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Posts Tagged ‘Narcissus ‘Baby Moon’’

at home (Allan’s photo)

We began the day by driving by and photographing, but not helping, a volunteer clean up effort in downtown Ilwaco.  You can read about it on our Ilwaco blog, here.

Before our Long Beach tasks, we watered the garden at

The Shelburne Hotel.

We have newly planted areas there that need monitoring.

I took a bouquet for the hotel lobby:

The back yard is turning into an open patio space.  I was excited to see the long narrow area in the middle, thinking maybe it could be a place to grow edible flowers….

…but no; it will be a bocce ball court.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

after watering

I turned to take a photo of the building…

…and realized that a rhododendron branch was blocking the sign.

So we fixed it.

 

And then, on to

Long Beach

to tidy up all the downtown planters and street tree gardens for Sunday’s annual parade.

Silverstream tulips

I immediately realized that I was cold, in the wind, and had neglected to bring warmer clothes.

Cerinthe major purpurascens

Tulip batalinii ‘Bright Gem’

I clearly must plant more Tulip batalinii: They are short, sturdy, and bloom late enough for the parade.

sparaxis

sparaxis and cerinthe

I was disappointed that not every planter had Narcissus ‘Baby Moon’.  I plant more every year, but did not replant in every planter this time.  I guess they peter out after awhile, probably from too much watering in summer.

As I walked along, I photographed every planter for a reference post, something I started to do last fall.  That will be the next blog post, and I will be able to refer back to it to see which planters are especially dull right now.  Sadly, the parade always falls on the first weekend in May at an awkward time between peak spring bulb season and mid-May flowers.

I am worried about Allium christophii surviving parade day.

So vulnerable. I must have been mad to plant them.

As soon as this veronica completes its brief bloom time, it is coming out. I mean it this time.

a difficult and wet, rooty, weedy bed in Fifth Street Park

We had encountered Parks Manager Mike and talked to him about somehow re-doing the above bed.  It is a problem.

Mike and me

He warned me that a crew member, having mulched a shrubby park, had then dumped bark on one of “my” flower beds.  It will not happen again.  Mike knew I would not like it, even though he probably does not know that our business slogan is “Just say no to barkscapes.”  Especially RED barkscapes.

red bark. Ouch!

This is where the bark ran out! (Allan’s photo)

We moved the bark from the half-done spot back to the shrubby side of the park.

Allan’s photo

bark around hydrangeas, etc, with gunnera and Darmera peltata

Allan found masses of bindweed to pull in the corner:

tree garden outside Abbracci Coffee Bar

a rain spotted Tulip ‘Cummins’

Tulip ‘Silverstream’ did not quite make it to parade day. (Allan’s photo)

I have agastaches for the empty centers of the planters.  I am holding off on planting them to prevent parade day damage and to avoid having to start watering before the end of next week.

Oh for more Baby Moon!

another good, late doer: Tulip linifolia. I think. (Allan’s photo)

The sparaxis flowers look good, but the foliage on them is not attractive this year; it browned off early.

Soon, while planting annuals, we will chop all the Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ by half to make it tighter.

The sedums were all serving as snail homes.

Just half of the snails I got from one clump of sedum.

The snails went into the trailer with the debris to be rehomed in the debris pile at City Works.

What have we here? Someone did this. Why?

We also accomplished the tidying and weeding of the Veterans Field gardens:

And then got back to the last two blocks of planters.

by NIVA green, another late narcissi; I need to figure out which one it is.

another great late bloomer, tall

Tulip ‘China Town’

At the very end, by the bus stop in Coulter Park, I saw a problem that needs fixing.  Tomorrow!  I had been cold and miserable throughout the Long Beach portion of the day.

sidewalk blockage, must fix, but too cold now!

a snail escaping from the trailer. I let it go.

We had a load of debris to dump, along with all the rest of the snails.

I treat the big tulips as annuals and discard them.  They do not come back as well the second year, and Long Beach needs a good, fresh show every year.

Feeling chilled and exhausted, we then repaired to

The Shelburne Pub

for a good warming hot toddy and meal.

….ah….

delicious chopped salad

the astonishingly delectable black garlic fried rice

I took some photos of the Shelburne as we left, trying to capture its evening magic.

Blue flowers show up strongly at dusk.

the pub deck

 

Here is the hotel website; you just might like to dine or to stay there sometime.

At home, I was intensely relieved to relax and watch a show of Gardeners’ World before our regular telly.

ahhhh….

Nigel!

garden touring!

The garden tour segment of this episode was stunning and theatrical.  You can watch it here.

Later, at bedtime, I watched another episode with another glorious garden tour…here.

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Wednesday, 25 April 2018

Shelburne Hotel

We planted an assortment of my favourite plants: Agastaches ‘Acapulco Salmon and Pink’ and ‘Sangria’ and ‘Golden Jubilee’, Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’, Helenium ‘Mardi Gras’, Zaluzianskya ovata (which should give great fragrance in the evening, so it went by the pub deck and the front entry), Diascia ‘Blackthorn Apricot’ (in pots with a couple of the Zaluzianskya).  This involved removing plants that had scattered into the wrong places during our long absence (the years when we did not work here between 2009 and now), including more monkshood that is popping up here and there (too poisonous for a public garden).

I am still desperate for a Melianthus major ‘Antenow’s Blue’ to grow under the arched window as in days of old.  Plain melianthus would be too tall, and not as blue.  Can’t get Antenow’s Blue here!   I don’t want to mail order it; hoping Melissa will find me one at Xera Plants.

looking north from the entry

Years ago:

summer garden at the Shelburne Inn

looking south from the entry

the pub deck with a couple of newly planted pots

a couple of newly planted semi shade pots in the back garden

While we worked, a staff member was digging out the six back yard beds.  In yesterday’s heat, he had removed the railroad ties.  This area will be graveled and will become a wedding and event area.

progress in the back garden

as it was a week ago

Allan hose watered for the first time this year.

Allan’s photo

I had brought a bouquet for the lobby:

And the new sign by the street had been installed. Wait till you see the gorgeous job that Brady was doing on the trim.

You can see photos of the interior, old and new, in this article from Wander with Wonder.

We appreciate the mention by the author.

Just north of the Shelburne, across the street, Allan photographed an art gallery’s sign:

Long Beach

A fog had blown in, welcome but chilly enough to require a jacket.  We deadheaded the planters, tree beds, Veterans Field and Fifth Street Park.

