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Posts Tagged ‘Olde Towne Trading Post’

Saturday, 30 November, 2013

To work or not?  I really wanted to finish the mulching at Andersen’s RV Park so that I could cross that job off the “last visits of 2013: work list.

I woke to heavy mist.  We had a coffee date at 11 AM with Kathleen S, on her last day of this month’s visit to the beach.  (I well remember the feeling of being a visitor to the Peninsula and having to go back to the city too soon.)   I decided I had better get up “early” and go to the opening day of the Saturday Christmas Market at the port in case the weather turned out to be conducive to working.

With no breakfast or coffee (thus saving my appetite for Olde Towne fare), I walked down Lake and turned on Myrtle Avenue to the Port.  By then, the mist had turned to a breezy light rain.  I stopped to call Allan (who was running about fifteen minutes behind me) and say “DAY OFF!”   As he has pointed out, Andersen’s RV Park was packed with RV folks down for the clam tides and we did not want to bring them down by lo0king depressingly muddy and downtrodden while mulching in the rain.

Pretty good excuse for a day off, yes?

I well remember one Thanksgiving Day at a former job of ours, The Shelburne Inn.  The wonderful Shoalwater Restaurant (now the Birdgewater Bistro in Astoria)  offered a Thanksgiving dinner there.  Not realizing how early the dinner began, I tossed out a few hundred bulbs all over the garden and we began to plant.  If bulb time is not done, it stops for no holiday.  Then, unexpectedly, the skies opened with a torrential rain, and the Thanksgiving dinner clientele began to arrive.  As they entered the fine restaurant with its stained glass windows and warm inviting atmosphere, they had to pass two drowned rats, me and Robert, planting bulbs in the mud.  What a sad spectacle with which to start off their elegant meal!  They probably all gave thanks that they were not us.

Back to today, and my walk down Myrtle to the Port….

On Myrtle, a tree glowed in the mist, er, rain.

On Myrtle, a tree glowed in the mist, er, rain.

I stopped first at Time Enough Books just to chat for awhile with owner Karla.

greeted by Scout, who's named for the protagonist of To Kill a Mockingbird

greeted by Scout, who’s named for the protagonist of To Kill a Mockingbird

seasonal decorations at Time Enough Books

seasonal decorations at Time Enough Books

wreath

Next door at the Saturday Christmas Market, I found Kathleen had the same idea as me:  Buying some tasty treats from Pink Poppy Bakery.

Pink Poppy Bakery, soon to have a shop by the Long Beach Arch!

Pink Poppy Bakery, soon to have a shop by the Long Beach Arch!

Harmony Soapworks from Oysterville had a booth

Harmony Soapworks from Oysterville had a booth

As did Angela's Tied Pool clothing.

As did Angela’s Tied Pool clothing.

a booth of stone candle holders

a booth of stone candle holders

I loved these little "best friends" pillows.

I loved these little “best friends” pillows.

The same fabric artist had made cute little stockings with Ilwaco scenes.

The same fabric artist had made cute little stockings with Ilwaco scenes.

Kathleen and I popped a couple of doors down to Don Nisbett’s Art Gallery where she bought a crab pot Christmas tree card.

Don's gallery

Don’s gallery

He usually has sweet treats  for customers; a cookie tided me over till we got to Olde Towne Café.   I had not been in for coffee for what seemed like a very long time (although it had probably only been a week).

Chester had been “saling”.  When his partner, Luanne, had first used that word I had assumed she meant “sailing”, since until recently he was a fisherman as well as a purveyor of good food and antiques.  Chester, however, says he likes a boat with a motor, and questing for antiques are now his business.  He had acquired quite a few new items.

frying pans

frying pans

a ship with its masts made of wood

a ship with its masts made of wood

a horn

a horn

part of a mast (I think) of a boat called Tortuga

part of a mast (I think) of a boat called Tortuga

and a thingie whose name i forget

and a thingie whose name I forget

Kathleen asked if he was going to polish the metal up, and he said, no, that when he first got into the antiques trade, he was advised to leave things as they were, and he “found that very easy to do.”

another thingie; Chester knew just what is was.  Some kind of gauge, I think.

another thingie; Chester knew just what is was. Some kind of gauge, I think.

Meanwhile, Luanne made someone a sandwich and then my breakfast and Kathleen’s lunch (biscuits and gravy and a BLT).

Luanne at work

Luanne at work

Allan arrived, soon followed by Donna and MR, so we had a proper coffee klatsch.  Judy and Tom still had a houseful of Thanksgiving company so were not part of today’s chat.  Luanne pointed out that the rain was descending quite fiercely outside, and I felt good about not have chosen work instead.

a thoughtful moment

a thoughtful moment

Donna's captured a livelier moment!

