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Posts Tagged ‘meander line’

Monday, 10 December 2018

We’d had this much rain since Saturday evening.

Before and after a visit, I spent my afternoon potting up shasta daisy starts for my plant sale.

Our dear friend Tony came to visit the garden with Maryann and Linda.

Maryann, Linda, Tony, and me

You might remember that MaryAnn is the former owner and the designer of the beautiful garden at Tony and Scott’s beach home.

Maryann, who visits family in England every year, gave me a Gardeners’ World book! I was thrilled!

Thank you, MaryAnn!

By the way, I do intend to get back to watching as many new-to-me episodes that I can find online of Gardeners’ World as soon as I can break away from my reading binge.

Poor Allan had to leave to have a wisdom tooth pulled.

The rest of the photos from today were all taken by Tony Hofer himself as we wandered the garden.

my one and only phormium

plant table in the bogsy wood

SW bogsy wood corner

bridge to the south gate

through the south gate: Linda just bought a house on the peninsula so I look forward to seeing her around.

outside the fence, at the meander line, the south property line that used to be riverbank.

I used to try to control nature out there, but now I let it go and I think the frogs are happier that way.

fortifications on the south fence

Back in the civilized garden again:

the cat bench that Allan made

at the edge of the patio

I gave Tony a great big clump of sarracenia.

the lean-to

lambs ears that I have been potting up

white rhododendron by Allan’s shed

old apple tree in front garden

treecups

east wall of house

front path

hellebore by front path

We all talked about how Allan and I could visit Tony and Scott’s Vancouver (Washington) home this spring, before they pack everything up to move to the beach.  MaryAnn would make dinner…I know it would be a wonderful trip and we could combine it with a visit to Cistus and Joy Creek Nurseries.

I love getting to see what someone else notices in our garden.  Thank you, Tony!

 

 

 

 

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Friday, 31 July 2015

Even though I’m sure it seems dull to many, I find days off without leaving my home and garden to be idyllic.

tadpoles in the water boxes:

tadpoles in the water boxes: “I don’t wanna grow up, not me!”

Allan did find one with legs!

Allan did find one with legs!

 I spent Friday planting some of the ladies in waiting and here I present the plants and tags for my own information and the amusement of other CPNs (certified plant nuts).  Before I got tucked into the task, CPN (and chef) Ann from Portland came over with her spouse, John, and a delivery of some ‘Xera Cobalt’ Agapanthus from Xera Plants.  (CPN=Certified Plant Nut.)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Ann was amused by the view east from our front gate, with three boats parked along the street. Normal for Ilwaco.

Ann was amused by the view east from our front gate, with three boats parked along the street. Normal for Ilwaco.

Her father, Frank W. Amato, publishes Salmon Trout Steelheader magazine and the Flyfishing and Tying Journal so Ann took a photo of the boats on the street scene for him.

back garden, east side, room for more plants

back garden, east side, room for more plants

That daylily at the front got dug out.  It has been pouting and drooping all year and was given every chance to improve.

after, with a colour switch on the pottery balls, to tone with some new Agapanthus.

after, with a colour switch on the pottery balls, to tone with some new Agapanthus.

stonecrop

Sedum ussuriense 'Turkish Delight'

Sedum ussuriense ‘Turkish Delight’

Little Bluestem

Little Bluestem

blues

blues2

Agapanthus 'Xera's Cobalt'

Agapanthus ‘Xera’s Cobalt’

Xera's Cobalt

Xera’s Cobalt

The colour of 'Xera's Cobalt'

The colour of ‘Xera’s Cobalt’

A plant new to me: Sideritis

A plant new to me: Sideritis ‘Touch of Spice’ (mountain tea)

Sideritis hyssopifolia 'Touch of Spice'

Sideritis hyssopifolia ‘Touch of Spice’; I think Teresa gave me this to try out.

another Agapanthus, this one from The Planter Box

another Agapanthus, this one from The Planter Box: ‘Two Times Blue’

twotimesblue

another area with a bit of room, thanks to removing a daylily and a siberian iris awhile back.

another area with a bit of room, thanks to removing a daylily and a siberian iris awhile back.

In went an unidentified eucomis, I hope the same one Pam grows so well in Seaside.

In went an unidentified eucomis, I hope the same one Pam grows so well in Seaside.

In the west bed: Dracocephalum 'Blue Moon', also new to me, from The Planter Box

In the west bed: Dracocephalum ‘Blue Moon’, also new to me, from The Planter Box

Sinningia: another plant new to me.

Sinningia: another plant new to me.

Also brought to me by our lovely friend Ann.

Also brought to me by our lovely friend Ann.

Because the Xera tag had the word “containers”, I decided that’s where it would go.

Sinningia roots! not what I expected.

Sinningia roots! not what I expected.

potted up

potted up

Talinium Limon, from 7 Dees, added to a big pot.

Talinium Limon, from 7 Dees, added to a big pot.

looking south over the back garden

looking south over the back garden

the plant vessel 'Ann Lovejoy'

the plant vessel ‘Ann Lovejoy’

the back garden

the back garden

Meanwhile, Allan worked on a project.

project

This is not going to be an unlawfully tall fence.

I planted some of my new Agastaches (an obsession) in the front garden.

Agastache 'Kudo's Mandarin'

Agastache ‘Kudo’s Mandarin’

kudos

I think the tags might be boring to some; I have heard that Steve likes to read them, so at least one reader does.

I find Agastache difficult to say.  I knew it was not Aga-stash, but for a long time I was saying it like I was aghast about something.  .  Here’s a good article about them (including various pronunciations, one of which does say “Aghast!”). Here is Agastache pronounced by Emma.

Later: I got the definitive pronunciation from garden writer Bob Nold, and am aGHAST that I have been pronouncing it per Emma for a few months:

Screen Shot 2015-08-17 at 11.12.34 AM

Thanks, Bob, as it is obsessively important to me to try to pronounce plant names correctly.

Kudo's Gold

Agastache ‘Kudo’s Gold’

kudosgold

Agastache 'Navajo Sunset'

Agastache ‘Navajo Sunset’

navajo

from the Planter Box: Rudbeckia 'Irish Eyes', in the front garden

from the Planter Box: Rudbeckia ‘Irish Eyes’, in the front garden

Allan's photo: Here it comes.

Allan’s photo: end of the day with six of seven posts in.

Saturday, 1 August 2015

There are all sorts of big projects in the garden that I could/should be doing.  Other than planting, I am low on energy for things like digging out sod to make gravel paths.

On Saturday, I actually left the property to walk down to the Portside Café to meet Our Kathleen for lunch; she was down for her semi-monthly visit.  It has taken us this long, what with garden tours and events, to find time to try out the Portside with new owners Debbie and Lauri.  I strolled west down the meander line from the back of my garden to the café.