My photos:

Tulip ‘China Town’

Tulip ‘China Town’

Strong Gold tulip still going so strong.

tree garden

Tulip ‘Silverstream’ and Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’

Narcissus ‘Baby Moon’

Tulip bakeri ‘Lilac Wonder’

Tulip greigii ‘Fire of Love’

Tulip greigii ‘Fire of Love’ and ‘Silverstream’

Muscari paradoxum

Tulip ‘Sensual Touch’ and ‘Black Hero’

Tulip ‘Sensual Touch’

Tulips ‘Formosa’ and ‘Green Wave’

Fifth Street Park, where the horsetail was back!  And camassia.

Fifth Street Park

color clash! (The city crew greatly reduced the street trees this spring.)

Allan’s photos:

green primrose at city hall

in a planter

deadheading before

and after

camassia

camassia

Tulip ‘Silverstream’

The last two blocks of deadheading were a challenge as suddenly the weather was hot again and I SO regretted having a jacket on (but had no way to carry it and my weed/deadhead bucket and tools).  On the way home, we deadheaded the welcome sign.

welcome sign

At home: clean debris for the compost bins.

Allan’s photo

Allan went to the port office to check on yesterday’s plants, and we are pleased to know the office staff watered.

Allan’s photo

Because I planted more bachelor button seeds and added a clump of monarda (bee balm) to the Shelburne back garden (both have edible flowers), the work list got shorter.

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Friday, 22 April 2016

The day began so rainy that I thought it might allow us to only get some essential Long Beach deadheading done.  The weather-induced late start meant that we did not get to Klipsan Beach Cottages and Golden Sands gardens as intended.  I told myself that they would surely be fine for five more days or so.

The Planter Box

We took the time to go to The Planter Box and use the rainy mid morning to clip back our cosmos being grown in the back green house.  It is so wonderful to have few enough jobs that I actually have time, for the first time in several years, to check on the cosmos now and “pinch” it.

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Allan’s photo


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at The Planter Box


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trimming the cosmos to make it bushier and not leggy; will start planting it around Mother’s Day.  This can be done by “pinching” with fingers or with clippers.

Long Beach

The weather, while windy, cleared up enough to make it possible to finish deadheading the Long Beach planters (started on Wednesday) and Veterans Field.

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Tulip ‘Formosa’ (and an old ‘Bleu Aimable’


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rhododendrons and the Long Beach gazebo


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Cerinthe major purpurascens across from the police station


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planter with golden oregano about to get too rampant


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Dutch iris (Allan’s photo)


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Narcissus ‘Baby Moon’, N. ‘New Baby’, Tulip ‘Strong Gold’


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I’m excited about the new to me me ‘New Baby’ narcissus, late blooming to go with ‘Baby Moon’

 

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Sadly, no time for lunch at the delicious Kabob Cottage


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Allan got two buckets of weeds out of the Vet Field beds.  (Allan’s photo)


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Vet Field garden (Allan’s photo)

Having gotten enough deadheading and weeding done to move on, we addressed the drifts of spent tulips in the Long Beach welcome sign planter.

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before

We made a trip to city works with the debris (lots of horsetail) and got enough soil to fluff up the front of the sign, and planted some geraniums ‘Rozanne’ alternating with ‘Orion’ (which is supposed to be even better than Rozanne).  I consider it too early to plant the annuals which will fill it out.

I had realized partway through that it was high time to dig out the thickly multiplied narcissi along the front.  It had gotten too thick and tall.  I moved some to the back and put some in buckets. Next fall, we will have the tulips in front.  Now, I have three buckets of extra narcissi to plant on the berms (something I don’t in the least feel like doing but I shall).  It was hard work and I know I missed some bulbs so will be removing more in the fall.

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after

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before, with lots of horsetail


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after; have used up my mulch pile and need more.

We weeded the west side of Fifth Street Park and I finished up the east side while Allan went back to the difficult center berm weeding job.

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Fifth Street Park, NE side


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I disturbed this little one’s evening.


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The nice guy from the Title Company and I were discussing how the BadAster keeps coming back.

I joined Allan at the berm where he was struggling with slow progress in hard packed thick weeds.

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before (Allan’s photo)


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Allan’s photo

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I found that even the heavy pick swung full force simply bounced off the weeds and so I got out the string trimmer in a state of high dudgeon.

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strimmed…good enough?


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after (Allan’s photo)

While dumping weeds at city works (again), I pondered further about how I felt that string trimming was just not good enough to allow the erasure of the third berm from the work board, even though I so want to, and then had a flash of hope: Perhaps next week, I can get that weedy “lawn” out with the half moon edger!  I’d even bought some poppy seeds to plant if only we could get the ground clear.  HUMANS WILL WIN!  (I hope.)

We had carried some plants for the planters around all day and had not got them planted, nor had I gotten more than just a few narcissi replanted in the south berm, nor had I remembered to take a photo of the rather good looking south berm, nor had we made it to KBC or Golden Sands at all.  Even so, I declared a three day weekend because life is short.

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at home (Allan’s photo)

Allan captured the intense sunset. 




For those who like the Grandma Scrapbooks blog, I’ve published a new post there.

Ginger’s Garden Diaries

gdiaries

from my mother’s garden diaries of two decades ago

1995 (age 71):

April 22: Finished planting 9in pots) the rest of the Foster Farms.  Planted the pansy plants in baskets.  Planted the fuchsia plants in baskets.

1997 (age 73):

April 22:  gray and damp.  Went out to plant strawberries but ended up working on one row moving new daughter plants from middle of row and trimming and/or replanting other plants within the row.  After about 2 hours I was rained in.

1998 (age 74):

April 22 noon-5:00   I worked all this time transplanting tomato seedlings into pots using compost with mushroom compost.  When I thought it was 3:00 and I came in to take a break and was surprised to see it was 5:00 so I closed up shop and came in.  Rec’d the fall Dutch Gardens catalog!

 

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Friday, 8 April 2016

From almost 83 degrees yesterday, our weather plunged to a chilly 50 degrees with a 25 mile an hour icy cold north wind.  I would have welcomed back the heat that I had complained about yesterday, because even with warm clothes and winter scarf, I was chilled to the bone and pushed around by the wind.

Ilwaco

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My favourite tulip, ‘Green Wave’, at the Ilwaco post office

I had remembered to soak some sweet peas and planted them at the Ilwaco post office.  We then deadheaded at the port office because there will be a preview of the Saturday Market tomorrow along Waterfront Way.  The little port office garden needed some mulch, so we zipped home, got some, and drove down Waterfront Way to deliver it (because we are special; only port workers and Saturday market vendors get to drive here).

