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Posts Tagged ‘Menlo Washington’

The WSU Master Gardeners of Grays Harbor and Pacific County present:

tour

 

Next to the fourth garden, we parked by a field of farm equipment, some new and some old.

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Allan’s photo

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promise of a garden up ahead

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entry to the front garden

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Trapeoleum speciosum on the trellis (Allan’s photo)

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the ornamental front garden

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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campanulas (Allan’s photo)

Coming around to the back garden, the focus changes to food production.

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tomatoes against the south side of the house

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a chicken coop in the background

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traffic jam at the door

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plump and pretty hens

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a raised bed edged with growing bags (Allan’s photo)

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in the greenhouse (Allan’s photo)

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farmland and cattle beyond

If I had to feed myself out of my garden, I might be eating chickweed, sheep sorrel, and some potatoes and a few berries, with some tomatoes from the greenhouse in late summer.  The intensive growing method in this garden made me ponder what I could do with the future kitchen garden space that I envision between our fence and Devery’s driveway.

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This could protect the plants from deer.

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carrots

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beans

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I overheard that these were sweet Walla Walla onions.

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lettuce (Allan’s photo)

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grapevines on the left

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berries and peaches

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roses, honeysuckle, blueberries (Allan’s photo)

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kitchen gardener extraordinaire, Tim

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gunnera by the back deck

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ready for alfresco meals from the garden

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on the deck (Allan’s photo)

Because this was not an ornamental plant collector’s garden, I was surprised to see a Melianthus major as we departed.

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A tour host was surprised that I recognized it; I said “There are six people touring behind me who will also know what it is.”  (Melissa, Dave, Ann, Evan, Pam, and Teresa!)

We had only one more tour garden to see, this one ten miles northwest of Raymond, and I was hoping to at least spy around the edges of two interesting private gardens on the way home.

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All of the gardens we toured today were in bucolic country side, making for a pleasant drive between each.

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We soon reached the third garden of the day.

The WSU Master Gardeners of Grays Harbor and Pacific County present:

tour

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The entry drive is a bridge over a river.

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approaching the one acre man made pond

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Allan’s photo

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Only Ann got a good photo showing the pleasing design of a spit of land going out into the pond.

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo (coming round the pond the other way)

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a sign warning of roots above the grass

Just as I was navigating that maze of roots, I met up with blog readers Deborah and her sisters from up north!  They had driven down from the tour, a longer drive than ours, and were doing the tour in the opposite order; I hope they enjoyed it as much as we did.  They still had the glorious Willapa riverside garden in store.  They asked where Allan was.  He had parked the van in a provided parking area across the river and was coming round the pond in the other direction.

It always amazes me to hear that people read this blog over their morning coffee.  I tend to actually forget that!  As I told them, while they are reading, I am probably still sleeping.  Deborah is one of my favourite kinds of readers, because she makes comments, as well.

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Allan coming around the other side of the pond

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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Glen’s house

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Note how there is not a glimpse of underlying liner in this dry river bed.

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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Prunus serrula (Allan’s photo)

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Allan’s photo

Right about here is where I finally met Terri, tour organizer.  We had been emailing back and forth for a month and have a lot in common in garden interests.  Allan and I will be visiting her garden near Westport sometime in August and are very much looking forward to that.

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view from the porch

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view from the porch

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view from the porch

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Allan’s photo

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on the porch

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before photos

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before photo

Notes about the garden:

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hose watering! (Allan’s photo)

Neither Allan nor I got a photo that got across the vastness of this property that had been transformed into an arboretum.  Ann did:

landscape

photo by Ann Amato-Zorich

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sighted as we stroll back to the exit

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Another huge parklike expanse was to our left on the road side of the bridge.

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Allan’s photo

We did not walk into that meadow because of my ill timed sore foot.  Now, looking at this photo, I wish I had made the effort.

 As we walked to our van to depart, we encountered Teresa from the Planter Box.  It seemed that our timing was off from that of all the other peninsulites.  She told us that she had heard that garden four had a great vegetable garden.  That was our next destination.