Looking back to the bogsy woods. Boat trailers parked at the back of the port parking lots.

Looking east to the bogsy woods. Boat trailers parked at the back of the port parking lots.

looking west; this little road is the closest thing to the Seattle alleys that I miss so much.

looking west; this little road is the closest thing to the Seattle alleys that I miss so much.

looking east again, farther along

looking east again, farther along

boat storage yard, former Warrior of the Seas

boat storage yard, former Warrior of the Seas

looking west toward First Avenue and the boatyard

looking west toward First Avenue and the boatyard

lots of interesting stuff

lots of interesting stuff

looking east

looking east

looking west: the boatyard

looking west: the boatyard

Portside Café

One block north on First Avenue: the appealingly cute Portside Café.

One block north on First Avenue: the appealingly cute Portside Café.

My orange chicken tropical salad and Kathleen's

My orange chicken tropical salad and Kathleen’s “hand-spanked” burger and onion rings were both big hits with these two diners.

in the Portside Café

in the Portside Café

sweet, with a framed photo (far left) that I took of Debbie and Lauri.

sweet, with a framed photo (far left) that I took of Debbie and Lauri.

looks like the back room of the café will be cozy in winter

looks like the back room of the café will be cozy in winter

Allan at work

As we dined, we saw Allan drive past with the water trailer; he had to water the Ilwaco planters.  He’d need to quit that job to have true three day weekends in summer.

Allan's photo at the boatyard, while filling the water tank.

Allan’s photo at the boatyard, while filling the water tank.

a boat coming in

a boat coming in

a deer strolling past City Hall after a nibble on the planters there

a deer strolling past City Hall after a nibble on the planters there

Ilwaco Saturday Market

I had assumed, since we had dined at one, that Kathleen would have already been to the Saturday Market.  She had not, so I walked most of the length of the market with her.

Look at the inviting tables and chairs on the deck of the Salt Hotel.

Look at the inviting tables and chairs on the deck of the Salt Hotel.

This little piggy went to market!

This little piggy went to market!

I petted the darling pig, and she wagged her tail.  And as she walked along, when something amused her, she again wagged her tail like a happy dog.  Allan had been to the market on his own and had also seen the pig.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

pretty fruit tarts

pretty fruit tarts

I covet about ten of these to hang in a garden tree.

I covet about ten of these to hang in a garden tree.

glass2

De Asis produce

De Asis Farm produce

De Asis Farm

De Asis Farm

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Of course, I bought a dessert (lime bundt cake) from Pink Poppy Bakery.

Of course, I bought a dessert (lime bundt cake) from Pink Poppy Bakery.

a noble dog outside Time Enough Books

a noble dog outside Time Enough Books

Blue Coast Farms gave me a bag of runner beans; she had an oversupply. They were delicious cooked up for dinner three nights in a row.

Blue Coast Farms gave me a bag of runner beans; she had an oversupply. They were delicious cooked up for dinner three nights in a row.

at home

This is one of the paths I wish to dig up and turn to gravel. So far, just wishin'.

This is one of the paths I wish to dig up and turn to gravel. So far, just wishin’.

Allan working on the project.

Allan working on the project.

I frittered the late afternoon and evening away with garden blogging, as I was still catching up on garden tour posts from Music in the Gardens.

Sunday, 2 August 2015

On the next day, a cold strong wind blew and I did not set foot out of the house except for a half an hour of bundled up plant watering.  I occupied myself with photo sorting and finishing the Music in the Gardens tour blog entries.  The cats appreciate a day like that.

Frosty

Frosty

Mary

Mary

Smokey

Smokey

Allan took a boating trip on Sunday.  It did not work out quite as he had planned, as the person he had arranged to go with canceled after he had arrived at her house.  My editorial comment:  I did not like that, as he had gotten up extra early (for us).  However, he was resourceful and he regrouped and went out on his own on the other side of the bay.  I am going to make that a bonus post for tonight so that this one is not too ridiculously long.

Even after a boating trip, Allan managed to weed and water the Ilwaco Community Building garden, a job to which he has dedicated himself once a week.

We are still mystified by the huge pile of discarded potatoes below the building, cast off from the senior lunch program for some reason.

We are still mystified by the huge pile of discarded potatoes below the building, cast off from the senior lunch program for some reason.

nasturtiums reseeded from when planters used to be by the library

nasturtiums reseeded from when planters used to be by the library

(Allan's photo): home at dusk after a long day

(Allan’s photo): home at dusk after a long day. Sadly, the next day someone folded this elephant garlic but didn’t it pose for a grand picture?

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Monday, 8 June 2015

I woke to the roaring of wind and went on strike.  There was no way we were going to weed a section of the beach approach in 25 mph miserable cold icy north wind.  Ok, not icy.  But a local outdoorsy fellow commented that he voted Monday “the coldest day of the year so far”.  I did not set one foot out the door until a dinner engagement, and spent the day catching up on writing this blog.  Every time I thought of going outside, another blast of wind would batter the house.  It felt more like a winter than a late spring storm; I wish it had at least brought some rain.

Allan, however, did go on an errand to the port, and photographed the sideways motion in one of the gardens there.

windblown

windblown

On the way back,  he did a tadpole rescue mission and brought back a colander of tadpoles from the meander line ditch, which is rapidly drying up in places.  He said one pool had had a tractor tire tracks at the edge and oil on the water.

lots of grass mown into the pond

lots of grass mown next the pond


the last pool of water getting crowded

the last pool of water getting crowded


an almost frog in the last pond

an almost frog in the last pond


rescue underway

rescue underway


a colander of tadpoles

a colander of tadpoles


some with legs!

some with legs!

They went into our water boxes.

with twigs to provide escape if desired later

with twigs to provide escape if desired later

At 6, with the wind still roaring, we took J9 out to the Depot for a belated birthday dinner.

I tried a new dish of polenta cake, hummus and chickpea salad.  Tasty!

I tried a new dish of polenta cake, hummus and chickpea salad. Tasty!


J9's brownie dessert

J9’s brownie dessert


strawberry cobbler

strawberry cobbler


happy trio

happy trio

Tuesday, 9 June 2015

I woke up later than usual and when I asked Allan why he’d let me sleep so late, he said because the wind had kept on roaring.  By the time we were ready to go, the sun had warmed the air and the wind did not seem as bad as it has the last five days, and especially not as bad as yesterday.

With all the bluster that’s been going on, I knew both the Long Beach and Ilwaco planters would need watering.

Smokey and Mary had no intention of going out.

Smokey and Mary had no intention of going out.

Long Beach

windy!

windy!