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Waterfront Way


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port office garden


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mulched


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our view


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got a hug and some dark chocolate kisses from artist Don Nisbett, whose gallery is next door to the port office 

Last night at about 1 AM, I saw this on Facebook:

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one of our planters, GONE

We checked on the location.  It was all cleaned up.  We tracked the pile of soil down at the Ilwaco City Works yard and rescued the valuable soil, two buckets worth, some bulbs, and some bit of the concrete planter for memorial garden edging at home.

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Dag nab hit and run drivers!

One less planter to admire, plant, and water, because the city does not really have the budget to replace it.  The planters cost a couple hundred dollars, I’ve been told.

The Depot Restaurant

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We deadheaded and weeded.


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Tulip ‘Virichic’


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a delicately rimmed narcissi

The Anchorage Cottages

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north wall garden


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Narcissus ‘Thalia’


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We now know these cottages were moved here from Fort Canby after WWII.


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Center courtyard: The annoying wild scilla looks great right now.


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Tulip ‘Strong Gold’ and Hebe ‘Quicksilver’


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Narcissi


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by the office


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foreground: a pot of ‘Green Star’ tulips all broken off but one.  What happened here?


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Tulip ‘Green Wave’ coming on

Long Beach

I had been looking forward to a day of tidying parks and planters.

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By Veterans Field: the big frying pan awaits Saturday’s Clam Festival.  (Allan’s photo)


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We got warm coffee drinks at the Great Escape Drive Through Espresso (Allan’s photo). The barista says sometimes the crosswind will blow coffee right out of her pitcher .

The wind made work kind of miserable.  I left Allan to weed Fifth Street Park and made the rounds of two blocks of planters and street tree gardens.

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golden marjoram and a geranium, by the frozen yogurt shop


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Cerinthe major purpurascens


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note to self: that rhododenron looks sickly (left); must be pruned


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street tree garden


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Carousel, Tulip ‘Strong Gold’, Narcissi ‘Baby Moon’ (blooming three weeks early than it should)


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Tulip ‘Orange Princess’


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Asphodeline ‘Lutea’, how I love thee.


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Narcissus ‘Baby Moon’


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Muscari ‘Plumosum’


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Tulip ‘Rococo’…and some picked tulips.


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Fifth Street Park, still rather drab

With Fifth Street Park done, Allan and I went to look at the north parking lot berm.  I had thought of weeding it today, but we found so many cars parked by it that we couldn’t do it, so we went on to Coulter Park (also on the list for today, as there will be a mermaid event in the building there for this weekend’s clam festival).

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Coulter Park: I left Allan working and went on to check two more blocks of planters.


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Who pruned this tree by Dennis Co?  I want to cut off the ugly stubs.


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Tulip ‘Formosa’..used to bloom in early to mid May.


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another gorgeous Narcissus


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essence of spring


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City Hall


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just stunning how these hosta shoots start out purple

I popped quickly into my favourite shop. NIVA green, for some photos for its Facebook page.

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in NIVA green


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tin lamps by proprietor/artist Heather Ramsay


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green tulips in the planter by NIVA green

As I patrolled the town, I learned from a source (second hand) that the horrid shopkeeper who was so awful a few days ago has been told by the powers that be that the flowers in the planters are NOT to be picked.  Shopkeeper’s response was that s/he pays taxes and so has every right to pick the flowers, and shopkeeper was told that the taxes do NOT work that way.  I am deeply appreciative of the Powers that Be for backing me up in this.

On the way back to Allan, I weeded the circular bed in the front of Coulter Park, and found to my delight that Allan had finished the back of the park.  He thinks, so correctly, that the roses on the weedy salmonberry infested side should be replaced with something non thorny because it is such a bugger to weed around them.  City crew is too busy rebuilding a ball field to bug them about this, but I hope eventually we can get this area cleared and replant it.

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before (Allan’s photo)


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birdsfoot trefoil around the roses (Allan’s photo)


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after (Allan’s photo)


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Allan’s photo


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Coulter Park azalea (Allan’s photo)


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sword fern, before (Allan’s photos)


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and after


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Coulter Park after


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Coulter Park

We ended the workday with a trip to the north parking lot garden, where the project became a quick removal of large blackberries because I could not stand one more minute of cold wind.

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cold wind from near the berm (Allan’s photo)


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TOO COLD to continue; the rest can wait for next week or better weather.

We dumped the debris and bailed out of work.

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Coulter Park: done and erased!  All sweet peas gardens planted.

I will be thrilled if we can get “berms” erased before the board fills up again for annuals planting time (coming in about three weeks).

Ginger’s Garden Diaries

gdiaries

from my mother’s garden diaries of two decades ago

1997 (age 72):

April 8: The GE repairman came and said the dishwasher motor is shot.  I’ll not be in a hurry to buy a new one.  I spent several hours transplanting tomato seedlings into individual pots.  Put the flea stuff on Tabby.

1998 (age 73):

April 8:  11:00-4:45  Ron the tiller man stopped by to see if I can leave the leaves, twigs, etc to be tilled into the soil.  It was too deep so I spent the rest of the afternoon picking all that stuff and piling it on top of the old compost box which means I won’t be able to sieve that soil for baskets, etc.  When I stopped at 4:45 I was so tired I went to bed till 7:00.

 

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Friday, 1 May 2015

We were down to the wire for getting Long Beach ready for parade day on Sunday.   Usually, we have Saturday afternoon after the Ilwaco parade to make one more go-round of Long Beach.  This year, I knew the Rhodie Tour would consume all of Saturday.

Before Long Beach, I wanted to get one more old trailing rosemary out of the Ilwaco planters.  To my horror, I realized they were already so dry that either we needed to water them today or on Sunday.  So as not to be worried about them all during Saturday, I decided on watering today.  We did not have time to get the water trailer organized so it had to be bucket watering; that takes at least 45 minutes less than using the water pump trailer but is much harder on aging backs.

dry

dry

Allan using up the water from a jug we carry with us in the van.

Allan using up the water from a jug we carry with us in the van.

We no longer have enough water buckets for this big project; this time, we would skip the street trees.

Filling buckets at the boatyard: We no longer have enough water buckets for this big project; this time, we would skip the street trees.

meanwhile....

meanwhile….

more bucket filling

more bucket filling

the Southern Cross looming overhead

the Southern Cross looming overhead

Having to bucket water was stressful, so we were squabbling from the get go today.  Some days are like that, as any couple who lives and works together would probably tell you.