Donna’s photo captured a livelier moment!

How wonderful it felt, after day after day of bulb time and mulching, to sit and relax with good friends.

Kathleen bought a particularly lovely floral teapot (which I wish I had photographed) and then we parted.  I do wish she lived here full time.  We’d have a grand time going to various events.

Kathleen's new teapot, lower right!

Kathleen’s new teapot, lower right!

After her departure, I went home while Allan went down to the Saturday market.  I should have gone in to my home office and started the monthly billing.  Instead, as the rain had stopped (oh, dear! we could have been mulching!), I trimmed about fifteen hellebores.

Hellebore...one that does not need trimming.

Hellebore argutifolius..one that does not need trimming.

Hellebore, removing old leaves, before and after

Hellebore, removing old leaves, before and after

I was closely observed.

Image

hummer

Image copy

As dusk approached, I got into the debris pile whose demolition and re-designing will be a winter project— for a windless day as it is near the Bogsy Wood.

pile

pile

The crab pots under a tarp that were the backdrop to this area have now been moved and prepped and stacked, ready for the commercial crab season to begin sometime after December 15th.

My mission in the pile:  To find some more spuds before the hard freeze that is predicted for next week.

Yukon Gold and red potatoes

a quarter of a bucket of Yukon Gold and red potatoes

I also rescued and shelled some red runner beans.  The insides of the pods are smooth like a fine suede fabric.

pods outside and in

pods outside and in

I don’t find the beans themselves to be very tasty.  Or maybe we do not know how to cook them deliciously.  I save them to plant more red runner beans next year simply because the flowers are beautiful.

beans of pink, black, and beige

beans of pink, black, and beige

Allan put up our Christmas lights until darkness thwarted him from adding the last string over the tall arbour at the front of the house.

our decorated crab pot

our decorated crab pot

From the end of our late and much missed neighbour Nora’s yard, I took a photo of the Jessie’s Fish Company star….

Jessie's at dusk

Jessie’s at dusk

I will be able to see it from my window throughout the month of December.

After dark, I enjoyed my Pink Poppy treat, a gingerbread cupcake with molasses frosting.

The top is slightly rumpled by the wax paper it was wrapped in.

The top is slightly rumpled by the wax paper it was wrapped in.

I expect to have no excuse to delay the long task of billing tomorrow, as rain is predicted for sure, and Olde Towne Café is closed on Sundays and Mondays!

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Monday, 28 October, 2013

We started at Casa Pacifica, a few minutes east of the Peninsula.  My first subject for thought was that the non gardening punter may not “get” Helichrysum petiolare.  Here, the small leaved cultivar swamps a whiskey barrel by the lower garage:

Helichrysum (licorice plant)

Helichrysum (licorice plant)

As I mentioned once before, a long ago client called it “that grey junk.”  I think most clients might like this sort of thing better:

flowers

flowers (Sanvitalia, Calibrachoa, Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ still blooming.

Walking up the road, I was shocked to see so many branches down.  There had been piles of tree branches and a couple of fallen trees on the side of the road as we drove in.  At the top of the driveway, an alder had snapped off in the windstorm of a couple of weeks ago.

a wind-topped alder

a wind-topped alder

from above

from above

one of several piles of branches

one of several piles of branches

My friend Dusty met me at the top of the driveway.

Dusty

Spook was standoffish and skittish as usual.  I wonder if I could lure her if I remembered to bring some cheese.

Spook eyeing me from the porch

Spook eyeing me from the front deck

At least she lets me look at her now; she used to hide under the deck the whole time we were there.

one of Leanne's dragons in fallen maple leaves

one of Leanne’s dragons in fallen maple leaves

We did a before and after on the lawn island, mostly pulling toppled orange montbretia and Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’.

before and after

before and after

Allan also weeded atop the back garden and clipped away some branches that were obscuring the well water pump.

fall colour in the back garden

fall colour in the back garden

While we worked at Casa Pacifica, I got a call from Chester of Olde Towne Trading Post Antiques saying that he could deliver Erin’s garden boat today.  Fortunately, we had time to finish job number one with a little extra time to spare in Long Beach.

I stopped at the Wooden Horse shop in Long Beach to talk to the manager about being on the cash mob.  They hadn’t requested to be mobbed…but I like the store a lot.  They will the mob site in January.

The shelving entrances me.

The shelving entrances me.

As does the Boston Terrier tin.

