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Posts Tagged ‘Origanum ‘Hopley’s Purple’’

Monday, 13 August 2018

guest photos!

Mary of Klipsan Beach Cottages sent me two photos last night:

Bella in the KBC garden

and a snake in the shrubbery (good for eating slugs and snails)

before work today:

We duck under these apple-laden branches to leave the front porch.

carrying one of three clumps of daylilies to plant at the Shelburne later

In the front garden, a late poppy must be Mother of Pearl or Angel’s Choir.

Our volunteer garden at the post office, where we stop every day but Sunday because there is no home delivery of mail where we live:

A few days ago, the Ilwaco Timberland Library posted this nice thing on Facebook:

Long Beach

We weeded four more sections of the beach approach, just leaving three and an end cap to go.  I hope to finish it tomorrow, as well as trimming back the rugosa roses by the police station.  Kite Festival starts next Monday so we want the approach to look as good as possible, considering that it survives with no supplemental water (an impressive feat by the rugosa roses).

Allan’s photo; coreopsis does surprisingly well with no watering

I got to pet this darling dog, a schnauzer-dachshund:

Monty by name

Monty’s person and two other people asked about the rugosa rose hips.

We have this far to go…

and we have come this far

We then watered the downtown trees and planters.

A couple admiring blue eryngiums (Allan’s photo)

I took photos for the August planter reference post.  Here is a sneak preview of some, uncropped, that show the Long Beach scenery.

Lewis and Clark Square

We STILL have not tried the new Mexican restaurant behind L&C Square.  Our style is to work straight through, eating a sandwich while working or in the van between jobs.

L&C Square from across the street, police station and Vet Field to the left

Fifth Street Park, NE quadrant,  with frying pan and Allan watering

Above, to the left, a child is putting a quarter in a slot to make the Razor Clam sculpture squirt water.

Fifth Street Park, SE quadrant

I found a painted rock!

When I posted the rock on a local rock-painters group, I was told that a friend hid that one especially for me to find.  Well done!

one cottage in a courtyard of cute little cottages

looking across at west side of Fifth Street Park

In a Fifth Street Park bed, NE side, I admired this heather, even though it does not show up well.

I like heathers that are spikier, like this one.  Maybe it is a heath.  I have to read up.

rudbeckia and Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies’

Once upon a time, I did not like orange flowers so did not grow California poppies or rudbeckia.  I have evolved.

Oregano ‘Hopley’s Purple’ is so wonderful. It goes and goes and goes.

Third Street Park

Stormin’ Norman’s and Wind World Kites

Wind World Kites

The flag shows that the wind was pushing us around today. Fortunately, it did not kick up till we were done with the beach approach.  I read later in a book by Monty Don (The Prickotty Bush) that a “lazy wind” goes right through you instead of around you.

A woman came up to me, seeing me using the hose, and said, “Now I understand.  I kept seeing you carrying a bucket and I thought, She’s sure getting a lot of water out of that bucket!” I showed her how it works:

bayonet and hose

lift the cap…

match up the notch, plug it in, twist, and Robert’s your father’s brother.

The Shelburne Hotel

Chef Casey Venus was picking some nasturtiums to garnish a cucumber soup.  I said sounded yummy and he brought us a bowl of it to share!

cold cucumber soup with crab…incredibly delicious

I was glad we had brought three clumps of daylilies from my garden to plant for his edible flower collection.

We watered and deadheaded.

Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’

the shady side of the front garden

It is a good thing cosmos has beautiful foliage, because most of the Sensation cosmos are just green feathery things with not a flower bud showing.

Ilwaco

While Allan watered the street trees and planters, I watered the boatyard.  At the south end, this view made me remember taking my black lab, Bertie Woofter, to swim on the west side of the boatyard.  Robert and I had a key to the back gate.

low tide

Straight across used to be all wild but is now part of the boatyard.

memories of Bertie Woofter swimming in that very spot

My note tied onto the blue globe thistle seems to be keeping people from picking it…

…even though eight out of ten elephant garlics have been picked under one of the official “please leave the flowers” signs.

The really big boat with a lot of clutter around it is gone (with its clutter) and all the hoses were in place, so watering went smoothly and easily.

I walked home, looking for the feral main street cats.

one orange one

and a black one

Further on the way home, a block east of our house, beautiful hydrangeas in an old garden:

 

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Monday, 16 July 2018

After a windy Sunday spent mostly blogging out the Markham/Grayland tour, we got back to work.

Ilwaco

Allan remembered that we needed to water some plants we had planted at the end of last week. Allan planted a Crambe maritima (sea kale) from the Master Gardeners sale in Grayland.

We are also trying out a Teucrium ‘Purple Tails’ from the Markham Farm garden.

Allan’s photo

The new rudbeckia clump was wilting.  I was so glad Allan had remembered to check it.  It got well soaked.

