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Posts Tagged ‘Long Beach (Washington)’

Monday, 4 March 2019

I felt the need to work despite the morning being so chilly that we discussed taking the day off.

The water boxes were frozen…

As were the ponds.

…so frozen that tossed pebbles just sat on the ice.

Cota and Bentley next door enjoyed an icy apple each.

We mulched the rose beds at the J’s garden across the street. The first bed is empty and needs a new rose.

And it needs a trellis to match the one at the other end.

Fortunately, there is a trellis going spare behind the flowering quince on the west fence.

Now we have a tiny future project, to move a trellis (Allan) and find a red or pink climbing rose (me).

The J’s garden front garden has plenty of crocuses.

To further test out the weather, we tidied the Ilwaco planters and street tree pocket gardens. Fortunately, lack of wind made 45 degrees workable. All but two of the tatty old erysimums came out of the planters today. (The two least tatty ones get a reprieve for now.)

Allan’s photo

Tatty (Allan’s photo)

I will wait till the nights are above freezing to add some Sedums. It would be great to have some hens and chickens and even echeverias, but the cooler the plant is, the more likely it will be stolen, so I must stick with something as basic as Autumn Joy that I can replace without expense.

As the day felt a bit balmier, we went on to Long Beach, first to Fifth Street Park to finish a bit of trimming in the northeast quadrant.

Allan trimmed a rudbeckia and a lavender…

…and was asked by the owners of the new barbershop to trim a rhododendron. He referred that to me. It was full of buds so I did the barest of trimming so that it does not dare to actually touch the building. It was enough to make the new business happy and feel welcomed.

You probably can’t even see a difference. Most of the pruning was at the back. People like to be listened to, and they saw me carry off several branches. I’ll try to remember to continue to leave an inch of space between the shrub and the building.

Allan had a look inside the spiffing new barber shop.

In a planter by the park, Allan saw this sorry sight in an ash tray by a planter.

Other than the rhododendron, I further pruned a row of Super Dorothy roses that had looked too thick in Allan’s after photo from last week:

After, today:

We went on to the Bolstad beach approach to check the planters. A plant thief has indeed helped themselves to some of our new sea thrifts. I think it must have happened before someone added primroses to the Lisa Bonney memorial planter, or surely there would be two holes instead of one.

We worked our way all along the beach approach garden, trimming ornamental grasses and pulling crocosmia. The weeding will come later.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

I was pleased to find that The Toy made quick work of most of the small stems of rugosa roses along the edge.

A hellebore at city Hall:

Allan’s photo

The planters on the Sud Snyder Drive beach approach got their late winter tidy.

The planter furthest east has become a smoking lounge.

I left the smokers a wee notice.

The next planter to the west is also a smoking lounge, but those smokers have thoughtfully put a bucket by the planter for their cigarette butts.

We had time to tidy up the World Kite Museum garden at four o clock, as the temperature began to fall quickly.

It’s a shame I had not put the beach approach trimming on the work board, as I did not get the pleasure of erasing it. At least I could erase three things, leaving a short list of late winter garden check ups still to do.

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Wednesday, 20 February 2019

While Allan pruned the Shelburne Hotel wisteria (see yesterday’s post), I did some garden clipping and tidying before helping to load the debris.

Before:

After:

I was happy to see the beginning of the spring bulb display.

With the wisteria debris loaded into the trailer and the trailer parked at home, we joined Our Kathleen for burger night at The Depot Restaurant.

Baked apple cider

Allan’s photo

Apple cobbler

Vanilla bean flan

We had a good long talk and, just as in My Dinner With Andre, we looked around when the kitchen lights went off to realize that we were the only diners left and that the staff was tidying up.

Thursday, 21 February 2019

Our small Pond was lightly iced over.

The pond edges are cluttered, like my mind.

I noticed that next door, Nora’s patch of snowdrops is blooming by her garage.

After a dump run with yesterday’s wisteria clippings, I decided that the remaining pile of wisteria at The Shelburne, along with what we would clip today, would not be enough to fill the trailer for a second dump run. In order to save our clients money by combining a load, I resolved to collect some more debris first.

Long Beach

We visited City Works to ask the crew for a pile of Soil Energy mulch and picked up a bucket of gravel for a low edge on the Heron Pond garden.

Allan’s photo

The area we weeded earlier is level with the sidewalk now but needs some river rock (of which there is a bin at City Works) to dress it up.

We could have dumped today’s LB debris at City Works…but It would save time to just include it with the dump load.

