Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘nurseries’

I did not leave the property today which is just the way I like a Sunday to be.  We had been invited to visit friends, and even offered a ride due to our defunct car, but we asked them to come visit us instead and they did.

Pat, Larry, Margaret

Pat, Larry, Margaret

We sat in the shade because Margaret is going through chemo.  I know so many friends who are, or who have done so.  They all soldier on so bravely and cheerfully.  Margaret and Larry have a charming garden in Long Beach where we put in a flower garden, and Patricia waters it for them.

We put Smokey (the friendliest cat) in the laundry room because Margaret cannot risk getting a scratch.  Where people are, Smokey will surely be.  Frosty usually follows him, and was mystified why his brother had been put away.

Frosty in the hallway

Frosty in the hallway

I decided Frosty should go in the laundry room (where the cats have food, water, and litter box) to keep his brother company, so that Smokey did not feel singled out.

After our delightful visit with human friends, we went back in the house to find that the cats had reached under the door, grabbed the hallway rug, and dragged it almost all the way into the laundry room.

disappearing area rug

disappearing area rug

How in the world did they get all that rug under the door in such a relatively short time?

all ruched up

all ruched up

They hightailed it out the cat door as quickly as they could.

out they go!

out they go!

If our friend Kathleen S has sharp eyes, she will see the cool fire extinguisher bell that she gave us.  It has been so unseasonably windy around here, we have been waiting to hang it outside til the weather settles a bit!

For most of the afternoon as I weeded and clipped in the garden, I had the mildly ominous feeling that in the evening we had to go out and water the Ilwaco planters (on foot) and the boatyard.  Oh how I wanted to just stay at home.  Then I came up with the most cunning plan.  Tomorrow, Allan can take the car into the auto shop (turns out it will “go” long enough on a battery charge to get up the highway that far) and then water Long Beach and come home on the bus, while I will water the planters, boatyard, weed down at Howerton and maybe even the mayor’s and Cheri’s gardens.  Tuesday, we could do Ann’s garden and if we are lucky enough to get the car back by Wednesday (depending on how fast an alternator can be delivered), I might not have to take the bus at all.

I am a big proponent of public transit, but the bus here is maddeningly intermittent.  Oh, and we found so many extra costs in renting a cargo van (such as one that size not even being available here) that we gave up on that plan for now.

With the burden of work off my mind, I was able to find more complete enjoyment in the rest of the day and got almost every part of the garden at least partly dealt with, except for the bogsy wood which has gone to the wild!

We had a raspberry fail; the canes of the early raspberries, loaded with berries, became burnt looking and the berries stopped growing.  Fire blight?  Allan cut those cane to the ground and they went into the wheelie bin.  What a shame, but perhaps the fall bearing ones will be all right.

Phooey!

Phooey!

I do hope all the canes are all right next year.  They are sentimental to me because most of them came from my mother’s garden.

We have all these plants to plant here and there and no way to get them to work in the very near future, so I will just get to enjoy them here a little longer!

holding area

holding area

The garden sometimes looks magical in the late evening light.

the patio

the patio

Night Owl? rose

Night Owl? rose

I was sitting at my computer typing away, about to share a passel of rose photos because not much happened today at home, when there was a knock on the door.  Allan said, “It’s Bill from the Boreas!”  I did not even make the connection in my mind that Ciscoe Morris, who was here today to give a lecture benefiting the local Boys and Girls Club, was staying at Boreas Inn tonight.  I had not gone to the lecture because of the feeling of being so far behind in the garden and having just one day off and because it was during the day when I just have to be outside.  So it took me quite by surprise that Susie and Bill had brought Ciscoe to see our garden!!

Susie had asked me if I wanted to come meet him at the inn but I felt all shy and Emily Dickinson-ish (“I’m nobody, how about you?”) and like it must be tiresome for him to have someone coming to meet him during his quiet time at the inn between events.

And here he was!

Ciscoe and the saying that would relegate me to just weeding if all my clients took it to heart.

Ciscoe and the saying that would relegate me to just weeding if all my clients took it to heart.

Classic Ciscoe!

Classic Ciscoe!

(“Nobody can design a better garden for you than the one you think out for yourself.  It could take years, but in the doing of it, you should be in paradise.”)

Oh!  And when he saw the feathery plant that is on a pot behind him in the above photo, he grabbed a frond and said “A restio!” and something complimentary about cool plants.  Yay!!!!  (You don’t see Restios much around here because, well, they look a little or a lot like horsetail, but they are wonderful!)

I was awfully glad we were not out watering the Ilwaco planters when they all showed up;  I had, as often happens, not turned on my phone during the day, so had missed Susie’s call.

me, Ciscoe, Allan, Susie

me, Ciscoe, Allan, Susie

with Ciscoe

It was a particular thrill for me when we were partway back into the garden and he said again that I had a lot of cool plants that you don’t see everywhere, and asked where I got them, and of course knew exactly what I meant when I said I used to mail order from Heronswood, and that we take a trip most years to Cistus and Joy Creek, and that I had gotten some at Dancing Oaks near where Sheila lives.  He said we must go to Far Reaches Farm, and I very much want to.  I said we had been to Dragonfly Farms and he beamed. I told him I get to help pick the plants ordered by the Basket Case and that Back Alley Gardens in Gearhart gets plants from Xera.  He agreed that if a plant has a Xera tag it is worth trying out, and admired the Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’ and the Verbascum ‘Eleanor’s Blush’ (which was new to him!) that I had ordered through Basket Case.  Oh!!  And when I said my plant table in the bogsy wood was big enough to be George Schenkian, he knew exactly what I meant.  It was just so fun to not have to go into the whole explanation of what lay behind the idea.  Not that I don’t enjoy recommending George Schenk’s great gardening books to people!

He wasn't used to our chilly evening wind!

He wasn’t used to our chilly evening wind!

He had interesting information about many of the plants, and of course my mind was sort of reeling and I probably have forgotten some of it.  I think tomorrow I’ll walk our route around the garden and see what I remember.  One particular thing he said was, upon admiring a pinky-mauve Astrantia in the front garden, that in England a garden was planted almost all in Astrantias and the garden had no slugs and snails so they might actually repel slugs.  Must get many more of them.

poppy admiration society

poppy admiration society

He remarked upon a particularly large Oriental poppy that had thrived on the dairy manure.  Susie was very pleased to hear it is one that I acquired from her former volunteer planter in Long Beach where I thin them out and replant them here and there so they don’t take over the planter and then leave a big gap when they go over.

the tale of Susie's poppy plant

the tale of Susie’s poppy plant

I promised Susie to bring a piece back to her garden!