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chatting with Teresa, then on to the next garden

 

 

 

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Saturday, 15 July 2017

The WSU Master Gardeners of Grays Harbor and Pacific County present:

Garden Two: “Colorful and Creative”

Every garden tour has one garden that becomes my favourite.  Gina and Jeff’s garden is one that could be my favourite of many tours.

I was thrilled just by looking at it across the street!

Before we crossed the road, we encountered Wendy and Bill, whose garden had been my favourite on last year’s tour.  Since then, I’d learned that for many years they owned the boat Aallotar which I often see at the Port of Ilwaco.  I longed for Aallotar stories but garden touring won out for everyone.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

closer

 

closer

walk to the front porch

Allan’s photo

wooden window box looks like copper

We finally made it to the check in table!  We could already hear the sound of the river and realized that the garden, while huge, is long and narrow because the river is just past the house and down a steep drop off.

The river sounded wonderful.

a double sort of curb holding the edge of the garden; that lawn is far below

The drop off at the edge of the garden is steep and dramatic.

Allan’s photo

garden creator Gina’s friendly little dog (Allan’s photo)

This cat was also getting attention. (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

I felt faint just looking at this path between the house and the edge. Folks with a good head for heights breezed along it.

Allan’s photo

Gina must have a great head for heights; she had picked every bad leaf off of the statuesque hollyhocks.

Allan’s photo

hollyhocks below the edge

I decided to explore the garden that stretched expansively from the other side of the garage.

back wall of garage

Allan’s photo

This was to cover up some sort of unattractive utilitarian thing. (Allan’s photo)

The long, narrow garden lay on both sides of the house between the road and the drop off to the river.  We began with the longest area, to the left of the house.

a sit spot (Allan’s photo)

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on the side of the garage

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detail

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looking down the expansive lawn

Because this garden is a work in progress, I have a feeling that eventually all of these beds will be as full as the ones right around the house.

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looking back

Squash and big healthy tomatoes grew in the roadside bed.  Someone commented about the fertile farmland valley silt in this area.

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Allan’s photo

One of the folks strolling toward me said (because of my knee brace, cane, and sore heel related limp), “Nothing stops you from garden touring, does it?!”

The garden beds on the river side go right up to the cliff edge.

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right on the edge….I wondered if eventually these trees would go.

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I would have to crawl on my belly to weed up to that edge!

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Allan’s photo

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plants clinging to the very edge of the steep drop off!

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Allan’s photo

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looking down (Allan’s photo)

I tip my gardener’s cap to the bold gardener who weeds along that curving edge.

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Most of the beds are more safely inland.

We turned back and walked toward the house.

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garden tour guests enjoying a sit spot

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peach tree near the garage

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a perfect rose

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I am now thinking about how this garden does not seem bothered by deer.

When Ann (Spiffy Seeds, The Amateur Bot-ann-ist) toured this garden just after we did, she especially noticed the burned tree (which went right over my head).

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photo by Ann Amato-Zorich, who says “Burned tree. Nature’s own shou sugi ban.”

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rustic woodsy planter

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from another angle

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and another….an idea I am going to emulate.

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Allan’s photo

To reach the other side of the garden, I went along the front of the house.

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Brick front porch wrapped front and right side of the house.

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front garden

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looking out from the porch

On the right side of the entry porch, the brick porch narrowed and became L shaped.  Its decor was so fascinating that I could have spent an hour there.

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This area had a concrete floor and a high roof with a chandelier and a skylight.

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story of my life!

I could almost weep with delight over all of these artful vignettes.

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Just off the porch was a waterfall pond.

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Going around the corner of the house, we found another tiny shady pool.

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Allan’s photo

Around the corner at the back of the house, we passed through an arbour to a greenhouse.

We failed to step back and get a long shot.  Ann kindly provided us with this:

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photo by Ann Amato-Zorich

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sink fountain

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Allan’s photo

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in the greenhouse

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We recently saw someone making a cool light fixture like this on a tiny house show.

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in the greenhouse

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in the greenhouse

Near the greenhouse, steps and a path go down to the river level.