As does the Boston Terrier tin.

A bit before the appointed time, we went to Erin’s garden to meet Chester and Michael.

house and cotoneaster

house and cotoneaster

entry lamp

entry lamp

While waiting, I thought about the future garden beds.  I want to leave a path along the fence at least as tall as the picket shadows.

looking southwest

looking southwest

Erin likes to set up a table for dining al fresco, so I don’t want to start the garden too close to the gazebo.

gazebo

gazebo

There will be a long garden bed on each side, with the picket fence width path along the edge, and I want to keep the center wide open for children to play.

tetherball

open center for tetherball and other games

Felix was there and happy to see us.

Felix on the front porch

Felix on the front porch

orange

From the porch, I thought further about the garden design.  Erin wants it to be like mine,  a big sweep of grasses and perennials and some shrubs, nothing that will block the ocean view.

porch

The line of the sprinkler system could be the inner edge of the south garden bed.

Felix thought I might have the power to open the door for him.

Felix thought I might have the power to open the door for him.

We tested the lawn with the half moon edger to see how hard it would be to dig the trenches around the edges of what will be newspaper based beds.  The digging seemed pretty easy!  Then Chester arrived.  I had thought he would need a boat trailer, but he and his stepson Michael had loaded the quite heavy boat onto his truck.

in the driveway

in the driveway

Chester looked at the steps going up to the lawn, and at the rather distant point past the gazebo where I had stuck in a half moon edger to say “the boat stops here”, and then he looked at an opening in the fence on the northwest corner of the lawn and suggested he drive in that way.  I texted Erin with the question, “Can Chester drive his truck on the lawn” and she texted back “YES!” and then “I think so.”  So he drove up the outside access road by the picket fence and very carefully backed all the way in to the boat spot.

truck backed into the future garden

truck backed into the future garden

audience

audience

Chester and the boat on the Olde Towne truck

Chester and the Olde Towne truck

preparing to offload...

preparing to offload…

olde

Chester and Michael

Chester and Michael  (note Felix on his way to investigate)

down

down

boat

Felix and the Olde Towne truck

Felix and the Olde Towne truck

After Chester and Michael departed, I realized the boat was sitting too straight ahead.  I wanted it at an angle that looked like it had washed up from the ocean.  As I grabbed the sides and pulled and yanked to no avail, I said to Allan “Can you help me shift the front over about a foot?”  He grabbed the rope and pulled to the side.  Easy peasy.

Very smart, Allan!

Very smart, Allan!

Here’s what she looks like.  The boat will be at the beginning of the south garden bed, leaving plenty of room for outdoor dining and parties.

boat in place

boat in place

washed ashore

washed ashore

I have known of several garden boats placed so they could be imagined to have washed ashore.  At Linda’s garden, even though the boat was a half mile from the beach, sometimes her guests really believed it had washed in.   Now someone might think we are imagining the boat washed in from Japan, and that is not it at all; there is too much sadness associated with that.  Besides, it is clearly not a Japanese boat.  (That reminds me to recommend again a beautiful book recommended to me by my friend Kathleen Shaw:  Facing the Wave by Gretel Erlich.)

With the boat all set, we finished daylight at the Boreas Inn garden and in Long Beach.

Boreas garden in long shadow time

Boreas garden in long shadow time

I remembered my plan to remake this raised bed along the north edge of the lawn with some good medium-tall grasses:

note to self

note to self; maybe Ilex ‘Sky Pencil’ also!

the glorious Lobelia tupa; would that all the ones I planted had done as well.

the glorious Lobelia tupa; would that all the ones I planted had done as well.

We cut down the tall fennel in Long Beach’s Coulter Park and got home in time for a Lake Street sunset.

from in front of our house...

from in front of our house…

I added most of the fennel stalks to our Corridor of Spooky Plants.  The last of the spooky tall stalks will be added on Halloween day, to make sure the structure is not too heavy if we get wind between now and then.

spooky plant walkway for trick or treaters

spooky plant walkway for trick or treaters

Allan made the little ghosts with small white rags over apple heads.

spiders

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I had planned another all Ilwaco day for Friday because our friend Patt was going to be passing through town. She’s a former resident who had to move away because of her spouse’s job, and she takes every chance to come back and visit.

We began at Larry and Robert’s, where I realized that their Escallonia is the wonderul white Escallonia ‘Iveyi’, old and large. I think of it is rare down here, so I wonder how that happened!

very big and white Escallonia

very big and white Escallonia

I watered while Allan dug the birdbath pedestal into the ground. The base was cracked, and we want to make sure it will not tip over onto one of their little dogs. Allan made it good and solid.

backyard birdbath

backyard birdbath

Then on to Mayor Mike’s; the rambling rose that is climbing into his tree needed a lot of dangling canes clipped with the long handled pruners.