After we got at least 2 gallons of water onto each of the 26 planters, we were able to head north.  The only thing standing between us and Long Beach was a quick check up on the garden at The Depot Restaurant.  There, we found the painters about to start.  To our surprise, one of them was the neighbour of our client Marilyn up in Surfside.  This makes sense when I think about it, because Marilyn is the mother of Nancy who co-owns the Depot.  (Nancy’s spouse, Michael, is the chef.)

The other painter, here about to pressure wash, was being very careful about the garden.

The other painter, here about to pressure wash, was being very careful about the garden.

We did not linger after deadheading a few narcissi.  Next up was a substantial clean up of the Long Beach welcome sign bed.  It was a mess.  Most of the May flowering tulips that I can usually count on to be in full bloom for parade weekend had already gone over due to our early spring (climate change or a one-off fluke?) and it was too early to plant annuals.

before

before

after.  We treat the tulips as annuals and yank them right out.

after. We treat the tulips as annuals and yank them right out.

The back of the sign still has some tulips in bloom.

The back of the sign still has some tulips in bloom.

In downtown Long Beach, I got my new wheelie cart, provided by blog reader MaryBeth, ready for its first use.  She told me that in the UK, such a cart is called a garden trolley.  As an anglophile I am adopting this usage so garden trolley it is from now on.

My trolley.

My trolley.

I was able to carry a jug of water, a heavy container of Sluggo, a weed bucket, my hand tools, a few plants, and eventually a full bucket of weeds.  The trolley was so perfectly balanced that even when weighed down with weeds, I could move it with two fingers and my thumb.  It made the job almost heavenly.  I want to find a pockety-thing to tie onto the top to hold small tools and maybe seed packets.

I would have been in a world of pain if I had had to carry a heavy bucket of weeds all around town.  Allan and I had split off into separate tasks; he was weeding all the parks, including the gardens at Veterans Field, while I did all the planters and street trees.

Herb N Legend Smoke Shop and a new tattoo parlor

Herb N Legend Smoke Shop and a new tattoo parlor

In front of the smoke shop:  Cerinthe major purpurascens

In front of the smoke shop: Cerinthe major purpurascens

The workers at the Herb N Legend smoke shop are among the  friendliest and nicest of any of the shopkeepers on our planter route. Other especially nice folks are at Captain Bob’s Chowder, the Hungry Harbor Grille, Wind World Kites, and of course NIVA green.

California poppy by the smoke shop

California poppy by the smoke shop.  Yes, the damnable COLD north wind was blowing something fierce.

Sparaxis by the smoke shop

Sparaxis by the smoke shop

and Narcissus 'Baby Moon'

and Narcissus ‘Baby Moon’

Last night, driving through town to go to dinner at the Cove, I sang a little song to Baby Moon thanking it for still being in bloom for parade weekend.  It started so early this year that I was sure it would all be done by now.  About one third of the Baby Moons are still blooming.

The little dog who is the mascot of the smoke shop likes to delicately pick snails and bugs out of the planter.  He treats the plants carefully and is an excellent helper.

dog

my little camera shy friend

The planters all took much longer than I thought to remove every little weed.  By the time I got to the southernmost one, I was grateful to be able to nip in to use the loo at Northwest Financial, the business owned by our friend Shelly Pollock (who spearheads the Grass Roots Garbage Gang beach clean ups).  If you live locally, and need any help sorting out your ACA medical insurance, her assistance is invaluable and free.

Northwest Financial and Insurance

Northwest Financial and Insurance, and a rhododendron

tiny cupped narcissi...my favourite...still in bloom in front of Kompton's Mini Mart.

tiny cupped narcissi…my favourite…still in bloom in front of Kompton’s Mini Mart.

Tulip 'Florette' still blooming.

Tulip ‘Florette’ still blooming.

Florette is a star this year.

Florette is a star this year.

Asphodel going strong in Fifth Street Park

Asphodel going strong in Fifth Street Park

Allan was still toiling at Fifth Street Park.  I helped a bit, and he moved on to the parks on Third Street.  I planted some fill in sweet pea seeds at the back of the northwest quadrant.

Fifth Street Park

Fifth Street Park

Captain Bob's Chowder

Captain Bob’s Chowder

across from the carousel: windblown Tulip 'Akebono' barely holding on

across from the carousel: windblown Tulip ‘Akebono’ barely holding on.  You can see the flag blowing straight out in 20 mph the north wind.  Brrrr.

The only thing I do not like about living at the beach is the accursed cold wind.  My friends who are sailors are able to appreciate it.

Because I’m working on a “Rhodie Driving Tour” album for the Music in the Gardens Tour Facebook page, I got some photos of the rhododendrons in the parks at 3rd Street.

SW corner of park

SW corner of park

This big bright red one has bloomed and dropped its petals.

This big bright red one has bloomed and dropped its petals.

The parks department wants me to prune that rhodo, above, down to the height of the fence and I do. not. want. to do it.

 

Northwest corner behind the gazebo

Northwest corner behind the gazebo

with the new river rock landscaping

with the new river rock landscaping

from across the street, looking west at those two rhododendron lined parks

from across the street, looking west at those two rhododendron lined parks

behind me as I took the previous photo: Lewis and Clark square

behind me as I took the previous photo: Lewis and Clark square

The wall encircling the back of Lewis and Clark Square has a plaque for the places the explorers visited.

The wall encircling the back of Lewis and Clark Square has  plaques for the places the explorers visited.

Allan was far enough ahead of me to now to have already weeded the little park behind the wall.

Allan was far enough ahead of me to now to have already weeded the little park behind the wall.

He had found a bird nest in one of the shrubs (Allan's photo)

He had found a bird nest in one of the shrubs (Allan’s photo)

behind the wall, viewed from across the street by Veterans Field

behind the wall, viewed from across the street by Veterans Field

flower detail (Allan's photo)

flower detail (Allan’s photo)

street planter by Lewis and Clark Square, lots of little violas have reseeded

street planter by Lewis and Clark Square, lots of little violas have reseeded

In about a week, we will begin the annuals planting of all these street planters.  I thought of planting some diascias this week and then thought why? when plants along the edge would likely be sat upon during the parade.

As I worked my way north, I saw something mighty cute in the window of the Cottage Bakery.

cats

kittycar

I checked out the new location of Home at the Beach, now inside the Sandpiper Mall just south of the pharmacy.

