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Posts Tagged ‘mermaid birdbath’

Tuesday, 2 September, part two

I woke up at eight, early for me (way early), all excited about going to see Steve and John’s garden. Unable to fall back asleep, I decided to get up to make sure I had time to pick a really good bouquet for them. I took my camera out into the garden because I usually do not see it in morning light.

The mermaids were chatting.

The mermaids were chatting.

Roscoea purpurea 'Spice Island'

Roscoea purpurea ‘Spice Island’ (a hardy ginger, came back this year)

view to the southwest

view to the southwest

the west bed, back garden

the west bed, back garden

I swear that since we cut a limb on Nora’s tree, we can now see the house on the hill better. I don’t want to see it from my garden. That’ll teach us to mess with someone else’s tree (although it was a limb hanging way over on our side and one that was crossing another and made the tree look lopsided).

Leycesteria 'Golden Lanterns' from Joy Creek Nursery

Leycesteria ‘Golden Lanterns’ from Joy Creek Nursery

Agastache 'Blue Boa' or maybe 'Blue Fortune' from The Basket Case

Agastache ‘Blue Boa’ or maybe ‘Blue Fortune’ from The Basket Case (via Blooming)

sedum flower, a variegated one

sedum flower, a variegated one

I have every intention of sorting through all my tags this winter and making a master list of plants like John has done for the bayside garden. I really mean it this time.

a golden heather Allan brought back from Seattle; he brought three so I ended up with two in my garden.  Excuse the dratted creeping sorrel mixed in, such a bad weed.

a golden heather Allan brought back from Seattle; he brought three so I ended up with two in my garden. Excuse the dratted creeping sorrel mixed in, such a bad weed (but edible and deliciously lemony)

Some chelone (pink turtlehead) ended up in the bouquet.

Some chelone (pink turtlehead) ended up in the bouquet.

The pink turtlehead was in the front garden, where it was too dry. I moved it to the back garden last fall, where the water table is high. Some popped back up in the front garden and will get moved to Golden Sands Assisted Living and to Jo’s garden.

Physocarpus (probably 'Dart's Gold') and an astilbe

Physocarpus (probably ‘Dart’s Gold’) and an astilbe

In the front garden, Tetrapanax papyrifer 'Steroidal Giant' with the great Allium 'Forelock'

In the front garden, Tetrapanax papyrifer ‘Steroidal Giant’ with the great Allium ‘Forelock’ (expensive, thus only two, getting more this year)

white lilies and Rubus lineatus

white lilies and Rubus lineatus

At the post office, I was excited to get a book in the mail. Allan had ordered me a copy of Linnets and Valerians by Elizabeth Goudge, after I was reminded of her by seeing a book at Olde Towne Café. Oh, my! Was this a sequel to Linnets and Valerians?

The Runaways

The Runaways

Later in the day, I was sorry to learn that this book was Linnets and Valerians under a boring title. I guess the publishers thought Americans would not by a book with the original title, which is so so so much better. Now I am trying (or Allan is trying for me as he is better at online shopping) to find a copy with the proper title.

We headed north on Sandridge Road with perfect timing to be at Steve and John’s on the dot of 11:30…till we got to the highway 101 crossing and I realized I had forgotten the book I wanted to show them, my hand gardening tools for later in the day, and the two plants I wanted to give them. So back we went, circling around Black Lake; getting the two plants was the most important thing.

The plants were part of the swag from the Bloggers Fling banquet and we had an extra of each one and figured Steve and John would enjoy trying out these 2015 introductions:

wiegela

disporum

Then we had our visit and tour of Steve and John’s bayside garden (see yesterday’s post). As we left their garden, rain had begun in earnest. I was hoping for a break so we could dump the weekend’s load of yard debris at Peninsula Landscape Supply and pick up a yard of Soil Energy mulch for our garden; the original plan had been to work for a couple of hours at Andersen’s RV Park between the mulch acquisition and home. I had already decided that was not going to happen, but I did want my mulch. (If I had woken up to rain, with the prospect of it lasting all day and nowhere to go, I would have been thrilled to just read.)

The weather got worse every moment. Allan pointed out how miserably drenched we would be if we followed the debris dumping and mulch plan.

We drove on past Peninsula Landscape Supply toward home.

We drove on past Peninsula Landscape Supply toward home.

I imagined an afternoon of reading, with rain outside. My desire for mulch was so strong that I couldn’t let it go and I said to Allan (gently, really) that if it were just me, I would unload the debris and get the mulch and get drenched….for the sake of fulfilling that desire. He took that as a challenge, he said, and turned around at the Red Barn Arena.

entering Peninsula Landscape Supply

entering Peninsula Landscape Supply

debris unloaded, getting a yard of steaming mulch

debris unloaded, getting a yard of steaming mulch

As we were getting loaded up, I sensed that the sky was lightening to the west.

I could feel the rain was about to cease.