Everyone was in an exuberant and happy mood.

in the garden

Ciscoe admired Allan’s own garden and seemed to think it clever that I had offered him a larger area so I don’t have as much to weed.  Of course, he is famous for his funny stories about how he and his wife have separate garden spaces and sometimes compete for plants.

by Allan's garden...Bill finds something very funny!

by Allan’s garden…Bill finds something very funny!

He also seemed to enjoy Allan’s spreadsheet of all the plant names, but could not help identify the one mystery fern that we just call the lettuce fern.

reading the spreadsheet

reading the spreadsheet

admiring Allan's garden

admiring Allan’s garden

discussing the fern of mystery

discussing the fern of mystery

And like me, he was amazed at the chocolate scent of one my Xera plants, new last year, that had finally bloomed and that he had never heard of either!

nodding chocolate flower

nodding chocolate flower

the tag, from Xera plants

the tag, from Xera plants

a closer look

a closer look

You have to lift the blossom to smell it.  Ciscoe said “Now I want a candy bar!”  Maybe he even said “Ooh la la! Now I want a candy bar!”

As we lingered around Allan’s garden, we heard our friend Devery’s voice at the gate.  Not ten minutes before, I had been telling Ciscoe (as we were by the transparent fence that gives a clear view of Nora’s house and gave Nora a view of our garden) about how when Nora and a friend of hers and Devery had heard Ciscoe was coming, and when I said (but not seriously believing it) that Susie had wanted to bring him to our garden, they all got very excited!  Especially Devery, who is a big fan and watches his show every Saturday and just loves him and Meeghan Black.    It was poignant that Nora’s funeral had been yesterday (I was explaining the big gathering of chairs for our memorial get together in the garden afterwards.)

Devery was walking by our house on her way to close the curtains of Nora’s house, and she had heard and recognized Ciscoe’s voice in the garden.  Oh please, do come in and meet him! I said.  She was so filled with delight, I could not have thought her naturally happy personality could get any bubblier, but it did!

joy!

joy!

Devery and Ciscoe

Devery and Ciscoe

Ciscoe takes off his hood for a better pic

Ciscoe takes off his hood for a better pic

Devery and Ciscoe

Devery and Ciscoe

a delightful moment

a delightful moment

This made me happier than anything, to have a part in bringing Devery so much happiness.

Allan, Devery and I were all quite giddy after Ciscoe left to go back to the inn with Susie and Bill, and we hung about the front steps chattering and laughing until it got so cold that we parted.   Devery said we must get together more, and idea that I was so glad to hear because we like her so very much and I have been worried we would lose touch with Nora gone.

There are people who just exude joy and bring happiness wherever they go.  Ciscoe is one and Devery is another and the fact that they got to meet in our garden is the happiest thing of the whole delightful evening.

Read Full Post »

This was not the final day of planting.  There are still some cosmos to plant in Ann’s garden, a very few plants (about ten!) that I want to add to Long Beach, and quite a few plants for my own garden.  But the big planting jobs are all done now. What a relief.

So as we headed to first job, we got our mail and there was a catalog for….bulb planting hell!

bulb catalog with the last big batch of annuals

bulb catalog with the last big batch of annuals

Bulb hell has its own quality, but is easier.  My clients, who have all become friends, and I go in together for bulbs from Van Engelen, and then there are hundreds of bulbs in my garage while I sort out everyone’s order.  And plant them.  With annuals, we keep having to go out to get more, and more, and more, and although plant shopping is enormously fun, it is time consuming and not very lucrative (because it is hard to charge for the time accurately, since much is spent schmoozing about plants, and we don’t resell the plants at a profit because we want all our clients to get the best plants possible and the biggest amount for their budgets!).  Bulbs hell includes the anxiety of getting them all in the ground, despite weather, by early December.

Saturday, we first we planted at the Ilwaco boatyard in increasing drizzle.  Here is another lesson in Round Up weedkiller damage.  A few weeks back the boatyard crew sprayed behind the fence with weedkiller, trying to kill the horsetail.  While the horsetail is still happy as can be, some of the boatyard plants are still blighted by drift.  (The crew boss promises this will not happen again.)

yellowed poppy foliage, happy horsetail

yellowed poppy foliage, happy horsetail

blue globe thistle was hit

blue globe thistle was hit

I feel fortunate at so little damage.  When I have time I will prune out the bad parts.  If the weedkiller had caused as much damage as it did at Marilyn’s garden, where a one foot or more strip on each side of a path was affected by someone spraying Round Up (Am I still brooding about this?  Kinda.), the long, narrow boatyard garden would have been a goner.

The annual poppies seemed particularly susceptible (and you can see how, in this section we have not yet weeded, the horsetail just brayed with laughter and had no damage at all).

 Poppies are a delicate flower.

Poppies are a delicate flower.

The garden looks fine overall.  We planted the newer areas with cosmos and painted sage, and left the center area, three years old, to perennials and reseeded poppies.

newest section

newest section

Our plans to also weed the middle section were thwarted by heavy rain, so we went to Olde Towne Café for lunch and hoped for the weather to lighten.  It didn’t.

weather view from Olde Towne

weather view from Olde Towne

I have set for myself an enjoyable obligation of photographing the Saturday Market for the Discover Ilwaco Facebook page.  Lately, because we have been working Saturdays, Allan has helped by taking photographs, too.  We feel for the market vendors as this is the second bad weather Saturday in a row!  In three previous years of photographing the market (only missed two Saturdays due to garden events!), I don’t remember two dire weeks back to back.

Allan took this from the Port Office deck.

Allan took this from the Port Office deck.

Japanese maples for sale, and Portside Café booth.  (That's the yellow café in whose street planter we plant yellow flowers.)

Japanese maples for sale, and Portside Café booth. (That’s the yellow café in whose street planter we plant yellow flowers.)

a line up of flowers in stone vases

a line up of flowers in stone vases

Allan and I both photographed the spectacular lupines at the Marie Powell Gallery.  His photo is much more clever.

my photo

my photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Those sea thrift (pink, foreground) are a bugger to deadhead later in the year but I love them.

After a wet walk through the market, it was back to work.   We got perhaps the last batch of cosmos for work at The Planter Box, where the tomatoes were irresistibly healthy looking (so I got three):

Planter Box tomatoes

Planter Box tomatoes

They have dozens of quite a few interesting varieties, so get ’em!