I replaced the Agastache that had been stolen last week and made note of a few other gaps that need filling in that particular planter.  I suspect more theft as I am sure I planted more trailies along the edge.  I hope whoever took the trailies and agastache was just passing through.  The hanging baskets looked undaunted by all the wind.

reseeded California poppies

reseeded California poppies

Just south of Streetside Taco I found an odd thing: a cosmos pulled up and resting in the water faucet cover which was upturned.

What the heck???

What the heck???

Maybe someone found it pulled up and tried to give it a drink of water?  Just as I had replanted it and was back to watering with the sprayer of Blue Stuff (fertilizer), I heard a voice chiding me for using such a non organic product.  There was Todd, who of course had read of my struggles trying to go to organic fertilizer in the LB planters.

Allan's photo:  Busted using The Blue Stuff!

Allan’s photo: Busted using The Blue Stuff!

I pointed out the sad cosmos and Todd said “Oh, I try to make sure to take all the ones I pull up to replant in the Wiegardt Gallery garden.”  I replied that these were short ones that would be a total disappointment to Eric!  This is an old joke about how Todd’s brother, artist Eric Wiegardt, always used to reminisce about a summer when the cosmos at the gallery were so tall…an effect I had never been able to recreate.  Cheered up by the joshing around (even after Allan joined us carrying another cosmos he had found pulled out in a planter just to the north), I noticed that the intensity of wind had died down.

Todd went on his way and we got back to watering.

I love this white diascia; too bad I only found about four of them for sale this year.

I love this white diascia; too bad I only found about four of them for sale this year.


DSC01365

Allan’s photo: Fifth Street Park


Allan's photo:  roses in Fifth Street Park

Allan’s photo: roses in planter


Allan's photo: dog water and people water in Fifth Street Park

Allan’s photo: dog water and people water in Fifth Street Park


Allan's photo: Hot Lips Salvia

Allan’s photo: Hot Lips Salvia and a perennial veronica

Allan saw someone from Benson’s By The Beach Restaurant beautifying their deck…

unloading some plants

unloading some plants


deck all planted up

deck all planted up


Gulls by outdoor seating between two cafés, hoping for a snack.

Gulls by outdoor seating between two cafés, hoping for a snack.


I am pleased with the big pop out.

I am pleased with the big pop out poppies.

Long Beach watering had proved to be a snap with only minor annoyances, decreasing wind, and a bit of fun banter, and we had plenty of time left to do the Ilwaco watering.

 Ilwaco

We began by weeding a couple of sections midway along the port.

Allan's photo: much vetch to weed out of the river rock bed on the curbside by the old Portside Café

Allan’s photo: much vetch to weed out of the river rock bed on the curbside by the old Portside Café

Vetch is actually beautiful and if it weren’t so rampant, I am sure we would all grow it as an ornamental.

looking west across my favourite section

looking west across my favourite section by Ilwaco pavilion


Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue' and santolina and a ladybug

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ and santolina and a ladybug


cropped

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

While we were weeding, a friend came out of a business after work.  I won’t say who as he may not want to be quoted.  We were talking about how excited we all are about the renovation of the Salt Hotel (formerly the Harbor Lights) and I said, “Ilwaco is going to become a hipster town!”  He scoffed and I said,”No, really, my Portland friends say THEY’RE COMING; they are already in Astoria, and they’re already coming here to the Sou’wester and Adrift.  The Salt is going to be a hipster hotel, you watch!”  He replied, “Hipsters are gonna come to Ilwaco when purple monkeys fly out of my butt.”  We’ll see who’s right; I still predict (and welcome) an influx of Portland area hipsters.  Any of them who are gardeners will be, I think, impressed with our selection of cool plants along the port.

Allan departed to water the street trees and planters with the water trailer while I kept weeding.

Allan's photo on the way to get the water trailer

Allan’s photo on the way to get the water trailer


Allan's photo: in the boatyard

Allan’s photo: in the boatyard


before, with lots of single stemmed weed grasses

before, with lots of single stemmed weed grasses


after

after


lavender

lavender

Because one of the merchants all of a sudden did not want us to use their water, I had to call Allan to refill the water truck to bring to water one of the port gardens, and since he had to do that, he did the east end (which is by a parking lot with no hose pipe) as well.  This surprising and I hope temporary development added half an hour to our day so we did not get done til near sunset.  I think what a lot of folks might not understand is that right now time is more valuable to us than money, so it does not make us happy to add extra work to the day.  It is a fortunate (and I hope not temporary) state of affairs to have the luxury to seek more free time and is only possible after years of frugality.  I do not welcome the job taking longer because of having to haul more water.

Allan's photo: east end garden

Allan’s photo: east end garden


Allan's photo: lavender

Allan’s photo: lavender


Allan's photo, bachelor buttons at the east end

Allan’s photo, bachelor buttons at the east end


Allan's photo: Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

Allan’s photo: Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’


Allan's photo: Stipa tenuissima

Allan’s photo: Stipa tenuissima shaped by the wind

At home, I had a bit of container watering to do.

Paul's Himalayan Musk rose in evening light

Paul’s Himalayan Musk rose in evening light

The wind had almost completey stopped and I was able to safely walk back into the bosgy woods for the first time in days.

found another big branch down

found another big branch down


where I left off during the wind

where I left off spreading new soil during the wind


bogsy wood bridge

bogsy wood bridge


looking north

looking north


salmonberry tunnel needs re-cutting

salmonberry tunnel needs re-cutting


lemony combination

lemony combination

Allan went on another tadpole rescue mission and returned with tadpoles and these photos:

Calla lilies at the end of Nora's back yard

Calla lilies at the end of Nora’s back yard


a goopy oily pool at the meander line

a goopy oily pool at the meander line, with no living tadpoles.  Who messed with this pool??


tadpoles in the last healthy pool

tadpoles in the last healthy pool


and lots of them

and lots of them

With no rain in sight to refresh the water in the rapidly drying pool, Allan rescued another batch.

DSC01395

We have two water tubs (one an old bathtub) on the patio, so he put some in each tub.  The ones that went into the water boxes a day ago seem to be thriving.

 

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I relished almost a week of rainy weather during the second half of January.  On the nicer days, I had to go out and garden.  I just can’t sit in and read all day on a nice day, much as I would like it.  In my 20s and early 30s, I was quite capable of staying in no matter what the weather…until the fateful year, round about 1988, when I became obsessed with gardening.

Friday, 16 January 2015

The big gardening excitement today was that MaryBeth came over with some sizeable peony starts.

peonies from Debbie

peonies from Debbie

Peonies are terribly expensive to purchase, so I was pleased indeed.