Mike's rose

Mike’s rose

In Mike's garden:  Eryngium 'Jade Frost'

In Mike’s garden: Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’

Kitty corner from Mike’s is Cheri’s garden where we weeded and deadheaded and pulled out a lot of spent Rose Campion.

Cheri's front garden

Cheri’s front garden

We timed it pretty well as when we stopped off at home, we were only running about fifteen minutes late for a coffee klatsch at Olde Towne. I tried to pick Luanne a nice bouquet. However, I was feeling exceedingly tired and could not seem to find enough flowers to make a lush arrangement.

This was the best I could do....

This was the best I could do….

I wish my sweet peas had done as well this year as last year. I suppose I can blame the weather. They are lacking in all “my” gardens compared to last year’s amazing bounty…except for Klipsan Beach Cottages where they are doing well.

Patt had arrived and was already enjoying her time at Olde Towne with Judy and Tom and Donna and MR. Luanne got to take a break and join us.

left to right...Donna, MR. Tom, Allan, Judy, Luanne and (just her shoulder), Patt

left to right…Donna, MR. Tom, Allan, Judy, Luanne and (just her shoulder), Patt

The delicious veggie sandwich on a croissant was mine.

Donna herself took some excellent photos. Here she is behind her big camera:

Donna

She edits her photos in Picasa with all sorts of delightful effects.

Patt and me, photo by Donna McKinley

Patt and me, photo by Donna McKinley

MR and Tom, photo by Donna McKinley

MR and Tom, photo by Donna McKinley

Olde Towne's darling Luanne, photo by Donna McKinley

Olde Towne’s darling Luanne, photo by Donna McKinley

Luanne kept visiting with us till about half an hour after closing time (which is 4 PM); then Allan and I went back to work in Ilwaco. He watered the planters while I weeded and watered at the boatyard.

the planter closest to the boatyard

the planter closest to the boatyard

As almost always, there was boat work going on while I watered from behind the fence.

Pacific Breeze

Pacific Breeze

I had an incident while watering. As I stood behind the chainlink fence, hidden by a tall bronze fennel, I saw a couple walk by. The man does not register with me in particular but the woman stands out because she has a large dog and tattoos and piercings. (All three of those things are shared by a number of my friends.) She walks around a lot with her dog. She has made comments to Allan while he waters that imply she knows something about gardening. This time, I saw she was picking a very LARGE bouquet. I stepped out into a view and said (not shouted) “Hey, no picking!” and added the usual: “If everyone did that, there would be no flowers left.” “Sorry”, she said, seeming sincere. I saw what was in her other hand from the one holding the LARGE bouquet: Professional looking red handled garden clippers. I said, “I am SHOCKED. You even brought clippers!” “Sorry,” she said again and she and her friend and dog walked on. I went out after a bit and thought I should take a photo from afar of finger blight in action (the bouquet in her hand as they walked away) but a car got between me and them. Maybe just as well.

As I went down the garden side of the fence pulling weeds, I saw some more finger blight. As always happens, someone had pulled the flowers off the Echinops (Blue Globe Thistle). It seems to be irresistible to finger blighters wherever I plant it. At least I know the attempt to twist off the flower stem was not from the woman with the red clippers.

finger blight

finger blight

I am amazed and pleased that the Alliums have for some reason been immune to picking, maybe because they are low to the ground. They are teetering due to our recent heavy wind but still there.

Allium albopilosum

Allium albopilosum

The big poppies are just going to seed…

red poppy

red poppy

big fluffy white peony poppy

big fluffy white peony poppy

Allan helped me finish weeding….

You can tell the gardening is entering the less flowery midsummer time...

You can tell the gardening is entering the less flowery midsummer time…

…and then we went to check on the Port Office gardens to make sure they looked excellent for the annual Tuna Classic event. Allan went up on the port office balcony to get some photos of the sporty tuna boats that come to town for the event.

marina overview

marina overview

And he snuck a photo of me working on the south side of the port office.

at work

at work

I was not feeling happy because both of my eyelids were stinging and burning, especially the right one. I thought (and still think) it might be because when I was weeding and clipping at the boatyard, I leaned into the Stipa gigantea ornamental grass to cut some broken stems, and the flower of the grass might have brushed against my eyelid when I closed my eyes to protect myself from the dreaded ornamental grass cut. (I should wear goggles when I do that.)