It was fine the next morning.

Long Beach

We pulled horsetail at the welcome sign and I wondered why, even though I did not fertilize them, in hopes they would not bolt up with no flowers till late in the summer, the cosmos are beautifully green…with only one flower so far.

At least the cosmos helps disguise the horsetail.

 

one cosmos flower so far, on the north side

the resident of the water timer box (Allan’s photo)

Before starting to water downtown, we called an emergency meeting with the powers that be about a matter that I am not going to write about.   I try not to bring gardening problems to the city and have succeeded, with two exceptions, for twenty years. (Twenty years of Long Beach gardening, maybe even longer…I can hardly remember when I began.) Having passed the problem on, I am now able to put the matter out of my mind, but I also felt quite firmly that I can no longer imagine tottering on till I’m 70 or 80 (should I be so lucky) with the city job (planters, parks, beach approaches, parking lot berms).  I have imagined for years that I could not give it up, and yet this week I feel mentally exhausted; I have hit a wall (one that maybe I will end up able to climb over after all).

I could give the city gardens up if only someone was coming along behind us eager to take the job on.  It’s not my business to choose the person(s), but I sure would hope it would be someone with the focus (in my case gimlet eyed autistic focus on every little plant picture in town) to keep everything as perfect as possible.  (We constantly fail at that.)  Maybe it would be someone who dared plant even cooler plants, taking the risk they would be stolen.  Maybe it would be someone who’d remove my personal favourite perennials and plant something with a tidier look.

I’ve promised the parks manager to keep going for two more years, if they can all stand me that long, and I keep my promises, usually.  Are you the one who would like to take it on after that?  (A week later: I may have just the person in mind, someone I have talked to who is a good ornamental and container gardener, and fit (because it’s a hard job) and who would actually want and love this job.  I have no control over the city will hire when the time comes, but at least I can strongly recommend…)

Imagine being partially retired…I could keep up on reading other people’s blogs! Letting Long Beach go would immediately result in being half retired.  That would be cool.  The plan right now is two more years till then.

And yet I still hope to keep tottering along on the Ilwaco and the Shelburne gardens forever.  Forever is a long time, and yet it is a word that people invoke so easily (example: “forever homes” for animals, when we all know that homes end when we die).  So why can’t I imagine forever gardens at the port and the Shelburne? Maybe I will haunt them.

But enough of that.  We watered the street trees and planters.

Someone decided to go barefoot.

dahlias in a planter

I like my mini-meadow look in each planter.  It would be weird to see someone else’s probably much tidier approach.  I will have to come to grips with that.

It’s tigridia time.

an agastache reseeded in the gutter!

Tigridia (held still because of wind); AKA Mexican Shell Flower

Allan’s photo

parsley, lavender, santolina, Oregano ‘Hopley’s Purple’

Oregano ‘Hopley’s Purple’

I now have Oregano ‘Hopley’s Purple’ in almost every planter.  I love its angular shape.

A fellow came to me while I was watering and said how much he loved the planters. He was visiting from elsewhere.  He insisted on shoving a tip into my hand, the hand that was holding the hose….paper money in a surprising amount.  I said I water as a paid job but he would not take it back, so….I split it with Allan!

It was Allan’s turn to bucket water the four Fish Alley barrels.  He found that someone had trashed one of them, stealing a clump of sedums and ripping up the santolina in the process (or maybe trying to steal the santolina itself?):

evidence: dropped sedum bits and soil

Color coordinated lilies (with Bensons sign) in Fifth Street Park

I finally got another clump of lilies on the other side of that little garden bed:

still in bud

in a planter: The new Cosmos ‘Xanthos’ compared in size with Cosmos ‘Sonata’

We checked on the parking lot berms.  I had thought they would desperately need weeding, but only a goodly amount of the really quite pretty birds-foot trefoil was bothersome, so we were able to just drive on to the…

Shelburne Hotel

…where I watered, while Allan hurriedly removed a dahlia and planted a new sedum in one of the planters on the number four deck, before the guests arrived to check in.

Allan’s photo

The dahlia got rehomed in the garden.

Sedum ‘Double Martini’, Cosmos ‘Xanthos’, “society garlic”, purple alyssum (Allan’s photo)…and one dahlia that is tall enough to stay here

The new nandina on the center deck is doing well. (Allan’s photo)

The faucet that would make watering easier is not working yet; Allan schlepped water up the stairs in a bucket and then watered part of the outdoor garden.

We love to see guests photographing the garden. (Allan’s photo)

lilies and Nicotiana ‘Fragrant Cloud’ (Allan’s photo)

I cut the pollen off of the lilies that are next to the path and planted an astilbe and a fuchsia where we had taken a cordyline down last week.  Allan did a project at the north entrance to the restaurant:

This odd little nook had the native blackberry in it, often reaching out to where people walk.