We had a good visit and then walked around the garden so that I could pickaxe out some starts of Darmera peltata for her.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo; Smokey is walking behind me and so is MaryBeth.

handing off the Darmera to MaryBeth

handing off the Darmera to MaryBeth

DSC00445

Saturday, 17 January 2015

The weather cooperated for reading, as these photos from inside the house show.

view to the south

view to the south

patio water gardens (and the last of the paperwhites, done)

patio water gardens (and the last of the paperwhites, done)

just the weather I wanted to see

just the weather I wanted to see

bogsy woods telephoto

bogsy woods telephoto

Monday, 19 January 2015

All of these gardening days are actually half days, as we are still firmly on night owl staycation time.  Weather forced me out on the 19th to weed here and there in a scattered way.  And I got the peony starts planted.

hellebore in the front garden

hellebore in the front garden

west side, some curly teucrium piled to give to Debbie for plant sale

west side, some curly teucrium piled to give to Debbie for plant sale

west side, some crocuses in bloom

west side, some crocuses in bloom

spot of sunshine (and I like the way the soil looks)

spot of sunshine (and I like the way the soil looks so rich and crumbly)

Clematis 'Freckles' has been blooming for week after winter week.

Clematis ‘Freckles’ has been blooming for week after winter week.

I should order one of those Clematis for Klipsan Beach Cottages and for the Anchorage for some midwinter joy.  I am pretty sure I got it from Bluestone Perennials, but a search shows they don’t carry it, so maybe I got it at Joy Creek Nursery in Scappoose, Oregon.  They do, indeed, list assorted Clematis cirrhosa in their catalog (and I would like to acquire more cultivars for the winter blooms).

buttery ranunculus

buttery ranunculus

Often while I am gardening at home, I see the Life Flight helicopter go by, and it gives a moment of sadness as I know that it is a scary emergency for someone.

It is going from the hospital in Ilwaco to a larger city hospital inland.

It is going from the hospital in Ilwaco to a larger city hospital inland.

My young Garrya has winter tassels.  I’d be thrilled were it not for the sad fact that the leaves are all spotted and ugly. I wonder if I should pick them off?

sad looking leaves

sad looking leaves

I have too many weeds to pull to fuss with picking leaves off of the garrya.

I have too many weeds to pull to fuss with picking leaves off of the garrya.

I had piled some fairly dry wood into the fire pit and had a strong urge to have the first campfire of the season…

It looked enticing....

It looked enticing….

until I realized there was standing water in the lawn all around it.

until I realized there was standing water in the lawn all around it.

still too wet

still too wet

Tuesday, 20 January 2015

I went out with no firm project in mind and then suddenly decided that I would dig an edge outside our west fence all down the Nora side, to make weeding easier.

beginning the afternoon project

beginning the afternoon project, with Smokey in attendance

a half-mooned edge

a half-mooned edge

This is only about one third of the wood that I picked from Nora’s back lawn and brought in for our campfire stash.

storm fall of alder branches

storm fall of alder branches

Meanwhile, on an outing to town, Allan found that some tiny crocus are blooming in the Ilwaco planters.

Allan's photo: By the Ilwaco Pharmacy

Allan’s photo: By the Ilwaco Pharmacy

Allan's photo; we hope passersby are noticing and enjoying.

Allan’s photo; we hope passersby are noticing and enjoying.

Wednesday, 21 January 2015

I had an audience of noisy crows while I weeded.

I had an audience of noisy crows while I weeded.

I tried out the panorama feature in my new-ish iPhone.

I tried out the panorama feature in my new-ish iPhone.

As I worked in the shady southeast corner of the garden, by the gate that goes to the gear shed next door, I found that the sword ferns are already started to unfurl.  This seems early to me.

There will be a lot of sword fern trimming when we go back to work.

Early unfurling. There will be a lot of sword fern trimming when we go back to work.

Allan gave the lawn its first mowing of the year.

Allan gave the lawn its first mowing of the year.

Hellebore buds in foreground

Hellebore buds in foreground

freshly mowed

freshly mowed, and a barrow of weeds

fragrant winter Lonicera (honeysuckle) in bloom...The hummingbirds were feasting from this.

fragrant winter Lonicera (honeysuckle) in bloom…The hummingbirds were feasting from this.

As dusk came, we were able to get a campfire starts and had our first hot dog roast of the season with the help of some of the dryer wood that I had stashed in the dry storage behind the garage.  The evening felt balmy and the chorus of frogs was loud beyond the bogsy woods.

fire

Thursday, 22 January 2015

I continued weeding along the east fence and next to the bogsy wood.

moss in the bogsy wood

moss in the bogsy wood, and some shells that Sheila once brought me from Mexico.

This area was the focus of my attention.

This area was the focus of my attention.

Onyx from next door kept me company for awhile.

Onyx from next door kept me company for awhile.

Onyx

Onyx

contorted filbert at the end of the center bed

contorted filbert at the end of the center bed

Sunday, 25 January 2015

a sunny day

a sunny day

a rare sighting of Calvin in the garden

a rare sighting of Calvin in the garden

I have found a spot for the two heavy blue wooden chairs, where they will not have to be moved when the lawn gets mowed.  We will use all light, inelegant plastic chairs back by the fire circle (and I won’t have to worry about them getting smashed by falling branches during windstorms).

a most satisfactory idea

a most satisfactory idea

Mary in the garden

Mary in the garden

Calvin and Smokey

Calvin and Smokey

cal

I’m pleased to see Calvin getting braver.

Calvin and the brothers, Smokey and Frosty, are ten, and mother Mary is possibly as old as thirteen.

Sunday was actually hot, in the low 60s.  I turned out a compost bin and further tidied up the debris pile next to Nora’s driveway.

compost

compost bin, before. It is supposed to spin, but doesn’t.

Now that we are no longer collecting compost from the local coffee shop, I have extra bins so I also dragged two of the plastic bins up and placed them right behind the house for composting yard waste (thus decreasing the size of the debris pile).

The job of digging out that non-rototing deep bin plumb wore me out.  Allan came home from his outing and helped me finish, thank goodness (thank Allan, actually).

Aftereward, I went back to the bogsy wood to cool off by looking at water.

still water in the bogsy woods

still water in the bogsy woods

inside the south fence, from the bridge

inside the south fence, from the bridge

I had been wanting since autumn of 2010 to have a bench outside the south fence, by the meander line.  Finally, I had one to spare: the bench that used to provide a sit spot where the blue chairs are now.

mission accomplished at long last!

mission accomplished at long last!

I sat out here very content while the sun went down and because I was quiet, the frogs started chirping…although not in the big pool right in front of me.

the seasonal pool at the meander line

the seasonal pool at the meander line

 

If i hadn't pulled some grass last fall, that pool would be like this area to my left.

If i hadn’t pulled some grass last fall, that pool would be like this area to my left.  (Better for frogs to have some wild areas.)

Mary joined me.

Mary joined me.

She approved of the new bench.

