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Posts Tagged ‘Oman Builders Supply’

Annuals planting hell continued today.  We had to be somewhere at 11:30 so made a rushed stop at the Planter Box to pick up more Cosmos and Salvia viridis (painted sage) for three north end jobs.

At the Planter Box:  Primula vialii for sale

At the Planter Box: Primula vialii for sale

Rush, rush, stress…..  Hard to think in a slightly warm greenhouse.

We then went to our now former job, Seanest, and met with the person who we think will be able to take over the garden care.  He is new to gardening, but it is a simple landscape these days.  We walked through, and I took lots of photos which I am emailing him with details about what the plants are, which are weeds, what to do to each area at each time of year.

arbor rebuilding

The driftwood temple, which had partially collapsed last time we were there, is being rebuilt with plain wood which will be dressed up with driftwood.

I do not feel particularly poignant about leaving the job even though it is a garden Robert and I created years ago; Allan and I are so overbooked that cannot get any of our gardens to the state I want them in right now.  So, goodbye to Seanest.

farewell, dear garden

farewell, dear garden

Oh dear.  Now I am feeling sentimental after all.   I would have hung onto the job if the house had still been owned by artist Phyllis Ray, who liked a more lushly planted garden than the low maintenance preference of the current owner.  (That doesn’t make much sense because a more complex garden takes more time, but also inspires more love on my part.)

Next we did our minimal bit of planting at Golden Sands Assisted Living.  The budget is small, but what is a garden (of ours) without four six packs of Cosmos and 12 plants of painted sage?  I was disheartened to learn that not only have the sprinklers not been installed in the courtyard garden but there is no plan to have them set up any time soon because of another very important maintenance job that is taking priority.  I responded that it is hard for me to do a job when the plants are not watered.  I was understood, and there is talk of staff volunteering to keep it watered.  We shall see.  We do this garden at a low “grandma rate” in honour of my mother having lived here and because I feel for anyone who can no longer have a garden of their own.  I want great beauty here, but it is hard going.

Below:  Allan got this nasty area weeded;  I was fretting to myself about the watering so did not think to take a before photo.

tidier

tidier

This is outside our four flower beds, but to have it infested with grass and horsetail brings down the tone of the whole garden.  The daylilies are the boring Stella D’Oro and are here because they were free!

There are still many weeds in the four flower quadrants, so even though we had intended to only stay long enough to get the plants in the ground, we were there for over two hours.

The four quadrants:

southeast

southeast quadrant

southwest quadrant

southwest quadrant

northwest; here is the one where I ran out of Cow Fiber mulch.

northwest; here is the one where I ran out of Cow Fiber mulch.
close up of plant table

close up of plant table in northwest quadrant

The best quadrant is the one that is outside the window where my mom lived for a year.  She invested money into buying plants for it so it has more interesting variety…even though like all the quadrants it suffers from the free plant syndrome:  Plants that are given away tend to be too free to multiply and end up being too much of one thing.  For example, all these quadrants are heavy with a pink scabiosa that I brought from many reseedlings at Klipsan Beach Cottages.

northeast quadrant

northeast quadrant, mom’s former garden area

I wonder if the resident of my mom’s old room would like to have the Euonymus in front of her window cut low enough so she could see out.  If only we had time.

another weedy bed in terribly poor soil

another weedy bed in terribly poor soil

I find this job disheartening at present.   There are areas to weed outside the four quadrants, but no time or budget to do so as often as they need.

I pondered whether there might be a way to have a fundraiser for buying some good, exciting, appropriate (drought tolerant!!) plants for the garden, or more mulch, or help getting the mulch down the long hallway.  There is no easy access to bring soil into the garden.

Allan said the secret to getting fundraisers is schmoozing, which we do not have time to do.

more weed blurred free Stella D'Oro

more weed blurred free Stella D’Oro and vinca

It was a relief to leave (even though I wanted more time to weed there, and more mulch, and a guarantee of good watering), and move on to the beautiful gardens at Klipsan Beach Cottages.

