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Posts Tagged ‘ornamental grasses’

Thursday, 18 February 2016

I most certainly did not expect to work today; we had every expectation of bad weather, and when we awoke to rain and the sight of the gale flags flying at the port, we relaxed into a day off.  I received an email regarding an exciting book at the library, which Allan would pick up for me, and then I would sit and read it all day long.

Meanwhile, I thought that today was the day that Smokey could go outside.  We examined his paw wound carefully and it seemed nicely closed up.

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Smokey and Mary in a characteristic pose

Smokey got outfitted for the outdoors by having his BirdsBeSafe collar installed.

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Smokey dressed for the outdoors

 This pretty much eliminates one good reason to keep him indoors all the time (cat depredation of birds, which the collar seems to effectively curtail).  The other is that he would be, of course, safer indoors.  So would I be, and I feel claustrophobic and unable to breathe at the very thought of never getting outdoors into the garden, so…that is why my cats (who I do not feel I OWN) get to make their own choices in the matter.  I also respect all cats who stay indoors all the time.

Soon he was back to the same pose as the one that greeted me before breakfast:

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Perhaps the weather was unappealing to him.

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rainy view from north window

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He moved to the desk by the window.

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and then to the window shelf…

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and then he was out.

Shortly after that, the sun emerged and I suggested we get one job done.  Allan later said that he had on his light shoes, and that he had made French toast (a day-off breakfast, already consumed), and was about to go on an exercise walk.  But he agreed to work so off we went to…

The Depot Restaurant

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east of deck, before (1:30 PM)

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and after (3 PM)

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before (Allan’s photo)

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going in (Allan’s photo)

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after (Allan’s photo)

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all tidied up

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south bed, before

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after

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before (Allan’s photo)

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after (Allan’s photo)

I should have added lime here, and had lime with me, and thought of it, and then forgot.  When we do the clean up of Marilyn’s garden, we are bringing down some divisions of the tallest Miscanthus because Chef Michael would like this side of the deck to have the same sense of enclosure as the east side.

We were fortunate in that Chef Michael gave us some creamy squash and potato soup to take home; that will make a wonderful dinner.

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north side of deck

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weeded; needs mulch as seems sodden and battered by all the rain

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I wonder if this would be a good view for a slide show through the year.

We had filled the trailer with debris, calling for a trip to the dump.  As we finished offloading, the rain began.  Our timing had been perfect.

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4 PM at Peninsula Sanitation

On the way home, we drove by Diane’s garden and I fretted to myself that the Stipa gigantea urgently needs trimming, as do the Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’.  I am terribly worried that the looming multiple doctors’ appointments will interfere with work (supposing something is wrong) and I have a luncheon engagement tomorrow (and it is supposed to be stormy) and I don’t like to work at private gardens on the weekends, and …worry, worry, worry.

Other than that, the work board is coming along well.

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I erased the Depot on the spring clean up list but had to add “Mulch Depot” under projects!

Smokey was back in.  I fretted anxiously over his paw, had Allan look at it closely with the flashlight, gave it hydrogen peroxide and the special vet ointment and hoped I had not let him out too soon.

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He attended to the writing of this post.  (Look behind the screen.)

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Here’s the book I would have read all day if we hadn’t worked.

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Thank you Georgianna.

Our weekly North Beach Garden Gang meeting is delayed till Friday evening because Todd, Dave, and Melissa went to the garden show in Seattle today.  That is too much road time in one day for my nerves.  Todd sent this photo with the caption “Smokey escaped!”

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photo by Todd

And this one, which long time readers of this blog will know is a joke:

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Now…for that Dan Pearson book.

Ginger’s Garden Diaries

gdiaries

entries from my mom’s diaries from two decades ago that correspond with today:

1997 (age 72):

Feb 18: Some of the tomato plants [from seed] are up!

1998 (age 73)

Feb 18:  I planned on working with my begonia bulbs in shop but I stopped to mend my garden jacket and then I took off the hood and resewed the collar.  By that time it was after 4 so I built my evening fire and didn’t accomplish anything except repairing my jacket.

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Thursday, 24 July 2014

I had to get a grip and go back to work; it’s not as if I can afford to simply retire.   Besides, my own garden might not provide enough to blog fodder.  My three days off had done my knee some good, so we did all our north end gardens.

Golden Sands Assisted Living

When we arrived, we saw evidence of bears getting into and onto the big wheelie bins by where we park.

smashed lids

smashed lids

We were told that the bear tossed the bins around like toys.  The maintenance man was busy building a better enclosure.

bins

In the enclosed courtyard, I weeded the four quadrant flower beds while Allan mowed the center lawn; we’ve started bringing my mom’s old rechargeable mower sometimes for this purpose.