She approved of the new sit spot.

m

 

mary

evening willows and water

evening willows and water

looking west

looking west

looking east

looking east

I could just see, beyond the green gear shed, the roof of the community college annex where I had planned to sign up for a water colour class.  I think it was starting tomorrow and I had simply not mustered up the energy to take it.  I treasure my evenings so much that I did not want to give any up, and I did not feel up to the conversational aspects of taking a class.  I have to admit that the Waterlogue phone app has satisfied some of my need to see how scenes would look as a watercolour.

"painted" with one click.  I know it is cheating!

“painted” with one click. I know it is cheating!

Looking straight south...

Looking straight south…telephoto

I feel I am sitting a bit below the street by the port buildings.  Where I sit used to be waterfront; everything to the south was built on fill in the 1950s.

setting sun over Cape Disappointment from my new sit spot

setting sun over Cape Disappointment from my new sit spot

It would have been the perfect evening for a fire, but we had a party to attend at the Sou’wester Lodge instead (see tomorrow’s post for that).

Monday, 26 January 2015

Still working in the back corner.  This used to be Mount Sod, where the grass dug up from the front garden ended up.  When we began the garden in November 2010, we dug up the front lawn so that I could plant bulbs right away.  The back beds I made with soil piled on newspaper right over the sod.  I planted potatoes in pockets of soil in Mount Sod and they worked very well at cleaning the pile and turning it into good dirt.  But now I want it completely de-spudified so I can plant shrubs and trees.  It turns out to be quite hard to get rid of every last potato.

questing for potatoes

questing for potatoes

I am moving some of the spuds to the debris pile behind the garage, and I’m trying something I read about: planting some of them in cardboard boxes.

Allan gave me some boxes from his shed.

Allan gave me some boxes from his shed.

Planted with Yukon Gold and red fingerling potatoes

Planted with Yukon Gold and red fingerling potatoes

The boxes, with soil in them,  will get buried by debris, and maybe they will make it easier to harvest potatoes at the end of the season.  I might try the same thing with some squash plants, and the foliage can cover the debris pile for the summer.  My eventual plan is to put a cute little garden shed here to provide privacy between the two houses.

a hellebore to enjoy while digging for spuds

a hellebore to enjoy while digging for spuds

On the 26th, I had some reading weather (at last!).  On the 28th, I swanned about with Nancy, and on the 29th we worked.  When we got home from the workday, I heard an ominous dripping sound from under my bathroom floor.  Worse yet, I remembered I had heard it in the wee hours of the night before and thought it was merely the sound of drizzle.  Allan crawled under the house and found this:

29 January: a sad sight indeed

29 January: a sad sight indeed

It was hot water, too.  We had early baths and then turned the water off till the next morning.  The next day, we got a notice from the city that they thought we had a leak somewhere.  That was kind of them, and is also an ominous hint that our bill may be high.  (I hope they  had JUST read our meter!)

Friday, 30 January 2015

To the rescue!

To the rescue!

The plumbing situation had us up very early.  (Allan got a call-back from Taft at 7 AM).  Neither of us had a whole lot of energy as a result.  The air felt rather chilly till I actually got going on a task.

I puttered around with weeding

I puttered around with weeding.

I set myself some small tasks that would give satisfaction.

the weedy base of a rose

the weedy base of a rose

That is a very mean rose, and yet is sentimental to me as it’s a white rambler that I started from a cutting from Maxine’s garden.  Maxine, Jo’s mom, was my first gardening client on the peninsula.

I trimmed the lower branches in order to access the weedy grass.

very satisfying

very satisfying

Allan tied down some branches from the Paul's Himalayan Musk rambling rose.

Allan tied down some branches from the Paul’s Himalayan Musk rambling rose.

Mary enjoyed the sun.

Mary enjoyed the sun.

the contorted filbert

looking north through the contorted filbert

hellebore admiration

hellebore admiration

Smokey and Frosty get a visit from Onyx

Smokey and Frosty get a visit from Onyx

We decided to have a fire.  It took the bellows to get it going.

bellows

I had just been reading an enjoyable psychology book called The Upside of Your Dark Side.  One thing it said was that sometimes we want something more than we actually like it when we get it.  Tonight’s fire was sort of like that, as the temperature had dropped and it was not entirely pleasant to sit out.

campfire

fire

We did enjoy toasting and eating spicey cajun sausages.

dogs

I have Googled what we can toast on a fork that is healthier for summer campfires as we cannot live on a diet of roasted hot dogs.  (Bell peppers and apple slices are one suggestion.)

Moon over the gear shed.

Moon over the gear shed.

I liked the glow in the window of the gate-door.

I liked the glow in the window of the gate-door.

We did not linger outside after our campfire dinner.  I was hoping for rain on Saturday as a large stack of books had been accumulating during all this gardening weather.

Saturday, 31 January 2015

Still no rain!  I worked on a blog entry about January outings for awhile but could not stay indoors.  I did not have a big plan so just started some weeding in the front garden.

before

before

The carex (Ice Dancer?) all along the edge looks tatty, so I chopped it hard with hedge shears.

The carex (Ice Dancer?) all along the edge looks tatty, so I chopped it hard with hedge shears.

Early crocuses have nicely clumped up.  I have gotten NO snowdrops so far in my own garden, and I find that disturbing.

Early crocuses have nicely clumped up. I have gotten NO snowdrops so far in my own garden, and I find that disturbing.

I was inspired to radically thin my clump of Rubus lineatus.   I’d planted it with a casual feeling that it would die in winters anyway, as it had died in winter every time I planted it in my former garden.  However, it has thrived and it is spreading vigorously.

That tall...um..Rubus something?? that I wanted for a long time and now have might be a bit vigourous.

From summertime: “That tall…um..Rubus something?? that I wanted for a long time and now have might be a bit vigourous.”

Rubus linneatus...amazing leaves.  Also had it, and it died, and I just bought it again....a familiar theme.

In my former garden: “Rubus linneatus…amazing leaves. Also had it, and it died, and I just bought it again….a familiar theme.”

The new leaves have a pretty little white feathery effect, provided by silvery-white undersides, when they start to emerge.  I don’t have a good photo of that.  Wikipedia commons does:

800px-Rubus_lineatus

So in the winter, I could see how it was spreading into other things, including my very special new tree (protected by bamboo).

The bamboo protects my variegated Davidia.

The bamboo to the right protects my variegated Davidia.

All the stems of the Rubus came up with a good yank except for this one, on the edge of a hellebore, that needed some hard shoveling.

All the stems of the Rubus came up with a good yank except for this one, on the edge of a hellebore, that needed some hard shoveling.

The Rubus is now strictly editing.  (In the foreground is a bamboo pole for a lily support).

The Rubus is now strictly editing. (In the foreground is a bamboo pole for a lily support).

Got lots of rooted clumps with sprouts at the base.  Planted some in the bogsy woods...to regret later?  and saved some for Debbie to collect for the plant sale, if she wants them.