KBC fenced garden

KBC fenced garden

There, I removed a wheelbarrow full of weeds from the fenced garden (mostly the bad aster, which wants to be a good plant but is not).

out, bad aster

out, bad aster

I also pulled a fair amount of elephant garlic, vindicating owner Denny who has never liked it.  Its tall glaucous stems and Allium flowers have amused me greatly but suddenly there is far too much of it.

uh oh, too much!

uh oh, too much!

Why can’t the the gorgeous and expensive Alliums albopilosum and schubertii spread madly like this?  (And would I still love them if they did?)

by the greenhouse

a well behaved white Allium by the greenhouse

plants to go in

plants to go in

While I weeded and planted Cosmos (barely finding room to squeeze in three six packs), painted sage, a chocolate cosmos, and a petunia ‘Pretty Much Picasso’, Allan deadheaded the many spent narcissi around the property and did some weeding outside the fence.

by the pond

by the pond

trimmed ferns looking lovely now

trimmed ferns looking lovely now

one left out of three

one left out of three

We stopped next at Oman Builders Supply where I found several Alliums had been swiped.  Two were completely gone and the stems looked as if they had been cut, not broken.  Two were broken off and lying in the garden next to a footprint.  Whose shoe fits it?

I am sure that every public gardener makes a plan for what a garden will look like, and probably most of those plans are thwarted by finger blight.

With the larger Alliums, the frustration comes partly because the bulbs are rather expensive.

what a shame

what a shame

My favourite, Allium schubertii, is still there.

My favourite, Allium schubertii, is still there.

The first year, I went to the effort to plant Cosmos at the back of this small garden. I gave it up because it resulted in too much fretting about them getting enough water, and the perennials have filled in enough to make an attractive show on their own.  I contented myself with adding six painted sage in an empty space at one end of the garden.

OBS garden

OBS garden with Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’

We finished our north end gardens of the day with the Wiegardt Gallery.  The many alliums there were undisturbed.

Wiegardt Gallery

Wiegardt Gallery

Wiegardts

Working in to the evening does provide a beautiful light in the garden.

Miscanthus, Aquilegia, Rhododendron

Miscanthus, Aquilegia, Rhododendron

Alliums

Alliums

Alliums

Wiegardt Gallery

lilac and the north facing studio windows

lilac and the north facing studio windows

While of course it would have been satisfying to get all the weeding and edging done, we had to head back down to Long Beach at 7 PM.  A few Salvia patens had been riding with us since yesterday and really needed to get their feet in the ground at the Veterans Field stage and Police Station planters.  I had wanted to add two to the Lewis and Clark square planter but realized it will fill in without them (unless I remove the architectural centerpiece of elephant garlic).  Downtown was jumping with exuberant people.   I felt so tired I was glad to get out of there.

We just had time to go to the Port of Ilwaco and plant some painted sage in the new garden on the south side of the office.  A few of the Saturday Market tents had already gone up.

tents

We did not stay for the sunset.  I had plants to sort out at home for tomorrow.

the view from the port office garden, 8:09 PM

the view from the port office garden, 8:09 PM

By dark I had tomorrow’s plants ready and a quick walk round the garden applying sluggo. That’s what they get for letting me see a couple slime their way across the dusky lawn.

Much as I long for, as I am sure Allan does too, a day OFF (for my own garden), tomorrow we will at least get the Ilwaco street planters planted up with some diascia I have here, and make a list of what else they need.  But first, Saturday is Market Day at the Port and then the local Coast Guard station is having an open house at Cape Disappointment.  There is an interesting view of Ilwaco from there that I have not seen for years, so we want to take time out to go.

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It certainly is hard to get back in the work mode after a contemplative three day trip to the Sylvia Beach Hotel.  Especially when I see how weedy my own garden is.  But Saturday, due to our heavy responsibilities for resort gardens, we did make it up to Klipsan Beach Cottages, Oman Builders Supply and Wiegardt Gallery to do the basic weeding and the deadheading of tulips and narcissi.

at KBC: tulip 'Green Star'

at KBC: tulip ‘Green Star’

and Tulip 'Cummins'

and Tulip ‘Cummins’

I hate to see the end of the Narcissi.  I often feel that they are my favourite flower, and if that is so, then they are over by early May and leave only lesser favourites for the rest of the year.  Surely they are not really my favourite.  It just feels that way because they are so glorious and so early that they make a strong impression.