I could feel the rain was about to cease. Light around the edges!

looking south, definitely light around the edges

looking south, definitely light around the edges

By the time we got home about fifteen minutes later, the sky was breaking into blue all around us.

looking south from front garden

looking south from front garden

looking west

looking west

and north, beautiful blue

and north, beautiful blue

Allan did most of the wheelbarrowing to fill in the new woods bed.

Allan did most of the wheelbarrowing to fill in the new woods bed.

I filled in some holes and low areas in the front garden where I had dug up a boring daylily, a clump of lady’s mantle, and other undesirables. (And, sadly, an Edgeworthia chrysantha that had died after being purchased and planted in glorious bloom in early spring of this year.)

I carried about nine five gallon buckets of mulch into the garage to save for later transplanting projects. Only for the last two did I get organized enough to use the wheelbarrow to make it easier. Then I stuck a shovel in the ground around a big Joe Pye weed to see how hard to would be to dig out.

It would be difficult.

It would be difficult.

Joe Pye wants to be in a damper spot (as do all the sanguisorbas in the front garden). Allan saw me poking at it and said he would not mind digging it up for me. Joy!

after

after

Of course, I had to haul most of my buckets of mulch back out of the garage to fill this in. My plan is to plant my new Rosa pteracantha there, as I have noticed that the area gets backlit by the sun and so its huge translucent red thorns should show up well.

Rosa pteracantha still in its pot.

Rosa pteracantha still in its pot.

The planting will have to wait as the mulch is still too hot to plant anything in it.

Cautionary tale: Whoever originally planted the Shorebank garden on Howerton Avenue at the port (not me!) put down steaming hot soil and planted immediately. Within days, all the shrubs they planted were dead and had to be replaced at great expense to the landscaper (who went out of business and shall not be named and shamed).

Sadly, another plant that went away was the contorted hawthorne from Joy Creek Nursery. Another cautionary tale: There was much argy bargy when Allan and I were planting the tree. “Don’t hold it by the trunk!” was the cry of dismay, and then there was an ominous cracking sound right where the trunk meets the root ball. For three or four years, the little tree put out some leaves (never any flowers) in spring and then went completely bare all summer, and it never grew an inch. I finally gave up.

contorted Paul's Scarlet Hawthorne...a goner

contorted Paul’s Scarlet Hawthorne…a goner

It’s back behind the house waiting for me to think of something to do with the branches. The root ball is the same size as when it was planted.

when I bought the poor thing, in 2011 at Joy Creek

when I bought the poor thing, in 2011 at Joy Creek

Moral: Plant trees carefully; they are not as tough as they look.

It’s going to be a challenge to get all the work done before the crowds for Rod Run weekend arrive by Friday afternoon. Even so, someone besides myself and Allan was pleased about our unexpected day off.

Smokey likes me to be at home.

Smokey (in his Birds Be Safe collar) likes me to be at home.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sunday, 22 June 2014

Hardy Plant Study Weekend presented by the Northwest Perennial Alliance

Tucker garden

Our last tour garden in North Seattle was one I especially wanted to see because Beth Chatto’s Gravel Garden is one of my favourite books.

photo

by the street

by the street

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

looking up into the garden

looking up into the garden

detail in the low retaining wall around the patio

detail in the low retaining wall around the patio

the front yard patio

the front yard patio

Allan's photo of thyme on the patio

Allan’s photo of thyme on the patio

front garden

front garden

from gravel to lawn in the front garden

from gravel to lawn in the front garden

gravel path, front garden

gravel path, front garden

very Beth Chatto

very Beth Chatto

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the first of a selection of assorted Eryngiums…my favourites!

Dahlias, Allan's photo

Dahlias, Allan’s photo

a mosaic step up the lawn

a mosaic step up the lawn

gazing upon the lawn and house

gazing upon the lawn and house

next to the pebble mosaic: a cluster of Salvia viridis (painted sage), my favourite annual and one you don't see in many gardens.

next to the pebble mosaic: a cluster of Salvia viridis (painted sage), my favourite annual and one you don’t see in many gardens.  It is not quite blossomed out yet.

painted sage, which I discovered in a slide show lecture by Lucy Hardiman

painted sage, which I discovered in a slide show lecture by Lucy Hardiman

Eryngium

Eryngium again, backed with Ceanothus

looks like my friend Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

looks like my friend Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

a tour guest photographing poppies

a tour guest photographing poppies

Here's why!

Here’s why!

I see Sheila heading for the back garden.

I see Sheila heading for the back garden.

I look back at the gravel garden.

I look back at the gravel garden.

Into the back garden.  Note the pond to the left.

Into the back garden. Note the pond to the left.

Perfection!

Perfection!

I poked at the lip to see if I could ascertain whether or not it was made from a big round tub.  Couldn't tell.

I poked at the lip to see if I could ascertain whether or not it was made from a big round tub. Couldn’t tell.

I have begun Googling “huge round tubs for ponds” and certainly hope I can find something like this, so nice and round, not one of those squiggly shaped plastic forms.  Looks like it has a wide lip for setting the pavers.  Maybe it is not a tub at all.

To my right, the garden.

To my right, the garden.

a trough garden

a trough garden

a reading spot

a reading spot

Along the same side of the garden as the pond, a wall drips with ferns over a path lower than the lawn.

Along the same side of the garden as the pond, a wall drips with ferns over a path lower than the lawn.

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blossoms drifted onto a fern

clematis fluff drifted onto a fern

Stepping from the fern grotto up onto the lawn

Stepping from the fern grotto up onto the lawn

a single yellow rose

a single yellow rose

levels in the back garden

in the back garden

There's Ciscoe!

There’s Ciscoe!  Note the sunroom to the left.

The sun room is open for tour guests to enter.

The sun room is open for tour guests to enter.

The sun room is open for tour guests to enter.

stunning.

stunning…may I have this AND the round pond, please!

a frog welcome mat at the door that goes straight out the back.

a frog welcome mat at the door that goes straight out the back.

into the garden

into the garden

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more levels of stone and plants

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another angle

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

another water feature

another water feature

I got distracted by a conversation and did not get any detail photos of this lovely area.  However, if you look at this entry in the Bonney Lassie blog, not only will you see an excellent photo of it but also links to other blogs about this garden.  (Alison, do you think that big round pond is a tub??)

looking down at the house and sunroom

looking down at the house and sunroom

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another level up, above a greenhouse, and going up to a little shed

Another level up, above a greenhouse, and going up to a little shed.

looking down

looking down

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little greenhouse

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greenhouse and shed

a path between greenhouse and an outbuilding (as I recall)

a path between greenhouse and an outbuilding.

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a shady nook by the house

We are about to go around the other side of the house.

We are about to approach the other side of the house.

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more simply lovely single roses

fern planter

fern planter

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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in the front garden again

in the front garden again

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I asked Sheila to take one more photo for me out the passenger window before we drove away.

I asked Sheila to take one more photo for me out the passenger window before we drove away.

This garden was very much my cuppa tea in every way and I feel now, looking at the photos, that I was too punchy and distracted to catch all of the details.  It is four hours way from me now, so I will have to read other people’s blogs to see more of it.


 

Sky Nursery

We had time to get to Sky Nursery before their closing time of six PM in order to get a birdbath that we have wanted for a long long time.  It is rather pricey (for us) and is often out of stock.

Sky Nursery

Sky Nursery

parking lot planters

parking lot planters

Allan took these three photos at my request.  The blue is Salvia patens, one of my favourites.

Allan took these three photos at my request. The blue is Salvia patens, one of my favourites.

P1080785

I bought a couple of hardy Fuchsias but was too tired to do much focused plant shopping.

mermaid birdbath from catalog

mermaid birdbath from catalog

Mer Family Birdbath

(MER-BB)

Designed by Kelly Godel

18″ x 18″ x 28″; 100 lbs (2 Pieces)

Mermaids, in folklore are supernatural, sea-dwelling creatures with the head and upper body of a beautiful women and the lower body of a fish. Many a travelled sailor has brought back tales of being enchanted by their beauty. In this original birdbath by Kelly Godel, we see all the members of a Mer family, happy in the knowledge that they won’t be disturbed by human presence. Mermaids were immortalized by Hans Christian Anderson’s famous 1837 novel, The Little Mermaid.

Mediterranean Kitchen

On the way back to the hotel (we were much too tired to go to the Bellevue Botanical Garden so missed that entirely on this trip) we had dinner at the Mediterranean Kitchen’s Bellevue restaurant.  It was a great favourite of mine in its lower Queen Ann and Capitol Hill (Komalco!) restaurants back when I lived in Seattle.  Zahrah, a deep fried cauliflower appetizer with tahini sauce, is so scrumptious.

Allan found it, close to the hotel, when he took a walk late Thursday evening.

Allan found it, close to the hotel, when he took a walk late Thursday evening.

When we arrived on Sunday night, the indoor seating was crowded so we ate on the patio.

The Mediterranean Kitchen

The Mediterranean Kitchen

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I got Farmer's Dish as it brought back happy memories of reeking with garlic.  Sheila and Allan got Dajaj Mishwi.

I got Farmer’s Dish as it brought back happy memories of reeking with garlic. Sheila and Allan got Dajaj Mishwi.

Allan's dish

Allan’s dish

I had forgotten how huge the portions were, and the sad thing was our hotel rooms at the Bellevue Hilton had no refrigerators so we could not take leftovers; the three of us could have split a Zahrah and one Dajaj Mishwi and been happy.

A dog walking with its human made eye contact with me.  I would love to have given him a taste, but garlic is not good for dogs.

A dog walking with its human made eye contact with me. I would love to have given him a taste, but garlic is not good for dogs.

back at the hotel...our new plant collection

back at the hotel…our new plant collection

and the water bottles Allan kept refilling to water the plants with, as some had been in the van for three days now.

and just some of the water bottles Allan kept refilling to water the plants with, as some had been in the van for three days now.

Tomorrow we would go home, but on our way we would visit five more gardens in southwest Seattle.

 

 

 

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