Got lots of rooted clumps with sprouts at the base. Planted some in the bogsy woods…to regret later? and saved some for Debbie to collect for the plant sale, if she wants them.

end of day; Allan had kindly dug out some running clumps of the carex (also saved for Debbie).

end of day; Allan had kindly dug out some running clumps of the carex (also saved for Debbie).

a young witchhazel just coming into bloom by the front gate

a young witchhazel just coming into bloom by the front gate

My BIG plan for January had been to get a load of maybe five yards of mulch delivered to build up the edges of some of the garden beds.  I delayed too long, and now rain (reading time!) is predicted.  (Surely on Sunday!)  A load of soil blocked our garage access and needs to be moves as quickly as possible.  I think I will just get one yard at time at the end of work days since my BIG plan did not come to fruition.

To close the month, we went to a musical performance at the Sou’wester.  (See tomorrow’s post.)  I have extended staycation for at least one more week.

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Saturday, 3 January 2014

I liked best the days that I could just sit around and read.  I had a rate visitor on the 3rd…

me and Kathleen and some tea

me and Kathleen and some tea

Sunday, 4 January 2015

Rain perfectly played into my desire to just read, read, and read.

south window view

south window view

north window view

north window view

Lake Street indeed

Lake Street indeed

The amount of rain was dramatic and wreaked havoc across the county:

IMG_7480

IMG_7481

IMG_7483

IMG_7490

Monday, 6 January 2015

I decided to check out how the 2 plus inches of rain looked in the garden.

barrow

in the bogsy woods

in the bogsy woods

west side of lawn path

west side of lawn path

fallen branches on Nora's lawn next door

fallen branches on Nora’s lawn next door

Why we don't go back under the trees in a windstorm

Spear-like branches are why we don’t go back under the trees in a windstorm

looking back

looking back

primrose

primrose

the back swale in the bogsy wood

the south swale in the bogsy wood

the middle bogsy wood swale

the middle bogsy wood swale

looking north from the bridge

looking north from the bridge

the meander line seasonal pond outside the south gate

the meander line seasonal pond outside the south gate

This used to be the Columbia riverbank (Baker Bay) before the port was expanded on fill.

under the bendy willows

under the bendy willows

looking north through the south gate

looking north through the south gate

Smokey followed me all around.

Smokey followed me all around.

smokey

I decided to actually leave the property to see how full the old swimming hole might be.

our neighbours' compost pile, outside our east fence

our neighbours’ compost pile, outside our east fence

The pond, which was the nieghbourhood swimming hole many years ago, was extra full indeed.

The pond, which was the nieghbourhood swimming hole many years ago, was extra full indeed.

The kids' fort that had been built there last summer had blown apart and most of the boards are in the pond now.

The kids’ fort that had been built there last summer had blown apart and most of the boards are in the pond now.

Even though we were between rainstorms, I decided it was far too soggy to do any gardening and happily returned to my books.

back in my own domain

back in my own domain

Tuesday, 6 January 2015

Much as I wanted to keep on reading, on the 6th I had to do some weeding as the weather is good.  Because I had shifted completely to night owl mode, that means just a few hours in the afternoon.  Unfortunately on this day I took out with the me the camera (Canon powershot pocketcam) unfondly known as Spot.

Allan's garden with a variegated hebe

Allan’s garden with a variegated hebe

The weedy east bed had been bothering me when I looked out from the east living room window.

The weedy east bed had been bothering me when I looked out from the east living room window.

Jasmine nudiflorum in bloom along the fence

Jasmine nudiflorum in bloom along the fence

Allan nailed up a narrow trellis piece for me on which to train some of the jasmine.

Allan nailed up a narrow trellis piece for me on which to train some of the jasmine.

In the north house bed, stems of Rubus lineatus may not leaf out again.  (I want to make the clump smaller anyway.)

In the north house bed, stems of Rubus lineatus may not leaf out again. (I want to make the clump smaller anyway.)

in the middle of the front border, a shrub of mystery still has white berries.

in the middle of the front border, a shrub of mystery still has white berries.

east bed area nicely weeded

east bed area nicely weeded (the main culprit had been creeping sorrel)

evening glow over the back garden as I return indoors

evening glow over the back garden as I return indoors

sunset over Cape Disappointment

through the bogsy woods: sunset over Cape Disappointment

Painted in Waterlogue

Painted in Waterlogue

Wednesday, 7 January 2015

The good weather persisted so I had to put in another afternoon of weeding, this time in the middle bed of the front garden.

before (and why did I grab "Spot" again?!)

before (and why did I grab “Spot” again?!)

Hellebore foetidus in bloom

Hellebore foetidus in bloom

looking west, before (damned Spot!)

looking west, before (damned Spot!)

and after removing old stems and weeds

and after removing old stems and weeds

The melianthus major looked messy but I did not want to cut it down yet.  The old stems might provide some frost protection.

The melianthus major looked messy but I did not want to cut it down yet. The old stems might provide some frost protection.

So I just trimmed off a lot of the old leaves.

So I just trimmed off a lot of the old leaves.

I was not pleased to find a pile of deer poop; they sometimes jump the low fence in the front garden.

I was not pleased to find a pile of deer poop; they sometimes jump the low fence in the front garden.

One of these winters I would like the project to be to secure the front garden from deer.  Or maybe I should continue to use it as a deer test garden and simply move the three roses to the back yard.

One more accomplishment: I pulled up a patch of curly teucrium.  Debbie can have it for the spring plant sale.

For now, it will be fine sitting in a pile.

For now, it will be fine sitting in a pile.

It's a bit of a pest but I love its curly fringed leaves.

It’s a bit of a pest but I love its curly fringed leaves.

Thursday, 8 January 2015

With good weather continuing to interfere with my afternoon reading, I cleaned up weeds (sorrel and shotweed) in the west end bed of the front garden.

Yesterday, the curly teucrium had come out of that corner.

Yesterday, the curly teucrium had come out of that corner.

Next time, I would start to tackle the cutting back of the back garden.

back garden, west bed and garden boat

back garden, west bed and garden boat

middle and east side beds

middle and east side beds

Smokey promised to help me.

Smokey promised to help me.

I had time before dark to just get a start on the west bed.

start

Allan had been across the river shopping in Warrenton, Oregon, and he returned with a welcome treat: takeout from Astoria’s Himani Indian Cuisine.

DSC00346

DSC00347

their friend cauliflower dish and my favourite cucumber yogurt condiment, raita

their friend cauliflower dish and my favourite cucumber yogurt condiment, raita

Friday, 9 January 2015

I hacked away further on the west side of the back garden.