At home, I did the blog for the day while Allan made dinner and then we watched a show as we ate. The whole time, I fretted and fretted because of the burning eyelid syndrome. This had happened before, twice, in the previous two years, with unpleasant results. In a state of extreme anxiety I almost wept because the very next day was the Gearhart garden tour. I had been counting the days and had indeed been looking forward it it ever since last year’s wonderful Gearhart tour. What if I couldn’t see? What if I had to go to the hospital? Oh, the distress.

The horror!  Above, 6 AM.  Below: 9 AM

The horror! Above, 6 AM.
Below: 9 AM

And indeed, when I woke up at 6 AM my right eye was swollen almost shut, just as I feared.

I took photos to email to Judy to garner sympathy. I did not think I would get a wink more sleep after 6 AM, and fretted about how I could enjoy the tour on only four hours of sleep…but I did fall back asleep for two more hours. There was little pain involved, just some eyelid burning, and my eyes themselves were fine, or I might have had the sense to go to the emergency room (or, er, waited till after the tour and then gone immediately). Fortunately, I had a pair of dark glasses so that my still swollen eyelid and under-eye bag would not scare the other tour guests. So off we went across the bridge.

There was the usual bridge work slowdown.

bridge work

bridge work

The usual complete halt, allowing for a photo through the bridge rails (for which I removed the cold washcloth that I had kept pressed to one stinging eyelid).

view

view

And the slowdown allowing a closer look at the bridge itself as we go nice and slowly up the highest spot.

bridge

And then, after all my suspense and fear of missing the tour, we were on to Gearhart for Gardens by the Sea!

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All that means around here is we crossed the bridge over the Columbia River to Astoria, Gearhart, and Seaside. We began our Saturday with a stop at Larry’s Antique Gallery Too! shop which involved much chatting and dog petting.

shop dog

shop dog

Then a stop at Olde Towne Café to trade compost buckets…More schmoozing ensued.

Captain Phil

Captain Phil

Then, of course, we had to take a walk through the Ilwaco Saturday Market to take photos for Discover Ilwaco.

Ilwaco Saturday Market

Ilwaco Saturday Market

Had a gander at a garden we used to do. Well, now that we live just a block from there, we have offered to return. It’s looking pretty bad! But for some strange reason they don’t want us back. The mind boggles. Since I offered, and was turned down (hearing that only from a third party after we submitted a bid), it has gotten so much worse I don’t even want it anymore. So there! (The person who cares for it is an excellent gardener but is overbooked and lives much further than one block away.)

big blackberry vines

big blackberry vines

Uh oh, somehow it got to be 2 PM and we were still in Ilwaco, so off we went toward Astoria. The previous week, we had had excellent garden company in our garden: Debbie H and Helen W. on Saturday and Laura D. on Sunday. Helen had invited us to come back and see her Astoria garden in June; we had previously seen it in July and in winter.

We also wanted to check out nurseries, and Allan wanted to go grocery shopping (how tedious!).

By 2:37, we were crossing the Astoria Megler bridge, to my usual terror.

the beginning

the beginning

the view to the west

the view to the west

too close for comfort

too close for comfort

cargo ship

cargo ship

construction guy

construction guy; I wish I were that brave!

down the curve

down the curve

I like it when the bridge is being worked on because it slows down the traffic and there is less passing on the bridge.

We survived and turned left to go into Astoria.

We survived and turned left to go into Astoria.

Somehow, though, we went by the Mill Pond Village and ended up on the road going east out of town, so we turned left into the Alderbrook neighbourhood to turn around. It’s a hidden gem just east of town; I only discovered it because a friend lived there for awhile. Two blocks wide, it’s next to the Columbia River and seems to have a lot of gardeners.

Alderbrook

Alderbrook

Alderbrook

pig weathervane

pig weathervane

and right next door, another!

and right next door, another!

Alderbrook

Alderbrook

seems like an artistic neighbourhood

seems like an artistic neighbourhood

vintage trailer in Alderbrook

vintage trailer in Alderbrook

by the river

by the river

Alderbrook riverside

Alderbrook riverside

interesting garden

interesting garden

There was an art gallery there, but this cannot really be a grocery store, despite the sign. Or can it?

former store?

former store?

an idyllic enclave

an idyllic enclave

Alderbrook does feel quite separate from the rest of the town. I was getting anxious about whether or not we would arrive at the Gearhart nursery before it closed, so I did not photograph any houses on the way out, and I now wish I had taken a photo of my friend’s former tiny house and garden; it still looked good from the street.

as one emerges from Alderbook and turns right, back into town...

as one emerges from Alderbook and turns right, back into town…

We did find the Mill Pond Village but will save Helen’s garden for its own entry, next, because it is so lovely.