In clearing it out, he found a plastic tub full of mud and water, and a broken pottery jar.

stinky old mud his foot would sink into

We will figure out a plant for in here.

Ilwaco

Allan watered the planters and street trees with the water trailer while I watered the boatyard with a nice new long hose that had appeared there.  Only had to use three hoses instead of four!  I even had time to do some weeding after watering.

Out of the ceanothus came my usual audience, my little feathered friend.

coming closer

The bird repeatedly sharpens? its little beak on the metal fence.

I’m not sure what that means.

Allan found that deer had been enjoying some planter nasturtiums.

Tuesday, 17 July 2018

I had big plans for this all Ilwaco day: weed and tidy at Mike’s garden, shear the shrubs at Coho Charters (Allan), water all the curbside gardens (mostly me) and weed at the boatyard (both of us).

Mike’s garden

Escallonia ‘Iveyi’

front garden needed more water

Allan tidied the path:

before

after

front garden, designed by “The Elves Did It” gardening business, years ago

I am trying to get the boxwood to be a solid hedge instead of little square clipped shapes.

Port of Ilwaco

At the port, I watered the east end curbside garden and did some weeding while Allan started shearing Coho’s escallonias.  Someone had accidentally driven over the end of our hose while Allan was attaching two hoses to reach the east curbside bed.  We now no longer had two hoses that would hook together today, so we took Captain Butch of Coho up on his offer to use his water instead.  The job was much easier by hooking our one hose up to his long hose, so I think the parking lot hose days are over for good.

As I was about to go on drag my hose to the other curbside gardens, a misty rain appeared and all of a sudden I just hit a wall and walked the two blocks home, putting everything else off till later in the week.  Allan kept shearing the three big escallonias.

before

after

before

after

before

during

after

one of the future Coho Charters captains

home

On my way home, I got to pet my neighbour, Rudder.

Good old Rudder snoozing in his front garden.

Puttering at home revitalized me.  I ran sprinklers and planted some of my new plants.

from The Pot Shed in Grayland

two more from the Pot Shed

a new sarracenia from the Master Gardener sale joins two others in a new container

It is almost the peak of lily time, most definitely the best time in my garden.

right: Sanguisorba ‘Lilac Squirrel’

Even though the mist had ceased, overnight we had enough light rain to make a puddle in the street (but not enough to fill the rain barrels).

 

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On the way out of town this morning, we stopped by the new ROOTS Juice, Salad, and Java Bar drive-through to get some photos for Discover Ilwaco.  People are raving about their smoothies and salads.

Roots

Roots

I wish the new owners great success so they can maybe expand to a sit down place!

I wish the new owners great success so they can maybe expand to a sit down place!  I would love that!

It's across the street from city hall, where we checked on our two planters.

It’s across the street from city hall, where we checked on our two planters.

The city hall planters are thriving so well because the staff gives them supplemental water.

The Depot Restaurant

The weekly deadheading session....

The weekly deadheading session….

north side of dining deck

north side of dining deck

east wall

east wall

As I deadheaded the two Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ in the barrel by the window, I reflected cheerfully on no longer having to deadhead the 20 Butterfly at Andersen’s RV Park!  I bet the new owners plant something lower maintenance there next year.

Long Beach

deadheading and supplemental water for the welcome sign

deadheading and supplemental water for the welcome sign

still wondering if echibeckia is too dark; it does pick up a bit of orange in the sun

still wondering if echibeckia is too dark; it does pick up a bit of orange in the sun

the back, mostly cosmos

the back, mostly cosmos

front and back

front and back

Veterans Field: deadheading while the lawn gets mowed

Veterans Field: deadheading while the lawn gets mowed

Gaura 'Whirling Butterflies' is the star now.

Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies’ is the star now.

The second weekly watering of the planters....

The second weekly watering of the planters….

The planters are a big hit with all sorts of bees, and even damsel flies.

The planters are a big hit with all sorts of bees.

The city crew was hard at work on the parks today.

The city crew was hard at work on the parks today.

Some of the sprinkler heads are not popping up due to a low water pressure problem, so the lawns are not the uniform perfection of green as usual; there is nothing to be done about it this summer.  The sheer amount of green is still impressive.

I found some finger blight by Funland.

I found some finger blight by Funland.

Anything along the edge of Funland gets sat upon. I will put some Cape Blanco sedum in here.

Anything along the edge of Funland gets sat upon. I will put some Cape Blanco sedum in here.

cottage

My favourite planter this year, the one by Dennis Co

My favourite planter this year, the one by Dennis Co

Agastache 'Acapulco Salmon and Pink': what a great do-er!

Agastache ‘Acapulco Salmon and Pink’: what a great do-er!

Here it is from the other side of the street.