Narcissi at KBC

Narcissi at KBC

In a mix I bought for the A Frame woodsy garden at KBC are some doubles.  I don’t really like the doubles and never buy them for Long Beach.  What do you think?

double narcissi...good or not so good?

double narcissi…good or not so good?

Among my favourites are the ones that look like birds with swept back wings and the ones with the tiniest of cups.

poeticus Narcissi

small cupped Narcissi

AT KBC, the trimmed ferns continue to unfurl…

sword ferns

sword ferns

The unfurling is the most amazing sight, if only one could sit and watch for days.

Euphorbia characias wulfenii continues to impress with its long period of bloom:

It's been like this since February!

It’s been like this since February!

The Welsh poppy is the first “poppy” to bloom.   My grandmother had these all over her garden:

Meconopsis cambrica

Meconopsis cambrica

A tiny little daphne (I think!) that Mary C. bought is almost hidden by bulb foliage:

If it is fragrant, it should be on top of a wall, because it is very low to the ground and far from my nose.

If it is fragrant, it should be on top of a wall, because it is very low to the ground and far from my nose.

The island bed around the pond is at its floriferous peak right now:

flowering treeds and shrubs

flowering tree and shrub with unfurling ferns and Japanese maple leaves

The on to a brief deadheading stop at Oman Builders Supply where one of my “green tulips” made me happy.

Tulip 'China Town'

Tulip ‘Greenland’ (I think)

We were in such a hurry at Wiegardt’s to get a satisfactory amount of weeding done that I took no photo at all.  We needed to get home and have a bit of turnaround time and then go to dinner with Carol, who after our trip to the Sylvia Beach Hotel had stayed in Long Beach for two more nights of vacation time.

Of course, we could not enter the restaurant until we had deadheaded the tulips and narcissi in the the Depot Restaurant garden!

Depot tulips

Depot tulips

tulips and narcissi at the Depot

tulips and narcissi at the Depot

And then….a last social get together with Carol until I see her again in the fall, when she plans a visit to the Peninsula.

The Depot was busy so we ate at the counter.

The Depot was busy so we ate at the counter.

And then, in fall 2014, we will, I hope, go back to the SBH.  I just cannot take spring vacations; they throw me off the gardening schedule too much.  We have both agreed that we need to stay at SBH for more nights (but will we end of extending our visit night after night because we won’t be able to leave….at all?)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The day started chilly but dry and with a chance of showers.  I optimistically pictured them as light and intermittent.   The knowledge that new plants had arrived at the Basket Case Greenhouse put me in a cheerful mood, as did the sight of the new-to-us tulip “Green Star’ in bloom in our volunteer garden at the Ilwaco Post Office.

Tulip 'Green Star'

Tulip ‘Green Star’

We headed north through Long Beach because we needed to buy some magnesium sulfate at The Planter Box.  (We apply it to roses at this time of year:  a cupful per rose to encourage basal breaks.)

Long Beach planter at the stoplight

Long Beach planter at the stoplight

At The Planter Box, I had the great pleasure of petting some baby ducks.

ducklings!

ducklings!

While we were at the Basket Case admiring the new plant acquisitions, the cold rain began.  Misty wore a fluffy pink coat and still shivered.

Walter and Misty

Walter and Misty

We filled our small car with wonderful plants, with me fretting to myself as usual that someone else would come along and get some of the best ones before I do.

Eryngium 'Jade Frost'

Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’!

From the Basket Case, we drove to Andersen’s RV Park and deadheaded the road box.  I suggested we drive on to points north because the sky looked just a bit light around the edges and the weather might improve as we traveled.  We traveled to Ocean Park and deadheaded a few narcissi from the Oman and Son Builders Supply garden.

OBS spring bulbs

OBS spring bulbs

and rain...

and rain…

The rain was not just wet but very chilly.   We decided to go north of Nahcotta to pick up a free composter that had been offered to us.  When we turned onto the residential road off Sandridge a memory surfaced from past work.

One summer before 2002, Robert and I had cared for the garden at the end of the road.  It had had a view of the bay from its deck and we had planted containers on the deck.  The new trendy plant at the time was Helichrysum petiolare and oh how I loved it.  Only later in the summer did I find out that the man of that household called it “that grey junk that she planted.”