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looking down

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plantings on the upper bank (Allan’s photo)

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from the path going down; garden creator Gina in view (Allan’s photo)

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

We learned later that the rock retaining wall was new this past year, and Gina has begun planting it up.

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Allan’s photo

I was still up on the top level by the greenhouse.

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the back porch and sunroom

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the other side of the path I couldn’t do!

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Looking down again, I could see a great temptation for reaching the river level:

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The kitty was there!

Someone told me that an easy access driveway was available at the other end of the garden.  I made my way in that direction.

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by the greenhouse, a basket ready for berries

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past the greenhouse

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looking back at the house and L shaped porch

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an easy road, with a greeter

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kitty welcoming Allan to the river road

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Allan’s photo

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along the river bank

I learned later that the river causes much destruction along this bank during a stormy winter.  The lawn survives!

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looking up the newly cleared area to the greenhouse

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The river made a beautiful sound.

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Allan’s photo

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new rock wall with tour guest for scale

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Look at the edge on that lawn.  Allan noticed that all the bare ground was weed free and carefully raked.

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the river bank, which likely gets flooded in rainy winters

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the sound of water always in the background

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the path down from below

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Allan’s photo

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We made our way back up the easy road to the top and appreciated the garden for awhile longer.

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a natural hose hanger

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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Look who we met arriving just as we were leaving!

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Dave, Melissa, Todd, Pam (downtown Seaside gardener)

They would be one garden behind us all the way.  Ann and Evan arrived just after this photo was taken. We should have just slowed down and toured with them, because they would notice things that we had missed.  I am always afraid of running out of time, so on we went to the next garden.

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I’m thinking how much I loved this garden and that I did not want to leave.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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August 23, 2013, in Menlo, Washington

We approached the fair from the back, having taken a detour in order to look at a pretty garden.   I had expected a quiet and sedate little fair so  the large selection of gaudy carnival rides quite took me by surprise.

approaching the fair

approaching the fair

rides

rides

kind of warlike, but science-fictiony.

kind of warlike, but science-fictiony.

bright whirly thing

bright whirly thing

rides

Starship...was it named before the year 2000?

Starship…was it named before the year 2000?

It whirled around quickly and perhaps was anti-gravity inside.

It whirled around quickly and perhaps was anti-gravity inside.

cups

memories

memories

As you can guess with my various phobias, a Merry-Go-Round is about my speed and my only childhood memory of a roller coaster is not a happy one!  I was scared out of my wits and after one circuit breathed a sigh of relief…but it passed by the loading spot and went around two more times!

Allan's roller coaster photo.  He admits he usually had his eyes closed when going on a roller coaster.

Allan’s roller coaster photo.

Below:  Allan’s photo of one of the ride attendants filling a bubble with air for a waiting child:

air

We heard that the air bubble ride was very popular.

We heard that the air bubble ride was very popular.  photo by Allan

It was impossible to stand up in the spinning bubbles.

Allan’s photo: It was impossible to stand up in the spinning bubbles.

Allan's photo of stairs going up to a long slide.

Allan’s photo of stairs going up to a long slide.

Leaving the screams and laughter of the carnival, we entered the horse barn.

painted horse

painted horse

We later saw the above horse in a competition and its name was “Love”.

This little pony was getting some affection:

pony

But apparently it did not want affection from just anyone.  After it was led out (amid cried by its people of “Horse coming through! Horse coming through!”)…

pony

….we saw this sign on its stall.

pony

I looked up 4-H (about which as a city girl I grew up knowing little) and learned that it stands for  Head (Managing, Thinking),  Heart (Relating, Caring), Hands (Giving, Working) and Health (Being, Living.)a 4-H-ers handsome horseMost of the horses were out at a competition of some sort.  We left the barn and walked past food vendors to a series of sheds and barns, each with a theme.

sheds

Thinking we might find our client, Ann, who had inspired us to go the fair, we started with the sewing barn.

sewing

Throughout the fair we found tributes to Margaret who had clearly been a supporter and contributor to many aspects of the event.