At The Basket Case, we picked up some Armeria (sea thrift) to fill in any spaces we might find in the Bolstadt beach approach planters.

Here are three more perennials that I did not mention in my rave review of Basket Case perennials:

Helenium (Helen's Flower)

Helenium (Helen’s Flower)

Basket Case has at least two kinds of Helenium, a tall mid to late summer plant with warm tones of daisy-like flowers.  I got me one of this new one.   These might not even bloom before Fred and Nancy close in midsummer, so only the discerning buyer will realize how great a plant this is.

Eupatorium 'Gateway'

Eupatorium ‘Gateway’

This Joe Pye weed is a little shorter than the others, claiming to grow “only” to five feet, with great big fluffy pink flowers that butterflies love.  My opinion is that it likes lots of summer water.  I adore this plant and bought one even though I probably already have it (but my Joe Pye gets taller than five feet! which might be just because it is mulched with cow fiber!).

There were only a couple of these left yesterday!

Helianthemum

Helianthemum

This orange Helianthemum is ‘Ben Nevis’.  These plants are great for growing on a rock wall.  I have found they do not bloom all summer, but the trailing foliage remains good.  Also comes in pink and yellow; not sure which other cultivars Basket Case has in stock.  I believe The Planter Box also has some cultivars of Helianthemum (rock rose).  Don’t be confused because Cistus (an excellent shrub which Basket Case also carries) is also called rock rose.

Dianthus 'Raspberry Swirl' and 'Fancy Knickers'

Dianthus ‘Raspberry Swirl’ and ‘Fancy Knickers’

Cute names, gorgeous plants.  “Pinks” are not always pink!  These are nice big healthy Dianthus.   I’m getting myself two more Raspberry Swirls if there are any left next time!

The rain continued to fall and we made the decision that we could not finish the weeding at Andersen’s RV Park this weekend.  We feel that to work in rain, with dripping raincoats, just makes vacationing guests feel sad for us and brings down the jolly weekender feeling!   We hope the guests there will see the pretty things (all the planters and containers are looking great, and plants well outnumber weeds in the garden beds).  I am too tired to give up my two days off because of not meeting the Andersen’s goal that I had set for us.

Allan also said he felt it was more important to check on the beach approach planters because more foot traffic walks by them, so we did.  We quickly used up the perennials we had bought for the Bolstadt approach planters (six Armeria, two Santolina ‘Lemon Fizz’) and found space for about eight more tough perennials which we will buy and add later this week.

Allan weeding the Lisa Bonney memorial planter

Allan weeding the Lisa Bonney memorial planter

One of the planters surprised me with this beautiful columbine!

One of the planters surprised me with this beautiful columbine!

not as miserable a job as it looks because the weather was not cold...

not as miserable a job as it looks because the weather was not cold…or windy

The beach approach garden is weedy again, of course!  But when we get around to doing it again, it will not be as miserable a job as the first weeding of the year.

beach approach, west end

beach approach, west end

Adorably, the Armeria (sea thrift) has reseeded at the end of the lawn.  I have read that it grows wild on the sea cliffs in Wales.

sea thrift

sea thrift

approach garden looking west

approach garden looking west

looking east; rugosa roses about to bloom

looking east; rugosa roses about to bloom

rugosa roses in bud

rugosa roses in bud

The rugosa roses are thuggish and a pain to weed around, but they will earn their keep from now till frost, first with flowers of pink, magenta, or white, and then with big orangey red hips.  They are also known as “The Tomato Rose” because of the size of the hips (about which some tourists ask us, “Are those tomatoes?”) and “The Salt Spray Rose” because they can take beachy conditions.

Dianthus in a beach approach planter, at least seven years old.

Dianthus in a beach approach planter, at least seven years old.

and a hardy geranium

and a hardy geranium

rain brings the colours out

rain brings the colours out

I wish the volunteers, back in the day, had not planted chocolate mint in the easternmost planter.

why?

why?

It has choked out the other plants, except for dog daisies.  Someone in passing commented to me last year how lush and wonderful the planter used to be.  Well…yes, before someone stuck the mint in there and it got well established.  The Nepeta (catmint, not a mint, not invasive) is buried with just one flower showing.

mint vs. catmint: no contest

mint vs. catmint: no contest

With about fifty of these planters to care for, we redo poorly planted old ones at a rate of maybe two a year.  We might eventually get to this one, which would involve having to dig it out, soil and all, and start over…or we might just decide the mint is fragrant and has a pretty flower and just let it be mostly one thing.

We were still in the rain as we left the beach approach for our next job.

the Long Beach arch

the Long Beach arch

We had some plants for the tiny World Kite Museum garden on the Sid Snyder Beach approach.  While Allan weeded it, I walked the approach and weeded the seven planters along its north side.  I must admit some of the weeding was just cosmetic because we had much still to do and it was six o clock.

Kite garden with Cosmos 'Cutesy', painted sage, one one sanguisorba added to the remaining perennials.

Kite garden with Cosmos ‘Cutesy’, painted sage, one one sanguisorba added to the remaining perennials.

There seems to be a big fail in the volunteer mowing, in that it does not include weed-eating, apparently!   We are not really in the weedeating business, but last year after declining to hand weed all along the shrub border, below, we did weed eat it a few times.  I think we will have to step up to weed eat around our little garden, as well.

the shrub parking lot border, which we most decidely do not have time to weed.

the shrub parking lot border, which we most decidely do not have time to weed.

The soil in the tiny flower garden was weird in spots.  When we redid it last year, we mulched with some bagged soil amendments.  Over the winter, it has turned into a weird rooty sawdusty substance in some areas and despite the rain was very dry.  Where are the roots coming from?  They are definitely roots, not fungi.  It is odd.  I pulled some out to have a good look.

weird and unsettling

weird and unsettling

Surely the escallonia on one side or hebe on the other could not be encroaching with this many roots?

We hope to take a yard of cow fiber up to Marilyn’s garden soon to mulch the edges where we had to replant (due to round up, blah blah blah!) and I will save out a few buckets full for this garden.  It could take about a half an inch of mulch.