I also had a strong memory of dropping a container of Soil Moist (the synthetic product we then used in pots;  now we use Zeba Quench, even though it is getting harder to find) on the lawn and having to pick up all the slippery little jelly pieces and then having to put a cone there so no one would walk on it and fall.  What an embarrassment!

not the best gardening memories!

not the best gardening memories!

Just to the left of the top of the driveway, our sad Soil Moist incident occurred.

And here is our wonderful new composter, a valuable acquisition.  It rotates.

nice composter

nice composter

Heading south again, we stopped at the Wiegardt Gallery to deadhead a few narcissi and plant a ‘Jade Frost’ Eryngium and a pine scented rosemary (intoxicating!).

Allan planting in the rain

Allan planting in the rain

We had piled our new plants on top of our raincoats and were still hoping the rain would stop.   The narcissi glowed in the grey weather and took my mind off being cold.

Narcissi

Narcissi

at Wiegardt Gallery

at Wiegardt Gallery

love the wee frilly cup!

love the wee frilly cup!

Narcissi and pine scented rosemary

Narcissi and pine scented rosemary

The rain washed away my enthusiasm for weeding the bed at the north end of the parking lot.  We decided an in-car Hawaiian barbecue feast might pass the time till the rain lifted so we stopped at Tu Tu’s Lunch Wagon in Ocean Park.

Tu Tu's

Tu Tu’s

During our car picnic the truth finally sunk in:  the rain had no intention of stopping.  We determined that we would at least get the narcissi deadheaded at Klipsan Beach Cottages and Andersen’s and then go on home.

Ocean Park interlude:  Why I dislike pampas grass:

so ugly if not cut back

so ugly if not cut back

But we love this driftwood fence and admire it every time we are in Ocean Park.

lovely

lovely

Then on to the deadheading at Klipsan Beach Cottages.

very wet

very wet

Oh how deeply thrilled I was to see that over the past week. Luis had mulched the fenced garden with the washed dairy manure from The Planter Box!  We are still behind on work so we are so glad to not have to do this.  What a beautifully detailed job he did, too.

mulched fenced garden

mulched fenced garden

a beautiful job by Luis

a beautiful job by Luis

stunning dark red tulips

stunning dark red tulips
Tulip 'Cool Crystal'

Tulip ‘Cool Crystal’

tulips

Tulips

Tulips

a returning tulip

a returning tulip

Most of the large KBC tulips are planted in pots and treated as annuals, but this particular tulip (above) has returned year after year in the garden.

Tulip

tulip

by the basement door

After attending to the house garden we walked across the drive to deadhead narcissi at the A Frame (one of the rentals when not occupied by its owners, Pete and Darlene).  Darlene wanted a vast show of narcissi in her woods garden so last fall we planted more, and more, and more…and finally this is the first year we got the breathtaking show that we wanted.  Enjoy:

entry to A Frame driveway

entry to A Frame driveway

A Frame garden A Callistemon blooms among the narcissi….

Narcissi

what a show!

what a show!

Allan had finally retrieved his raincoat from under the plants in the car and he toned will with the narcissi display.

Allan

narcissi and clam cleaning shed

narcissi and clam cleaning shed

The windowboxes on the cottages feature tiny species bulbs.  This will be the last year for the windowboxes;  they are being phased out and these bulbs will instead be displayed in some larger seasonal containers.  We all agree we’ll miss the windowboxes but they take too much time in the busy summer.

cottage windowbox

cottage windowbox

cottage windowbox

cottage windowbox

It’s nice to have the view of looking up into the faces of the flowers.  Sometimes they look back.

tulip

tulip

Owner Mary asked me to take some photos inside the cottages for the website…That made for a nice dry job for awhile while Allan continued to weed.

windowbox from inside

windowbox from inside

a wonderful place to stay

a wonderful place to stay

much more pleasant than out in the rain

much more pleasant than out in the rain

I fell in love with this valance in the cottage four kitchen.

I fell in love with this valance in the cottage four kitchen.

The cottages all have guest journals and I do so want to come up some winter day and read them all.  The last time I read them was the winter when Robert and I painted the cottages inside, to make some winter money, and that must have been before 2002.

room journal

room journal

guests from Russia!

guests from Russia!

and a recommendation

and a recommendation

Before we moved on from KBC, three more shots of the garden:

by the garage: Corokia cotoneaster

by the garage: Corokia cotoneaster

sword fern unfurling...the payoff for all the earlier cutting back

sword fern unfurling…the payoff for all the earlier cutting back

rhododendron and waterfall

rhododendron and waterfall

On the way back south I was sorry to have forgotten to even take a look at the Golden Sands Assisted Living garden….and our second visit of the year is so overdue…but we no doubt would have seen some big need that would have given me sleepless hours tonight.  We drove straight on to Andersen’s to deadhead the narcissi in the RV park.

west side garden

west side garden

Payson Hall planters

Payson Hall planters

tulips

tulips

Lorna will be thrilled that her tulips have almost popped, but the most thrilling sight of the entire day to me was that her sweet peas are up.  With the cold wet weather I have been terribly worried, having planted all the special seeds with no way to replace them if they failed.

Thank you, Mother Nature, for those teeny tiny sprouts.

Thank you, Mother Nature, for those teeny tiny sprouts.

The silver lining to the day is that although this blog entry took much longer than I thought it would, I may have time to read a few back entries of the Tootlepedal blog tonight.   I don’t know how he gets so much done and also writes such long blog entries each day.  Perhaps with practice at daily writing will come more speed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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At last we headed up north on February 15th to our favourite job, Klipsan Beach Cottages.   (Hrm, Allan says his favourite jobs are Long Beach and Ilwaco because he feels he does more good for the most people in those very public gardens.  And he adds because there is so much appreciation in the towns from the top—city and port administrators—on down to the passersby.)

KBC: Time to wake up!

KBC: Time to wake up!

inside the fenced garden

inside the fenced garden

Valentine's Day lights in the center of the garden

Valentine’s Day lights in the center of the garden

Water feature: the Gunnera leaf was a gift.

Water feature: the Gunnera leaf was a gift.

and a greeter (Timmy or Sarah)

and a greeter (Timmy or Sarah)

Next, on the same day, Oman Builders Supply in Ocean Park.  Oops, the Gaura looked absolutely terrible and had to be cut back severely.  I wonder how long it had looked ghastly?  But soon the garden had a tidy appearance.

Oman Builders Supply garden

Oman Builders Supply garden

At Wiegardt Gallery, the ornamental grasses caught the late afternoon sun beautifully…until we chopped them down.

looking from Wiegardt Gallery south toward Bay Avenue

looking from Wiegardt Gallery south toward Bay Avenue

What the photo does not show is all the white blades of grass that had blown all over the lawn and down to the Bay to Ocean walking path, all of which we obsessively raked and picked up because that it the kind of gardening business we are.

On February 16th, thrilling news!  The Basket Case Greenhouse had opened for the season and we made our first plant purchase!

primroses and violas

primroses and violas

We then went on to Andersen’s RV Park where Allan did hours of tedious weeding, as did I, eventually, but first I did the more satisfying job of pruning two big hydrangeas.  I am so very glad we no longer do the job of the 300 hydrangeas; it put us way too far behind in the wake up calls to our regular gardens.

before and after

before and after

The day grew increasingly cold and windy and I felt miserable but dogged, especially when I joined Allan on the west (beach) side of the house in the full effect of the weather.  We preservered, and as we drove home the rain came.  I had a very much enjoyed a hot cup of tea and warm socks.

On February 17th we got halfway, or less than halfway, done with the the cutting back of grasses on Discovery Heights.   We started at the top and will work our way down the four gardens.

the top garden before and after

the top garden before and after

and another view of the top garden before and after

and another view of the top garden before and after

T-Junction garden

T Junction garden before and after (looking north)

and because I am obsessed with before and after spring clean up shots:

T-Junction garden looking south, before and after

T-Junction garden looking south, before and after

You might see two Phormiums up top….from long ago and oddly not looking too bad!

The chopping of grasses and raking and weeding takes considerable time, so we did not even get to middle and lower garden, but they will be next, after a five day break which I am about to explain.

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