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the fair's slogan

the fair’s slogan

Quilts and Roses, Tails and Noses…..For some reason, wherever I saw the fair’s catchy slogan, I felt choked up and a little teary eyed.  I wished my friend Montana Mary was with us because she would have loved the whole thing.

Some excellent quilts were on display.

quilts, photo by Allan

quilts, photo by Allan

ABCs

ABCs

quilt

Allan’s photo of a prize winner

circles

Now I’m going to do that terribly annoying thing that newcomers and incomers do:  Make brilliant suggestions for improving the fair.  A lot of the quilts were hung sideways like this:

hard to see and appreciate

hard to see and appreciate

sideways

hard to get the full effect

hard to get the full effect

Allan held a couple of them open so I could see them better, but I know there were many quilts that I missed just through not wanting to struggle with the sideways poles they hung on.

roses

roses

It was nothing like looking at them full on.  I am sure the problem was lack of room.

However, in the next barn a large selection of hobbies was on display.   I did not go deep into that barn; Allan told me later some of them were in small old cases that were worn out and opaque, cloudy, hard to see into.  Some of the hobbies were more like collections:

barbie collection

barbie collection, photo by Allan

I don’t want to insult anyone’s collection, but that’s not the kind of thing I think of as a hobby.  (Allan tells me the Puyallup Fair has similar collection displays but with more room.)

a book collection

Allan’s photo of a book collection

Here comes my incomer suggestion:  I say consolidate the collections into a smaller area in the center of the room, (sorry, Barbie!) and give way more wall space for the skilled and beautiful quilt creations.  Perhaps even the “foods” barn could have more room for quilts, and the quilts could be a running theme through the whole show.    End suggestion number one!

Allan's photo of a clock in the hobby barn:  Now that's beautiful!

Allan’s photo of a clock in the hobby barn: Now that’s beautiful!

This human-sized sculpture of St Francis reminded me intensely (in a positive way) of a Vorlon from Babylon 5.

Vorlon

In the “foods” barn we found the classic displays of gleaming home canned produce and treats.

food

peaches

peaches

mix

mix

In another small barn, we found some gardening displays.

Master Gardeners

Master Gardeners

(I was a Master Gardener, so called, never felt the training really qualified one as a “master”, dropped out after one year. )

map of Master Gardener project at our museum

map of Master Gardener project at our museum

a creative display

a creative display

Our local grange is the sponsor of the Long Beach Peninsula Edible Garden Tour.

Long Beach Grange

Long Beach Grange

bees

bees

The hornet next below reminds me of the scariest experiences I have ever had gardening, when I came thisclose to backing into one while weeding at Discovery Heights.

chilling

chilling

This man was charmingly enthusiastic about his pitcher plant and the flies inside of it.  I used to have one of these at the edge of my pond…it came through one winter…wish I still had it!

plant

Grange news

Grange news

[I find it interesting that Nirvana member Krist Novoselic moved to a small town upriver from us and became an active member (the “Worthy Master”, in fact) of his local grange.]

rhodos

Next door to the gardening themed barn, we found animal cuteness, preceded by chickens.

chicks

more poultry

more poultry

and then …. bunnies.

Allan's rabbit photo

I find them unsurpassingly adorable although I know my friend Sheila, who has been plagued with garden-raiding rabbits, feels quite, quite differently.

rabbit

ears

such ears!

such ears!

wiggly

This “rabbit parts” drawing makes me worry about the eventual fate of the bunnies…But I suppose 4-H-ers might make a similar drawing of a horse…

bunnies

After perusing every rabbit and bird, we entered the barn of the flower exhibit.

garden

Within, assorted categories of plants were displayed.

flowers

First came roses:

As you can see, some quilts were also on display in this room.

As you can see, there was room to display more quitls….

All along the walls in this room, it would have been possible to hang more of the quilts that were so crowdedly displayed in the sewing barn.

Rose 'Julio Iglesias'

Rose ‘Julio Iglesias’

The roses were well labeled with the name of each.

Rose 'Distant Drums'

Rose ‘Distant Drums’

Distant Drums was labeled as “Distance Drums” but because this rose was given to me as a present once by a particularly valued old friend (Bryan Runnings), I knew its real name.  Wish I still had it!  At the time, my old garden was too shady to support many roses.  That silvery colour is true to reality.