I am still wanting the four quadrants to be more vibrant at this time of year.

southwest quadrant

southwest quadrant

southeast

southeast…rather blah now!

northeast...better!

northeast…better!

northwest...just needs MORE.

northwest…just needs MORE.

Inside, one of the residents, Ann, told us how much she loves the garden, and talked about the garden she had to leave behind when she moved in. So even if I’m not satisfied, the gardens are still giving pleasure to the residents.

So even if I'm not satisfied, the gardens are still giving pleasure to the residents.

To the left, you can see the wheelbarrow that I am about to push down the long, long hallway.

Klipsan Beach Cottages

the usual look into the fenced garden through the east gate

the usual look into the fenced garden through the east gate

Melianthus major, so small compared to last year because it died all the way back in the winter.

Melianthus major, so small compared to last year because it died all the way back in the winter.

Allium albopilosum

Allium albopilosum

lily

lily; when my mom moved into Golden Sands, I moved some of her lilies up here.

probably 'Conca D'Or'

probably ‘Conca D’Or’

daisies in the lawn border

daisies in the lawn border

pulmonaria under the big rhodo on the pond island

pulmonaria under the big rhodo on the pond island

Chocolate flower (some children were touring the garden and loved smelling this)

Chocolate flower (some children were touring the garden and loved smelling this)

Oman Builders Supply garden, Ocean Park

the usual deadheading...

the usual deadheading…

Marilyn’s Garden, Surfside

We had not gotten as far north as Marilyn’s garden for what felt like an awfully long time (but was probably just three weeks at most).

When we arrived, we found a doe and a fawn in the front garden.

When we arrived, we found a doe and a fawn in the front garden.  They ambled away.

giant miscanthus by the lawn hiding the neighbours' house

giant miscanthus by the lawn hiding the neighbours’ driveway

looking south along the garden path

looking south along the garden path

oregano by the path

oregano by the path

along the path

along the path; the garden was abuzz with bees

view from the porch

view from the porch looking northwest

Oddly, the deer don't eat the lilies here.

Oddly, the deer don’t eat the lilies here.  Do I dare to plant more?

Cosmos

Cosmos

and more cosmos

and more cosmos

Wiegardt Gallery

Heading back south again to Nahcotta…our weekly stop at Wiegardt Gallery.

the front garden

the front garden

in the ornamental grass garden near the street

in the ornamental grass garden near the street…I am very pleased the deer are not eating the pink feathery sanguisorba

And they aren't eating the sanguisorba near the front door either...

And they aren’t eating the sanguisorba near the front door either…

...even though they nibbled on it earlier in the year.

…even though they nibbled on it earlier in the year.

bees on the cosmos again

bees on the cosmos again

If I had to pick a favourite annual, I think cosmos would win over painted sage.

If I had to pick a favourite annual, I think cosmos would win over painted sage.

The Cove Restaurant

The reward for actually leaving the house and going to work: dinner at the Cove Restaurant.

a little wildflower garden by the parking lot

a little wildflower garden by the parking lot

You can see that the Cove is right by the Peninsula Golf Course; golfing is not my thing, but it does make for a green and peaceful setting.

looking north to the clubhouse and restaurant

looking north to the clubhouse and restaurant

I envy the success with sunflowers in front of the restaurant.

I envy the success with sunflowers in front of the restaurant.

dahlias in the entry garden

dahlias in the entry garden

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dahlias

entry garden with Alllum schubertii

entry garden with Alllum schubertii

inside at the bar, that is not our friend Ed Strange

inside at the bar, that is not our friend Ed Strange, and that is golf on the telly

Even though it was fish taco Thursday, I had to have the ahi tuna

Even though it was fish taco Thursday, I had to have the ahi tuna

And Allan had the yakisoba bowl

And Allan had the yakisoba bowl

I had bites of Allan’s dinner; the delicious ingredients went all down through the noodles, not just piled on top, and included wonderful sea beans from the shores of Willapa Bay.

 

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Sunday, 13 July 2014

Garden Bloggers Fling, Portland

Sunday's well-worn itinerary

Sunday’s well-worn itinerary

On the way from Ernst/Fuller Gardens to the Rhone Street Garden, our tour bus was halted by a freight train. We were all astonished that in the middle of the city, a train that long was allowed to block so much traffic. Since then, I’ve done some reading on freight trains in Portland and found this was probably not unusual.

Again, the two Fling tour buses were going in a different order to the small gardens so that only 40 of us at once would descend on each one.

trainwatching

trainwatching

It is no exaggeration to say that the train had us sitting there for at least fifteen minutes, cutting into our Rhone Street Gardens time.

Rhone Street Gardens at last

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I should have thought earlier in this blog series of enlarging just the text.  Might go back and fix the previous entries!

Joy!! I was so very excited to visit Rhone Street Gardens, as that and Danger Garden are blogs that I adore. To see both of these gardens in person will deeply enhance my blog reading experience. I also was very much enjoying the smaller gardens, as they were much more accessible to me in my sore legs state of being, and I did not have to go far afield and away from all the other humans to find a place to sit. In the small gardens, one can go round several times and catch every detail.

I wish I had remembered to ask owner Scott (who also was one of the Fling organizers) what the story was about flooding, as I could not picture how a garden like this floods. Perhaps the story was written in his blog before I discovered it, so I’ll poke back and have a look. (I did, and learned that the flooding was along the parking strips. Allan says he was told the storm sewers backed up as high as the bottom step of the stairs by the sidewalk.)

Bloggers arrive at Rhone Street Gardens

Bloggers arrive at Rhone Street Gardens; Scott is to the very left

Allan's photo, approaching the garden

Allan’s photo, approaching the garden

I believe that is Lisa, a blogger who most impressively came all the way from Spain

I believe that is Lisa, a blogger who most impressively came all the way from Spain.

(Lisa’s blog: http://descubriendohojas.blogspot.com/)

sit spot by the front steps

sit spot by the front steps

steps to the front porch

steps to the front porch

Leslie from California explores the sidewalk gardens.

Leslie from California explores the sidewalk gardens.

(Leslie’s blog: http://www.starappleediblegardens.com/)

along the sidewalk

along the other length of sidewalk along the front of the house

Below: wood edges on sidewalk, perhaps added recently to counteract flooding?

really paved in 1911???

really paved in 1911???

Allan's photo: "kit for raised garden lumber detail"

Allan’s photo: “kit for raised garden lumber detail”

grasses swooping next to the sidewalk

grasses swooping next to the sidewalk

to my right: sloped garden by the house

to my right: sloped garden by the house

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

grasses and perennials mixed

Parking Strip: grasses and perennials mixed

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

What is this grass?  I must acquire it!

What is this grass? I must acquire it!

Allan's photo: "Schizachrium looks better than ‘blue oat grass’  no dead center"

Allan’s photo: “Schizachirum looks better than ‘blue oat grass’ no dead center”

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Maybe Scott wrote this down for Allan.

I see that I need to start collecting ornamental grasses again. I used to, then got complacent and slacked off. These are wonderful.

salvia, I believe

salvia, I believe

galvanized pots mark one end of the L shaped parking strips

galvanized pots mark one end of the L shaped parking strips

looking to the right

looking to the right

I meant to have some of the delicious orange juice on my second walk-through but got so absorbed in the garden that I forgot! As you can see, and as I forgot to mention earlier, the day was not blazing hot and the light on the gardens was not all harsh sun and shadow as it had been on Friday and Saturday.

As I turn up the path, the porch is to my right. (I have a terrible time with left and right, and Allan often reads the blog after it is published and gives me corrections. 😉

porch

 

As I turn up the path, the porch is to my right.

on the porch

on the porch, a blogger gets a photo looking out

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo from the porch

a secret sit spot behind the grasses

a somewhat secret sit spot behind the grasses

Scott wrote here about the creation of this sit spot.

I remember Lucy Hardiman speaking about how she likes the secret sit spot behind shrubs in her garden so that she can eavesdrop on what people say about it.

This one caught my eye, of course.

This one caught my eye, of course.

rain chain

rain chain by the porch

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

standing by the sit spot

standing by the sit spot

birds must love this garden

birds must love this garden

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Now I turn my attention to the shed of wood and metal (a look that I like very much.)

with a blogger enraptured with plants

with a blogger enraptured with plants

shed

the best green roof, with grasses and flowers

the best green roof, with grasses and flowers

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

(I do hope this inspires Allan to build a little shed like this between us and Nora’s security light… I have no such skills. I used to think that I should wait and see if I get a gardening neighbour next door, but have realized from the Ernst/Fuller garden that a privacy wall is good, even with a friend next door.)

roof2

 

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

 

passageway between house and shed

passageway between house and shed

shed

looking back at the shed

with garden detail

with garden detail

I walked around three times and took a photo each time.

I walked around three times and took a photo each time.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

roof

 

OOOh, Allan took a photo of the building details!

OOOh, Allan took a photo of the building details!

beside the path

beside the path

just past the shed

just past the shed

sit

little courtyard behind the shed

little courtyard behind the shed

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Earlier this year, Scott wrote about the need to create a privacy screen for this particular sit spot. (In rereading that post, I finally realized that the metal trough planters that I like have a name: stock tanks.)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

sign on fence by that little sit spot

sign on fence by that little sit spot

 

lily at corner of house

lily at corner of house

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

bloggers turn the corner from the sit spot to the back of the house

bloggers turn the corner from the sit spot to the back of the house

I could hear water among this greenery in the back corner.

