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Posts Tagged ‘Mirabel Osler’

A VERY typical day indeed as we got back to maintenance.  The only thing approaching a project was Allan removing some lady’s mantle that was crowding three new blueberry plants at Diane’s garden.  He also transplanted some Cerinthe although, in my opinion, it would not hurt the blueberries at all (but Diane wanted the area cleared all but for the berry bushes).

Allan's project, before and after

Allan’s project, before and after

The blueberry to the left is ‘Pink Lemonade’ and had lots of berries.  I got all excited thinking that maybe my Pink Lemonade at home might have berries.  (I found at the end of the day that it doesn’t, even in its third summer here.)

Diane and Larry's 'Pink Lemonade' blueberry

Diane and Larry’s ‘Pink Lemonade’ blueberry

Meanwhile, I deadheaded the Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ at The Red Barn.  The lovely Helianthemum ‘Lemon Queen’ in that area does not need deadheading at all.

Helianthemum 'Lemon Queen'

Helianthemum ‘Lemon Queen’

beautiful in every stage of flower

beautiful in every stage of flower

beloved of all sorts of bees and the like

beloved of all sorts of bees and the like

bee

I do wish the whiskey barrels got more watering at The Red Barn!

two out of four barrels

two out of four barrels

The one closest to the barn door (left) gets the most water because people dump their stable cleaning buckets into it.  The next one gets far less (i.e. not enough) water.  Note the difference in the size of the nasturtiums.  (The third one, furthest from the door, is, of course, the paltriest!)

The happiest one is by the stable on the south side of the building, protected from the north wind.

lopsided but happy

lopsided but happy

In a wonderful gardening book that I just read, A Breath from Elsewhere, Mirabel Osler wrote a chapter about plants she dislikes.  One is sanvitalia (creeping zinnia) and I just don’t know why.  Yes, it is bright yellow, but with a charming green center.

I find sanvitalia to be just charming.

I find sanvitalia to be a delight.

At the barn, I feel sorry for the horses that are inside dark stalls with no one coming to put them out to pasture.

Indoors at one in the afternoon.

Indoors at one in the afternoon.

I will pick a handful of lush grass in for the poor horsie to eat.  Just a taste of the fresh outdoors.

These two were more fortunate.

The one on the foreground came over to say hello.

The one on the foreground came over to say hello.

two being led out to pasture

two being led out to pasture

After my work at the Barn, I went back to Diane’s (next door) and deadheaded her cosmos.  I have some lavenders to add to the roadside bed but am waiting for damper weather.

still so unsatisfying...will mulch with cow fiber!

still so unsatisfying…will mulch with cow fiber!

Larry, Diane’s spouse,  mulched the roadside bed with cranberry mulch but I don’t think it adds anything other than a nice dark colour.

Next came the deadheading of the welcome sign.  How very badly it needs more blue in the planting!

Yellow "stops the eye" but next year will have Geranium 'Rozanne'

Yellow “stops the eye” but next year will have Geranium ‘Rozanne’

In downtown Long Beach, Allan went to work on Coulter Park while I started walking around to deadhead the planters.  I thought at first I would get away without watering them, but they just were not damp enough to hold till Monday and look fresh and happy.  Soon the watering rounds will stop but not yet.

I keep meaning to Google for what type of Daphne this is:

short, fragrant, long period of bloom

short, fragrant, long period of bloom

The daphne planter is kitty corner from the cranberry harvest mural on the south wall of Dennis Co.

The daphne planter is kitty corner from the cranberry harvest mural on the south wall of Dennis Co.

In the planter by the Long Beach Pharmacy, one cosmos continues to behave strangely with green non-flowers.

an odd cosmos indeed

an odd cosmos indeed

It has some flowers low down on the stem.

It has some flowers low down on the stem.

I weeded and deadheaded at Veterans Field.

at three o clock, vendors were setting up for the afternoon farmers market

at three o clock, vendors were setting up for the afternoon farmers market

I am impressed by the continuing red white and blue-ness of the little Veterans Field garden.

Next year:  More Salvia 'Hot Lips' as it has been a great doer.