Next came dahlias, and here comes my next Incomer Suggestion for Improvement.  The gorgeous dahlias were not labeled at all by name.  So when I saw several black ones I particularly craved, I could not write down names for later plant acquisition.

dahlias

I want this one...

I want this one…

and this one...

and this one…

dahlia

trio

dahliaThis was the only information given:

sign

Allan said I could write to the person at the bottom of the tag but that is a lot of effort!

another example of the need for more informative labeling

another example of the need for more informative labeling

and another:  name of Hosta, please?

and another: name of Hosta, please?

Another suggestion, and this one was brought up by someone else with whom I was talking at the fair:  The flower room could be cooled off with fans, and perhaps the water in the vases changed to keep the flowers fresh.  By Friday evening, some were wilting and some had lost their petals.  The room had been, I was told, quite warm earlier in the day.

Allan's photo of cosmos

Allan’s photo of cosmos

and another bouquet photo by Allan

and another bouquet photo by Allan

I would like a name for the interesting cultivar in the above photo!

just a little cool air would be good here to keep them closer to tip top shape

just a little cool air would be good here to keep them closer to tip top shape

These were labeled ("blue globe thistle" and "Russian sage") and thus educational as well as attractive

These were labeled (“blue globe thistle” and “Russian sage”) and thus educational as well as attractive

another informative sign

another informative sign

a 1st prize

and another 1st

1st prizes

Allan said this was the only Dianthus entry.

Allan said this was the only Dianthus entry.

bouquet

Down the center of the room, a row of bouquets had competed for prizes.

flowers

a foliage display

a foliage display

one display unaffected by warm temperatures

one display unaffected by warm temperatures

I found the several memorials for Margaret to be very moving.

another Memorial for Margaret

another Memorial for Margaret

I did a little research and learned she managed the fair for 8 years and died in early 2013.

margaret

margaret

that darling slogan again

that darling slogan again

As this journal  entry goes on and on…and on….I wonder if I should have divided it into “Quilts and Roses” and “Tails and Noses”!  But then where would the rides and (later) Elvis have fit in?

A nearby barn contained the traditional displays of veg large and small that I expected and looked forward to finding at the fair.

herb display

herb display

veg

veg

fun veg

fun veg

strange veg

strange veg

big veg

big veg

green

You know I love gardening quotations:

quote

quote

Wall space had been found to hang a few more quilts:

quilt2

quilt

and another memorial for Margaret Habersetzer.

m

Even though I wanted more education on cultivar names of flowers in the flower display, I did find informative displays here and there at the fair.

about fish....

about fish….

and pigs

and pigs

Pigs are said to be smarter and more trainable than dogs.  I could see the intelligence in their eyes in the pig barn….

pig

that is, when their eyes were open.

pigs

pig

pigs

pig

pig

pig

This girl felt safe and comfortable between two large pigs cleaning a pig’s ears.

pig

In the cattle barn, the animals were tethered to the wall but clearly were so placid that they would not kick out behind themselves.

cows

I hope this was less annoying to wear than it looked...

I hope this was less annoying to wear than it looked…

dinnertime

dinnertime

classical cow names

classical cow names

These two folks were having a well informed discussion about the finer points of cows.

These two folks were having a well informed discussion about the finer points of cows.

mom

sleek like a sea lion

sleek like a sea lion

a calf being petted

a calf being petted

Both Allan and I took photos of the pattern on these two backs:

my photo

my photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

more pets

more pets

Having looked at every animal and every veg and flower in every barn (we thought), we went in search of dinner.  On the way, we passed Elvis.

Allan got the best photo of Mr. Presley.

Allan got the best photo of Mr. Presley.

We found one more barn to go through whose booths seemed to consist mostly of churches and politics but there I did find Andi Day promoting the Long Beach Peninsula.