Next we went back down to Ilwaco.  We stopped at the boatyard to photograph some boats for Discover Ilwaco, and I pondered the amount of horsetail in the middle area where we have not yet weeded.

oh dear, oh dear

oh dear, oh dear

One hopes the two well weeded ends of the garden will keep passersby happy.

in the boatyard

in the boatyard

We finally did the last of Saturday’s planting at the Port of Ilwaco office garden with some Cosmos ‘Cutesy’, since we want the flowers to remain short in order to show off the Basket Case baskets that hang above.  Or maybe I should still add a very few salpiglossis.

port office garden

port office garden

There are some tiny little seedling that we are leaving in the garden till I figure out what they are.  I usually can identify seedlings….but these look like painted sage, which is unlikely as I had never planted it here, nor do I ever find it to re-seed this prolifically.

my favourite perennials, Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue', in the port office garden

my favourite perennials, Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’, in the port office garden

Basket Case plants above and below

Basket Case plants above and below

just south of Port Office garden

just south of Port Office garden

Rain had stopped!  The gardens on the Howerton side of the office glowed with California poppies.

Howerton gardens

Howerton gardens (photo taken earlier in the day)

Finally, at 8 PM, we weeded the gardens at the east end of Howerton.  What had caught my eye when driving past earlier were the dead leaves (now picked off) on the Eryngium there.

bad leaves now plucked!

bad leaves now plucked!  This was caused by the hot spell around Mother’s Day.

Howerton by Queen La De Da's Art Castle

Howerton by Queen La De Da’s Art Castle

The Howerton garden that was most recently done (below) is the very westernmost one;  it was filled in with plants divided from other areas, and they will size up to fill the space but maybe it needs a little something more to be added.

perhaps a few more wind tolerant perennials...

garden to right….perhaps a few more wind tolerant perennials…

Along with Andersen’s RV Park, we did not get to the weeding at the Howerton garden section at the very west end of the street.  And both will have to wait because, having caught up with this blog, I am about to commence on two days off.  (I can feel that Howerton Street weeding project tugging at me, but I will try to resist.)

When I get my own cosmos and painted sage, container plants and perennials,  planted in my own garden, I will officially declare Annuals Planting Hell 2013 over!

I have worked 18 days in a row and Allan has worked 20.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

I woke in the night to the sound of rain. On and on. This was good. All the plants we have been planting will get watered.

It was not so good at ten AM when a seemingly ceaseless torrent was falling. We had in the garage five flats of plants for today’s job and I just wanted them out of here. I did not want to be carrying them out to the patio to get light, and then into the car tomorrow instead of today. Annuals hell must end, as weeding jobs are urgently calling to us. As is my own garden.

Mary sets a tempting example

Mary sets a tempting example

But wait…Was there some lightness in the sky to the south? The sky was definitely light around the edges to the south and to the west. I said we should just go to the job. I cited the example of Deadliest Catch, an inspirational tv show about hardworking crabbers on the Bering Sea. Allan looked skeptical about the weather, especially since the forecasts all called for it to worsen hourly all day long. But the rain suddenly stopped. We loaded, and as we did the rain came lashing sideways again. I did not care (much). Surely we could endure and plant twelve whiskey barrels even in a torrent. And yet…if I stayed home I could read a couple more months of the Tootlepedal Blog archives.

But we went to Casa Pacifica, Dan and Leanne’s garden near Wallicut Farms. It is our only job off the Peninsula (unless one is a stickler for the fact that technically Ilwaco is part of the mainland).

When we got there, the sun came out intermittently. And rain came back for a while but not for long.

after a squall

after a squall

Soon raincoats came off and stayed off and all twelve barrels and several smaller containers were cleaned up and planted.

The barrels have Narcissi so we cut the foliage back by two thirds. It must be done in order to plant. My guru Ann Lovejoy would not approve; in this recent article she writes of the importance of letting the foliage mature. And yet once NW garden celebrity Ed Hume (who was as well known as Ciscoe in his day) said in a lecture that narcissi foliage can be cut three weeks after the flower has bloomed.

before

before; unplantable.

before:  last year's boringly overgrown Helichrysum

before: last year’s boringly overgrown Helichrysum

after

after, Helichrysum cut back VERY hard

Planted: An Agyranthemum in the center (“Butterfly’, ‘Spring Bouquet’, or the white one) and around the edges mixed (80!! total) calibrachoas of various colours and sanvitalias and, in the planters closer to the house, some blue felicia as well. In the mid-center of each, three painted sage triangulated around the Agyr. Some have Diascia that came back from last year.

Dusty lives in hope that I will stop to play fetch. It will not happen as then he will not stop pestering. But most of the time he walks with me all around the job with his head just where I can reach down and pet him. I love that and lavish him with smooches.

Dusty

Note Spook in the background.

Dusty

Dusty

Spook continues to be very shy, but it is progress that she stays out from under the deck while we are here.

Spook

Spook

We did not have time to weed, but I did walk along the bottom of the garden casting Sluggo up into it, with camera in hand. (Allan deadheaded narcissi while I talked to Dan and Leanne at the end of the work session.)

the shady end of the long border

the shady end of the long border

I don’t add many new perennials to this garden because it has water troubles in the summer; the well is just not enough for home and garden, too. It might be fixed for this year. It has therefore been a garden that peaks in mid springtime.

Another problem is that I would like to lavish the garden with cow fiber mulch but the lawn where a truck would have to drive to deliver the load close to the garden is also the septic field. And it would have to be wheelbarrowed up at the end of the wall. And if the pile were dumped in the driveway it would be far from the end of the wall. And I am tired just thinking about it. Maybe this fall we will manage to do it. As I have said to myself every year since taking on this job.

long curved border goes from shade to sun

long curved border goes from shade to sun

guardian of the garden

guardian of the garden

geranium and hosta

geranium and hosta

Silene

Silene

hardy geranium

Geranium macrorrhizum

Halmiocistus wintonensis

Halmiocistus wintonensis

Around the north side of the house, in a spot that is usually wet from roof runoff, I found a small blue flower which I think is a kind of Camassia that I planted last fall. I would have rain barrels at every gutter catching water for summer in this garden.

camassia

I surprised Spook in her nap on the hot tub cover and got as close to her as I ever have!

snoozing

she was snoozing

With this, the last of the big batches of annuals is planted, and I can see the light at the end of Annuals Planting Hell. There are still a few days of filling in here and there. The concrete planter in Ilwaco that needs a hole drilled is still undrilled. Andersen’s needs more cosmos and some Salvia patens. Some gaps in the Long Beach planters need filling, and because I had made a careful list of exactly what plant was needed where, we went to The Basket Case to get some more annuals.

My list would have been incomprehensible to another: two uppies here, four trailies there, five herbie flatties there. But I knew what I wanted.

We also got some plants for a big shady planter against the house at Andersen’s RV Park; it only gets morning sun.

I'm trying a big new impatiens there.

