘Spring Green’

Tulip ‘Queensland’

Tulip sylvestris

I had finally learned, from Monty Don on Gardeners’ World, that T. sylvestris is fragrant.  I rarely think to smell a tulip.  I did, and it has a beautiful scent.

not sure which one this is!

The work board has gotten ever so slightly shorter.

 

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Monday, 8 April 2019

Long Beach

All but two photos today are by Allan.

Before we even got to Long Beach, I felt that the weather was too windy for weeding on the beach approach. We kept going because of a cheque awaiting us at city hall. While we were there, we deadheaded the city hall garden.

Even though I had every intention of just dumping debris left over from our previous beach approach session and then going home, I suddenly decided that we simply must do one section of the approach garden. And so we did, despite the pushy, cold wind.

It was good that we’d finished this part last time; it would have been sloshy work today:

Weeding this “end cap” was our goal:

We met two darling dogs. The eight month old shepherd is Athena.

Some narcissi has appeared at the edge of the beach grass.

We did meet our goal.

We now have this far to go.

Ilwaco Fire Dept volunteer garden

As we neared home, Allan suggested we check on one of our two volunteer gardens.

An early poppy:

Dutch iris buds:

Tulip greigii foliage:

A fancy tulip:

At home, in the evening, we watched a film that I had learned about in a Gardeners’ World special about allotments. We rented it from YouTube.

It is a complete delight and well worth seeking out.

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Thursday, 4 April 2019

The weather surprised us with a workable day.

Tulip ‘Lilac Wonder’ at the Ilwaco post office

Long Beach

We plunged right back into weeding the Bolstad beach approach, with the hope to finish three sections, by which I mean three HALF sections; I have divided it up more in my mind to make it psychologically easier.

Allan’s photos tell the tale.

I LOVE poms!

one lonely tulip that the deer did not eat

By this point, I really wondered if we were going to make it to the end…which would be three short sections.  It was one of the harder, more grassy areas.

I was determined but exhausted.

It would be nice to be able to leave the clover and birdsfoot trefoil and vetch for pollinators.  I want to but I don’t think people would understand.  What do you think?

Allan doesn’t like the vetch because it climbs all over the roses in a cloud of pink….and the birdsfoot in a cloud of yellow.

We did it! You can see there are grasses still at the very base of some of the roses.  My arthritic right hand, going into its 65th year, just cannot get those out very well anymore.  Once the roses leaf out, the grasses there will be pretty much hidden.  That’s just the way it is.  In a more refined garden, I would manage it (or delegate).

We were delighted to reach our goal.  On the way south, we deadheaded two blocks worth of narcissi in Long Beach….

Tulip ‘Lilac Wonder’ at the police station.

…and the Long Beach welcome sign.

I have begun to notice that there is little sign of the pink and white tulips on the back of the sign.

just one patch out of 100 tulip bulbs

The front looks floriferous.

But when I got in close, I found several tulips like this…drooping, and when I pull them, the stem comes right out.

This says to me that voles have taken up residence in the planter and are eating the bulbs.  This means that for next year, the tulips would have to be planted in cages or pots covered with mesh….or this might be the last year that tulips will be the spring show at the welcome sign.

Voles won’t eat narcissus bulbs so the spring show might have to be all daffodils; some are late blooming…but then there is so much bulb foliage to deal with.  How very tiresome to have to ponder this.

With our work in Long Beach done, I did a quick check up on the Shelburne Hotel garden while Allan did some grocery shopping across the street.

The garden is looking fine and needed only a small bit of deadheading.

looking north

the first Dutch iris

My neighbors were at the pub!

Bentley and Cota

Allan’s photo of Bentley

looking south from the north end

looking south from the entry way

Allan’s photo

I had received in the mail a plant order….I was happy to see it but I wished the plants (some agastaches) were in some sort of little pot (even fiber, to save on plastic) rather than just loose and needing immediate attention.

I have to admit that I was so tired, I just bunged them into a bucket and will deal with them tomorrow.

The work board tonight:

 

 

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