Here it is from the other side of the street.

Knautia 'Thunder and Lightning'

Knautia ‘Thunder and Lightning’

Some of the planters still have the plaques from volunteers, but with one exception, they are all cared for by us now.  The exception is the bright happy planter of annuals at the far west end of Sid Snyder beach approach which is still adopted by Back Country Horse Rides.

Geranium 'Rozanne' and golden marjoram, a bit of cosmos, and two agastaches which have been swallowed by Rozanne.

Geranium ‘Rozanne’ and golden marjoram, a bit of cosmos, and two agastaches which have been swallowed by Rozanne.

I like the angularity of Oregano 'Hopley's Purple'.

I like the angularity of Oregano ‘Hopley’s Purple’.

I went into the Long Beach Pharmacy for a candy bar to give me the energy to finish, and saw this, which reminded me of Joey Ramone:

joey

For those who don’t know: When Joey recorded that, he was battling the cancer that eventually took his life at age 49.

It was a finger-blighty day.  Allan found one of the Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ plants completely missing from the planter by the smoke shop.

all off balance now (Allan's photo, before deadheading the remaining one)

all off balance now (Allan’s photo, before deadheading the remaining one)

(Allan's photo) The symmetry is gone.

(Allan’s photo) The symmetry is gone.  He did a comb-over.

Allan's photo, bench in use by Malai Thai restaurant

Allan’s photo, bench in use by Malai Thai restaurant

Allan got done with his share of the planters before me (he had fewer) and so he deadheaded alchemilla mollis (lady’s mantle) in Fifth Street Park.  His photos:

before and after, southeast quadrant of park

before and after, southeast quadrant of park

before and after, southwest quadrant, with Sambucus 'Black Lace'

before and after, southwest quadrant, with Sambucus ‘Black Lace’

Toward the end of the work day, we went out to Sid Snyder beach approach, where we had had the soaker hoses in the planters turned on for 24 hours.  It was to no avail, as they were still powder dry.  The hoses are too deep, have too little coverage, and are pretty much useless.

painfully dry (ivy left over from a volunteer)

painfully dry (ivy left over from a volunteer)

We checked up on the kite museum’s tiny entry garden, gave it some Fox Farms Tiger Bloom fertilizer, and headed out to check on the Bolstad beach approach garden and planters.  At the westernmost planter, I saw wilted santolinas and said “OH! They are not as drought tolerant as I thought!” and then saw they were pulled up and left to sit on the planter and die.

why?

why?

Allan thought it might be deer.  I think it is a human.  This stretch of three westernmost planters is repeatedly vandalized with plants pulled up that deer don’t like, and pulled up with force.  The way they are left sitting on the soil is too uniform for deer, in my opinion.  This is why those planters are so empty: plants keep on being destroyed.

Dang BLAST it.

Dang BLAST it.

further inland; it is extra frustrating because santolinas are one of the few plants that will survive out here with just about no water.

further inland; it is extra frustrating because santolinas are one of the few plants that will survive out here with just about no water.

The Lisa Bonney memorial planter has had many plants pulled out.

The Lisa Bonney memorial planter has had many plants pulled out.

So we had time to do some on the main stretch of the beach approach here with hoses hooked up to the in ground faucets…if we could find them all.  (They don’t reach the westernmost five planters.)  We did not look, though, because when we checked the first one, the water was still turned off.

dry under there

dry under there

Adjacent planter remains dry.

Adjacent planter remains dry.

looking southeast

looking southeast

On a happier note, our weeding had held up well.  We cut back two very drought-stressed ground level santolinas and then left because there is not much else we can do out here.  Bravo to the rugosa roses and escallonia! for holding up in this drought, which is serious and unusual.

from The Chinook Observer

from The Chinook Observer

Allan wanted to spend the remainder of our work time on the “big pop out” on Ocean Beach Boulevard, so we did.

big pop out, before

big pop out, before

after

after

Again, bravo to Rosa rugosa alba for blooming with no water, even though its running nature maddens me as I would like to plant more cool stuff in this planter.  Everything gets invaded by the rose.

A gentleman who was staying in the adjacent vacation rental came out to retrieve with his little dog, Sunny, who had squeezed under the fence.

Sunny

Sunny

making friends

making friends

The Cove Restaurant

Sondra's garden

Sondra’s garden

We met Dave and Melissa (Sea Star Landscape Maintenance) for our weekly dinner.

Some of the yummy items.

Some of the yummy items.

the stir fry

the stir fry  and a fish taco (they were out of ahi tuna tonight)

The Mayan Pork Conchinita

The Mayan Pork Conchinita

Melissa got duck with sauce made from Starvation Alley Farm organic cranberries.