We got to Back Alley Gardens with 45 minutes to spare (if they close at five).

Back Alley Gardens

Back Alley Gardens

I got some cool Salpiglossis ‘Chocolate’, another Hebe ‘Quicksilver’, a pretty purple and yellow annual, and some variegated thymes but was sad that they did not have a big shipment of unusual plants from Xera like they did last year at this time.

Salpiglossis 'Chocolate'

Salpiglossis ‘Chocolate’

Catalina grape

Catalina grape

As always, we admired a lot of the indoor garden themed art in the adjoining Natural Nook.

Informative tea towels with hummingbirds and dragonflies

Informative tea towels with hummingbirds and dragonflies

birdhouses

birdhouses

sculpture

sculpture

The Natural Nook

The Natural Nook

Then on we went to Seven Dees in Seaside without a feeling of time pressure because they are now open till seven in summer.

I usually don't go for cutesy critters, but there is something about this hippo...

I usually don’t go for cutesy critters, but there is something about this hippo…

Seaside 7 Dees

Seaside 7 Dees

a mossy 7

a mossy 7

catnip protected from...

catnip protected from…

one of the shop cats

one of the shop cats

I do love a moggie.

I do love a moggie. And they know it. Probably from the baby talk.

Our two carts of lovely purchases.

Our two carts of lovely purchases.

Catchy names seemed to abound.

Geum 'Alabama Slammer'

Geum ‘Alabama Slammer’

Astrantia 'Vanilla Gorilla'

Astrantia ‘Vanilla Gorilla’ (next day, in my garden)

Vanilla Gorilla may have been a Back Alley purchase. On his recent visit to our garden, Ciscoe Morris told us that a study in the UK showed that Astrantia REPELS SLUGS. I already love the plant and now have more reason to collect them.

And an exciting new Eryngium which stays small so might be great in containers:

Eryngium 'Blue Hobbit'

Eryngium ‘Blue Hobbit’

As we left 7 Dees at 5:45, I suddenly got an ominous feeling: Didn’t Costco close early on Saturdays? We had wanted to go there last to get some frozen food, but we had made a terrible error because when we pulled into their parking lot at 6:05, they had closed five minutes before. This is so hard to remember as it seems so early for a grocery store of any sort to close on a Saturday; it probably goes with their reputation of being very good to their employees.

Oh dear. We stopped at Fred Meyer and while Allan did some minor grocery shopping I checked the plant department and found more salpiglossis. It used to be an unusual annual to find but has obviously caught on.

common name:  Beardtongue

common name: Beardtongue

I also was surprised to see very inexpensive Leycesteria ‘Golden Lanterns’ there.

Golden Lanterns

Golden Lanterns

A very peachy coreopsis spoke to me of Lorna (Andersen’s RV Park) but it was too leggy so I passed it by.

Lorna's colour palette...

Lorna’s colour palette…

I got myself some more heirloom tomatoes and peppers for the edible garden tour; I still wonder if my garden will look ridiculously under-edible.

Hint of the day:

To my horror, both 7 Dees and Fred Meyer were selling the horrid Aegopodium (Bishops Weed). Do not fall for this dreadful thug.

at 7 Dees:  Do not fall for this.

at 7 Dees: Do not fall for this.

At Fred Meyer

At Fred Meyer

Don't do it!

Don’t do it!

Do not buy this plant, don’t take starts from anybody, or you will so regret it. This amusing article will tell you more, but I have to disagree with the author’s assertion that Bishops Weed does not seem to grow into lawn turf…because it does. It also looks terrible after it blooms and does need to be sheared at that time.

Back we went across the river…

approaching the dreaded four mile long bridge

approaching the dreaded four mile long bridge

glad to slow down for a flagger at the top

glad to slow down for a flagger at the top

the descent

the descent

the view upriver

the view upriver

Allan says the bridge does not bother him although he did find it startling the first time he saw how high the span goes. He does wish that people could not pass on the bridge. We obviously survived another crossing because I am here to tell this story.

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Friday we were rushing about to get the Ilwaco gardens (planters and trees on First Ave, Ilwaco boatyard garden and Howerton Street gardens) to the peak of perfection that I like to see before the children’s parade on the first Saturday in May.

Boatyard has a long, long garden.