Admiring Cornus 'Midwinter Fire'

Admiring Cornus ‘Midwinter Fire’

the earliest crocus

the earliest crocus

progress on the west bed

progress on the west bed

and a good cleaning of the middle bed

and a good cleaning of the middle bed

until sunset glowed on the south wall of the house

until sunset glowed on the south wall of the house

Tuesday and Wednesday, 13 and 14 January 2015

After the blissful relief of some rainy reading days, I had to return to weeding and chopping in the back garden.

south window view

south window view on Wednesday

late Thursday, after considerable gardening

late Thursday, after considerable gardening

The best weather for me was pure rainy reading weather.  More about that later.

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Thursday, 30 October 2014

We took the day off because of wind and rain and were both going to go shopping overseas (Warrenton, Oregon), until Allan pointed out that the grocery list was long and that I don’t really enjoy shopping.  So off he went, happily alone, while I stayed home to read.

Or so I thought.  The drizzle was not enough to keep me indoors when I had a couple of new bareroot plants from Todd that needed to go into the ground.  I started by planting a Baptisia sphaerocarpa (yellow false indigo) behind the cat bench in the back garden as I had removed a Sedumn ‘Autumn Joy’ that was too low.  THEN I googled it.  Oops, it only gets three feet tall.  Some musical plants ensued, resulting in my getting more planted than I thought I would.

I finally got my Berberis ‘Orange Rocket’ (2 of them, acquired in Seattle last June) in the ground, after transplanting two sanguisorba starts into the back garden.

Berberis 'Orange Rocket'

Berberis ‘Orange Rocket’

While Todd visited the other day, I’d noticed a few exciting things during our tour of the garden.  A mystery evergreen shrub in the front garden has white berries.  It is an angular plant, looks thorny but is not painful to touch, and neither of us could ID it.

white berries

white berries

My Edgeworthia rubra has buds already.

My Edgeworthia rubra has buds already.

Dicentra scandens still blooming by the sun porch.

Dicentra scandens still blooming by the sun porch.

My white sanguisorba died back to the base...

My white sanguisorba died back to the base…

but it's putting out new growth

but it’s putting out new growth

I admired a few dwarf conifers (can’t name them, though).

conifer

conifer

conifer

In Allan's garden

In Allan’s garden

I was inspired by the damp but almost windless weather to go back to the bogsy wood and transplant a golden Virburnum that I had planted too close to a variegated elderberry.  Then I saw two small, new hydrangeas were too close together.  All got shifted around.

former danger tree shade bed

former danger tree shade bed with Virburnum removed…

and it went in here...

and it went in here…along with 2 Sauromatum venosum bulbs from Todd.

It's a good thing I have a new shade bed in the works as I am almost out of room again!

It’s a good thing I have a new shade bed in the works (under that tree, by the swale) as I am almost out of room again!

I checked the most satisfactory rising of the water in the seasonal swale outside the south gate.

pondy swale

pondy swale

water under the willows

water under the willows

water in the long grass

water in the long grass

...the grass I wanted to pull, but didn't.

…the grass I wanted to pull, but didn’t.

My grass-cut finger is only now healed from when the grass fought back almost two weeks ago (or more).

Hardy fuchsias gleamed in the rain.

Hardy fuchsias gleamed in the rain.

fuchsias

Nicotiana langsdorfii has put out new flowers.

Nicotiana langsdorfii has put out new flowers.

pineapple sage

pineapple sage

My river of blue Geranium ‘Rozanne’ has put out fresh new growth.  If I had cleaned up the old spent growth, it would look all fresh and new.  The strangely warm weather has inspired all this strange late-blooming behavior.

Geranium 'Rozanne' new and old growth.

Geranium ‘Rozanne’ new and old growth.

Languishing in a corner of the garden I found the tin pig that sadly reminds me of a friendship lost not by my choice.  Poor pig.  Makes me feel baffled just to look at it.

languishing pig

languishing pig

I put Pig up front with the Halloween decor so I can give him to Pink Poppy Madeline.

Now I'll remember to send Pig to a happy new home.

Now I’ll remember to send Pig to a happy new home.

I know Maddy will like the pig, because she and Jacob had its sister and brother at their wedding.

wedding pigs will be good company

Wedding pigs will be good company; perhaps my pig will grow wings.

I finally remembered to transplant (again) the yellow Baptisia into the front garden.

Despite all the rain, the soil is still powder dry right under the surface.

Despite all the rain, the soil is still powder dry right under the surface.

I still need to find a good spot for this wiegela from Todd.

I still need to find a good spot for this dusky leaved wiegela from Todd.

I added some sopping wet plant stalks to the corridor of spooky plants.  It is now almost done except for the decorative touches and the final part that inconveniently blocks the lawn path.

the Halloween entry corridor

the Halloween entry corridor

I called Allan on his shopping trip to tell him that even though I had said we would not use cobwebs this year as they look so tawdry in daylight, we needed them after all.  The corridor is not spooky enough without them.

Finally, the rain came down strong enough so I could go inside guilt free.

south window view

south window view

I felt bothered by the darkness created in the living room by the Halloween window film.

Next year will wait till the last day to put this up!

Next year will wait till the last day to put this up!

My book, The Last Anniversary by Liane Moriarty, had a number of thought provoking passages about age.  I’m sorry to say I identify with the pain stuff even though I am not QUITE 60, surely too young to be OLD.

book

Rose attends a funeral and contemplates old age:

age

old

She remembers what it was like to THINK she was old, but still be young:

50

Memories of her sister:

memories

memories

I am working hard on appreciating every moment now.

Also, I apologize to MaryBeth at my failure to make the book photos less curvy.

The Last Anniversary is mostly set on a fictional Australian Island, has a set of characters of all ages, and like all Liane Moriarty’s books, I recommend it for a good read.

ScribblyGumMap

Book frontispeice:  A mystery set on a little island; how very satisfactory!  Irresistible!

I had to get it through interlibrary loan; it did not take long to arrive.

I’d forgotten it was Thursday till our friend Jenna (Queen La De Da) texted me to invite us to join her birthday dinner at the Cove.  We couldn’t, because Allan was still across the river.  When he returned, we did go to the Cove for a late dinner, and I was glad to have been reminded of the day as otherwise I could have missed our Thursday tradition.

Allan's photo: entering the Cove

Allan’s photo: entering the Cove

the menu

the menu

Caeser salads

Caeser salads

ahi tuna

ahi tuna

Our day concluded with two episodes on DVD of the most recently released season of True Blood.  I do wish my memory were better for what happened in the intricate and convoluted plot during previous seasons.

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Monday, 6 October 2014

my project

After lazing around all weekend, I finally got to my project at the south end of our property.  The ditch out there is called the “meander line” that divides our property from Port of Ilwaco property (and is also the line between the port and the town itself).