Melissa got duck with sauce made from Starvation Alley Farm organic cranberries.

chocolate lava cake, cannoli, lemon mascarone cake

chocolate lava cake, cannoli, lemon mascarone cake

Or, as Ann Amato-Zorich told me, one cannolo!

It is very good to have jobbing gardener friends to share gardening stories with at the end of the week (although it is not the end of their week, as they work at least five days a week and we have cut down to four).  Melissa and I are in agreement that it is our favourite part of the week.

 

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Wednesday, September 4, 2013

Almost always my workday in other people’s gardens begins with some thoughts about our own.  Today, the view from the kitchen sink window…

sink view

sink view

…inspired me to get a photo of a beautifully silvery corner of Allan’s ferny shade garden.

fern collection edged with ajuga

fern collection edged with ajuga

During a brief stop at Olde Towne to switch compost buckets, I added some Alliums to a dried bouquet I had started there earlier in the week.  It seemed to me that the Alliums that blow down in the boatyard garden will get a bigger audience in a vase on the Olde Towne counter.

at Olde Towne Café

at Olde Towne Café

We did not linger because we needed to start at our furthest north garden, Marilyn’s.

Marilyn's garden, the usual view

Marilyn’s garden, the usual view

Eventually I hope to do a reprise post of how this view changed over the year.

Next, the Wiegardt Gallery:

Wiegardt Gallery garden

Wiegardt Gallery garden

Japanese anemone, north side Wiegardt garden

Japanese anemone, north side Wiegardt garden

I would not let loose the Japanese anemone in a flower border but it seems to behave all right back here in the shade among the ferns.

Then came the weekly deadheading at the increasingly drought tolerant Oman Builders Supply garden in Ocean Park.  Today was not a day with extra time to stop for a snack at Jack’s Country Store.

OBS garden

OBS garden

Gaura 'Whirling Butterflies' and some late poppies at OBS

Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies’ and some late poppies at OBS

At Klipsan Beach Cottages we try to spend at least an hour a week grooming the garden.

KBC, looking into the fenced garden

KBC, looking into the fenced garden

some annual colour that Mary added by the pond

some annual colour that Mary added by the pond

Hydrangea 'Izu No Hana'

Hydrangea ‘Izu No Hana’

Look how tall that Eucryphia is!

Look how tall that Eucryphia is!

I needed to talk with Mary about something so went up to the cottage she was cleaning.  The place was unusually empty at mid week and the ocean view decks looked so peaceful.

west facing cottage decks at KBC

west facing cottage decks at KBC

At our next stop, Andersen’s, we weeded the box by the road because car-watchers would for sure be sitting out there during Rod Run, a classic car event that would take over the Peninsula on the upcoming weekend.  The cars cruise all around the Peninsula and car lovers sit and watch.

Pacific Highway and 138th

Pacific Highway and 138th, with staffer Al in the background mowing by the road

My energy was low and I helped myself along with a handful of wake up beans (coffee beans covered in dark chocolate).

The Andersen's poppy field is pretty much poppyless now.

The Andersen’s poppy field is pretty much poppyless now.

At Andersen’s, two great big car-hauling trailers were already parked in which guests had transported  their rods.  (“Trailer Queens”, these cars are called, the ones that are not driven in.)  And a couple of rods rumbled into the park.  (These are classic American cars made prior to a certain year, sometimes souped up for more speed.   I personally prefer a nice British or Italian car but never mind.)

We got back down to Ilwaco and to our weeding at the boatyard.   It’s a long strip and to finish it in time for Slow Drag at the Port, we had to fit it in around other jobs.

Ilwaco boatyard

Ilwaco boatyard

The least attractive part of the garden is a section that the port crew did not entirely clear so I reclaimed it by adding some soil and doing some weeding…oh, a couple of years ago.  It never got a fresh new set of cool plants so once the poppies are done has very little structure.

before and after

before and after…adding good plants will be another improvement project for fall

We worked till dusk again…but remember, we don’t start early in the morning.

sky over the boatyard

sky over the boatyard (with Stipa gigantea)

looking north past the oil tanks

looking north past the oil tanks

and south over Jessie's

and south over Jessie’s

Thursday, September 6, 2013

Morning home garden thought:  I love the big puddle that forms in the Lake Street depression outside our driveway when it rains.  Allan always hopes the city will fill it in.  (I’ve told him to just ask them to, and I think they will.)  But I like the way it gives me a raindrop weather report and its reflective quality for photos of the house!

raindrops in our puddle

raindrops in our puddle from our front window

Thursday:  the big push to make the Port of Ilwaco gardens perfect for the Slow Drag.  By Friday morning we figured (correctly) that flagged ropes would be run down the side of Howerton Street making garden access difficult for weeding.

The Phormiums and the pampas grass that I so wanted to get the port crew to remove from the street garden by Marie Powell’s Gallery looked…okay today.  I might lose my incentive to get this done and be stuck with them for another year!

Looking east from Powell Gallery

Looking east from Powell Gallery

The spot by the Ilwaco pavilion (restrooms) that we decided to take on before Blues and Seafood showed the effect of having had dandelions gone to seed there for years…  I forgot the after photo so took one on Slow Drag evening (the next day)

before and a belated after

before and a belated after

As soon as the weather is reliably moist, I’ll put some starts of small grasses and santolina in here.  Oh, maybe that gorgeous reddish unidentified grass (might by pink muhly grass) from my garden! What’s in there now is Pacific Reed Grass which I find a bit dull (though native and all).

At the west end of the port we just had to do a small amount of weeding at the garden by Queen La De Da’s.

down by Queen La De Da's

down by Queen La De Da’s

There was a restaurant sign that kept falling down at this end so there is nothing planted there.  It’s fixed now (bolted to a post) so I could fill this area in.

an Agastache 'Acapulco Salmon and Pink' still blooming

an Agastache ‘Acapulco Salmon and Pink’ still blooming

Even though the poppies are gone, there is still enough going on here to make it interesting.  (And the big test?  During Slow Drag, this garden did not get walked on (much) even though it was by the starting line of the race…so it looked enough like a garden to keep people off… More on this during the Slow Drag blog entry!)

At the Time Enough Books garden, I cut back the Ceanothus that was overhanging the street in order to make plenty of room for pedestrians.

It was out as far as where the sidewalk is damp.

It was out as far as where the sidewalk is damp.

This did NOT look enough like a garden, apparently, because during Slow Drag some people put their chairs right in it!  (Yes, there will be a photo of that!)

With the Port gardens put to rights we headed north, first deadheading the cosmos at the Depot Restaurant.

The Depot, same old view!

The Depot, same old view!

and more admiration for Solidago 'Fireworks'

and more admiration for Solidago ‘Fireworks’

When we drove through downtown Long Beach, we could tell Rod Run was imminent.

long beach

North of town we weeded and deadheaded at the Anchorage and I did a limbing up of Viburnum by cottage 6.  Here is the “before” from last week:

What was I thinking?

two weeks ago

And the after.  I think the two long curvy branches on the sides of the one to the right should go, but Allan disagreed.

after

after

I also have a problem with the squatty short trunk on the left side.  It has to be low to let the number of the cottage show….But if I cut it to the ground, the left hand shrub will look lopsided.  What do you think?

nearby, a favourite of mine:  Fuchsia 'Hawkhead'

nearby, a favourite of mine: Fuchsia ‘Hawkhead’

The pots were windblown.  I hope they have a certain weather-sculpted charm.

Picotee petunia with a chunk missing

Picotee petunia with a chunk missing

While I was deadheading sweet peas in the office patio I heard a deep rumbling.  Sure enough, a guest with a hot rod had arrived.

at The Anchorage

at The Anchorage

As I put my tools in our van, Allan chatted with the owner about…cars.

car talk

car talk

Thanks to a good rain, the Long Beach planters did not need watering but we did check most of them for deadheading.  The Rod Run audience was already setting up chairs in the street to see the cars come in.   The most avid fans start their vigil on Thursday and watch cars till they drive away on Sunday or Monday.

car watchers

car watchers

I appreciate the ones who bring chairs.  I can guarantee there will be much planter sitting over the weekend.

At least the hanging baskets will be unscathed...I hope.

At least the hanging baskets will be unscathed…I hope.

Oh dear, how will the city crew get through the throngs of people to water the baskets?  Probably at 7 AM!

We went back just north of downtown to the Boreas.  I do like to do jobs in order from north to south or vice versa but earlier our friend Ed Strange had been parked in “our” spot while mowing the lawn!

after deadheading at the Boreas

after deadheading at the Boreas

As we drove south through Long Beach again, I saw that the planter sitting had begun.  There were two men parked on this one, but one of them is behind the two women.

planter sitters

planter sitters

A nice Veronica is under that one man’s butt  (That’s a flowering plant, not a person!).  This does not bother me as much as you might think.  Over the years, I have gotten inured to what Rod Run audiences do to the planters.  I just observe in amazement, really.

They may not know that, at least at one time, there was a fine for sitting on the planters (except for the benches, of course, which are on the sidewalk side).  Or so I was told by then city administrator Nabiel Shawa, who may have been just humouring me.  And if it existed, it was never enforced.  (Long Beach town could get rich on that fine during Rod Run weekend.)

We finished the day doing more weeding at the boatyard garden.  Lots of people would be driving and walking by there the next evening for the Slow Drag at the Port.

a beautiful reseeded four o clock at the boatyard

a beautiful reseeded four o clock at the boatyard

Gallardia continues to dazzle.

Gallardia continues to dazzle.

I adore Oregano 'Hopley's Purple'

I adore Oregano ‘Hopley’s Purple’

Cosmos, Gaura 'Whirling Butterflies', Artemisia 'Powis Castle'

Cosmos, Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies’, Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’

For some reason I have thought the white Gaura looks great in a garden but the pink Gaura only looks good in containers.  This pink one might make me change my mind.

I think it's 'Passionate Rainbow'.

I think it’s ‘Passionate Rainbow’.

Rain threatened after forecasts of thunder and lightning.   The Kaisha Lanae had her lights on out in the water.

a dark evening

a dark evening

The rain held off long enough so that we had time to weed the garden at the very east end of Howerton…one that has not had any supplemental water for a couple of months.

Howerton and Elizabeth, looking west

Howerton and Elizabeth, looking west

Stipa tenuissima in the wind

Stipa tenuissima in the wind

What a good sense of accomplishment.   We had gotten all the port gardens done and finally freed up a day to for weeding Ann’s garden.  With Rod Run traffic, a Friday job just  a few blocks from home would be perfect.

Friday, September 6, 2013:  before Slow Drag

At home garden thought:  Can anyone tell me what this cool plant is in my front garden?  It’s right by when I get into our vehicle in the morning.

probably from a Hardy Pant Study Weekend plant sale!

probably from a Hardy Pant Study Weekend plant sale!

I had been quite pleased with the accomplishment of getting all the Port gardens done, till I realized I had forgotten the one on the south side of the Port Office.

Allan weeding at the port office

Allan weeding at the port office

The morning was one of those still ones with the water like a mirror.

rumrunner

After that, we got back to Ann’s at last,  We had left last time to go to the Pacific County Fair, thinking we would be back the following week, and then got rained out.   In bad weather it is all we can do to get our city and resort gardens done.

The neighbour cat came over and said hello while I was weeding.

a pretty and friendly cat with a big fluffy tail

a pretty and friendly cat with a big fluffy tail

S/he may or may not have been welcome in Ann’s garden but got quite comfy on the back porch.

right at home

right at home

Allan was working on the side of the house so the wheelbarrow was far from me.  I carried my bucket down to the dump area at the bottom of the sloping lot.

admiring some 'Bright Lights' chard on the way

admiring some ‘Bright Lights’ chard on the way

And got a different view from the house.  It reminds me of a farm in the city.

at the bottom of the hill below the fenced veg and berry gardens

at the bottom of the hill below the fenced veg and berry gardens

I divided up some golden marjoram and spread it around the flower garden.  This might add some cohesiveness.

imagine a nice repeating gold along the edge

imagine a nice repeating gold along the edge

I put in a start of shasta daisy, some toadflax, some Phygelius.  (The deer might nibble the latter but they let it bloom at Marilyn’s garden.)   Now I know it also needs some Solidago ‘Fireworks’.

some new garden art by a friend of Ann's

some new garden art by a friend of Ann’s

I’m pleased to report that we got around the entire garden and were able to leave by a quarter to four to go to Slow Drag.  Last year we had also chosen Ann’s as the best place to work on Rod Run Friday and had gotten so absorbed in weeding (it was a new job then and we had a lot to do there) that we missed the first hour of the drag and some of the best photo opportunities of cars going round and round and round and round.

Walking down to the Port I paused to contemplate the pruning going on, quite visible from the street, in the “lost garden” that I think I will soon have to call the formerly lost garden.

oh dear...

oh dear…

The Hawaiian shaved ice booth was just arriving….

cone

Next, some Slow Drag photos.  It sort of relates to gardening because, well, our gardens are there.

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August 13, 2013

We began at the Depot Restaurant garden, where an errant bindweed taunted us with white flowers way up on top of the wall of hops.

Allan undaunted

Allan undaunted

Solidago 'Fireworks' will soon burst into golden flames.

Solidago ‘Fireworks’ will soon burst into golden flames.

Persicaria 'Firetail' at the Depot

Persicaria ‘Firetail’ at the Depot

Then we tackled the Bolstadt beach approach garden in Long Beach.

looking east from the west end of the garden

looking east from the west end of the garden

Unlike the huge and days-long spring weeding of the garden, all we wanted to go was get big weeds out and grassy sections improved.

and cut back old flowers from santolina...

and cut back old flowers from santolina…

and cut some of the more unsightly lupines...

and cut some of the more unsightly lupines…

The set up for the weeklong Kite Festival would begin the following Sunday.  Kite Festival is singularly responsible for our choosing to change this garden from a carefully cultivated long bed of beautiful flowers to a pretty much monoculture of rugosa roses…the only thing that will stand up to what used to be days of garden trampling.