We spring cleaned the corner garden at Veterans Field…

….and clipped and weeded the little popouts.

Allan’s photos. The Toy makes quick work of ornamental grass shearing.

I walked over to the main street to check on a planter that I had been told had been recently dug in (plumbing problems). The damage was minor. To my distress, I saw on a different planter that someone had picked every single flower, the crocuses and irises and early narcissi, and shredded them into a pile left on the edge.

WHY?????

I carried the petals back to show Allan. I had resolved to not get so upset about finger blight this year and have already failed in my resolution.

The Depot Restaurant

We trimmed the ornamental grasses on the south and east side of the dining deck. That doesn’t mean we can erase The Depot from the work list, as the north side garden is still untouched.

The Toy, which made short work of the lighter grasses, is not strong enough to go through the giant Miscanthus, whose stems are like bamboo.

The Shelburne Hotel

While Allan finished the wisteria pruning and made the second dump run, I did more general spring clean up of the garden. (I wish I had a before and after of the excellent pruning of an old woody hydrangea that I accomplished there yesterday.)

Anyone who has a lot of sword ferns to clip should buy themselves The Toy. It is available at Clatsop Power in Astoria and is saving us a substantial amount of time.

It also worked wonders on zipping through the epimedium. You can trim epimedium to the ground now so that the new flowers show off. I just thinned it here to avoid a bare effect.

In the garden:

We worked on wisteria clipping and clean up till dusk and then rewarded ourselves with dinner in the pub.

Brian O’Conner performs there most Thursdays. His deep and resonant voice makes any song emotionally moving. I resolved to try to dine there most Thursdays this year. That may be a resolution I can keep.

He plays in the parlor, which is adjacent to the pub and also has pub dining.

View from our favourite table

Hummus appetizer

My favourite, chopped salad with Mary’s fried chicken

The work board this morning

And the work board tonight

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Monday, 18 February 2019

Long Beach

We would have started at the Heron Pond had there been a parking place.  Instead, we began with the City Hall gardens.

I was so pleased with how the Stihl trimmer (The Toy) worked on the ornamental grasses on the west side that this is the only photo I took there.

I did not ask my phone to make its photo all artsy black and white.

Allan did better with before and after photos on the east side of city hall.

before
after

I channeled Gardeners’ World’s Carol Klein by putting some cuttings of Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ into a plastic baggie to keep them fresh till I can pot them up.  I had forgotten to bring a baggie but had fortuitously found one in the gutter (lord knows what was once in it).

Before we had quite finished cleaning up, Allan espied a parking space by the pond, a block away, and hightailed the van over there to snag it, then came back for the wheelbarrow and tools.

While he tidied and weeded and clipped around the pond, I did the same for the north two blocks worth of planters, therefore missing the traditional photo of Allan crossing the little waterfall without falling in.

His work location could have been viewed on the Heron Cam, shown here the following afternoon…

…so someone would surely see if he lost his balance.

My planter photos:

Erysiumum ‘Bowles Mauve’

The Toy works wonderfully at trimming small stems in the planters, and I believe it has already saved me hours of clipping.

Before:

a messy golden oregano

after (with hand clipping around the bulb foliage):

I helped Allan finish the last bit of work around the pond.

our audience

Allan’s Heron Pond photos:

before
after
before
after

before
after

Note how the underwear shows on the way across to the waterfall (and around the edges). I want to avoid this with our pond.

Next came Veterans Field and the Police Station rugosa roses, with only an hour clipping before time to clean up and dump debris.

Neither area allowed for use of The Toy; both required big loppers and the cutting of individual stems.

Police station (Allan’s photos):

before
after

Veterans Field flag pavilion, before…

Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies” has very tough stems.

The great big mess (Allan’s photo) had me fearing we would not get done by dark.

We prevailed. (I left the Salvia ‘Hot Lips’ unclipped because we are still due for some cold nights.)

Way over by that white car, below, is the little corner garden.

Because I did not get that far, I cannot erase Vet Field from the work list.  We did make an excellent dent today and also scored a gorgeous bookshelf from a “free” pile on our way home.

This morning:

This evening:

None of these work accomplishments are refined and perfect weeding jobs, just the somewhat rough first clean up.

Tuesday, 19 February 2019

I spent the next day in the greenhouse at home, avoiding the rain by potting up some plants for my sale and rearranging my room to accommodate the new book shelf.  This meant that I actually emptied out my ancient and ugly filing cabinet, the one full of old letters from friends and of sorted articles (on non-gardening topics) that I have been collecting since the 70s.  Putting the files into two cardboard boxes does not mean that I can erase “filing cabinet” from my at home list.