Home at the Beach's new shop

Home at the Beach’s new shop

inside the tiny mall, a bench with a touching memorial plaque

inside the tiny mall, a bench with a touching memorial plaque

bench

Across the street, I noticed and ignored, for now, a big weedy sedge that has snuck in under the street trees.

I did not have a tool strong enough to remove the weedy sedge.  Next week, its time will come.

I did not have a tool strong enough to remove the weedy sedge. Next week, its time will come.  It has comouflaged itself among narciss and schizostylis.

Geranium 'A.T. Johnson' redeeming itself under a street tree.  It's one of the plants I have gone off over the years due to its weedy habits.

Geranium ‘A.T. Johnson’ redeeming itself under a street tree. It’s one of the plants I have gone off over the years due to its weedy habits.

in the window of the Long Beach Pharmacy

in the window of the Long Beach Pharmacy  (Chemist, in the UK)

Helianthemum 'Wisley Pink' about to bloom with a red leaved Armeria

a pink Helianthemum  about to bloom with a red leaved Armeria in a street planter by the stoplight

Across from Dennis Company in the northernmost block

Across from Dennis Company in the northernmost block with Tulip ‘Formosa’

By the time I got to the final block, Allan had finished the City Hall gardens and Coulter Park’s street side gardens and was helping to finish the planters.  The tulip ‘Formosa’ is in some places just starting to bloom.  I planted lots of it this year, but clearly not enough.

As we prepare to drive off, I notice a bright deciduous azalea behind the Coulter Park historic train depot.

As we prepare to drive off, I notice a bright deciduous azalea behind the Coulter Park historic train depot.

Our very last task, as the sun was about to set, was to check on the planters on the Bolstadt beach approach.

one of the beach planters

one of the beach planters with two heights of armeria (sea thrift)

On the way home we had a look at the sunset from the Seaview beach approach road near the Depot Restaurant.

sunset over a monkey tree

sunset over a monkey tree

One last rhododendron photo in Seaview, just south of the Sou'wester Lodge.

One last rhododendron photo in Seaview, just south of the Sou’wester Lodge.

Back when the house above belonged to an elderly artist named Marge Horner, I used to mow her lawn and clean for her occasionally.  I miss her.

All our parade and tour preparations were as done as they could be, and we could collapse and look forward to the rhodie tour tomorrow.  We would miss the Saturday Ilwaco parade because of the rhodie tour.  Because of needing time at home, we would skip the Sunday parade.  You can enjoy last year’s parade here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Friday, 17 April 2015

The day was miserable in spots for just three reasons:  25 mph mighty cold wind, too much to do, and like a doofus I was too frazzled in the morning to take my new green wheelie cart to Long Beach (an omission I would regret later).  The vehicle had lots of Ilex ‘Sky Pencil’ and other plants and we had not yet figured out a system for taking the wheelie to Long Beach.  We will have it figured out by next time!

Ilwaco

at the Post Office, a creamy California poppy in bloom

at the Post Office, a creamy California poppy in bloom

Our first task was to see if the two planters city planters had been moved from semi-hidden locations to more visible spots on Spruce street.  Well, they were, BUT the one at the fire station was one of the ones moved, after I had told fire chief Tommy yesterday that it wouldn’t be moved, and the one hidden by other planters next to a café had been left unmoved.  A stop at city hall got it sorted; the one by the café will be moved to the fire station in a complicated dance of musical planters.

We put some violas and golden variegated thyme in the two newly placed planters, along with a Diascia ‘Blackthorn Apricot’, and will add more plants next week.

Allan by one of the newly positioned planters.  Sadly, the owner of the English Pub passed away some years ago and the building is for sale.

Allan by one of the newly positioned planters. Sadly, the owner of the English Pub passed away some years ago and the historic  building is for sale.

We then swung around to town to do the rest of the planters, starting with the boatyard intersection.

boat

See the little bit of yellow at the edge of the garden?  That is Limnanthes douglasii, also known as fried egg plant.

also known as meadow foam

also known as meadow foam

Narcissus bulbocodium 'Golden Bells' (Yellow Hoop Petticoats) in a planter.

Narcissus bulbocodium ‘Golden Bells’ (Yellow Hoop Petticoats) in a planter.

same planter as above at First and Eagle

same planter as above at First and Eagle, with Narcissus ‘Baby Moon’, golden oregano, and Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’

After over an hour working on the Ilwaco planters, adding some violas and thyme, and in one case digging out some too-large narcissi, we went on to Long Beach.

Long Beach

Allan weeding and deadheading the welcome sign

Allan weeding and deadheading the welcome sign

front of welcome sign

front of welcome sign

front

I'm most pleased with the back side of the sign.

I’m most pleased with the back side of the sign.

Thank you for visiting Long Beach, with tulips complementary to blue.

Thank you for visiting Long Beach, with tulips complementary to the colour blue.

Next stop: Veterans Field, which will be the main gathering place for the Clam Festival tomorrow (April 18th; this blog is running about six days behind).  We won’t be going this year as I have home gardening to do and Allan has some motorcycling to do.  You can read about our enjoyment of last year’s festival here.

The city crew was getting the tent with the giant frying pan set up (not the same pan that is mounted in Fifth Street Park).

The city crew was getting the tent with the giant frying pan set up (not the same pan that is mounted in Fifth Street Park).

LB Parks Manager Mike Kitzman

LB Parks Manager Mike Kitzman

Allan planted five Ilex ‘Sky Pencil’ at the back of the corner garden.  

 Sky Pencil stays elegantly columnar.

After a thorough grooming of both of the Veterans Field gardens and the adjacent park behind Lewis and Clark Square, we headed for the Sid Snyder beach approach.  On the way, we paused to drop off a gardening bill to the Oman Builders Supply Long Beach store (for our work at their branch in Ocean Park.  Outside, I almost got caught by a little scam.  One of four high school age kids asked me if I would buy a book of coupons for $1.  The local high school has offered such books before.  I first said no, because the coupon books rarely have anything that we would use, then decided to be a good citizen and said yes and handed him a dollar.  As they walked away, I looked at what the kid had handed me and pursued them right into Oman and Son and said, “Hey, you’re just pan-handling; give me my dollar back.”  Which he did, looking only faintly embarrassed.  I realized they were spring breakers from somewhere else!

It was just an old newspaper insert that had probably been blowing down the street! (We found another one blowing down the beach approach road later on.)

It was just an old newspaper insert that had probably been blowing down the street! (We found another one blowing down the beach approach road later on.)

That was interesting.

Onward we went, weeding and deadheading the planters and the kite museum garden (fertilized it!) on Sid Snyder Drive and then the Bolstadt beach approach planters.

Sid Snyder and Bolstadt Beach Approach roads

Sid Snyder and Bolstadt Beach Approach roads

satellite view of beach approach roads

satellite view of beach approach roads

Allan's photo: one of the Sid Snyder planters with lots of California poppies coming on

Allan’s photo: one of the Sid Snyder planters with lots of California poppies coming on

Allan's photo:  Two trail ride outfits are located along Sid Snyder.  Here, a group is heading to the beach.

Allan’s photo: Two trail ride outfits are located along Sid Snyder. Here, a group is heading to the beach.

me waiting for Allan by our last planter on Sid Snyder

me waiting for Allan by our last planter on Sid Snyder

weeding the westernmost planter on Bolstadt beach approach  (Allan's photo)

weeding the westernmost planter on Bolstadt beach approach (Allan’s photo)

Sedums are good here as these get very little water.

Sedums are good here as these get very little water. (Allan’s photo)

Allan weeding one of the western Bolstadt planters

Allan weeding one of the western Bolstadt planters

The west end of the beach approach garden

past the west end of the beach approach garden (looking east toward town)

rosemary in one of the planters

rosemary in one of the planters

That rosemary and the heather harken back to my friend Lily Gibson, who died in 2004 in her early fifties of ALS.  Before that, she had taken on two of the volunteer planters on the beach approach and won the prize for best planter.  She would drive out with her three little dogs every day and water it, and took such good constant care that she even had blue lobelia thriving around the edges.  (We only water these planters on occasion; last year the city crew watered them once a week in summer.)  I planted the lilies in Fifth Street Park and at City Hall with Lily in mind.

To check on the planters, I walked east along the weedy beach approach.  We don’t have time in our schedule to do anything about it yet.

weeds!

weeds!

City Hall, looking west

City Hall, looking west, with the Chinook flag flying

The wind was getting worse, and colder.  I checked 642 weather (26 mile an hour gusts) and my Wind Alert app.

Wind Alert

Wind Alert

I put an another flannel shirt and my jacket (difficult in the flapping wind) and gave myself the Deadliest Catch pep talk: “It could be worse.  I could be crab fishing on the Bering Sea.”  (Of course, we don’t make $50,000 in a few weeks, either.)

Deep purple bases on emerging hostas on the east side of city hall.

Deep purple on emerging hostas on the east side of city hall.

north side of city hall

north side of city hall

The memorial marker is worn.

The memorial marker is worn.

This hellebore has been looking good for months.

This hellebore has been looking good for months.

City Hall west side

City Hall west side

After dumping our debris at City Works, we took an intermission from Long Beach to check up on the garden at…

The Anchorage Cottages

Narcissus 'Baby Moon' still blooming in the windowboxes..

Narcissus ‘Baby Moon’ still blooming in the windowboxes..

...along with Tulip batalinii 'Bright Gem'

…along with Tulip batalinii ‘Bright Gem’

center courtyard

center courtyard

the bearded iris that got half broken off last week

the bearded iris that got half broken off last week

Camassia

Camassia

Tulip 'Angelique' by the office

Tulip ‘Angelique’ by the office

sweet peas and a new application of Sluggo by the chimney

sweet peas!! and a new application of Sluggo by the chimney

After the most basic of deadheading and weeding and the planting of two dahlias, we returned 20 blocks south to groom all the street planters in Long Beach.  By now it was 4:30 PM.

Long Beach Planters walkabout

For two and half hours, with me feeling increasing soreness from carrying a heavy bucket, we did the Long Beach planters.  We did the two north blocks together, then split up and each took half of the rest of them.  I swear I will not do the bucket carrying again; next time I WILL get organized and take the green wheelie cart that Mary Beth gave me!  (We need to organize a way to lash it into the trailer; that will be easy for Allan.)

just north of Dennis Co....The mermaids will be at the Depot building for clam festival.

just north of Dennis Co….The mermaids will be at the Depot building for clam festival photo opportunities.

Here they were last year, photo courtesy Queen La De Da's

Here they were last year, photo courtesy Queen La De Da’s

Tulip 'Rococo' at 3rd N and Pacific

Tulip ‘Rococo’ at 3rd N and Pacific

me striving for perfection with Coulter Park in the background

me capturing the picture above with Coulter Park in the background (Allan’s photo, zoomed)

more 'Bright Gem' tulips

more ‘Bright Gem’ tulips

2nd N and Pacific...I SO hope to get this vinca-heavy planter redone this spring!

2nd N and Pacific…I SO hope to get this vinca-heavy planter redone this spring!

variegated euonymous and tulip (Allan's photo)

variegated euonymous and tulip (Allan’s photo)

Baby Moon and Tulip 'Bright Gem' (Allan's photo)

Narcissus Baby Moon and Tulip ‘Bright Gem’ (Allan’s photo)

Tulip 'Green Wave' next to Scoopers ice cream shop.

Tulip ‘Green Wave’ next to Scoopers ice cream shop, blown by the wind

Tulip 'Green Star' (Allan's photo)

Tulip ‘Green Star’ (Allan’s photo)

The wind was tormenting me, so when I got across the street (I was criss crossing back and forth) I went into NIVA green for a moment of respite.

niva

Tulip 'Green Wave' in bud

Tulip ‘Green Wave’ in bud

window display

window display

Heather Ramsay's newest lamp, from a Peek Frean tin

Heather Ramsay’s newest lamp, from a Peek Frean tin

one of several gardening books on display

one of several gardening books on display

The pond at Bolstadt and Pacific

The pond at Bolstadt and Pacific

When I went into the Long Beach Pharmacy for a quick purchase, I saw some cute garden decor items:

faucet with crystal raindrops

faucet with crystal raindrops

“Sometimes the tiniest flowers smell the sweetest.”

another faucet with crystal water drop and a fairy door

another faucet with crystal water drop and a fairy door

Back to work!  In front of Stormin’ Norman’s kite shop, this planter is due for a clean out of aster that goes back to volunteer days.

For a few years, the aster was polite; now it is on the run all over the planter.

For a few years, the aster (by the lamp post) was polite; now it is on the run all over the planter.

I did not expect the wire plant to be so vigourous; may have to do something about that, too.

I did not expect the wire plant to be so vigourous; may have to do something about that, too.

in front of the Cottage Bakery: reseeded Cerinthe major purpurascens

in front of the Cottage Bakery: reseeded Cerinthe major purpurascens

sparaxis!  wish I had lots more of this darling bulb, which is blooming early this year.

sparaxis! wish I had lots more of this darling bulb, which is blooming early this year.

Sparaxis

Sparaxis

Narcissus 'Baby Moon'

Narcissus ‘Baby Moon’

more cerinthe

more cerinthe

looking south, still two block to go to meet up with Allan, who is doing the southern two blocks

looking south, still two block to go to meet up with Allan, who is doing the southern two blocks

Delightfully, the wind had died down just a bit, as you can see from the less intense angle of the flags as I passed by Veterans Field again.

not quite straight out.  Still a north wind, the coldest one.

not quite straight out. Still a north wind, the coldest one.

As I worked on this planter, passersby swooned over Tulip 'Akebono'.

As I worked on this planter, passersby swooned over Tulip ‘Akebono’.

Lewis and Clark Square and Veterans Field

Lewis and Clark Square and Veterans Field

by Fifth Street Park (Allan's photo)

by Fifth Street Park (Allan’s photo)

Tulip 'Rococo' (Allan's photo)

Tulip ‘Rococo’ (Allan’s photo)

Tulip 'Rococo', lavender, and a Tulip 'Black Hero' that returned from a few years ago

Tulip ‘Rococo’, lavender, and a Tulip ‘Black Hero’ that returned from a few years ago (Allan’s photo)

Tulip 'Florette' (Allan's photo)

Tulip ‘Florette’ (Allan’s photo)

The multiflowering tulip ‘Florette’ has been fantastic this year.  I’m going to plant more of this type next fall.

Tulip 'Florette'

Tulip ‘Florette’ (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo...I must ask him where this was!  The original name of Long Beach was Tinkerville.  The old Tinker house is just west of our friend and client Jo's house.

Allan’s photo…I must ask him where this was! The original name of Long Beach was Tinkerville. The old Tinker house is just west of our friend and client Jo’s house.

(The photo was taken at First Place Mall and the shop is a new art consignment store.)

by the bus stop

I can tell by this photo that Allan had turned at the southernmost planter and was working his way north again. Tulip ‘Apricot Parrot’, almost over.

Allan also did the final grooming of the Fifth Street Park gardens, where we had weeded extensively three days before.

Allan also did the final grooming of the Fifth Street Park gardens, where we had weeded extensively three days before.

Finally he caught up to me, where I was plucking maddening little grasses from the planter in front of the Hungry Harbor Grille....with the cold wind on my last nerve.

Finally he caught up to me, where I was plucking maddening little grasses from the planter in front of the Hungry Harbor Grille….with the cold wind on my last nerve.

By 7 PM, Allan and I had met up.  I was so deeply glad to be done.  We dug deep and managed to groom the Ilwaco Post Office and plant two dahlias there on the way home.

My cat family had been watching me from the window as I carried plants to the holding area.

My cat family had been watching me from the window as I carried plants to the holding area.

I am taking three days off, I HOPE.  The little chair and table that I arranged for a sit spot are not going to be sittable until I get these plants organized and planted, and a lot of them go here,

weeding and planting at home await me.

weeding and planting at home await me.

As we did the evening sorting out of the van, the sun was a huge red ball on the horizon at the end of the street.

As we did the evening sorting out of the van, the sun was a huge red ball on the horizon at the end of the street.

At midnight, after some blogging, some dinner, and The Amazing Race on telly, Mary snoozes while I finish this blog entry.  (Allan's photo)

At midnight, after some blogging, some dinner, and The Amazing Race on telly, Mary snoozes while I finish this blog entry. (Allan’s photo)

Allan said that the sight of a cat on the back of each chair reminded him of photos of three mountains lined up.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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Wednesday, 15 April 2015

Some garden admiration while loading the trailer for work:

a black tulip by the driveway, maybe 'Black Hero' returning for several years in a row.

a black tulip by the driveway, maybe ‘Black Hero’ returning for several years in a row.

a Hebe next to Erysimum 'Winter Orchid' (right) that filled the air with fragrance.

a Hebe next to Erysimum ‘Winter Orchid’ (right) that filled the air with fragrance.

looking east at the front garden which I so hope to weed soon.

looking east at the front garden which I so hope to weed soon.

Port of Ilwaco

After a quick check on Spruce Street to see if the two street planters have been shifted to their new positions (they haven’t), we started weeding and fertilizing at the east end of Howerton Way and worked our way west.  One day was not enough time to do a perfect job. We got the biggest weeds and a lot of small ones and left a few more hidden areas unweeded for lack of time.    It would have been a great day to “Map my Walk”….if I had remembered.

Curbside gardens run from east to west all along the landward side of the buildings.

Curbside gardens run from east to west all along the landward side of the buildings.

easternmost garden, before (Allan's photo)

easternmost garden, before (Allan’s photo)

after (Allan's photo)

after (Allan’s photo)

The easternmost garden bed with lots of Armeria (sea thrift).

The easternmost garden bed with lots of Armeria (sea thrift).

looking west

looking west from Howerton and Elizabeth

While we were weeding that long bed, Mayor Mike stopped by, and over the course of the conversation I agreed to take on the community building garden.  What?  We are supposed to be cutting back.  My affection for Ilwaco won over good sense.  I have always said I would not do that garden with its bindweed, horsetail, and (in my often disagreed-with opinion) too much heather planted on level ground.  I am fussy about heather and only appreciate it on a slope.  Also, there is salal which I cannot abide in a garden.  (A fellow CPN later said to me, “Salal gets mowed.” So we’ll see if I can live with weeding around heather and salal.  We have two fewer private gardens in Ilwaco this year, and I said to Allan that the amount of work time will probably come out about the same as last year by adding the community garden.

At least I had the sense to tell Mike that we would not be able to get to it for a couple of weeks.  Lawdy, we don’t even have the Long Beach beach approach garden weeded yet and that usually takes us 6-7 days.

Ceanothus by the Loading Dock Village building (Allan's photo)

Ceanothus by the Loading Dock Village building (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

with ornamental grass (Allan's photo)

with ornamental grass (Allan’s photo)

At the Ilwaco Pavilion garden bed, I had the urge to do some alteration.  Out came two clumps of Pacific Reed Grass and in went a Hebe ‘Boughton Dome’ and a couple of golden variegated lemon thyme and some seeds of ‘Twister’ California poppy.

before

before

after

after

one bed further west, my favourite, full of Narcissus 'Baby Moon'

one bed further west, my favourite, full of Narcissus ‘Baby Moon’ and beautifully round santolinas

An orange helianthemum is blooming already.  How I love these and wish they bloomed for longer than just springtime.

An orange helianthemum is blooming already. How I love these and wish they bloomed for longer than just springtime.

I added one Agastache ‘Cotton Candy’ to the garden on the south side of the Port Office.

port office garden

port office garden

As we went along all these gardens today, I fertilized selected plants rather than casting the fertilizer all over the beds.  I fear the latter approach would get loose dogs to digging.  I’m worried already that dogs will get into the port office bed and break off my precious alliums.

Allium albopilosum already blooming

Allium albopilosum already almost blooming

and another cluster of big fat buds

and another cluster of big fat buds

If dogs were drawn in by fertilizer smells, at least it would be unintentional damage unlike human finger blight; I also fear people finding the alliums irresistable to pluck, not realizing that each bulb is expensive and only produces one flower per year.

Other than a bit of wind and sun too bright for good plant photos, the weather was exceptional and not too hot.

Other than a bit of wind and sun too bright for good plant photos, the weather was exceptional and not too hot.

We did a thorough weeding of the beds on the north side of the port office and Don Nisbett Art Gallery, despite a little argy- bargy about whether we were going too slow (so quoth Allan) and me wanting to achieve something like perfection because the Saturday Market will be open with people walking past the gardens.

before

before

after

after

before

before

after2

The bed above is proof that even though narcissi perennialize, they sometimes have to be replenished.  They have petered out completely here so we must plant more next fall.

As we weeded those beds, a fellow engaged us in conversation and gave us his attractive business card.  He will have a booth at the Ilwaco Saturday Market this summer, selling varieties of cherry tomatoes and (I think) some sort of condiments or sauces.  His items sounded delicious.

card

I like his business name and think his biz card is gorgeous.

I like his business name and think his biz card is gorgeous.

By the time we reached the next bed, adjacent to Time Enough Books, I was having to sacrifice perfection for speed.  If we did not get the boatyard done today as well, we would not have time to do our north end jobs this week.  We got most of the weeds and I hoped that the river rock and many beach strawberries would disguise the little grasses that we left behind.

Time anxiety ruled and some weeds had to be skipped over.

Time anxiety ruled and some little weeds had to be skipped over.

While we were weeding somewhere along this stretch, someone from a passing car yelled out “We love you!” or maybe “I love you!”  By the time I uncricked my neck and looked up, the vehicle was two blocks away.  If indeed the words were directed at us, it was much nicer than being honked at.  The honking, while usually from friends, is jarring and startling when one is working along a busy street, especially in Long Beach.

I deadheaded the tulips in the Time Enough Books garden boat; they are yellow to catch the eye of passersby.

boat

west

Tulip 'Akebono' (left) is my favourite this year.

Tulip ‘Akebono’  is my favourite this year.

Tulip 'Akebono'

Tulip ‘Akebono’

Tulip 'Akebono'; note the thin red petal outline

Tulip ‘Akebono’; note the thin red petal outline

lily flowering Tulip 'West Point'

lily flowering Tulip ‘West Point’

The Time Enough Books garden area with blue ceanothus is easy right now.

The Time Enough Books garden area with blue ceanothus is easy right now.

time

Narcissus 'Baby Moon' blooming in the garden by the old Harbor Lights motel.

Narcissus ‘Baby Moon’ blooming in the garden by the old Harbor Lights motel.

By the time we got to the two westernmost garden beds, I had despaired of getting to the boatyard at all, and while weeding I brooded about which jobs we would have to skip in order to get Ilwaco and Long Beach completely groomed for the clam festival on Saturday.  As one might expect when one is running out of time, the last two beds proved to be exceptionally weedy.  We had filled almost every bucket with weeds, so Allan drove off to the east end of the port to dump the debris.

By the dump site, he had an audience.

By the dump site, he had an audience.

He's sorry this photo came out blurry...but look at that strut!

He’s sorry this photo came out blurry…but look at that strut!

At this grim hour, as I kept slogging along on that exceptionally weedy westernmost garden bed, who should track us down by Todd Wiegardt, newly moved back to the Long Beach Peninsula.  (You may recall that he has been mailing us cool plants since last summer.)  As we talked, he couldn’t resist weeding. With his expert help (he used to be the curator of the display garden for the famous Plant Delights Nursery in North Carolina), we got the last Howerton Way gardens done well enough to move on to the boatyard.  Just have a look at this photo album of the Juniper Level Botanic Garden of which he was curator and you will see why I had no worries that he might pull out a good plant.

second to last Howerton Way bed, done well enough

second to last Howerton Way bed, done well enough

Allan and Todd weeding

Allan and Todd weeding the last Howerton Way bed.

Todd’s weeding technique impressed me in that he has speed and the knack of removing the weeds without disturbing the soil very much.  (Turning the soil over encourages more weed seeds to germinate.)

On to the boatyard!  All the nasty big horsetail had started to poke out of the soil.  With less than two hours till sunset, we just tried to get most of it broken off (said to be more effective than pulling it) and the larger weeds and bindweed pulled.  The littler weeds will mostly have to wait till the week before the May 2 children’s parade.

at the boatyard, with horsetail (Allan's photo)

at the boatyard, with horsetail (Allan’s photo)

after (Allan's photo)

after (Allan’s photo)

(Allan's photo)

before (Allan’s photo)

after (Allan's photo)

after (Allan’s photo)

I had planted Narcissus ‘Baby Moon’ all along the edge thinking how cute it would be all in flower for the parade.  Of course, as regular readers have heard me saying for weeks now, it is blooming WAY EARLY.  I doubt it will last till May 2nd.

 Narcissus 'Baby Moon'

Narcissus ‘Baby Moon’

two weeders (Allan's photo)

two weeders (Allan’s photo)

I finally had to call uncle as it looked like Todd could keep going; I had hit the wall.

indefatiguable

One of us was indefatigable and it was not me.

the man who saved the day!  (Allan's photo)

the man who saved the day! (Allan’s photo)

Thanks to Todd, we got the three block long boatyard done well enough to call it good for the early Saturday Market opening.  (The Market’s official opening day is May 2nd; this week is a sneak preview in association with the Long Beach Razor Clam Festival.)

The Perserverance.

The Perserverance.

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