Andi Day

Andi Day

While she and I were talking, a couple from the area joined the conversation and it turned out that their family had been somehow connected with the Kola House in Ilwaco, a large former B&B that is to the south of our friends and garden clients Larry and Robert’s home.  Their names were Pete and Penny Kramer and I would like to talk to them some more.  They said they have some interesting historical photos of Ilwaco.

Allan had not noticed the Funbeach booth so he wandered off and got lost.  By the time I emerged, Elvis had been replaced by the excellent Naselle Marimba Band.

Naselle Marimba Band

Naselle Marimba Band

This tall cowgirl was photographed by both me and Allan as she wandered the fair.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

my photo

my photo

fairground hilarity

fairground hilarity

I found the Indian Fry bread I had been seeking…

chinook

chinooks

The Chinook have had a heartbreakingly difficult time being recognized as a tribe.  You can sign a petition on this subject here.

Eventually, Allan reappeared (perhaps I was the lost one) after I had finished my bread.  He had eaten a gyros but said it was too mayonaissey.  I saw a sign for a baked potato booth and thought that sounded intriguing.  Couldn’t locate it.  Did see a friendly deep fried booth but had no desire for a fried twinkie.

Deep Fried Heaven

Deep Fried Heaven

Then I noticed something that had peripherally registed before: salmon being cooked near the rollercoaster ride.

fish

Chinook tattoo on the salmon chef

Chinook tattoo on the salmon chef

salmon fire

salmon fire

Allan's photo:  It smelled delicious

Allan’s photo: It smelled delicious

The salmon came from the same kitchen as the fry bread for a good price, so I had some.

very tasty

very tasty

Nearby, a man played traditional flute.

Nearby, a man played traditional flute.

On Allan’s walkabout, he had seen that an equestrian event was about to take place so we strolled over past the horse barn to the corral.   I was busy eating the last of the salmon, so Allan took some photos.

The younger riders were led through the course…

pony

The older riders and their mounts were swift and accomplished.

horse

Some were just too young to compete.

baby

Allan’s photo

I did want to get home before dark and had already stayed longer than planned.  As we looked for the exit gate, a rain began.  Fortunately for the fairgoers, it was not a cold rain.

At the gate, we saw this sign and realized…we had not found any goats!

where had they been?

where had they been?

We did not go back to seek them out.

Returning to our van, we passed another nice garden.

right on Highway 6

right on Highway 6

garden

The houses along this stretch of road back right up to the fair.

Now, having seen the Pacific County Fair, I am interested in going next year to the Clatsop County Fair near Astoria, Oregon and see how it compares.

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Aug 23, 2013

I probably would not have had the desire to go to the Pacific County Fair had it not been for our nice new van.  While I still found the “Willapa curves” around the bay to be disconcerting, I felt safer sitting up high.  I am far from being the same species as my friends who speed around happily in little sports cars.

At the last of the curves, I thought to take some photos.

At the last of the curves, I thought to take some photos.

the welcome sight of the bridge where the road gets straight again

the welcome sight of the bridge where the road gets straight again

for me, a big relief to get to the place in the road

for me, a big relief to get to the place in the road

The tide was so high it was almost up to the road in places; on the way back in the dusk several hours later it would be so low that all sorts of mudflats, snags, and featured showed (but I was on the wrong side of the van to take photos out the window).

high tide

high tide on Willapa Bay, approaching South Bend

The tide was so high it was almost up to the road in places; on the way back in the dusk several hours later it would be so low that all sorts of mudflats, snags, and featured showed (but I was on the wrong side of the van to take photos out the window).

trees

approaching South Bend

When we got to the town of Menlo, site of the Pacific County Fair and six miles inland from Raymond (a bayside town just north of South Bend), we had to park a few blocks east of the fair and walk back.

park

That turned out to be good news.  As we approached a side street, I glimpsed an enticing garden half a block to our left.

Had we parked closer, we would have missed this.

Had we parked closer, we would have missed this.

garden

garden

exuberant clematis on fence

exuberant clematis on fence

The place next door was not as garden-y but had a good sit spot by the garage.

neighbour

At the end of this block and around the corner, we came to the back entrance to the fair…which, as promised earlier, will be our NEXT post.

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