I could hear water among this greenery in the back corner.

a little secret bubbler

a little secret bubbler

Allan's photo: looking out to the driveway

Allan’s photo: looking out to the driveway

looking back from the arbour that leads to the driveway

looking back from the arbour that leads to the driveway

looking back from the driveway to the side of the house

looking back from the driveway to the side of the house

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Scott said the neighbours' chickens like to visit.

Scott said the neighbours’ chickens like to visit.

At the foot of the driveway, Scott’s cat (or the neighbour’s orange cat?) was looking suspiciously at the big tour bus parked across the street.

what the heck is that?

what the heck is that?

I'll lie down but I'm still keeping an eye on it.

I’ll lie down but I’m still keeping an eye on it.

Allan's photo of me taking the picture

Allan’s photo of me taking the picture

and trying to get some attention from the cat

and trying to get some attention from the cat.

I think the standoffishness indicates that this was the neighbours’ orange cat…or else he was really obsessed with that bus.

from the foot of the driveway, looking down the parking strip toward the corner from where I started

from the foot of the driveway, looking down the parking strip toward the corner from where I started

Allan's photo:  "soft sidewalk edge"

Allan’s photo: “soft sidewalk edge”

garden

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Echinacea pallida (must have!!) and a verbascum

Echinacea pallida (must have!!) and a verbascum

parking strip

parking strip

fireweed against the house

fireweed against the house

house

I just so much appreciate touring a garden in a house that was made for the working or middle class!

I can imagine living here.

I can imagine living here.

Having come full circle, here are the stairs to the front porch.

Having come full circle, here are the stairs to the front porch.

parking strip plants

parking strip plants

stairs

I back up for some more street views.

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the kitty appears

the kitty appears

street

 

I'm mystified as to where Allan took this photo; maybe from the front porch??

I’m mystified as to where Allan took this photo; maybe from the front porch??

I found out that Scott's husband likes Star Trek!

I found out that Scott’s husband likes Star Trek!

As our time at Rhone Street Gardens drew to a close and we all began to gather near the front steps, Boots decided it was time to pose.

(I hope I have his name right.)

(I hope I have his name right.)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo: Kylee from Ohio and Boots

Kylee’s blog: http://ourlittleacre.blogspot.com/

Allan's photo: cat admiration society

Allan’s photo: cat admiration society

cat photos

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Allan’s photo: more cat photos

Allan's photo of a photo of garden owners (all three of them)

Allan’s photo of a photo of garden owners (all three of them)

happy family

happy family (Allan’s photo)

and then...some territory defending! (Allan's photo)

and then…some territory defending! (Allan’s photo)

At the end…We had difficulty tearing ourselves away. The garden completely lived up to my expectations and I was sorry to leave.

end

Next: the John Kuza garden in collaboration with Sean Hogan.

P.S.:

Allan noticed this cute license plate and wondered which blogger it belongs to!

Allan noticed this cute license plate and wondered which blogger it belongs to!

Here’s Pam Penick’s ode to Rhone Street Gardens.

Here’s GardenBook on Rhone Street Gardens.

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Friday, 11 July 2014

Garden Bloggers Fling

a fourteen hour day!

our whirlwind day!

Westwind Farm Studio

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Screen Shot 2014-07-28 at 6.28.09 PM

Just up the road from the Old Germantown Road garden, we visited Westwind Farm, a recording studio, yoga center, lavender farm, and nursery. I had been there in 2007 when it the landscape was brand new and again in 2011.

We parked above the garden where a lavender festival was going on and walked down some gentle steps to the garden. (I skirted the steps by picking my way down the lawn next to them.)

passing by daylilies mixed with grasses

passing by daylilies mixed with grasses

One of many delightful things about the Bloggers Fling was how often we were plied with treats. Here, by a table under a tree a bartender offered wine or ginger ale. The scorching hot sun had retreated into a haze, making our visit more comfortable.

bloggers mingling

bloggers mingling

The billowing meadowy look prevails in the gardens.

The billowing meadowy look prevails in the gardens.

The gardens right around the house are more structured.

The gardens right around the house are more structured. (The pink flower is astilbe.)

On the edge of the garden, the salt water swimming pool inspired one blogger to wade in.

pool

bpool2

Next to the pool house, some gentle quacking noises guided me to a little flock of ducks.

by a waterfall pool

by a waterfall pool; I looked at the horsetail intermingled with astilbe and wondered why I spend so much time trying to eliminate such a beautiful thing.

falls

splashing water and ducks quacking

pond

ducks2

looking up from the pond

looking up from the pond to a fireplace terrace

I contemplated the steps going up the hill and thought "I really shouldn't.."

I contemplated the steps going up the hill and thought “I really shouldn’t…”

so enticing

so enticing

A procession of ducks drew my attention back to the lawn.

A procession of ducks drew my attention back to the lawn.

 

ducks pass bloggers dabbling toes in the salt water

ducks pass bloggers dabbling toes in the salt water

I went up to the fireplace terrace...

I went up to the fireplace terrace…

and then could not resist going further up.

and then could not resist going further up.

(If you are just joining this blog, all the hesitation is due to a torn calf muscle that I was supposed to be “taking easy”.)

Irresistible

Irresistible

the view from halfway up

the view from halfway up

and further still

and further still

I found it relaxing that the garden was not perfectly weeded; the occasional dwarf fireweed cluster looked perfect here.

the greenhouse at the very top

the greenhouse at the very top

the veg garden fence at the very top

the veg garden fence

sunflowers in the fenced garden

sunflowers in the fenced garden

looking down

looking down

I have admired this fence since my first visit to this garden.

I have admired this simple, handsome fence since my first visit to this garden.

It is strung with fairy lights.

It is strung with fairy lights.

Fortunately, my memory was correct in that there was a gentle slope down the back of the hill with no steps.

Grasses along the slope.

Grasses along the slope.

Grass expert John Greenlee had a big hand in this garden, and I recall hearing in the past that Ann Lovejoy (my favourite garden guru) also had some involvement in its beginning.

mixed flowers, ferns and grasses

mixed flowers, ferns and grasses

back to level ground

back to level ground

I acquire a delicious glass of wine...and sit down.

I acquire a delicious glass of wine…and sit down.

My view from where I sat:

a blogger's chair, with lavender from the festival uphill

a blogger’s chair, with lavender from the festival uphill

bloggers1

blogger's sunhat and camera

blogger’s sunhat and camera

A folksinger's voice and guitar drifted down from a tent up the hill.

A folksinger’s voice and guitar drifted down from a tent up the hill.

telephoto of singer by the lavender field

telephoto of singer by the lavender field

The singer regaled us with a song that usually bugs me (“I’m a picker, I’m a grinner” are not my favourite lyrics) and made it sound good, followed by two songs that I adore: Knockin’ on Heaven’s Door and Somebody that I Used to Know with its quirky melody.

I took one more quick turn around the nearest part of the garden.

The ducks had been caged.

The ducks had been caged.

looking over the grassy meadows below the house

looking over the grassy meadows below the house

 

view5

steps to house deck overlooking the pool

steps to house deck overlooking the pool

Then back to my sit spot. Meanwhile, Allan had had his own walkabout.

Allan’s photos:

a mown path

a mown path

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flowers and sculpture

flowers and sculpture on the way down from where the bus parked

herding ducks

herding ducks

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More of the Eryngium giganteum that I so want.

More of the Eryngium giganteum that I so want.

by the salt water pool

by the salt water pool

refreshed bloggers

refreshed bloggers

so wonderful after such a hot day

so wonderful after such a hot day

beside the house

beside the house

inside the greenhouse atop the hill

inside the greenhouse atop the hill

the view from on high

the view from on high

b9

P1090903

P1090904

monarda (bee balm)

monarda (bee balm) and Stipa gigantea

the billowing meadowy look

the billowing meadowy look

Reunited, Allan and I climbed the path to the bus park; the buses always left on time.

view from the bus of bloggers climbing the hill

view from the bus of bloggers climbing the hill

John Greenlee, garden designer

John Greenlee, garden designer

and one last straggler running with a forgotten backpack

and one last straggler running with a forgotten bag

We were caught on a traffic jam on the way back (in fact, I recall the bus had left the Germantown Road garden a little early because of that possibility).

on the comfy bus

on the comfy bus

As we crept slowly along Old Germantown Road’s narrow lane, branches brushed the side of the bus. We got to the hotel at a few minutes to seven and rushed to and from our rooms to get to the banquet in time…and that’s next.

 

 

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Sunday, 24 November, 2013

Today was a big bulbing day.  With no recreational or social stops whatsoever, we drove straight up to Klipsan Beach Cottages, where we had 566 Narcissi to plant at the A Frame.    The A Frame sits down lower than the eight cottages that line the ridge and is to the south of Mary and Denny’s house and the entry road.  Like all the units, it is privately owned, and when the owners Pete and Darlene are not there it becomes one of the vacation rentals.

The A Frame from the entry road

The A Frame from the entry road (taken after our planting session)

The A Frame

The A Frame

When tossing out batches of bulbs for Allan and I to plant, I have learned that if there is a batch of 5 to 10 in a bag, it is easier to find them if I just drop the bag and then whoever plants arranges the bulbs in a pleasing pattern.

bags in a ground-cover-y area

bags in a ground-cover-y area

Otherwise, the bulbs disappear into ground cover (here, beach strawberry that has had the nerve to move in to the area, and sweet woodruff, which I most decidedly did not plant.  It is a nemesis of mine!).

When looking for somewhere to fit that many bulbs, I noticed an impractical in and out swoop of the lawn between a few hydrangeas that Darlene had had planted a couple of years ago.  Denny agreed the area was awkward for the lawn mower so I decided to join up the hydrangea semi circles.

before

before

after

after

Unfortunately, the horrible ivy just beyond the garden actually is on the neighbouring property next to the irregularly shaped lot.

bright sunshine and strong shadows

bright sunshine and strong shadows

Again, the sun shone powerfully, blinding me as I moved from sun to shade.  While digging out the new bed I got so hot that I changed into a summer shirt and was awfully glad I had not removed it from the car.  It was 61 degrees!

blue blue sky

blue blue sky

Someone told me later that the unusual number of jet trails in the sky were from jets being turned around due to a big storm in Texas that has delayed many flights.

In the beds around the decks of the house, I planted the showy narcissi that I chose (unusually) this year:  Flower Record, Tropical Sunset, Fragrant Rose, High Society.  I hope they won’t be too gaudy.

by the deck

by the deck

I thought for sure I had pulled the last of the painted sage yesterday at the boatyard.  Here was a healthy clump still in bloom by the A Frame’s propane tank!

Much of the A Frame garden is wooded.  Once upon a time, ivy covered the soil between the A Frame and the cottages till Allan and I hacked at it and rolled it off like a noxious carpet.

sparsely treed woods reclaimed from ivy

sparsely treed woods reclaimed from ivy

To plant in that tough ground and in the rooty spots of the newly created hydrangea bed, I found that the new red tool we recently got from Back Alley Gardens in Gearhart outshone my beloved Ho Mi (Korean hand plow, E-Z Digger, Zen Digger).

My ho mi supplanted by the hefty red tool

My ho mi supplanted by the hefty red tool

The warm sun continued to make bulb planting feel unseasonal during our entire long session at KBC.

the last leaves of Tiger Eyes sumac

the last leaves of Tiger Eyes sumac

over by the garage

over by the garage

and the matching pump house door

and the matching pump house door

I had been terribly worried toward the end of our A Frame planting  that we would not get done in time to do Marilyn’s garden as well.  We did, and with enough time to take some Christmas decoration photos.

It feels weird to see Christmas decorations out in the summer-like weather.  Mary went ahead and put them up today because later this week, she will be so busy with visiting family that she won’t have time.

tower of white lights in the garden

tower of white lights in the garden

I have not been able to bear cutting down the wands of the Dierama

I have not been able to bear cutting down the wands of the Dierama (even though they hang over the path)

Up on the cottages, Mary hung a wreath for each one.

cottage door

cottage door

wreath with ocean view

wreath with ocean view

A little after two thirty, we went north to Marilyn’s garden and planted a considerably smaller batch of bulbs: only 136.

We leave many of the tall perennials and grasses standing all winter at Marilyn’s as they provide shelter and seeds for the birds she loves to watch from her window.

I did pull the cosmos, painted sage, and cut back some flopsy perennials along the path to make room for bulbs.

before

before

after

after

Just when we had finished, I noticed that in the driveway garden, a double pink Hellebore is already about to bloom.   I cut all the tatty old leaves to the ground, as one is supposed to do.

Hellebore before

Hellebore before

and after

and after

Hellebore in bud.  It will be glorious.

Hellebore in bud. It will be glorious.

Much to my delight we got done in time to go to Wiegardt Gallery with enough light to cut back some perennials and plant 20 more Narcissi bulbs.  This job absorbed 10 of the ‘Fragrant Breeze’ bulbs that I forgotten to account for in my last order.

Allan chopping perennials

Allan chopping perennials (and the last, still green cosmos pulled out)

As the sunset, I took some photos of the ornamental grass area by the road.

My favourite, Stipa gigantea

My favourite, Stipa gigantea

I wanted to take photos showing the view to east and west on the paved walking path that goes by Wiegardt Gallery.  First,  I noticed all the windblown grass blades all over the lawn.

uh oh....it was on both sides of the paved walking path.

uh oh….a mess on both sides of the paved walking path.

 With enough light left to pick them up, I gathered over three hundred blades in a big armful.  It is the sort of job that leads to counting.  Allan did not understand why I didn’t just rake; I felt the area was too large, and there were too many leaves, and it was just easier to gather them.
He helped me finish.

He helped me finish.

Then I could take a tidy set of east and west photos.

looking west along Bay Avenue toward the ocean

looking west along Bay Avenue toward the ocean; the sky was pale pink. Really.

looking east to Willapa Bay

looking east to Willapa Bay, with another pink sky that did not register

To the left, the Pacific Ocean.  To the right, Willapa Bay.

Bay Avenue

Bay Avenue. What they call Peninsula Highway, we call Sandridge Road (along the bay)

Now we have but three batches of bulbs to plant other than mine own, one large, one medium, one quite small.  It is all contigent on an order of 200 tulips arriving that were due on Friday and have somehow got hung up in Portland (according to UPS tracker).  Without them, bulbing is now at a standstill.

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9 October, 2013: north end jobs

I don’t know when I switched to the writing “Oct 9” instead of “9 Oct”.  As a longtime Anglophile, it is time I get back the the Anglo/European date style even if it looks odd to some.

After an inspirational tour of Lisa’s new garden, we went on to three north end jobs, with a stop at Peninsula Landscape Supply to pick up three more buckets of river rock for the Larry and Robert garden.

at Peninsula Landscape Supply

at Peninsula Landscape Supply

At Eric Wiegardt’s gallery, I pulled some cranesbill geraniums and weeds here and there while Allan cleared an area that was ALL pesky cranesbill ‘A.T. Johnson’ and just a bit of ajuga, leaving…just a bit of ajuga.

before and after

before and after

The geranium is especially pointless in this garden because deer eat off the haze of insipid pale pink flowers.

cute Coreopsis 'Flower Tower' by the front door

cute Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’ by the front door

I may not love the BadAster, but the bees sure do.

I may not love the BadAster, but the bees sure do.

Next, we drove north to Marilyn’s garden.  Something odd had happened on the south end of the garden.  A path, like something had been dragged, went through to the next yard and a Barberry ‘Helmond’s Pillar’ was knocked right over!  Allan righted it again while I pulled some spent Cosmos and painted sage.

What have we here??

What have we here??

The garden is tall and jungly now...

The garden is tall and jungly now…

Miscanthus plumes

Miscanthus plumes

On the way back to Ocean Park, we stopped and had a look at a rental possibility for our friend J9, who hopes to move back to the Peninsula.  Perhaps the block we looked at is not for her…

"We are a gun toting neighbor watching Hood!"

“We are a gun toting neighbor watching Hood!”

Two houses shared the same sentiment.  Back to the rental quest!

Two houses on the block shared the same sentiment. Back to the rental quest!

Onward to Klipsan Beach Cottages for more fall cleanup.  I personally would choose to leave Thalictrum ‘Elin’ (below, left) up all winter.  I love the colour of the stems and the structure.  I have come to realize that not everyone sees the architectural beauty in dormant plants, so I cut it back.

before and after

before and after

Allan cut down some ferns and I pruned a buddleia and while I did some other work, Allan cut down a whole passel of Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’ behind the bench.

before and after

before and after

I worked in the area to the south of the greenhouse (just east of the bench spot), tying up some flopped Melianthus major and Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’, weeding and pulling out dead-ish foliage.

This area has two different Melianthus and a lovely rose (not blooming today).  It used to be all raspberries.

before

before

after

after

The garden still has much beauty to offer.

Billardia longiflora

Billardia longiflora

Of course, this pretty pale purple aster does not spread thuggishly!

Of course, this pretty pale purple aster does not spread thuggishly!

Agapanthus and aster

Agapanthus and aster

roses

roses

sunlit hydrangeas in the A Frame's garden

sunlit hydrangeas in the A Frame’s garden

Artemisia 'Guizhou'

Artemisia ‘Guizhou’ by the greenhouse

I hope guests can see the beauty in the tawny stalks of Artemisia ‘Guizhou’, because i am not ready to let it go.

Sedum 'Autumn Joy' truly was this bright in evening sun.

Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ truly was this bright in evening sun.

On the way to Marilyn’s garden, the van had started to make an odd noise…a grinding sound.  All the way from Marilyn’s to Klipsan Beach Cottages, Allan was listening and trying to diagnose it.  It seemed to be coming from the undercarriage.  When I would ask for his theories or how serious it might be, I was admonished to “Listen!”  Leaving KBC, more listening ensued and some slight speeding up, slowing down, and brake work.  Could it be a brake shoe?  The universal joint?  I questioned whether we might have to take it into the shop, and if so, when, and would we be able to get across the river to pick up our lawnmower from the Astoria repair shop (without realizing my ultimate fear of breaking down on the bridge), and did the Saturn still work? (The Saturn shifter is getting stiffer and more problematic.)  These questions were spread out over seventeen miles, but…”Listen!”  One thought crossed my mind…could it be as simple as a…but…”LISTEN!”  I thought to myself about what a difficulty it would be to take the van in for repair, and wondered again if it could be as simple as a br…. “LISTEN!”

When we stopped in front of Larry and Robert’s house to drop off the river rock buckets, Allan looked underneath the van.  He popped back up and suggested I do the same.  There indeed was a BR…ANCH! caught in the spare tire which (kind of oddly) is located underneath the vehicle.

looking under the van by Larry and Robert's house

looking under the van by Larry and Robert’s house

In our own driveway half a block away, Allan obligingly got a better photo.

tire branch

tire branch

I hope this was the cause of all our van trouble today.

small but very noisy

small but very noisy

I had just enough daylight to drag most of Sunday’s debris to the new debris pile.

debris pile at sunset

debris pile at sunset

Sometimes, WordPress informs me,  readers will have to view an ad at the bottom of a post (unless I pony up for a more expensive blog).  So here’s one of my choice.  Water Music Festival is this weekend and is the event for which Music in the Gardens tour is a fundraiser.  Both benefit music programs in the schools.  We hear the Saturday evening concert is sold out, but the other two performances will be excellent and as I post this, seating is still available for those shows.

WMF

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Friday, September 27, 2013

With much rain predicted, I was sure we could get the entire day off.  I had various computer projects in mind, mainly sorting out and deleting some of the 16,000 plus photos I’ve taken since my old computer crashed last February.

I walked down to Olde Towne in the wind while Allan continued to snooze.

strawberry waffle

strawberry waffle

He joined me after awhile because I had gotten thoroughly soaked by sideways rain and buffeted by wind on the way to breakfast.  While he took the opportunity to go to a shop in Seaview to have new shocks installed in our van, I got a ride home from Queen La De Da and told myself I would put ten things away before I booted up the computer.  After maybe thirty things had been properly dealt with, I proceeded to sort cerinthe seeds that I had collected over the summer.

Cerinthe chaff

Cerinthe chaff

Out of that pile of chaff (in a bowl made by my friend Sheila (New Leaf Plants and Pottery), I got over 150 seeds.

Cerinthe seeds

Cerinthe seeds

They are large and each plant produces so many that I am amazed at how expensive a packet of Cerinthe major purpurascens seeds is.

Allan returned from his errands and told me that, as the rain and wind had slowed, he had seen the Port of Ilwaco crew out removing (with a backhoe) some of the tall ornamental grasses we had tagged earlier in the week.  We waited long enough to give the crew a head start and then went out…leaving the cats snoozing.

Smokey and Mary

Smokey and Mary

The crew had done a wonderful job of tidying up after themselves after removing grasses to the north of the old Port Bistro building.

where once were grasses

where once were grasses

We had just a bit of cleaning up to do so we also clipped the big, woody old lavenders.  We may replace them next spring.

Two more tagged by the much missed old Port Bistro café

before (Sept 25)

after

after

I am a big fan of ornamental grasses; the problem with those is that they blocked the oncoming traffic sightline of people leaving the nearby parking lots.

Just to the west in the next curbside bed, the removal of another large Miscanthus had pulled the root mass of a Ceanothus in a way that reminded me of the ruching up of a rug.

root mass out of place

root mass out of place

Allan managed to get it back where it should be with the pick, and I did some pruning on the Ceanothus and pulled as much soil as possible into the hole where the grass used to be.   We’ll get more soil but we want to wait till the removal of the rest of the tagged plants because we will have more holes to level off.

by the tuna club

by the tuna club…I’ll plant something smaller in this spot.

At home, the cats were still snoozing but Mary welcomed some attention.

waking up

waking up

At five PM we walked three blocks down to the museum for opening night of “Charles Fitzpatrick: Pen & Photo”.  On the way, I admired a stunning gazania in Judy’s garden.

Gazania

Gazania

The rain held off for our walk to the museum, and the snacks were excellent.

refreshments

refreshments

Peninsulites examine the photos.

Peninsulites examine the photos.

One panel of photos was especially interesting to me as it showed a lot of old hotels, including the Grandview Lodge…AKA The Sou’wester.

photos

enlarged

enlarged

Back in those days, the beach came right up to J Place in Seaview and was at the Sou’wester’s front door.  Now it is half a mile to the west because of dune accretion.

Every November, the museum has a lively auction of small pieces created by local artists and craftspeople.  The display was up for preview and I now know which ones I am going to bid on.

preview of 6x6 art auction

preview of 6×6 art auction

Unfortunately, so do a number of other people.

art collectors plotting

art collectors plotting

We were able to walk home without being rained on.

heading home past Larry and Robert's garden boat, with Judy and Tom's house in the background

heading home past Larry and Robert’s garden boat, with Judy and Tom’s house in the background

Soon after we were cozily indoors, the rain returned with force and remained for most of the next two days.  As it was only 6 PM, I had a good head start on writing the blog post about the wonderful bayside garden I had seen the day before.  What with getting the photos in the right order and side distractions such as messages from friends, it took four hours to complete the entry after all.

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