I’m trying a big new impatiens there.

and assorted types of begonias

and assorted types of begonias

These might like more sun but they do ok in the east facing planter. The tuberous begonias excel and are the same thing that Andersen’s owner Lorna’s dad used to plant there.

At The Planter Box I stocked up on Cosmos for planting at the Ilwaco boatyard, Larry and Robert’s garden and….soon I hope! my garden. Uh oh, I still need more for my friend Nancy! And more for a few last clumps of Cosmos at Andersen’s, in an area it was too late to weed tonight. I got one flat of the very good Salvia patens plants that Planter Box grew this year.

At The Planter Box

At The Planter Box

Teresa and I talked a bit about when would be a good date for a midsummer madness Cash Mob at the Planter Box, probably in early July.

Planter Box

Planter Box

I saw salpiglossis starts and wanted some for gardens of ours that might be on the tour this year, but we were full up with plants by then.

Salpiglossis has a gorgeous flower.

Salpiglossis has a gorgeous flower.

I also saw just two of this cute little plant I had once found for sale somewhere and planted in an Ilwaco planter. It looked adorable all summer long. Apparently, it is a house plant. I don’t know why it is not sold in quantity for summer containers.

so cute!

so cute!

Then…Andersen’s after six. The wind had come up with a biting chill and the rain returned, but the east facing planter was not at all bad to work in with the house between us and the ocean. I was so tired I did not put on gloves, then regretted it, then could not get them on over wet hands. I just remembered that one of the crew gave me some Hershey’s kisses, as he often kindly does, and I was so busy I put them in my pocket and did not eat a one. (I think that shirt is still in the car….tempting….). I decided to hold off on planting some Salvia patens in the Payson Hall planters, as it is supposed to get down to 44 degrees tonight. I think they will be happier if they wait till we go to Andersen’s (and all other north end resorts) on Friday to fluff it up for the three day holiday weekend.

The last task was to plant 12 tiny little not very promising white petunias in the two west side whiskey barrels that lacked them. They were in little six packs so small that one could hardly tell each held six plants. The wind and rain blew straight from the sea just over the foredune and I thought very hard about Deadliest Catch while planting the little plugs.

I often think in bad weather, "Could be worse, could be crabbing on the Bering Sea!"

I often think in bad weather, “Could be worse, could be crabbing on the Bering Sea!”

It’s on tonight and I look forward to sitting in my chair eating warm food and drinking wine and feeling inspired by the crabbers’ hard work in almost all weather. I have put on hand lotion five times and my hands still feel dry from the wet cold soil. I could never be a crabber…too wimpy.

Home by seven PM! I had had it with the outdoors, but Allan went out and mowed and weed-ate our lawn…in the drizzle. The grass was long and so wet it is amazing A) that he did it and B) that our little rechargeable electric mower got through it at all.

Read Full Post »

Annuals planting hell continued today.  We had to be somewhere at 11:30 so made a rushed stop at the Planter Box to pick up more Cosmos and Salvia viridis (painted sage) for three north end jobs.

At the Planter Box:  Primula vialii for sale

At the Planter Box: Primula vialii for sale

Rush, rush, stress…..  Hard to think in a slightly warm greenhouse.

We then went to our now former job, Seanest, and met with the person who we think will be able to take over the garden care.  He is new to gardening, but it is a simple landscape these days.  We walked through, and I took lots of photos which I am emailing him with details about what the plants are, which are weeds, what to do to each area at each time of year.

arbor rebuilding

The driftwood temple, which had partially collapsed last time we were there, is being rebuilt with plain wood which will be dressed up with driftwood.

I do not feel particularly poignant about leaving the job even though it is a garden Robert and I created years ago; Allan and I are so overbooked that cannot get any of our gardens to the state I want them in right now.  So, goodbye to Seanest.

farewell, dear garden

farewell, dear garden

Oh dear.  Now I am feeling sentimental after all.   I would have hung onto the job if the house had still been owned by artist Phyllis Ray, who liked a more lushly planted garden than the low maintenance preference of the current owner.  (That doesn’t make much sense because a more complex garden takes more time, but also inspires more love on my part.)

Next we did our minimal bit of planting at Golden Sands Assisted Living.  The budget is small, but what is a garden (of ours) without four six packs of Cosmos and 12 plants of painted sage?  I was disheartened to learn that not only have the sprinklers not been installed in the courtyard garden but there is no plan to have them set up any time soon because of another very important maintenance job that is taking priority.  I responded that it is hard for me to do a job when the plants are not watered.  I was understood, and there is talk of staff volunteering to keep it watered.  We shall see.  We do this garden at a low “grandma rate” in honour of my mother having lived here and because I feel for anyone who can no longer have a garden of their own.  I want great beauty here, but it is hard going.

Below:  Allan got this nasty area weeded;  I was fretting to myself about the watering so did not think to take a before photo.

tidier

tidier

This is outside our four flower beds, but to have it infested with grass and horsetail brings down the tone of the whole garden.  The daylilies are the boring Stella D’Oro and are here because they were free!

There are still many weeds in the four flower quadrants, so even though we had intended to only stay long enough to get the plants in the ground, we were there for over two hours.

The four quadrants:

southeast

southeast quadrant

southwest quadrant

southwest quadrant

northwest; here is the one where I ran out of Cow Fiber mulch.

northwest; here is the one where I ran out of Cow Fiber mulch.
close up of plant table

close up of plant table in northwest quadrant

The best quadrant is the one that is outside the window where my mom lived for a year.  She invested money into buying plants for it so it has more interesting variety…even though like all the quadrants it suffers from the free plant syndrome:  Plants that are given away tend to be too free to multiply and end up being too much of one thing.  For example, all these quadrants are heavy with a pink scabiosa that I brought from many reseedlings at Klipsan Beach Cottages.

northeast quadrant

northeast quadrant, mom’s former garden area

I wonder if the resident of my mom’s old room would like to have the Euonymus in front of her window cut low enough so she could see out.  If only we had time.

another weedy bed in terribly poor soil

another weedy bed in terribly poor soil

I find this job disheartening at present.   There are areas to weed outside the four quadrants, but no time or budget to do so as often as they need.

I pondered whether there might be a way to have a fundraiser for buying some good, exciting, appropriate (drought tolerant!!) plants for the garden, or more mulch, or help getting the mulch down the long hallway.  There is no easy access to bring soil into the garden.

Allan said the secret to getting fundraisers is schmoozing, which we do not have time to do.

more weed blurred free Stella D'Oro

more weed blurred free Stella D’Oro and vinca

It was a relief to leave (even though I wanted more time to weed there, and more mulch, and a guarantee of good watering), and move on to the beautiful gardens at Klipsan Beach Cottages.