Boatyard has a long, long garden.  With a recurring horsetail problem.

in the boatyard:  calendula

in the boatyard: calendula

a very early bachelor's button

a very early bachelor’s button

last of the narcissi

last of the narcissi

I knew my friends Patt and Judy were meeting for a coffee klatsch at Olde Towne.  Patt had moved away but still has a part time job here so is usually here once a week.  I told Allan while we were weeding that we could probably only stay at the coffee klatsch for fifteen minutes because we still had so much to do.

When we got to Olde Towne, I did not even notice the odd sight of paper shamrocks on the door and only slowly did it dawn on me that there was something peculiar about seeing shamrock decorations on the table.  Oh!!!  It turned out that an event was going on:  a belated birthday party for me!  Olde Towne had been in transition to their new location during my St Patrick’s Day birthday but all this time they had been planning to organize a late party.

the shamrocks clued me in

the shamrocks clued me in

As you can see below, I got a garden snail who will be just perfect in the bogsy wood…and Luanne’s son Michael is making me a bogsy wood sign!  You can also see in the montage above a lovely purple and green scarf made by Rosemary  and a cunning little round box from Heather at NIVA green, who knows how much I love little boxes.  Also some jam from Patricia…a beautiful vase…cards….I have never before had two birthdays in one year.

new critter for the bogsy wood

new critter for the bogsy wood

Chester

Chester

Part of me still had that anxious feeling about work, but when Chester of Olde Towne presented me with some photos of the original house that stood on the site of our double wide, I became completely absorbed and considerable time went by!  I had been so wanting to see what the house looked like.  The previous owner of our land had had it burned down because she wanted a double wide!

the original

the original

from the back

from the back

Nove 2011

Nov 2011

As a lover of vintage houses, I could wish the old house was still here.  But if a restored vintage house had still sat here in 2010, I probably would not have been able to afford this big piece of land.  (And we do still have the original workshed.)

photo by Queen La De Da

photo by Queen La De Da

I had to tear myself away from Olde Towne so that Allan and I could get back to work.  The new little garden at Veterans Field absolutely had to be watered as the dedication ceremony was the next morning.  So off to Long Beach we went.  The first thing I realized was that the city crew had put the two round planters right in front of the big new stage.  I did not think they were going to move them until the stage was actually finished, so I did not put any new plants in them.  Oh, dear!   Fortunately, Narcissus ‘Baby Moon’ will carry them through the weekend without too much embarrassment.

not really ready for prime time

not really ready for prime time

The red white and blue confetti garden is still settling in nicely though.

The garden is a semicircle around this little plaza.

The garden is a semicircle around this little plaza.

It looks pretty red white and blue

It looks pretty red white and blue

Not being a nationalist, this is the first red, white and blue garden I have ever done.

After watering it, we hurried back to the Port of Ilwaco where we hoped to finish the gardens along Howerton.  (The east end we had got done before the surprise party;  we still had Time Enough Books, the Port office and Nisbett Gallery, the Powell gallery and the east end parking lot gardens to do!)  It was not to be:  Our excellent social time had cut the afternoon short, but we did get done all the way to where the parade will turn.  The garden at the east end of Howerton is past the parade route and by a parking lot and so people may or may not notice it still has some horsetail in it.  We would have worked till 8 and finished but we had another social engagement at 7:30!  Allan dropped the trailer off at home two blocks away while I stayed and weeded till the last possible second and am pleased that I got the largest weeds out.  And then we were off to the Depot Restaurant with only a couple of minutes to spare.

It only took minutes after being seated at the table for me to stop fretting that the port garden weeding had been done in a rather rushed way and without complete perfection.  Our friend and client Lisa from Crank’s Roost was treating us to the special wine dinner along with our fellow landscaper and friend Ed Strange and our dear longtime friend Patti from Seaview.  I credit the company and not the wine with being able to just let go and be and recognize that the my career will not end if a few weeds remain along a parade route.

I had completely forgotten that the dinner was in part a belated birthday treat, which certainly tied in with the afternoon.  In fact, I was starting to feel I had been born in May.

Depot owner Nancy Gorshe pours.

Depot owner Nancy Gorshe pours.

And the food:

the salmon

the salmon

the steak, with Ed's fork in motion

the steak, with Ed’s fork in motion

From the Depot newsletter:

MARYHILL RESERVE

WINEMAKER DINNERJoin winemakers and owners Craig and Vicki Leuthold for a fun evening of tasting great wines from the Columbia River Gorge!