The first year after planting a few experimental rugosas, even they got trampled to blackened mush.  Now they are strong enough to hold their own.

roses with hips

roses with hips

I noticed new banners on the poles, and am not thrilled about them.  I have much sympathy for anyone who for economic reasons may have joined the military for educational and job opportunities.  I especially think they need support after returning home.   However, I think a nice kite banner might be more appropriate for happy, strolling tourists than this fierce eagle.  (I can think of plenty of political type slogans that could be on banners:  Feed the Hungry, Stop Violence against Women, House the Homeless, none of which would be perfect for a beach stroll, in my opinion.)

banner Downtown seems like a better place for this banner than on the beach approach.  (It could distract, perhaps, from the hotel whose gift shop flies, and I am not kidding, a confederate flag.)  There is a way that the Peninsula supports the troops:  Specials for Service Members.   I walked along weeding and thinking about war and its consequences on drone-bombed civilians and on my veteran friends with PTSD and was not in as cheerful a mood as I had started out in.

Anyway.  We got to the last section of the garden and I decided the rugosa roses needed to be cut back to make plenty of room for kite festival crowds.

during and after

during and after

We always get lots of questions about what the rose hips are…Some folks think they are tomatoes (which is why the one of the rose’s common names is The Tomato Rose).

I had sort of thought about trying to water the beach approach garden until I realized it had been so long, over a year, since I had done so that the water sources (faucets under metal plates in the lawn) were so overgrown with lawn grass that I could not find them without a metal detector.  This certainly proves that the roses are drought tolerant.

rose hips

rose hips

and just a very few late roses

and just a very few late roses

We then dumped a trailer load of rose debris at city works.  Allan took a trailer full of buckets of water out to water the Bolstadt planters while I began the task of watering all 37 of the main street planters (and six whiskey barrels and the two planters at Veterans Field).

northernmost planter on east side of Pacific

northernmost planter on east side of Pacific

Tigridia (Mexican shell flower)...held for the photo because of wind

Tigridia (Mexican shell flower)…held for the photo because of wind

Fortunately, the broken bottle in this planter showed well enough so that I did not stick my hand into it while grooming the plants.

???!! why?

???!! why?

When I got to the two planters at the Veterans Field stage, I would have been deeply mystified at their newly mismatched appearance….

left: with Salvia patens (blue) in the center.  right: No Salvia patens.

left: with Salvia patens (blue) in the center. right: No Salvia patens.

However, I had already gotten a message from my friend who organizes the Jake the Alligatorman Birthday Party and its events the previous Saturday on this very stage.  She had written, “I feel bad the beautiful pot to the right of the stage got squished. It was a local who was drunk and him and a friend were throwing themselves around aggressively and one landed in the planter. Missy got him out and gave him a scolding.”  I replied, “ARGH! Drunks! Oy! Well, these things happen, and it will probably revive. We will check it on Monday!  What can ya do!  Tell Missy awesome for giving him a scolding. Do you have a pic of that moment? Would be great for me blog.”  She wrote, “Darn no pic! Everyone was just kind of disgusted he was an ass. Should have snapped a pic, he was slumped with a cig in his mouth.”  I can picture the scene from similar ones in my punk rock background.  Let me reassure Wendy again that the Jake event does very little damage to the plants and flowers.  (The broken bottle in a planter was nothing new or particular to that weekend.)  The more “genteel” crowds at the kite festival do FAR more damage (or used to, before the Rugosa Rose Solution) than the Jake crowd ever has, as do the Rod Run sitting-on-planters-and-watching-cars-go-by people on the second weekend in September.

While Allan watered some of the south end of downtown planters, he took a nice photo of someone on the Benson’s Restaurant porch indulging in an old fashioned pastime.

the reader

the reader

And a funny bumper sticker:

newfie

After Long Beach, we went back to finish weeding the boatyard garden.  Blues and Seafood would take place Friday and Saturday night at the Port of Ilwaco, and Art Night would be Thursday, resulting in many passersby.  Our lives are scheduled by festival preparation year round.

at the boatyard...I love Geranium 'Rozanne' mingling with Artemisia 'Powis Castle'.

at the boatyard…I love Geranium ‘Rozanne’ mingling with Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’.

gorgeous 'Hopley's Purple' oregano

gorgeous ‘Hopley’s Purple’ oregano

four o clocks reseeded from last year, with cosmos

four o clocks reseeded from last year, with cosmos

and on their own

and on their own

After the boatyard was weeded well enough, we fluffed up the gardens to the south and north sides of the Port Office.

on north side of Port Office along Howerton (looking east)

on north side of Port Office along Howerton (looking east)

south side of port office

south side of port office

Agastache 'Navajo Sunrise' and Knautia 'Thunder and Lightning'

Agastache ‘Navajo Sunset’ and Knautia ‘Thunder and Lightning’

The marina was like a mirror…

marina

and the angled light at the late hour made it hard to keep working, which made a good excuse to go home and have a wander through my own garden.

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