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Posts Tagged ‘Martin Luther King Day March’

Martin Luther King Day March, 21 January ’91

The encampment from the Federal Building cleaned up all traces of their occupation and on Monday joined in with the Martin Luther King Day march.  I continued to join with this fascinating group of people.

MLK

MLK

MLK

MLK

Martin Luther King Day march

Peaceworks Park, 26 January

I then returned to my workaday world, but on January 26th went to photograph a rally at Gasworks Park in Seattle, which had been rechristened “Peaceworks Park” for the day.

Peaceworks Park

Peaceworks Park

at the old gasworks

at the old gasworks

I’m generally to reclusive for a holding hands circle; it is easier to stand on the outside and photograph it.

peaceworks circle

peaceworks circle

I also cleverly avoided the ubiquitous group hug.

group hug!

group hug!

sign

adding a symbol

adding a symbol

the sign of the times

the sign of the times

the cost

the cost

Alaskans for Peace

Alaskans for Peace

The soup kitchen was reassembled for the rally.

The soup kitchen was reassembled for the rally.

Some folks had made a LOT of origami birds.

Some folks had made a LOT of origami birds.

back at the Federal Building, late January-early February

Meanwhile, picketing continued at the Federal Building, including the steady presence of Arthur Fisk, a quiet well read man of great intelligence whose company I particularly enjoyed.

at the Federal Building

at the Federal Building

As my work route and going to the gym route took me past there, I would stop to take a picture and to join in for a little while.  Several of the regulars were people of deep faith.  The Church Council of Greater Seattle had spoken out against the war.

Thou shalt not kill.

Thou shalt not kill.

Before the social internet and search engines, people scrounged for information about diplomatic breakdowns that had led to the brink of war, and shared the news among each other verbally and with xeroxed news articles.

father

The faithful Arthur Fisk, left

The faithful Arthur Fisk, left

fisk

the faithful Arthur Fisk, left

Jan, one of the regulars

Jan, one of the regulars

The over thirty regulars would show up after work.

Diane.  Both she and I favoured more elaborate and lengthy signs rather than slogans.

Diane. Both she and I favoured more elaborate and lengthy signs rather than slogans.

"Peacenik Self-Starter Kit"

“Peacenik Self-Starter Kit”

To the left, in beret, Robert, shortly after I met him.

To the left, in beret, Robert, shortly after I met him.

I had first noticed Robert on the carpool ride from the Federal Building to “Peaceworks Park”.  Everything he said had a funny, droll character to it.  This is the tipping point when my visits to the Federal Building began to contribute to the journey that led to me becoming a full time gardener.

"Beware of Mire" was Terry's reference to Vietnam.

“Beware of Mire” was Terry’s reference to Vietnam.

Diane, who was knowledgeable about such things, had tried and failed to get an official permit to have this petition table (below) on the site. Soon after this photo, she and Terry were arrested for civil disobedience for not removing this table.

petition table

petition table

I joined the group after work and on Sundays for the two or more weeks the gathering continued.  I made a flip sign out of a big art pad so that I could rotate quotations.  Words meant a lot to me, and people did stop to read in detail.

flipsignMight I add, it was darned cold out there, but during that time there was little rain.

the flippable sign

the flippable sign

Arthur and Terry

Arthur and Terry

Arthur and Terry, and a quotation by Seattle’s mayor

A group of women showed up after work in the evenings.

evening shift

evening shift, dressed for the cold

center: Matthew, who later bought my house

center: Matthew, who later bought my house

Steve

Steve

I must admit I very much enjoyed taking photos of the people, who often looked quite wonderful in the winter and evening light.

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