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Posts Tagged ‘Oriental poppies. what not to plant’

Today we got the last of the Cosmos planted. I could think of two unplanted places that might take some, so I suppose I might buy a few more six packs, but maybe not! It is a shame that there are still some very nice Cosmos at the Planter Box that need a home. I suggest local gardeners go buy some. Oh, but not all the Cutesies. I am dissatisfied with having Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ as the only tall plant on the LB welcome sign, south side. The north side, with Cosmos, looks better. So I think we will add four six packs of cutesy cosmos there. (It, like ‘Sonata’, is short.)

Today, we were surprised by a fierce rainstorm while at the bank, so we went to Olde Towne, just a block away. We wound up staying a bit after the rain stopped, just because life is pleasant there.

Olde Towne Café

Olde Towne Café

We put in Luanne’s two flower containers the two different colours of Salvia patens grown by the Planter Box. Not sure what the blue one was called in the seed catalog but the pink is called “Patio Pink”. I adore Salvia patens and before this year have only seen it in cobalt blue and “Cambridge” (light) blue.

The cobalt blue is still my favourite.

The cobalt blue (left) is still my favourite.

We stopped at Larry and Robert’s to put two Petunia ‘Pretty Much Picasso’ in the boat and two Salvia patens in the pots on the front steps. I just needed a home for my last four Salvia patens, and now they are dealt with!

Larry and Robert's east side

Larry and Robert’s east side

I discussed with Larry some exciting plans for the back yard, now that they have had their old deck removed!

Next, on to Mayor Mike’s…but a pause to wait out more of this:

rain

intense squall; not worried because ’twas light around the edges.

In the front corner, closest to the street, I planted a signature patch of three Cosmos and three painted sage, and three more of each elsewhere in the garden. Now the painted sage is all planted (but there are a very few more six packs available at The Planter Box; tell ’em I said it is ok to sell them to you!)

corner signature

corner signature

I pulled a big patch of horrible scilla: a precursor to the end of the day… Should have taken a photo of how bad the area it was in looked before pulling and how nice afterward. More on this later!

scilla by the bucket (with a spent iris)

scilla by the bucket (with a spent iris)

Allan did a beautiful job of weeding the path and path edges:

well done

well done

Oriental poppies

Oriental poppies

I probably would not plant Oriental poppies in such a small garden because they leave such a gap when they are done.

Below is that little daisy…What is it? One sees it in photos of famous British gardens, between stair pavers or on walls…

I have forgotten its name!

I have forgotten its name!

We then spent over an hour at Cheri’s garden, where I planted one of the two Penstemon ‘Burgundy Brew’ that I thought should go to oenophile clients. And six cosmos. I forgot to take any photos at Cheri’s garden even though I meant to show how well filled in is the area where we put transplants that needed to be moved last month from the future outdoor cat run. I was distracted by another rain squall and then an amusing conversation with Charlie (who asked us when we were going to retire…oddly, a thought I had just been pondering myself!).

We then went to our last job of the day, Ann’s garden, which we have sorely neglected all month because it is not a major destination for annuals.

south border, before and after, weeded by Allan

south border, before and after, weeded by Allan

Ann has the oddest weed, one that is unfamiliar to me. It looks just like a forget me not but has small greenish flowers, maybe with a tiny it of blue, so is useless and yet as invasive as forget me nots are! The foliage is kind of yellowy at this time of year. It was all over the edge garden, above left.

Now, here is why I hate, hate, hate, scilla (blue bells). Ann, and my grandmother, and many other gardens have the big coarse one, but I was just reading that the delicate Siberian Squill is also quite pesky. My grandma’s garden was over run with lank dying horrid scilla foliage in springtime, swamping and burying other plants, and so is Ann’s and several other gardens I know. It has appeared in areas of my own garden from where it had been growing in the lawn.

scilla, rampant and hideous

scilla, rampant and hideous

The lank dying foliage is a home for slugs, and smothers other plants, and mingles with the narcissi so that when one pulls the scilla out, out comes a good narcissi bulb by mistake. So annoying! We pulled buckets and buckets and buckets of it and only got four smallish areas done. This is why I cried “NOOOOOOOO!” when I saw that someone had in a kindly meant and sharing way planted some in a new garden we had created for a friend. Fortunately, our friend believed my warning and is removing it….but slowly, so as not to hurt HER friend’s feelings.

The lily of the valley that we have weeded out twice, roots and all (we hoped) has, but of course, sprouted back. This is another plant someone might share with you. Don’t accept it!

here it comes again

here it comes again

I was glad to get back into this interesting garden, despite my dismay with there being scilla everywhere (as I knew there would be from the fact that everywhere one digs, one finds white scilla bulbs). I managed to fit in five six packs of cosmos, in hope that the deer will leave it alone. (They usually do.) I Sluggo-ed heavily because so many slugs were hiding in the scilla leaves.

oriental poppies

frilly Oriental poppies

frilly Oriental poppies

peony and iris...after much removal of scilla and that weird faux-forget me not.

peony and iris…after much removal of scilla and that weird faux-forget me not.

Ann's enclosed veg garden is looking wonderful.

Ann’s enclosed veg garden is looking wonderful.

I hope we can spend a whole day here next week.

Our last small task was to plant one pink Calibrachoa to fill the planter in front of Peninsula Sanitation office. This entailed a drive past the boatyard where we saw two boats named after friends of ours.

for Nancy and Mary

for Nancy and Mary

We were too wet and cold from having been considerably rained on while weeding Ann’s garden to spend the last half hour of daylight weeding the east end garden bed on Howerton at the Port. Tomorrow? At home, before getting dry, I popped in three remaining cosmos and can now declare that annuals hell is over. These are the only unplanted plants in our possession now:

all that is left!

all that is left!

Two rosemary for the Depot, a Burgundy Brew for Gene, a four o clock donated by Planter Box for Golden Sands, three artichokes for Leanne (Casa Pacifica), a ‘Green Jewel’ echinacea for the Wiegardt Gallery, a golden thyme for a beach approach planter and a Verbascum ‘Jackie in Yellow’ for Erin’s garden to which we STILL have not been this year. (Someone else has been weeding there, thank goodness!)

We need more yellow flowering plants for Erin. Why NOT use Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ even though it is an annual? Some short cosmos to punch up the effect at the welcome sign. Eight more beachy perennials for the Bolstadt beach approach planters. Some plants for Larry and Robert’s front stairs pots. (Kind of shady there. I think they want colour, though, flowers, not a tasteful perennial planting.) Those will be fun to gather and do not represent a descent back into planting hell.

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