Next year: More Salvia ‘Hot Lips’ (right) as it has been a great doer.

Some of the short Cosmos has been excellent and some just terrible.  I have a feeling the ones called ‘Cutesy’ were the bad ones (and the reliable, tried and true ‘Sonata’ the good ones).

good (left) and bad (right)

good (left) and bad (right) with one paltry flower and a lot of dead

In the above right photo, you can also see a paltry Lobelia tupa.  Of three planted there, two of them look better:

a good tupa!

a good tupa!

but none have bloomed with the glorious flowers that we had from the Boreas Inn’s tupa!

Lobelia tupa, 8-2

Lobelia tupa should be doing this!

Back to the planter watering….I admired the schizostylis (river lily) now blooming under many of the trees.

Schizostylis in pale and dark pink

Schizostylis in pale and dark pink

At the restroom on Fifth Street, as elsewhere around town, the baskets from Basket Case Greenhouse still look wonderful.

 

basket

I think the park at Fifth Street is looking great, too.

I did not deadhead every cosmos...It would have taken hours.

I did not deadhead every cosmos…It would have taken hours.

I still long for the day when watering Ilwaco does not come right after Long Beach…so we can have crab rolls at Captain Bob’s Chowder!

When I got to Fish Alley, I did not have to bucket water the barrels.  (Joy!) I did chop back  the variagated sedum that still looked just awful.

water spots? too much rain? mildew? yuck!

water spots? too much rain? mildew? yuck!

I walked down Fish Alley and the alley to the east to get back to the Columbia Pacific Farmers Market.

looking east

looking east

I can’t bear to pull the Cerinthe that reseeded in the left hand barrel, even though they symmetry has been thrown off.

at the market

at the market

Kim from River Rock Farm was making bouquets out of dahlias (but cleverly avoided being photographed).

Kim from River Rock Farm was making bouquets out of dahlias (but cleverly avoided being photographed).

heirloom tomatoes from River Rock Farm

heirloom tomatoes from River Rock Farm

The Clatsop Weavers and Spinners Guild were doing a demo.

The Clatsop Weavers and Spinners Guild were doing a demo.

Our realtor friend and garden client Cheri is a member of this group but was off getting a treat at Sweet Celebrations cupcake shop!

I had been hoping that Wholesome Hearth Bakery would be at the market with their delicious little black bottom cupcakes.  They weren’t.  One of the spinners suggested I could go to one of the two Long Beach bakeries but I said the treat would not be as much fun if it did not come from the open air market.

Heading west again…a telephoto looking through Fish Alley to show that the view corridor goes all the way to the beach (half a mile west through the dunes).

looking west

looking west

The photo that got away:  Due to traffic I just missed a couple walking through Fish Alley carrying a bouquet of dahlias from the farmers market.  Imagine…

As I finished the planters, I realized that we should not have pulled the Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ out of the planter in front of Wind World Kites (of which just one blue corner shows above).  Not before Rod Run!   The Fuchsia that we had pulled the Crocosmia to reveal got almost totally smashed by Rod Run car-watching planter-sitters.

a lesson learned...

a lesson learned…smashed Fuchsia would have been protected by thickly planted Croscosmia!

I have no photos to show the excellent job that Allan did all around Coulter Park….

And will close with a selection of tomatoes that I picked at home while he went out to water the Ilwaco planters.

tomatoes

tomatoes

…and the still golden view from the south window.

dusk

Next:  If fate is willing and no catastrophe intervenes, I’ll be posting about something I have been looking forward to all summer long:  tomorrow’s Cannon Beach Cottage Tour!

 

 

 

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July 27, 2013

Gardens by the Sea tour benefits Clatsop CASA.

garden one: Hubik garden. From the program: “A flowing garden walled in green, displaying a beautiful drainage solution.”

Hubik garden

Hubik garden

The beautiful fencing and gates, we were told, had been built by Mr. Husik.