WELCOME WINE

Maryhill 2010 

Winemakers White or Red

FIRST COURSE

Spicy Mango, Toasted Macadamia Nuts and House Greens tossed with

Sesame Ginger Vinaigrette

Maryhill 2011 Riesling

SECOND COURSE

Creamy Roasted Butternut Squash Soup topped with Toasted Pumpkin Seeds and Pumpkin Seed Oil

Maryhill 2011 Viognier

ENTREES

Pan Seared Bacon wrapped King Salmon on Horseradish Smashed Potatoes topped with Porcini Mushroom Cream Sauce

Maryhill 2010 Mouvedre

 OR

Sliced Wagyu Flat Iron Steak on Cipollini Onion and Celery Root Puree topped with Arugula and Charred Green Onion Salad and Crumbled Blue Cheese

Maryhill 2010 Les Collines Cabernet

DESSERT

Apple Crumble Tart topped with Whip Cream and  House made Caramel Sauce

Maryhill 2007 Port

And here is my conclusion after a day of choosing between work and friends.  I have been driven, self-driven, as a self employed person since age 20.  I am an exacting boss of myself.  Maybe that is why I have managed to keep my cleaning business going for 18 years in Seattle and a gardening business for almost twenty years down here.  But the world will not end if we sometimes choose time with our lovely, kind and generous friends over getting the work done to standards that only we have created for ourselves.  (I do think that gardening allows more leeway than cleaning did, though…I could not have left a house partly clean before an event!)  I also feel fortunate that on Friday, nothing particularly needed watering.   That is a garden task that could not have been postponed for anything.

And here is the proof that the parade went on smoothly even despite a few weeds, weeds which I doubt were even noticed at all:

the parade begins

the parade begins

Tulips and Children's Parade

Tulips and Children’s Parade

tulips

passing the boatyard

passing the boatyard

impressive hairdo

impressive hairdo

Time Enough Books garden

Time Enough Books garden
garden by Port office

garden by Port office

Following the parade, we took photos at the first day of the 2013 Saturday Market, a weekly task we have set for ourselves in order to enhance the Discover Ilwaco Facebook page.

At 11:30 AM, on my way to down Lake Street to the parade, I had had to stop for an emergency watering at Larry and Robert’s  garden.  A couple of new plants were lying sideways with their tongues hanging out from thirst.  The temperature was an unseasonable high seventies.

So this evening we had to go to Long Beach to water the planters because I want them to look fresh and happy for tomorrow’s big parade.  There, the heavy wind was back.

the last windblown tulips

the last windblown tulips

I decided to leave even partly shattered ones just to get a little more colour.  I wish there were some May flowering tulips with shorter stems.

You can see Allan in his orange vest watering across the street.

the last hurrah

the last hurrah

Town was crowded with happy tourists.  Maneuvering was a bit difficult in places.  We got it done and I can rest easy…but I know that my own garden and Larry and Robert’s simply must get water tomorrow as more of this strange hot weather is expected to continue.

Long Beach town

Long Beach town

 

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After a late summer and fall of immense change, we took comfort in the rituals of holidays on the Peninsula.  (Speaking of rituals, it took me until late autumn to realize to my dismay that I had completely forgotten to go on September’s Cannon Beach Cottage Tour.  Argh, what a shame that was.)

But in early December up went the crab pot tree….

world’s largest crab pot tree in Ilwaco

and on a starry night, came the lighting ceremony and crab-centric Christmas carols.

by the boatyard at night

lighting of the crab pot tree

lighted boats at the port

the crab pot tree

At the port on tree-lighting night, shops stayed open and lighted boats sailed out to the bar and back.

Don Nisbett Gallery, always with hot chocolate on lighted boat night….

At The Planter Box, Christmas trees arrived.

trees at the Planter Box

The Hungry Harbor Grille owners assembled their expansive Christmas Village in the back dining room of the restaurant.

Hungry Harbor Christmas Village

I imagined that I lived in a two story apartment of the top floor of the building, lower right.  For some reason it appealed to me more than any Victorian village house, and it did have a roof garden and close proximity to a greenhouse.

We made the last rounds of our gardening jobs.  Mary and Denny of Klipsan Beach Cottages always did the best garden holiday decorating of any of our clients.

at Klipsan Beach Cottages

December at KBC

Olde Towne Trading Post Café and Antiques

Mid December found Allan and I at last on our staycation.  I went most days to Olde Towne Café and, realizing it was the perfect dream of a coffee shop, created a Facebook page for them.

Olde Towne holidays

How very much we needed our winter of peace, puttering, reading and rest.  Much as I have done in 2012 by writing these flashback journals, in the winter of ’09-’10 I scanned photos of the past and relived thirty years of memories.

 

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