While it felt very productive, even while I was doing the project I questioned the urge that I have to alter nature.  Why was the idea so strong in mind to cut the salmonberries (when they will just grow back) and alter the view of the willows in an area that I rarely visit?  It is as though I need to exert control over nature on every inch of the property.  I’m going to have to put a bench out there to make the project make more sense.  It would be pleasant to sit and look at the meander line ditch fill with water during the rainy season, and perhaps next summer I will be able to watch tadpoles there.

the bridge over our ditch to the south gate

the bridge over our ditch to the south gate

to my left, the swale path through the bogsy wood that fills with water when there is much rain.

to my left, the swale path through the bogsy wood and salmonberry groves that fills with water when there is much rain.

Smokey chose to accompany me on my mission.

Smokey chose to accompany me on my mission.

outside the fence, looking left

outside the fence, looking left

salmonberry blurring willow

looking right (west) to the willows that hang over the meander line ditch (and my camera is being annoying)

I chopped away at the salmonberry that was blurring the willow lines, above.  Even though I was in shade, I kept thinking “I’m too hot and am not having any fun.”  The day must have been all of 75, too hot for my comfort although some folks thrive on sunny days like that.  I was saved by the arrival of our friend J9; we sat around the fire circle for awhile visiting, till we had solved enough of the world’s problems for her to get a bowl of cherry tomatoes from the greenhouse and go on her way.  First, she picked up the wonderful memorial that Allan had made for her cat; more on this later.

Near the fire circle, I was pleased to see that my new Fuchsia 'Windcliff Flurry' has leafed out again; I had let it become distressed by not watering it enough earlier this summer.

Near the fire circle, I was pleased to see that my new Fuchsia ‘Windcliff Flurry’ has leafed out again; I had let it become distressed by not watering it enough earlier this summer.  It’s the plant with the tag and happy little leaves.

I let myself be distracted by picking my Cox's Orange Pippin apples.

I let myself be distracted by picking my Cox’s Orange Pippin apples.

I ate one that had fallen, after cutting the bad part out.  (There was an earwig inside, horrors.)  It was tasty but a bit mealy and I wondered if I had waited too long to pick the apples.  I had definitely waited too long to pick the one Pink Lady apple that I had noticed awhile back.  When I looked for it, this is all I found:

Pink Lady, all et up

Pink Lady, all et up

Pink Lady is really ‘Cripps Pink’ apple, renamed for the American market, apparently.   Or maybe it’s an improved Cripps Pink.   But no!  According to Earl’s Organic Produce:

“To clear up any confusion, Cripps Pink apples and Pink Lady apples are the exact same apple with the same pink color and quality. The only difference is that Pink Lady® is a registered trademark of the Pink Lady Apple Association.  Pink Lady® was one of the first apples to be marketed under a specific brand name rather than by its variety name.

The Cripps Pink apple and Pink Lady apple are a cross between a Golden Delicious apple and a Lady Williams apple.  John Cripps from Australia crossed the two varieties in 1973 and that is why they are called Cripps Pink apple and/or Pink Lady apple.  When you are out shopping, keep in mind that they are the same apple variety.”

I learned about the trademark name controversy in this excellent article by Tony Avent.

But I digress, just as I digressed into apple picking to avoid the hot, hard work of salmonberry chopping.  By the time I returned to the meander line, the weather had cooled somewhat.

I had already made a pile of clippings, and now I added to it.

I had already made a pile of clippings inside the fence, and now I added to it.

And the willow are revealed in all their sinuous form!

And the willow are revealed in all their sinuous form!

I pulled lots of long grass from the flat area outside the gate, and I then tore a whole lot of grass out of the middle of the meander line ditch so that I would be able to see the water in winter season.  Little frogs hopped away in dismay as I altered their home.

the meander line ditch

the meander line ditch

I felt the strong desire to clear grass all the way along the ditch under the swoopy willow to the left of the above photo…and told myself how unhappy the frogs would be if more of their habitat was disturbed.  But don’t they have enough grass on the portside bank of the ditch?  Before I could succumb to more desire to change nature, I cut my finger on a blade of grass and went indoors to deal with the quantity of blood (like a deep paper cut).

I lost my momentum then.  Allan went out to the area and was inspired to clear with the strimmer the area where I had worked and made it look ever so neat.  For my own entertainment, here are before and after photos:

beforeafter

beforeafter

outside the gate

outside the gate

See how we have laid claim to this non garden area and made it all “civilized” and ready for a bench?  If we ignore it for a month, it will quickly go back to the wild.

after strimming

after strimming

Looking east toward the neighbouring gear shed; I was pleased to see Allan had strimmed there, too.

Looking east toward the neighbouring gear shed; I was pleased to see Allan had strimmed there, too.

And he strimmed all along the old log by one side of the big ditch.

And he strimmed all along the old log by one side of the big ditch.

Larger view:  Why is it so tempting to go in there and pull ALL the long grass.

Why do I want to mess with the frog's home so very badly?

Why do I want to mess with the frog’s home so very badly and make the ditch all clear?

Aren’t the willows just glorious with their swoopy arching branches?

Allan’s weekend project (when not boating)

Before we have our evening fire, let me back track to where J9 picked up the cat memorial that Allan made for her recently and suddenly deceased pal, Buddy (only five years old, sudden kidney failure):

J9 found her favourite image of Buddy and took it to the Picture Attic where they added a title and made her a print.

He then sandwiched it, edging it with clear marine seal, and trimmed it:

an outdoor plaque for Buddy's grave

Christl from Wiegardt Gallery had given him some scraps of clear, non yellowing acryclic and some weatherproof tape.

Christl from Wiegardt Gallery had given him some scraps of clear, non yellowing acryclic.

Then to be sure, the edges were super glued and covered with Christl’s weatherproof tape.

A repurposed piece of book shelf was chosen to frame it. A decision was made to not cut it in the shape of a heart or use a tail base to hide a small stake. Buddy’ ears for a patterned for the top seemed right.

IMG_1069

More weather protection was provided by insetting the picture with a router.

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It was then cut and sanded and an angled block was added behind.

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Stain and two coats of fiberglass resin left over from a boat project to further protect it were added.

 evening campfire

And then, the fire of the evening.

fire

 

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

 

Allan's photo of where the little bats fly around in the dusk.

Allan’s photo of where the little bats fly around in the dusk.

moonrise over the gearshed

moonrise over the gearshed

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Poking at the fire is so relaxing.  (Allan's photo)

Poking at the fire is so relaxing. (Allan’s photo)

 

coals

Fog drifted in and we could see it floating across the moon, while foghorns sounded from the Columbia River shipping channel.

foggy moon to the east

foggy moon to the east

and to the southwest, the lights of Jessie's almost non stop fish processing plant

and to the southwest, the lights of Jessie’s almost non stop fish processing plant

We figured this would be the last campfire of the season, as rain was due on Friday and we now had to get back to work for the rest of the week.

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