KBC fenced garden

KBC fenced garden

There, I removed a wheelbarrow full of weeds from the fenced garden (mostly the bad aster, which wants to be a good plant but is not).

out, bad aster

out, bad aster

I also pulled a fair amount of elephant garlic, vindicating owner Denny who has never liked it.  Its tall glaucous stems and Allium flowers have amused me greatly but suddenly there is far too much of it.

uh oh, too much!

uh oh, too much!

Why can’t the the gorgeous and expensive Alliums albopilosum and schubertii spread madly like this?  (And would I still love them if they did?)

by the greenhouse

a well behaved white Allium by the greenhouse

plants to go in

plants to go in

While I weeded and planted Cosmos (barely finding room to squeeze in three six packs), painted sage, a chocolate cosmos, and a petunia ‘Pretty Much Picasso’, Allan deadheaded the many spent narcissi around the property and did some weeding outside the fence.

by the pond

by the pond

trimmed ferns looking lovely now

trimmed ferns looking lovely now

one left out of three

one left out of three

We stopped next at Oman Builders Supply where I found several Alliums had been swiped.  Two were completely gone and the stems looked as if they had been cut, not broken.  Two were broken off and lying in the garden next to a footprint.  Whose shoe fits it?

I am sure that every public gardener makes a plan for what a garden will look like, and probably most of those plans are thwarted by finger blight.

With the larger Alliums, the frustration comes partly because the bulbs are rather expensive.

what a shame

what a shame

My favourite, Allium schubertii, is still there.

My favourite, Allium schubertii, is still there.

The first year, I went to the effort to plant Cosmos at the back of this small garden. I gave it up because it resulted in too much fretting about them getting enough water, and the perennials have filled in enough to make an attractive show on their own.  I contented myself with adding six painted sage in an empty space at one end of the garden.

OBS garden

OBS garden with Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’

We finished our north end gardens of the day with the Wiegardt Gallery.  The many alliums there were undisturbed.

Wiegardt Gallery

Wiegardt Gallery

Wiegardts

Working in to the evening does provide a beautiful light in the garden.

Miscanthus, Aquilegia, Rhododendron

Miscanthus, Aquilegia, Rhododendron

Alliums

Alliums

Alliums

Wiegardt Gallery

lilac and the north facing studio windows

lilac and the north facing studio windows

While of course it would have been satisfying to get all the weeding and edging done, we had to head back down to Long Beach at 7 PM.  A few Salvia patens had been riding with us since yesterday and really needed to get their feet in the ground at the Veterans Field stage and Police Station planters.  I had wanted to add two to the Lewis and Clark square planter but realized it will fill in without them (unless I remove the architectural centerpiece of elephant garlic).  Downtown was jumping with exuberant people.   I felt so tired I was glad to get out of there.

We just had time to go to the Port of Ilwaco and plant some painted sage in the new garden on the south side of the office.  A few of the Saturday Market tents had already gone up.

tents

We did not stay for the sunset.  I had plants to sort out at home for tomorrow.

the view from the port office garden, 8:09 PM

the view from the port office garden, 8:09 PM

By dark I had tomorrow’s plants ready and a quick walk round the garden applying sluggo. That’s what they get for letting me see a couple slime their way across the dusky lawn.

Much as I long for, as I am sure Allan does too, a day OFF (for my own garden), tomorrow we will at least get the Ilwaco street planters planted up with some diascia I have here, and make a list of what else they need.  But first, Saturday is Market Day at the Port and then the local Coast Guard station is having an open house at Cape Disappointment.  There is an interesting view of Ilwaco from there that I have not seen for years, so we want to take time out to go.

Read Full Post »

The day started chilly but dry and with a chance of showers.  I optimistically pictured them as light and intermittent.   The knowledge that new plants had arrived at the Basket Case Greenhouse put me in a cheerful mood, as did the sight of the new-to-us tulip “Green Star’ in bloom in our volunteer garden at the Ilwaco Post Office.

Tulip 'Green Star'

Tulip ‘Green Star’

We headed north through Long Beach because we needed to buy some magnesium sulfate at The Planter Box.  (We apply it to roses at this time of year:  a cupful per rose to encourage basal breaks.)

Long Beach planter at the stoplight

Long Beach planter at the stoplight

At The Planter Box, I had the great pleasure of petting some baby ducks.

ducklings!

ducklings!

While we were at the Basket Case admiring the new plant acquisitions, the cold rain began.  Misty wore a fluffy pink coat and still shivered.

Walter and Misty

Walter and Misty

We filled our small car with wonderful plants, with me fretting to myself as usual that someone else would come along and get some of the best ones before I do.

Eryngium 'Jade Frost'

Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’!

From the Basket Case, we drove to Andersen’s RV Park and deadheaded the road box.  I suggested we drive on to points north because the sky looked just a bit light around the edges and the weather might improve as we traveled.  We traveled to Ocean Park and deadheaded a few narcissi from the Oman and Son Builders Supply garden.

OBS spring bulbs

OBS spring bulbs

and rain...

and rain…

The rain was not just wet but very chilly.   We decided to go north of Nahcotta to pick up a free composter that had been offered to us.  When we turned onto the residential road off Sandridge a memory surfaced from past work.

One summer before 2002, Robert and I had cared for the garden at the end of the road.  It had had a view of the bay from its deck and we had planted containers on the deck.  The new trendy plant at the time was Helichrysum petiolare and oh how I loved it.  Only later in the summer did I find out that the man of that household called it “that grey junk that she planted.”

I also had a strong memory of dropping a container of Soil Moist (the synthetic product we then used in pots;  now we use Zeba Quench, even though it is getting harder to find) on the lawn and having to pick up all the slippery little jelly pieces and then having to put a cone there so no one would walk on it and fall.  What an embarrassment!

not the best gardening memories!

not the best gardening memories!

Just to the left of the top of the driveway, our sad Soil Moist incident occurred.

And here is our wonderful new composter, a valuable acquisition.  It rotates.

nice composter

nice composter

Heading south again, we stopped at the Wiegardt Gallery to deadhead a few narcissi and plant a ‘Jade Frost’ Eryngium and a pine scented rosemary (intoxicating!).

Allan planting in the rain

Allan planting in the rain

We had piled our new plants on top of our raincoats and were still hoping the rain would stop.   The narcissi glowed in the grey weather and took my mind off being cold.