The beautiful fencing and gates, we were told, had been built by the late Mr. Hubik.

front corner

front corner

tour guests at the gate

tour guests at the gate

stepping inside

to the left, the front porch

to the left, the front porch

detail

detail

inside the gate, photo by Allan

inside the gate, photo by Allan

Turning to the right, we find a water feature.

to the right, a pond

to the right, a pond

with water dripping from a shell

with water dripping from a shell

curving around from the pond, a mixed border

curving around from the pond, a mixed border

border

birdfeeder

birdfeeder

Allan went into the little path that you can see to the left of the photo above.

corner

corner

corner view

corner view

And look who he found there!

garter snake

From the lawn by to the flower border we look back toward the house.

curvy boxwood

curvy boxwood

side door

side door

Allan saw evidence of a dog’s presence….

a sure sign

a sure sign

And then saw the dog in the glass door on the side of the house.

dog

The dog looks like one of my favourite bloggers, Chess the purebred border collie.

Chess's relative?

Chess’s relative?

On the other side of the lawn from the house, the garden border has curved the corner and runs down the side. (Unlike Peninsula gardens, I cannot name south or north or west or east side as I got all turned around while looking for the garden.)

While perusing this area, we encountered our friend and client Lorna, owner of Andersen’s RV Park, touring with Karen, wife of consummate local plantsman Steve Clarke.  Lorna had already taken photos of things that she liked in garden six, where they had begun the tour, especially a pink flowering plant that she wanted identified but I could not tell what it was from the photo.

side border

side border

from the border to the house

from the border to the house

Passing a fire circle, we approach an intriguing garden shed.

circle

looking back at the house

looking back at the house

elegant garden outbuilding

elegant garden outbuilding

inside

inside

inside

inside

inside

the view out the back of the shed

the view out the back of the shed

What a delightful place. Before we go around the shed to enter that appealing view, we find another water feature at the corner of the house.

fountain

fountain

and a handsome gate to a parking area

and a handsome gate to a parking area

Going behind the shed, we find the “beautiful drainage solution”, a wetland that I would love to have at the back of my garden.

still with water even in summer

still with water even in summer

Pond is partly? fed with this system.

Pond is partly? fed with this system.

pipes

The vegetable garden behind the shed and next to the pond is impressively beautiful and perfectly maintained.

stunning

stunning

dahlias

dahlias

pyramid

pyramid

happy fig in a barrel

happy fig in a barrel

(I think I need to dig up the little fig tree that Nancy Allen gave me and plant it in a barrel against the warm back wall of our house.)

an excellent trellis

an excellent trellis

dahlia

This whole area with its big green pond and symmetrical beds and well placed trellising was my favourite part of the garden.

Here we come to the end and turn around.

the end of the garden

the end of the garden

I stood and gazed back for quite awhile enjoying the view and waiting for another tour guest to move so that I could take more photos.

She was photographing this view.

She was photographing this view.

looking back

looking back

nice plump onions

nice plump onions

Allan's photo

You can see her on the right taking another photo in this very photogenic area.

You can see her on the right taking another photo in this very photogenic area.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

beside the pond (and Allan examining the drainage system)

beside the pond (and Allan examining the drainage system)

Above: Note the nicely built terracing next to the pond. I like the bark, too; perfect for a veg garden as it echoes the colour of straw.

Allan feels that the pump system was for pulling water out of the pond rather than draining water into the pond.

bench

We return to the main garden on the path between the garage and the garden shed.

back

lawn

Now we see the garden from inside the curving boxwood hedge.

inside

rose garden

rose garden

tour guests, photo by Allan

tour guests, photo by Allan

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

And the boxwood hedge guides us back to the front gate.

gate

I enjoyed all of this garden and while there thought of the poignancy of continuing to garden after one’s partner has passed away.  On this subject, I recommend the garden writer Mirabel Osler, of whose book A Breath from Elsewhere,  Publisher’s Weekly wrote that she “addresses the neglected topic of coping with garden demands when one’s gardening partner dies or becomes ill. Drawing on her own experience, she offers suggestions for handling guilt, grief and moving forward in new ways.”  This is a book I have not read (I was searching to see if her wonderful book A Gentle Plea for Chaos addressed that issue, because I remembered that she carried on their garden after her spouse died.  It is now top of my “to read” list.

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