I have a plan for the old filing cabinet.  More on this later.

Allan’s outing included taking some of his boating book to Time Enough Books (where it had sold out!) and a quick tidy of the post office garden.

Ilwaco Post Office, before
after

I even booted up my computer to write this post instead of writing from the depths of my comfy chair.  With rain due tomorrow as well, there may be a blog break.  I feel more comfortable and less pressured when the blog is running at least three days behind.

 

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What have we done this year for the holidays?  Not much.  I did not decorate one little bit, because I did not want to give up reading and gardening time to put up a tree and then take it down again.

Oh, but wait.  I did put out one piece of Christmas decoration, something I have had since 1977:

We have had enough seasonal festivity to make this Season’s Greetings post.  (Soon, I will catch up on the reading and gardening news for December.)

Saturday, 15 December 2018

We had our holiday dinner at the Depot Restaurant early with Our Kathleen, because her schedule would not permit her to join us on Christmas eve.  Our repast was so delicious that I must show you. Even though some people make fun of pictures of dinner, I know for a fact that some of you like that sort of thing.

bubbly, cheesy, flavourful French onion soup

the winter’s best wilted spinach salad

delicately prepared fish for Allan, with a lemony sauce

Kathleen chose the Thai calamari appetizer for her entree.

My favourite winter menu dish, the Cingiale Brasato

flan

sorbet duo

tiramisu

The Depot tree, decorated in a foodie theme, and in the window box, African daisies are still blooming

We decided to forgo our traditional Christmas crackers and exchanged presents without opening them.

Tuesday, 18 December 2018

My own personal mission was to not leave my property.  However, we could not miss our holiday tradition of enjoying the Christmas Village display at the Hungry Harbor Grille in Long Beach.

a Christmas crab pot in our post office garden

On the way, we picked up more books from the library, where we found a Christmas carol gathering.

Allan’s photo

We drove to the end of the Bolstad beach approach to see how far up the massive, storm driven tide had come. Quite, far, with driftwood all the way to the picnic shelters.  Allan acquired a bundle of kelp for compost bins, stuffing it into the back of the van.

a feast day for some gulls

in the planter outside, flowers still blooming in our unusually mild winter

even bigger than usual

I imagine myself in the idyllic scene, where the snow is not slippery and where everyone likes each other.

Each building is so detailed, one could spend hours looking in the windows.  Pilgrim Pat, who first took us to see this village, used to take binoculars so that she could see the details of the far away buildings.

Below, I like the triangular building.  It reminds me of Seattle.  Behind it, by the window, it the apartment building with a roof garden which is my choice of where to live, on the top floor and with the garden as part of my domain.

Why I choose that instead of a house can only be explained by my fond memories of the year when I lived in the Gables apartments in Seattle.

The Gables would fit right into the village.  My apartment was on the second floor off the central courtyard.

Allan went outside the restaurant and, through the window, got two side views of my apartment building.

Looks like we somehow got our heavy cement curved bench up to the roof garden!

I now might rather choose to live in the new little float house:

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo; it is rather exciting that the TARDIS is there.

Allan’s photo

The village harbour has a multitude of lighthouses.

Allan’s photo

the ghost ship

Clang, clang, clang went the trolley,
Ding, ding, ding went the bell…as the trolley zoomed by the fish market…

…and the Long Beach Tavern.

The Clamshell Railroad was running, too.

As darkness fell, the carnival lights came on.

one of several lodgings to stay when you visit

If you would like to watch a video that shows the trains and the trolley, click here.  It is rather noisy from other diners; just imagine that you are sitting in a popular café with a view of the village.

We dined on the pasta special and a Reuben sandwich.

Night had come by the time we left the village.

the lights of Long Beach

Allan photographed the Shelburne Hotel on our way home (with our van whiffing of salty kelp):

And he walked to the next block to get a photo of the Christmas lights at Lucy Dagger’s house:

a piratical Christmas

In the evening, I read a book about another village where (despite an alarming number of murders) life is cozy and friends are friends for life.

After that excursion, I did not have to leave the property for five blissful days. Every day is a holiday of reading, gardening, puttering, and projects.  Skooter sleeps in even later than we do….

Monday, 24 December 2018

We had the pleasure of a visit from Mary and Denny, formerly of Klipsan Beach Cottage and now easing into their retirement in their new home in nearby Naselle.  After so many years of being constantly on call at the cottage resort, Mary says she is going to have to figure out what she likes to do in all her free time.  Mary and Denny were on their way to a late afternoon Christmas Eve dinner at the Depot, and our own Dickens Christmas Eve dinner came later at 7:30 PM.

The Depot Restaurant

Dickens dinner

The glory of Yorkshire pudding

Allan tried a new menu item of spice meat balls and hummus.

Window boxes still flowering

Egg nog flan

View from our table

On the tree




We opened our presents late in the evening and now, for us, the celebration is done and we will return to gardening, puttering, reading, and projects—one of which is to catch up with a few blog posts before going on another short blogging hiatus.

 

 

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Thursday, 11 October 2018

Long Beach

At last we had time to do a project that had been weighing on my mind: dig out the wire vine, Muehlenbeckia axillaris, from the planter in front of Stormin’ Norman’s.

I planted it years ago, thinking it was a cute little trailing house plant that would not make it through the winter.  After a very few years, it had done this:

before: a great splodge of Muehlenbeckia axillaris (wire vine)

It had been cute and then had gone suddenly berserk.

We dug it out, but did not take all the soil out because we thought we could control any wire vine that popped out from pieces of root. (And oh, how we had tried to sift through and get all those pieces.)

Today:

before

The wire vine has returned throughout the planter despite semi-diligent attempts at control.

We were incredibly lucky during the digging out stage to get a parking spot right next to the planter.

Allan moves the trailer closer in.

such a lucky spot!

Before:

Allan’s photo

cleaning the perennials

After all the plants were out, as Allan removed the soil in the wire vine planter, I pulled the Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ from the next planter.

before

after

Most merchants don’t like tall plants in front of their shops. The Wind World Kites guy loves the crocosmia and jokes that he now has nowhere to hide.

After much digging and removing all the soil and the tattered years-old landscape fabric that separates soil from gravel, we found roots down IN the gravel.  This is ominous.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

We hauled the heavy debris to city works and dumped it in an inhospitable spot and returned with buckets of the last of the mulch pile and some landscape fabric from the works shop.  It was utterly exhausting, heavy work, especially because this time we had to park half a block away and haul everything

My back was panging, so I answered some garden questions while standing straight against a wall.  Part of the job is to be friendly to tourists.

The woman in blue was from England and had lived there till 1958.  I asked her if she had heard of garden writer Marion Cran.  She had not.

with new fabric to keep the soil from migrating into the rock

I had had rather a stroke of genius; we also brought the last two hanging basket innards and used that soil to extend what we had.

Allan’s photos

putting plants back in

Allan deadheaded a block worth of planters while I re planted.

Allan’s photo

Upon his return, the planter was done.  Many bulbs were also replanted.

Last week:

Stormin’ Norman’s

Today, after:

I was able to salvage all the perennials by carefully inspecting their roots.  I will be watching closely for any sign of wire vine emerging from them; if it does, out they will come.

Across the street is a planter I quite like (even though the matching santolina was stolen).

I have enjoyed Cosmos ‘Xanthos’.

pink gaura

I used the pink gaura to replace the bad agastaches in the Agastache Catastrophe (a batch with diseased leaves).  The gaura has been good and has bloomed longer, with no deadheading, than the agastache does.  I will use it again next year, along with perhaps the shorter white one, ‘So White’.

colourful Long Beach

After our project, we deadheaded and tidied a few more planters.

chrysanthemums

a rogue white flower stem

Geranium ‘Rozanne’ and yellow chrysanths

pink chrysanthemums starting to fade

I love the chrysanthemums that have perennialized in some of the planters.  They take up too much room to have them in every one.

The Shelburne Hotel

We had time to tidy up the back garden at the Shelburne.  Chef Casey had found akebia fruits on the south fence.  I sought them out under cover of the vine.

the akebia vine that I planted years ago

akebia fruits…I saved one to try out but I have forgotten to do so.

(I did try it a couple of days later.  The insides have a sweet pulp that is so full of seeds that there is little food to offer.)

Asian pears on the west fence

Someone had filled the bird bath with bean seeds. (Allan’s photo)

The beans in pots are well past their prime.

I picked off some moldy old beans….

…and then realized I remembered the hotel’s Halloween event and realized I should leave them till after Halloween.   I then decided to leave the old Joe Pye Weed and some other plants to add a spookier ambiance to the front garden.

spooky Joe Pye weed

“Get ready to sit, sip, and talk to the spirits at the Shelburne Hotel. Will be having Chariot reading Tarot cards by appointment (starting at 6pm on 10/26), Adrift Distillers Amaro release (10/27 from 5pm-7pm), seasonal cuisine, and cocktails that represents the spirits at the hotel.

Will be playing the Shining in the Inglenook both nights as well.

COSTUMES ENCOURAGED.

So join us for our haunted gathering at the Shelburne. Dine and drink with the ghost…maybe even say hello?”

The Shelburne’s sister hotel, Adrift, suggests something about a ghost in the garden!

Hmmm.  I’m not saying whether or not I have ever seen Annie May in the garden.

front garden, looking north

and south

Halloween is a good reason to leave the long, draping wisteria till November before a preliminary pruning.

We rewarded ourselves for an exhausting day with a tasty meal and drink in the Shelburne pub.

As diners arrived at the pub, Brian O’ Connor began to sing, as he does every Thursday.  You can sit in the living room to listen and dine, or sit in the pub with the music as ambiance.

His deep and distinctive voice has an emotional quality that draws a regular audience on Thursday nights.

We heard part of the performance during our relaxing meal.

chop salad with fried chicken, fish and chips, cranberry cosmo

The bartender and I agreed that even though we are not usually fans of fried chicken, the version offered at the pub is delectable.  (I get it as a side on the salad.)

so good

fish and chips (Allan’s photo)

My favourite dessert on the peninsula these days is the pub’s cheesecake tart with blackberry topping.

On the way home, we checked out some Halloween decorations in Ilwaco.

Lake Street

Spruce Street

Lake Street (Pirate Lucy Dagger’s house)

We have accomplished all our little work board projects other than mulching.

accomplishments still don’t include the indoor at home projects left over from last winter

I enjoyed the partial emptiness for a moment before adding Bulb Time.

That list is even missing two small job.

Tomorrow, the bulbs come and the sorting begins, a rather dreaded task that hurts my brain.

 

 

 

 

 

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Tuesday, 2 October 2018

I had hoped for another reading day.  Sunny weather sent us out to work, thwarting my desire to spend a day reading Marion Cran.

the red rain gauge

the very big spider

Long Beach

Writing up the September planter reference post over the weekend had filled me with desire to clip back the tatty looking Geranium ‘Rozanne’. Like this one:

I did not get an after, but I did get a photo of the Salvia leucantha:

And the smoke shop:

smoke shop, before

after

Not every Rozanne needed clipping, just maybe half of them. Probably depends on how much wind each planter gets.

one of many wheelie carts of Rozanne debris for my compost bins

Meanwhile, Allan had been digging the big old lavender out of the planter we redid last week.  It had looked just awful in the planter reference post:

last week: Fifth Street Park NE, just redone, big lavender has to go

after, today

Allan’s photo, not easy to dig out

new soil and planting

after

We did a bit of clipping and deadheading in Fifth Street Park.  It is looking at its best now—after the tourists have mostly gone home.

NW corner

I love the purple aster.

I divided that aster from the boatyard; I wish I could remember its name.  The tall asters are the ones I like, and I must collect more.

I hope planty people notice my Melianthus major.

SW corner of park

South side; these grasses (which a landscape architect chose years ago for this spot) will flop forward over the lawn soon.

corner

Each street corner had a supposed dwarf pine, chosen by the same landscape architect.  This side it is indeed dwarf, and the other side is huge!

I got to pet these darlings.

We saw Scott and Tony walking Bailey and Rudy through town, two more dogs to pet.

Scott and Bailey

Tony and Rudy

It was past time to dig the dangity blang non blooming cosmos out of the welcome sign—AND the one that was blooming, because it could not stay there all by itself.

before, back

after

both sides, before

after

front, before

after

We saw a big frog, a medium frog, and a little baby frog.

big

medium

little (Allan’s photos)

I am sure they had a bad day, with their shelter being almost all removed.

The debris looked more impressive before Allan walked on it. (This is after).

Well.  That was my worst failure of a garden bed in long time.  I picked Cosmos ‘Sensation’, even though I knew it gets tall, because I thought the Geranium ‘Rozanne’ would grow vigorously and swamp a shorter cosmos.  So the cosmos was too tall for the sign.  Even where I did not have to clip it, it did not bloom, perhaps because the conditions there are too lush.  It is one of the few gardens that has an irrigation system.  I hope that next year will be better.

I kept the non weedy debris for my compost bins.  The cosmos root balls would get dumped at city works because they have horsetail in them. On the way, we did some clean up at city hall.

clipping back floppy Miscanthus ‘Variegata’, west side

after (Allan’s photo)

City Hall, west side

I noticed that the baskets were down!

I am happy to say I snagged all four baskets (minus the basket) out of the debris pile when we went to dump.

On the way home, we pulled Gladiolus papilio out of one last planter.

Last week: Vacant lot, too much running Gladiolus papilio, Rozanne is tired

today

We got home in time to deal with the vast amount of compost.

clipping into smaller pieces and layering green and brown

We had found one dramatically fasciated cosmos:

It was not till a few days later that I read that fasciation may be caused by a virus and such material should not be composted.  Oh well.  I LIKE fasciated stems.

I enjoy fall clean up and composted and petting dogs, so this was a good work day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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24 September 2018

Long Beach, Washington

My monthly planter reference post.  Pretty dull for anyone other than me.

Six blocks of planters, going north to south

 

Block one, east side

law office (just Geranium ‘Rozanne’ and golden oregono)

law office

Dennis storage lot

Dennis storage lot

Block one, west side

Dennis Co north (lots of Knautia that used to be variegated, reverted to green)

Dennis Co north, Rozanne is too far gone to look good but still blooming

Dennis Co south

Dennis Co south, my favourite

Block two, east side

Elks. Rozanne still good here

Elks

NIVA green with old dwarf rhodie

NIVA green

Block two, west side

Scoopers north

Scoopers north, escallonia left from volunteer days, green santolina

Scoopers south

Scoopers south also has old dwarf rhodie

Block three, east side

Pharmacy parking lot

LB Pharmacy parking lot, finally started pulling the mint

Cottage Bakery

Cottage Bakery, Knautia ‘Thunder and Lightning’ reverted to green

Funland

Funland, where someone stole the north side santolina 😦

Police Station

Police Station

Block three, west side

SW of stoplight corner

SW of stoplight corner, has old rose reverted to root stock that I want out

Wind World Kites

Wind World Kites

Stormin’ Norman’s

Stormin’ Norman, needs total dig out because of wire vine, pink gaura has been rather fragile

I put in pink gauras to replace the bad agastaches that were diseased.  Semi-successful, people admire them, but they are brittle.

Third Street Park (Gazebo)

Gazebo

Block four, east side

Lewis and Clark Square

Lewis and Clark Square

Carnival Gifts, shrubby, and with mint

Carnival Gifts, shrubby from volunteer days

Carousel, must pull crocosmia, and oh! the horses have been taken in for the winter

Carousel

Fifth Street Park NE

Fifth Street Park NE, shrubby from volunteer days, giant hebe, running rose, woody old lavenders, should at least get the lavenders out

Block four, west side

Third Street Park

Third Street Park, tired Rozanne needs clipping

Hungry Harbor

Hungry Harbor, has a good very dark leaved phygelius but too much golden oregano

Sweet Phees with excessive golden oregano

Sweet Phees, more interesting from the inside with heuchera and astilbe

Fifth Street Park NE, just redone, big lavender has to go soon

Fifth Street Park NW

Block five, east side

Fifth Street Park SE with Salvia leucantha

Fifth Street Park SE, Rozanne is tired, will clip next time

Oceanic RV Park

Oceanic RV Park, Crocosmia trying to come back, must pull

Coastal inn with great zauchsneria in the middle

Coastal Inn, all in a boring muddle from the other side

Block five, west side

Fifth Street Park SW, where the veronica redeemed itself with a rebloom along the edge

Fifth Street Park SW

smoke shop, tired Rozanne needs clipping

Smoke shop has nice yellow dahlias. Rozanne looks good from inside

Streetside Tacos, love the very old santolina, Rozanne still good

Streetside Tacos, this was one of my four original volunteer planters so those santolinas are about 20 years old

Block six, east side

vacant lot

Vacant lot, too much running Gladiolus papilio on south end, must pull!, and Rozanne is tired

Paws by the Sea pet shop

pet shop, escallonias from volunteer days

Powell and Seillor accounting

Powell and Seillor, very windy planter

Block six, west side

Credit union

credit union, has good pink dahlias

bus stop, boring but ok, just took out and replaced old lavender

bus stop, boring low cranesbill geranium of some sort from volunteer

First Place Mall, the parsley amuses me

First Place Mall with parsley

 

 

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