Narcissi

Narcissi

at Wiegardt Gallery

at Wiegardt Gallery

love the wee frilly cup!

love the wee frilly cup!

Narcissi and pine scented rosemary

Narcissi and pine scented rosemary

The rain washed away my enthusiasm for weeding the bed at the north end of the parking lot.  We decided an in-car Hawaiian barbecue feast might pass the time till the rain lifted so we stopped at Tu Tu’s Lunch Wagon in Ocean Park.

Tu Tu's

Tu Tu’s

During our car picnic the truth finally sunk in:  the rain had no intention of stopping.  We determined that we would at least get the narcissi deadheaded at Klipsan Beach Cottages and Andersen’s and then go on home.

Ocean Park interlude:  Why I dislike pampas grass:

so ugly if not cut back

so ugly if not cut back

But we love this driftwood fence and admire it every time we are in Ocean Park.

lovely

lovely

Then on to the deadheading at Klipsan Beach Cottages.

very wet

very wet

Oh how deeply thrilled I was to see that over the past week. Luis had mulched the fenced garden with the washed dairy manure from The Planter Box!  We are still behind on work so we are so glad to not have to do this.  What a beautifully detailed job he did, too.

mulched fenced garden

mulched fenced garden

a beautiful job by Luis

a beautiful job by Luis

stunning dark red tulips

stunning dark red tulips
Tulip 'Cool Crystal'

Tulip ‘Cool Crystal’

tulips

Tulips

Tulips

a returning tulip

a returning tulip

Most of the large KBC tulips are planted in pots and treated as annuals, but this particular tulip (above) has returned year after year in the garden.

Tulip

tulip

by the basement door

After attending to the house garden we walked across the drive to deadhead narcissi at the A Frame (one of the rentals when not occupied by its owners, Pete and Darlene).  Darlene wanted a vast show of narcissi in her woods garden so last fall we planted more, and more, and more…and finally this is the first year we got the breathtaking show that we wanted.  Enjoy:

entry to A Frame driveway

entry to A Frame driveway

A Frame garden A Callistemon blooms among the narcissi….

Narcissi

what a show!

what a show!

Allan had finally retrieved his raincoat from under the plants in the car and he toned will with the narcissi display.

Allan

narcissi and clam cleaning shed

narcissi and clam cleaning shed

The windowboxes on the cottages feature tiny species bulbs.  This will be the last year for the windowboxes;  they are being phased out and these bulbs will instead be displayed in some larger seasonal containers.  We all agree we’ll miss the windowboxes but they take too much time in the busy summer.

cottage windowbox

cottage windowbox

cottage windowbox

cottage windowbox

It’s nice to have the view of looking up into the faces of the flowers.  Sometimes they look back.

tulip

tulip

Owner Mary asked me to take some photos inside the cottages for the website…That made for a nice dry job for awhile while Allan continued to weed.

windowbox from inside

windowbox from inside

a wonderful place to stay

a wonderful place to stay

much more pleasant than out in the rain

much more pleasant than out in the rain

I fell in love with this valance in the cottage four kitchen.

I fell in love with this valance in the cottage four kitchen.

The cottages all have guest journals and I do so want to come up some winter day and read them all.  The last time I read them was the winter when Robert and I painted the cottages inside, to make some winter money, and that must have been before 2002.

room journal

room journal

guests from Russia!

guests from Russia!

and a recommendation

and a recommendation

Before we moved on from KBC, three more shots of the garden:

by the garage: Corokia cotoneaster

by the garage: Corokia cotoneaster

sword fern unfurling...the payoff for all the earlier cutting back

sword fern unfurling…the payoff for all the earlier cutting back

rhododendron and waterfall

rhododendron and waterfall

On the way back south I was sorry to have forgotten to even take a look at the Golden Sands Assisted Living garden….and our second visit of the year is so overdue…but we no doubt would have seen some big need that would have given me sleepless hours tonight.  We drove straight on to Andersen’s to deadhead the narcissi in the RV park.

west side garden

west side garden

Payson Hall planters

Payson Hall planters

tulips

tulips

Lorna will be thrilled that her tulips have almost popped, but the most thrilling sight of the entire day to me was that her sweet peas are up.  With the cold wet weather I have been terribly worried, having planted all the special seeds with no way to replace them if they failed.

Thank you, Mother Nature, for those teeny tiny sprouts.

Thank you, Mother Nature, for those teeny tiny sprouts.

The silver lining to the day is that although this blog entry took much longer than I thought it would, I may have time to read a few back entries of the Tootlepedal blog tonight.   I don’t know how he gets so much done and also writes such long blog entries each day.  Perhaps with practice at daily writing will come more speed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

In our life, a trip overseas is not as exotic as it sounds.  That’s what someone told me that oldtimers call a trip across the Columbia River to northwest Oregon (about a twenty minute drive to Astoria).  I have never found an oldtimer to confirm this since I first heard it somewhere.

Due to cold rain, our mission was to visit our favourite north Oregon coast nursery, Back Alley Gardens in Gearhart.

As always, they had some excellent plants from Xera.

plants

plants from Xera..

and more

and from Blooming Nursery, and more

desirable plants, as always

desirable plants, as always

I got myself some violas with faces….

violas

violas

And a peachy apricot primrose for a friend who adores such colours:

primrose

primrose

I saw the same primrose later in the day at Fred Meyer, the only really cool plant there.  Such is life sometimes!

I got myself a ‘Golden Rocket’ barberry (love gold foliage) and some little violas with faces and a burgundy coloured Garrya.

The indoor part of the dual business, The Natural Nook, had luscious gardenesque things to offer:

shelf

shelf

plants

plants

blue

blues

orbs

orbs

mini glasshouse

mini glasshouse

In their  friendly and welcoming way, the owners told me friends of mine had been in recently, but I soon learned my name had been bandied about by folks I definitely would not call friends.  Shocking, shocking I say!  And might I add that contrary to the tale of my faux friends, no other local gardens had anything remotely like the 500 visitors that ours and Judy’s had on garden tour day.  Indeed, most definitely not.  There’s nothing like a little scandal to liven up the day, and I was somehow reminded of Mr. McGregor, a garden mystery by Alan Titchmarsh, or perhaps the new and rather shocking  village life novel that I am presently reading, Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling.  (Who knew she could use such language!)    Even the gentle Miss Read ventured into the darker side of village life at times.  I idly wondered if I should devote my garden blogging time to a small town garden mystery novel…but no, I think that this year I should focus on keeping my commitment to blog on a regular basis.  And yet…if I only I had the skill to write a garden mystery, I would have plenty of material.

Meanwhile, all winter I had had in mind a re-visit to one of my favourite gardens of the Astoria garden tour of 2012,  the Westbrook garden at the Mill Pond Village.  I wanted to see how full Ms. Westbrook’s dry creek bed and pond got in winter rain, and we were having plenty of rain today.

When we got there, I poked around the edge, taking photos, not wanting to be too intrusive although it is sort of a public garden  between two sidewalks, in a lot between townhouses.

front of townhouse today

front of townhouse today

Look how good the bones are of the garden along the street!  It looks as good today as it did last summer.

Westbrook curbside last summer

Westbrook curbside last summer

the garden between townhouses

the garden between townhouses, today

dry creekbed

dry creekbed

ans swale

and pond swale

Then the owner of this lovely garden, Ms. Westbrook herself, popped out, and we had a lovely chat.  She said we looked familiar, and rather cold in the chilly wind.  (I thought later how nice it is to hear that someone is so interested in one’s garden that she comes to prowl it offseason!)  She told us that this year, the pond never overflowed with seasonal water because she had dug it out a little deeper.

the pond

the pond

pond and late winter sky

pond and late winter sky

same view last July

same view last July

Now that we had conversed with the owner, I felt that I could actually walk through the garden and take more photos.

crocus patch

crocus patch

townhouse garden

IMG_3771

townhouse garden

IMG_3776

IMG_3775

IMG_3777

How well it looks in winter!

the same wooden house from a different angle last July

the same wooden house from a different angle last July

The townhouse complex is right by the Columbia River.

view across a common lawn to the river

view across a common lawn to the river

The homes right around the reclaimed Millpond have always intrigued me, and I would love to live in one if only I had a vacant lot as well to make a garden in.

The Millpond with a lot for sale!

The Millpond with a lot for sale!

On the way home through Chinook, we saw sure signs of imminent spring:

flowers for sale along the sidewalk

flowers for sale along the sidewalk

flower sign

narcissi border and a beautiful clematis arbour

narcissi border and a beautiful clematis arbour

 

Read Full Post »

While Allan and I most definitely went to the Northwest Flower and Garden show…and stayed at his parents’ house in north Seattle…I have no photos from that year.  It was completely new and different and fun for me to go with someone who very much wanted to attend every possible seminar and learn as much as he could about gardening.

Garden of Mu, Olympia

In the spring, Allan and I went to Olympia to help a cyber-gardening friend, Mike Unser, dig up plants from his garden to prepare for a move to his new country home near Shelton.

Mike's garden

Mike’s garden

There were many plants to dig up (and share). A number of folk from the Pacific Northwest gardening forum showed up to help. (I actually did have some people photos, somewhere…)

Mike's garden

Mike’s garden

Here was another good example of gardening friends who met online coming to know each other in person.

Joy Creek and Cistus Nurseries

For the annual trip to Joy Creek and Cistus, we met Sheila and others from the Rainyside.com garden forum for lunch and plant shopping. I was still holding to my frugal plan of buying only for my clients, and none for me.

Sheila by an Echium at Cistus

Sheila by an Echium at Cistus

at Cistus:  Echium

at Cistus: Echium

Echium

Echium

Alki Beach, Seattle

In the summer, Allan and I went to Seattle, stayed at his parents’ house, and indulged in a Northwest Perennial Alliance garden tour weekend.  I think that is the July when we were there because his mom had a hip replacement and someone needed to stay at the house for four days to take care of making dinner for his dad, making sure Dale took his medication, and so on.  Or perhaps we were there for Dale’s birthday in August.

We now come to the very photos that inspired this whole set of prequel journal posts.  I was poking back through my albums and found these and thought “I MUST share these on my blog!”  And then I thought about all the old garden photos that I had…and began the big late winter project of catching up from 198something to the year I began to blog, 2007.  (One year to go at this point!)  So…just LOOK at the plantings all over this house in the Alki Beach neighbourhood of Seattle.  And these were not even on the official weekend tour; we just happened upon this place while on a drive.

the most astounding container display

the most astounding container display

The fabulous little house was tucked away between two tall buildings.

just..wow

just…WOW

It is breathtaking.

It is breathtaking.

astonishing!

astonishing!

more flower house photos

and more

As one drives along Alki past the cottage garden of annuals, one then seas a mysterious hillside garden with Asian inspired tea houses….This was the best angle I could get of that fascinating place.

Asian style garden on the hill over Alki beach

Asian style garden on the hill over Alki beach

Up the hill into West Seattle, I also had to photograph this swoopy brick wall.

bricks

bricks

Northwest Perennial Alliance Tour

On spring and summer weekend, NPA members host open gardens for each other.  If I lived in Seattle, I would go to every one.

On the one that Allan and I attended, we saw in the lower U District, near the freeway, a Jurassic garden of huge plants.  This garden was meant to be tall enough to be structurally in tune with the towers that surround it.

Jurassic garden

Jurassic garden

Gunnera

Gunnera

Below, inside one of the NPA tour houses that was near Allan’s parents’ house in north Seattle…

garden window

garden window

outside the same house's bay window

outside the same house’s bay window

The same house had its bedroom, in the back, with doors that could completely open to the garden.

bedroom

bedroom

Those were just two of the several gardens we toured that weekend….

Rainyside Tour in Portland

I was finding the garden touring to be irresistable; I’d never been able to do much touring with Robert because we were too poor and because his behavior was unpredictable. In early fall of 2005 we met up with some Rainysiders, including Sheila, for an overnight stay in Portland and touring of some gardens. I was particularly to see the one below, which was designed with 4 quadrants by Lucy Hardiman and which had been featured in her lectures at the garden show.

in the 4 quadrants garden

in the 4 quadrants garden

a gew gaw in the Lucy-designed garden

a gew gaw in the Lucy-designed garden

center of the 4 quadrants garden

center of the 4 quadrants garden

in the 4 quadrant garden

in the 4 quadrant garden

Below:  another Portland garden by…someone famous! a garden writer whose name I have forgotten.  His garden spills out onto the street.

a well known garden

a well known garden

Below:  I think this was in Kym Pykorny‘s shade garden.

water container

water container

I was thrilled to bits to visit Dulcy Mahar’s garden, because her gardening column in the Oregonian was a highlight of my weekly reading.

in Dulcy's garden

in Dulcy’s garden

Dulcy's fire circle

Dulcy’s fire circle

and...somewhere on the tour

and…somewhere on the tour

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »