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Posts Tagged ‘ornamental grasses’

July 20, 2013

from the program:  Instead of being “deer resistant”, this garden is wildlife friendly and proof that you can coexist with deer and still have plenty of flowers.  Nancy and Marilyn call this their healing garden because, while recovering from knee surgery and from cancer, they have been inspired and comforted by watching plentiful birds and a mother deer and fawns living in the garden.  It was designed and planted by Tangly Cottage Gardening to be viewed and enjoyed year round with structural perennials and ornamental grasses for winter interest. There will be a page at tanglycottage.wordpress/deer featuring deer resistant plants.

This garden on a small lot is one that Allan and I began from scratch in 2006.   I’ve written about it a lot since then, so will just do a walk through here from the day before tour day (when we did the final tidy up) and tour day itself.  I hope the tour guests understood that while small, the garden shows off how you can have lots of flowers even though the deer amble through daily.  If you can see a hose in the photo, it’s the day before tour day.

the view from the street

the view from the street

To the left of this photo (out of the picture) is the driveway, where the neighbour to the east and Marilyn and Nancy have planted shrubs for privacy…eventually.

driveway and corner of garage and neighbour's house

driveway and corner of garage and neighbour’s house

between the driveway and the lawn is a deep shade garden with Hellebores and ferns amid alders and one conifer.

between the driveway and the lawn is a deep shade garden with Hellebores and ferns amid alders and one conifer.

shade garden the day before tour day, looking west from driveway

shade garden the day before tour day, looking west from driveway

looking north at the shade garden, day before tour day

looking north at the shade garden, day before tour day

looking south

Above, looking south: We took up our nicest table and chairs, and Nancy thought it was so great to have a sit spot on the lawn that she says she is going to get a table and chairs for it!

Nancy ready for tour guests

Nancy ready for tour guests

She served cookies made by her spouse, Chef Michael of the Depot Restaurant.  There were 200, I believe, and my first hint that the tour was quite successful is when we arrived to find all the cookies gone.  I did not mind at all because I was so happy we had had that many people come through.

The deer, for some reason, focus on the area in front of the front porch, but they have left the lady’s mantle and geranium ‘Rozanne’ alone.

Barbara Bate

Barbara Bate

Barbara Bate was the musician for this garden.  She does a great deal for the community.  She sang at my mother’s memorial service and knew the words to the song my father used to sing, “Because”.  (We made a garden for her in 2008, not the sort we go back and maintain.)  Barbara’s musical repertoire is vast and she was perfect for this venue.  Last year, she was the musician for the Hornbuckle garden, and later Tom and Judy told me people were dancing in their courtyard.

Barbara

side view of front porch (looking east) with Barbara

barbara

looking west

looking west from the lawn

Allan (left), Sheila (right) and I

Allan (left), Sheila (right) and I

NW garden at edge of lawn, photo by Kathleen Sayce

NW garden at edge of lawn, photo by Kathleen Sayce

The only pre-existing plant in the flower borders was the orange monbretia that had run over the neighbour’s garden to the west.  I consider it a thug, but don’t fight it in the front corner by the street because it intermingles with salal (speaking of thugs!) and adds some colour.

Sheila and Debbie take a break.

Sheila and Debbie take a break.

where the lawn meets the gravel path

Above, where, the lawn meets the gravel path:  Phygelius, Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’. Knautia ‘Thunder and Lightning’, lady’s mantle, backed with Miscanthus.

looking southwest-ish the day before tour day

looking southwest-ish the day before tour day

looking south the day before tour day

looking south the day before tour day

west of porch:  Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue', Salvia viridis, and Lavender

west of porch: Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’, Salvia viridis, and Lavender

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue', photo by Kathleen Sayce

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’, photo by Kathleen Sayce

against west wall of house:  Papaver 'Lauren's Grape' and Salvia viridis

against west wall of house: Papaver ‘Lauren’s Grape’ and Salvia viridis

looking south on tour day

looking south on tour day

looking south

figs

The fig tree grows larger and larger on the east side of the path against the house.  The deer do not eat the figs!

tour guests

tour guests

tour

guests

guests

Shasta daisies, blue glove thistle, bronze fennel, cosmos, painted sage, photo by Kathleen Sayce

Shasta daisies, blue glove thistle, bronze fennel, cosmos, painted sage, photo by Kathleen Sayce

photo by Kathleen Sayce

photo by Kathleen Sayce

I brought my Deer Xing sign for the chair by the southwest corner of the house and a bowl to fill with water.  It had occurred to me that this bird and deer friendly garden had no water!  Nancy was so taken with this that she agreed a bird bath would be an excellent gift for her mother, Marilyn.

day before

day before

I decided to present the garden quite honestly and did not trim the stems where deer had eaten the white mallow and Crocosmia as they nibbled their way by.  It is impressive enough that there are enough flowers to share and enough things they do not eat.  A chaise lounge is kept across the back porch or the deer will climb right up there and eat flowers (although in my experience, they usually leave dahlias alone).

back porch, photo by Kathleen Sayce

back porch, photo by Kathleen Sayce

To the south side of the house is a river rock dry pond which is good for drainage in the winter.  On its south side grow native shrubs and trees along the property line, and on the house side we have a path and a planting of Siberian iris, Persicaria ‘Firetail’, and double orange daylilies.

river rock swale

river rock swale

Hops grow up on the east side of porch railing (not shown).  I’ve tried to grow a honeysuckle on the south side but the area does not get watered and so that has not been a success.  If I remembered to water it whenever we check on the garden, it would do much better.

On tour day, we went in to visit Marilyn and saw the garden from a different perspective: from the inside out.

From this window, the view west has been blocked by the fig tree.

From this window, the view west has been blocked by the fig tree.  Oops.

I planted that tree between two windows and did not expect it to do this well!  Next time we visit the garden we will do some pruning.

another west window...that's better

another west window…that’s better

From this window, a deer has been observed birthing a fawn right in the garden.

another west window

another west window

from the kitchen window, looking south to the greenbelt

from the kitchen window, looking south to the native shrub and tree border

the walk to return to the front lawn (taken the day before)

the walk to return to the front lawn (taken the day before)

As we drove away, we saw one of the garden residents just down the street.

waiting for the tour guests to get out of the garden!

waiting for the tour guests to get out of the garden!

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July 20, 2013

from the program:  This large meadow garden on the dunes of a Butterfly Shores estate showcases the many plants that thrive in full exposure to salt, wind and winter storms.  As you wander through the meadow, notice the garden art, collected driftwood planters and sculpture, pond and fountain.  The tall fence around the back gardens protects artful bird feeders from bears, raised-bed vegetables from deer and encloses a sheltered patio.  This remarkable garden design was planted and maintained  by local gardener Diana Canto.

A few years ago, the owner of this property asked me if we would create a garden for her.  We were simply too busy, so I referred her to local gardener Diana Canto, whose own garden I had admired.  Here is the wonderful landscape that Diana has created in front (west) of the house.

side

Bristol garden

Bristol garden

There is only one house and dune grass between this garden and the beach.

looking from the garden to the west on a pre-tour visit.

looking from the garden to the west on a pre-tour visit.

house

garden

Everything in this garden is exposed to salt wind, storms, and I am sure to deer.

beachy

beachy

daisies and ornamental grasses

daisies and ornamental grasses

detail, taken on a rainy pre-tour day in late June

detail, taken on a rainy pre-tour day in late June

also on pre-tour day

also on pre-tour day

in late June

in late June

on that rainy pre-tour day

on that rainy pre-tour day

 

in the west (front Garden), Deb sets up for a photo

in the west (front Garden), Deb sets up for a photo

It was such enormous fun touring with Debbie and Sheila.  Kathleen was touring from north to south so we did not connect with her till the end.

Perovskia (Russian Sage)

Perovskia (Russian Sage)

This is one of the prettiest Perovskias I have ever seen.

This is one of the prettiest Perovskias I have ever seen.

grasses

looking west

looking west

The house across the road is attractive indeed and is said to be built to be tsunami safe.

daisies

daisies, Allan’s photo

another daisy photo by Allan

another daisy photo by Allan

beds around the house

beds around the house

garden confab by the porch.  Left: Diana Canto, who designed the garden, and in the center, Phil, spouse of tour organizer Nancy.

garden confab by the porch. Left: Diana Canto, who designed the garden, and in the center, Phil, spouse of tour organizer Nancy and a stanch supporter of the garden tour.

a serious discussion

a serious discussion

plants by the foundation and porch steps

plants by the foundation and porch steps

lovely built in porch planters, taken late June

lovely built in porch planters, taken late June

on tour day

on tour day

garden next to porch

garden next to porch

from the porch looking west

from the porch looking west

To the north side of the front garden, a path leads into the fenced back garden.

to the back

to the back

garden near the arch path

garden near the arch path

Inside the back yard, a raised bed grows edibles.

veg

veg

back garden, taken in late June

back garden, taken in late June

on tour day

on tour day

Kathleen Shaw's photo of the north side of the back garden

Kathleen Shaw’s photo of the north side of the back garden

Our friend Kathleen Sayce's view of the back garden

Our friend Kathleen Sayce’s view of the back garden

On the porch, I greeted singer Randy Brown, the musician for this garden, who last year was the musician for our garden on the tour.  I was hoping we would be at the Bristol garden during one of his sets.

Randy Brown

Randy Brown

We reminisced for a little while; he said, “Your garden was industrial strength colour therapy!  Vietnam vets with PTSD should go there to heal.”  He would have loved Jo’s garden!

Allan's photo of Randy

Allan’s photo of Randy

Randy and his drummer.  He excels at making up songs about the moment.

Randy and his drummer. He excels at making up songs about the moment.

from the porch, looking west

from the porch, looking west

The garden tour confab had gotten bigger.  I joined it just before we left, and then Sheila and Debbie and Allan were waiting for me, after I had tried to keep them on schedule up til then!

on the back patio, a sheltered spot from wind

on the back patio, a sheltered spot from wind

The patio is on the east side of the house.

The patio is on the east side of the house.

delicious refreshments

delicious refreshments

yummy

yummy

fire circle

fire circle

patio

patio

Sheila taking a photo

Sheila taking a photo, Deb probably thinking about taking a photo

I am sure I would have snagged some Sheila photos for this blog, but she is having computer problems and has not been able to process hers yet.  Debbie’s photos will likely appear on her own Rainyside website.  In fact, it is on the Rainyside and other gardens forums that Sheila and I originally “met” even thought at the time, we both lived on the Long Beach Peninsula.

I should add that this house and property is for sale as of July 2013.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I suspect that yesterday will have been the longest day of our work year, but maybe not, as garden tour month approaches and three of the gardens we have a hand in will be on the tour (on July 20th).

We had much to do yesterday, and our main goal was to get many jobs done and get to Andersen’s RV Park by five to do a lot more weeding before the Sisters on the Fly group starts to arrive this weekend.

Larry and Robert’s garden

We began just down the street at Larry and Robert’s garden with the continuation of changes to their back yard.  

before and after

before and after

We added an Azara microphylla (an excellent small tree with fragrant winter blooms) and some pea gravel and river rock and some edging from materials that were on the property.  I have in the past had an aversion to scalloped edging.  Now I cannot remember why, because I think it looks just grand here.  Now we need some more river rock for against the house and some sort of plant to fill in the narrow border there that is somewhat resistant to three small dogs (nothing too delicate).

Ilwaco intermission

We then planted an Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ in our volunteer garden at the Ilwaco Post Office.

Ilwaco Post Office

Ilwaco Post Office

As we headed out of Ilwaco, the man who sells firewood on 2nd SW waved us down and gave us two hollow rounds of wood that could be used as planters, he said in appreciation of our volunteer work in town.  I told him we do get paid to care for the planters and the boatyard (although the latter did start out as a volunteer project years ago) and that the post office is our only volunteer garden now.  He still insisted we should have the planters.  (He has them for sale sometimes over at 2nd SW and Eagle.)

a garden gift

a garden gift

Might I add, those things are very heavy!

Diane’s garden

Next, we stopped at Diane’s garden and The Red Barn Arena (next door to each other): Allan fertilized the whiskey barrel planters at the barn and Diane’s containers while I deadheaded and weeded along the road.

at Diane's

at Diane’s

That roadside garden clearly needs more plants.  I’ll add some of the inexpensive Dianthus from the Basket Case next time we go there.

Anchorage Cottages

After Diane’s, we went to The Anchorage Cottages where we were requested to prune a branch off of the Ceanothus so that the parking sign for cottage one would show.  The shrub was thick with bees.

Ceanothus

Ceanothus (California Lilac)

Ceanothus (California Lilac)

Even though the bees were gentle, they got pretty agitated when I tried to lop a large branch, so I settled for quickly cutting one small piece and then scampering well back while they swarmed toward me…then…whew!!…resettled on the flowers.

The number one just barely showing.

The number one just barely showing.

Plant emergency of the morning:  thrips on a lily!  Doused it with a cup of mild dish soap well diluted with water.  Fingers crossed.

cured, I hope

cured, I hope

I was reminded of this New Yorker cartoon, long a favourite of mine.

 

george-booth-aphids-on-the-heliotrope-new-yorker-cartoon

Anchorage center courtyard

Anchorage center courtyard

New Dawn rose

New Dawn rose

We did not spend as long there as I would have liked because our mission remained to get to Andersen’s by five.  Our next stop was The Basket Case to pick up some plants for Andersen’s garden shed border which I felt had looked a little bare after the previous evening’s weeding there.  I also got two Lobelia tupa for Sheila as she and Harold are coming to visit us soon!

at the Basket Case, what a deal!

at the Basket Case, what a deal!

Wiegardt Studio Gallery

Next we went all the way up to Nahcotta/Ocean Park to the Wiegardt Gallery where again we went round the garden in haste but I hope effectively.

at Wiegardt Gallery with manager Christl

at Wiegardt Gallery with manager Christl

Allium schubertii

Allium schubertii and albopilosum

Wiegardt

Alliums white and purple

Alliums white and purple

Allium albopilosum and Allium moly 'Jeannine'

Allium albopilosum and Allium moly ‘Jeannine’

front walkway

front walkway

west side of gallery

west side of gallery

It occurs to me that next time we are there, I will take you inside!  Eric Wiegardt is a renowned artist and the gallery is beautiful.

Ocean Park intermission

We were doing well as it was only three o clock, so we had time to stop at Jack’s Country Store for what we call “Jack’s snacks”.   Of such tiny luxuries are happy moments made.

Bliss:  The Jack's Snacks Cooler and my potato salad in the car

Bliss: The Jack’s Snacks deli cooler and my potato salad in the car

I think this is the first time since the beginning of May that we have had time, when at the north end, to stop for a treat.

Next up:  the small entry garden at Oman Builders Supply.  But first, we did a U Turn to get a better look at a garden near Jack’s that is looking fine.  Garden tour next year?

an Ocean Park garden

an Ocean Park garden

driftwood and toadflax

driftwood and toadflax

lupines

lupines and foxgloves

a work in progress

a work in progress

Doing another U turn to get back to OBS, we saw that the poppy garden behind Jack’s is still there.  Jack himself started it, or his wife perhaps, and it is being carried on.

east wall of Jack's

east wall of Jack’s

Oman Builders Supply

After those distractions we got to Oman Builders Supply garden.

OBS garden

OBS garden

Mainly I wanted to make sure that the Eryngiums ‘Jade Frost’ and Lobelia tupa that we had planted last week had no transplant shock.  They were fine.  We could have spent quite awhile deadheading the Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ but more work called to us to keep moving.

The remaining deadheads can wait till next week.

The remaining deadheads can wait till next week.

hebe flowering at OBS

hebe flowering at OBS

Klipsan Beach Cottages

We pulled into our parking area at Klipsan Beach Cottages at a quarter to four.  Still on track for our day’s plan.  I knew the garden would be in good shape and that we could get it done in an hour.

Klipsan Beach Cottages

Klipsan Beach Cottages fenced garden

Allium albopilosum (Star of Persia)

Allium albopilosum (Star of Persia)

Allium schubertii

Allium schubertii

Rose 'Jude the Obscure'

Rose ‘Jude the Obscure’

The names of some of the roses are lost to us!

The names of some of the roses are lost to us!

rose

Last year this one did not open well but this year it looks fine.

Last year this one did not open well but this year it looks fine.

Last year Mary brought back some choice shrubs, and the one below is still in a pot because we have not found the perfect spot for it.  I think it is some kind of callistemon but if I am wrong, perhaps someone will enlighten me.

a recent acquisition

a recent acquisition

One of the two cats put on a charming show for me in the garden.

Sarah, who did get a belly rub

Sarah, who did get a belly rub

The foxgloves are restricting the view of one of the entry signs.

No one can bear to cut them down.

No one can bear to cut them down.

We would have left, as I had planned, by 4:45, but owner/manager Mary and I got into a conversation about Nora’s funeral, and life, and death, and afterlife or not, and walked up to the cottages and back, and so Allan and I did not leave till a little after five.

Corokia cotoneaster

Corokia cotoneaster in late afternoon light

Andersen’s RV Park

At last, we got to Andersen’s at five fifteen.  While Allan planted the new perennials in the garden shed garden, I weaseled out of my least favourite garden task (planting) to discuss with the staff what to do with one of those free planters we had been given in Ilwaco earlier in the day.  Jan came up with a good spot for it, and we waited for Al to return from walking his dog in order to suggest it, because it involved an area for which he had been seeking a design solution.

Al and Chewie return from the beach

Al and Chewie return from the beach

He liked the idea but since his shift was over, another staffer and Allan ended up doing it.   I hope Al was not disappointed the next morning to find it done, because he does like to have a project.  Jan’s idea was so good that it couldn’t wait till morning!

the round hollow wood

the round hollow wood

I snagged three gazania out of planters on the east side of the house where they closed up in the afternoon for lack of sun.

Till eight thirty, Allan and I weeded like mad in the beds behind the office, where the pernicious quack grass had returned; I walked the other beds and planters removing dead bulb foliage.  The results were satisfactory and now, on Monday, all we have to do is a light weeding from one end of the gardens to the other and all will be perfect…at the same time!  This is rare, because as you can probably tell, we have too many jobs to reach that state of glory very often on our larger garden jobs.

behind the office

behind the office

Having time to deadleaf as well as deadhead really makes a garden look perfect.

Buddliea 'Black Night' before...

Buddliea ‘Black Night’ before…

and after picking off yellowed leaves

and after picking off yellowed leaves

If an RVer who is also a gardener camps here, s/he must be pretty impressed with the beauty of the gardens at this time of year in evening light.  Tired though we were, we lingered to take some pictures in the late evening.

poppies and Payson Hall

poppies and Payson Hall

Baptisia (false indigo)

Baptisia (false indigo)

Stipa gigantea, my favourite ornamental grass

Stipa gigantea, my favourite ornamental grass

Stipa and Payson Hall

Stipa and Payson Hall

gold spangles

gold spangles

sunset light

sunset light

On the way out, we swung by the garden shed so I could see the new plants in.  It does look more filled out with the addition of a couple of Gaura ‘So White’, a Cistus, a Phygelius ‘African Queen’ and…something else…I forget what!

garden shed garden

garden shed garden

Al had, earlier in the day, made the gravel path at the very far end look spiffing but it does not show in this photo.

An emergency

Finally we could go home!  As we drove south through Long Beach, I checked my messages on Facebook to get an update from my gardening neighbour (four doors down), Judy.  As I read her fairly reassuring message about her visit to the cardiologist, another message popped up from a client at a commercial establishment.  There were caterpillars all over a shrub, having stripped the leaves, and looking horribly unsightly right next to a venue for an event on Saturday.  Could we come tomorrow (Saturday morning) and cut it down?  I won’t name the business because no one wants to think about horrid caterpillars.  It was on our way home, and Saturday morning was fully booked with events (Saturday market, visiting friends, cash mob) so we had to make an emergency detour with loppers and a chainsaw and cut the shrub (a Leycesteria formosa) to the ground at dusk-thirty.  I felt terrible because a hummingbird was feeding on the flowers; every leaf was gone, but the flowers remained.  One on the other side of the building (away from the next day’s event) was still leafed out, although a bit chewed, and I think the hummer could find it.

In my own garden I would have left the shrub alone to leaf out again, but at a business such ugliness cannot stand, especially if caterpillars are dropping onto customers!

We could not haul the debris.  Nay, would not.  No caterpillars allowed in our work trailer or at the site where we dump.  Fortunately there was a place we could stash the branches till the infestation is gone.

By then it was far too late to blog about such a long day so I made a placeholder entry via my iPhone on the way home…where we collapsed in front of the telly and had a comforting dinner quickly whipped up by Allan and watched Master Chef.  Just before that, as I did the evening spreadsheet on my computer, Allan came in to my office to show me this riding on his shirt.  If anyone knows caterpillars,  perhaps they can tell me what this horrid creature will become.  Nothing nice, I bet.  I shudder to think how many hitched a ride on our clothes.

a garden pest

a garden pest

I am hoping for no more days this long unless they are that long…in my own garden.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The day started with a sudden inspiration that instead of going to Andersen’s RV Park and weeding the east side as I planned, we should get the cow fiber to mulch the newly planted edges of the Marilyn garden.  Since we would be going by Oman Builders Supply on the way to M’s, we first went to Basket Case to get a couple of Eryngiums for that garden.

Basket Case cat

Basket Case cat

and a gorgeous basket

and a gorgeous basket

With Eryngiums in the car (and a few other irresistable plants to fill in along the repaired-after-weedkiller-damage edges at Marilyn’s) we went up and over and down a block to The Planter Box and got loaded up with two scoops of manure.  I picked out some more edging plants and one more six pack of Cosmos (for the Boreas Inn, if I can find time to get it planted there!).

my flat of plants being totaled at Planter Box

my flat of plants being totaled at Planter Box

With the addition of manure and more plants, Marilyn’s is beginning to look right again.

before and after

before and after

before and after

Mulch makes such a difference!

Mulch makes such a difference!

One of my gorgeous variegated Miscanthus there is reverted to green, really a shame and something I have not seen before with this grass:

half and half

half and half

Next week, we should have time to go down the middle of the garden and weed and then will just be in a holding pattern till tour day (July 20th).

the need to weed!

the need to weed!

If we had not had to spend so much time lately fixing the edges of the garden, the center would be well weeded by now.  I don’t dread the job, as I will find it so satisfying.  The hard part is we have to haul away all the debris.

The mulching and planting took less time than I thought it would;  I’d thought we might end up with extra cow fiber and my back up plan was to take it to Golden Sands.  But we had the perfect amount.  Since we had run into Andersen’s owner Lorna at the Planter Box, and she had there expressed a desire for some more small ornamental grasses, we figured our extra time could be spent fulfilling that request.

On the way we planted two Eryngiums and a Lobelia tupa at Oman Builders Supply, talked to them about the need to start watering regularly, and admired the size of the Alliums in the little garden.

Alliums schubertii and albopilosum

Alliums schubertii and albopilosum…very large

Then back we went to The Basket Case and got almost all their little grasses.  This is a boon for them because it is not a year round nursery, and when they sell out of plants, they will close for the rest of the summer and fall (probably in mid July)!

Here’s when the day got hard.  The area at Andersen’s where Lorna craved small ornamental grasses and some flowers was the barren end of the poppy bed, where poppy seedlings just do not “take” like they do at the other end.  This is not through lack of watering by the staff, and the bed has been mulched, but the other end is just moister.  We had not gotten round to weeding it and it was a mess of beach grass and couch grass, both with hugely running roots.  It was…just…hard work.  The kind of weeding job where you pull long long grass roots and know that only regular policing will keep the bad grass from coming back and swamping the desirable grass.  Worse yet, it has wild beach lupine whose roots are like iron.

before and after

before and after

A wheelbarrow full of plants went in.

little grasses and some flowers

little grasses and some flowers

Deer wander this garden so the non grass plants were Lobelia tupa (one, to try it out), Lavender, Catananche, Gaura ‘Whirling Butterfiles’ and ‘So White’, and Coreopsis ‘Baby Sun’.

It doesn’t look that different, yet, but should fill in well.

potential

potential

You can see where after the patch we weeded, all of a sudden the poppies are spectacular.  Dare we say we think it has something to do with the septic field?

Unfortunately, we still have three unweeded areas and might not get to them till next week.  One is the shade bed east of the house (our original plan for today) and two are near the office back door.  Oh, when?

still just befores!

still just befores!

This is one reason I am going to try to quit a job tomorrow by passing it on to a competent gardening friend who may be willing to take it over.  We’ll see.  I cannot stand being so overbooked and always running behind.

Even though we were plenty tired after this, at 7 PM we went to our last job.  I knew we absolutely had to water the Ilwaco planters now that the rains have stopped.  As has happened before, we were perhaps one day too late and in several of the planters the little sanvitalias were drooping flat on the soil and shriveled up.  I could not bear to photograph this.

The Ilwaco planters are round cement and the soil in them just bakes.  We bucket water them, or rather Allan does.  We do have a water truck but it takes an hour longer to water with it.  An hour extra would be more strain on the city budget and at the end of the day we do not have that extra hour.

Some of the sanvitalias were fine.  The stressed ones, eight in all,  I cut back hard, hoping they would put out more roots as the tops grew back, and I resolved that I cannot use this choice and cute little plant in the Ilwaco planters next year.  I had forgotten that it is more sensitive to dryness than Diascia or even Calibrachoa.  And dryness is the curse of the Ilwaco street planters.

As we watered and groomed the Ilwaco planters (in a wind so cold I put on a winter scarf), I became obsessively worried that the Sanvitalia in the Long Beach planters had suffered the same fate.  So after watering, at 8-exhausted-15 PM we drove back up to LB and cruised the car up and down the main street.  Ah, thank heavens above, the Sanvitalias were fine, perky, and pretty.  The LB planters are much larger and do not get dry as quickly.  They should hold until Wednesday, the day we plan to begin their regular watering.  (With a quick connect hook up and a short hose for each planter, no buckets for the ones on the LB main street I am glad to say!)

Here is a happy Sanvitalia in my garden tonight;  I hope the LB ones stay this happy until Wednesday.  Gardening can be such a big worry.  Times like the last half of today are not the jolly side of this business.

Wish they were all this happy.

Wish they were all this happy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Today we went to one of the thrice yearly volunteer beach clean up events organized by the Grassroots Garbage Gang. We decided that instead of going to our usual spot on the Seaview approach or our second usual choice, Benson Beach, we would start at Beard’s Hollow. It’s the very south end of the beach that runs for (I think) 18 miles north and is a bit of a walk from the parking lot so is not as frequently cleaned. It used to be my beach walking destination when I lived in Seaview in 1993.

near the parking lot

near the parking lot

The trail used to be underwater until well into spring, causing me a lot of frustration after I moved to Ilwaco. I then found a trail up and over the big hill between me and the beach, crossing over where Discovery Heights is now, only to find that after about half an hour, when I got as far as Beard’s Hollow I could get no further without hip waders.

Since then, the Discovery Trail has been built and provides access to walkers and bicyclists year round.

Discovery Trail

Discovery Trail

beside the trail

beside the trail

licorice fern in tree

licorice fern in tree

Salmonberry

Salmonberry

still pool reflections

still pool reflections

skunk cabbage

skunk cabbage

I have read that in the UK, our native skunk cabbage is sold at a pretty price as an ornamental plant and is called “swamp lantern”. I don’t want to Google and find out it is not true. It is a gorgeous bog plant, but difficult to tranplant.

swamp lantern

swamp lantern

sword fern

sword fern (unpruned!)

When one gets to the really big rock, one is almost at the beach. The trees have grown considerably since I used to walk here.

the big rock

the big rock

Here is what the trail used to be like in winter; this is one of the roads through the dunes.

road around the rock

road around the rock

the rock

the rock

native stonecrop and blackberries

native stonecrop and blackberries

the rock

a small part of the rock

nature's moss garden

nature’s moss garden

At last, the beach…

to the beach

to the beach

The Coast Guard helicopter flew by.

Beard's Hollow fishing rocks

Beard’s Hollow fishing rocks

Someone had lost a bouquet, or tossed it overboard in a memorial service perhaps.

mystery flowers

mystery flowers

flowers

 

flowers and fishing rocks

flowers and fishing rocks

The Beard’s Hollow fishing rocks have witnessed many dramatic scenes. When the tide comes in, human explorers are taken by surprise on the outer rocks and many have been rescued over the years.

rock full of birds

rock full of birds

rockscape

rockscape

clues that the tide does come in

clues that the tide does come in

rocks

We found enough garbage in the next hour and a quarter to fill three large bags. People who drive down the beach to have a campfire…(and the beach is a legal highway, and in my opinion that is very regrettable) don’t even have to pack their garbage out on foot, so why do they leave it behind like this? Just throw it in the truck bed, folks!

campfire debris

campfire debris

They did at least put it all back in the packaging.

the south end of the long beach

the south end of the long beach

While it is satisfying to fill a bag with larger items, the tiny little bits of coloured plastic are especially bad for birds. They think it is food and fill themselves up and then starve.

It would take days to fill a back with these tiny pieces

It would take days to fill a back with these tiny pieces

I become obsessed with picking up each one but I know that many more are tumbled under the sand.

Far in the distance with the telephoto I could see folks in groups cleaning to the north.

cleaning crew

cleaning crew

People enter at each of the major beach approaches or walk out from their own streets. Most start at 9:30 AM but we usually manage to roll in at about 10:15. Today about 325 signed in.

We walked down as far as this shallow seasonal stream.

stream

stream

The one time I do like to see vehicles on the beach “highway” is when the volunteers come along to take our bags.

loaded with debris

loaded with debris

And then, back through the green along the beautiful trail.

a side trail around the big rock

a side trail around the big rock

bicyclists

passing the big rock

passing the big rock

more licorice ferns

licorice fern, a tree dweller

licorice fern, a tree dweller

Sambucus racemosa (red elderberry) has a tropical look.

Sambucus racemosa (red elderberry) has a tropical look.

elderberry grove

elderberry grove

moss and mushrooms

moss and mushrooms

The trail is a draw for bicyclists as it goes all the way from Ilwaco to north of Long Beach.

discovering the trail

discovering the trail

Discovery trail map

Discovery Trail map

We were just down at the Beard’s Hollow section. Click here for a larger view.

Next on our agenda: the volunteer soup feed reward halfway up the Peninsula at the Senior Center. Because we start late, and go late, we have been known to arrive for the very last bowls of soup, but today we arrived in time to have two choices, and we both chose clam chowder made by Steve of The Great Day Café.

soup reward for volunteers

soup reward for volunteers

The Senior Center is right next door to Golden Sands Assisted Living so we found it handy to check on all the new plants starts we planted yesterday, and I am happy to report they are all standing up tall…no wilting. Allan found this very nice monthly newsletter that shows how much they appreciate the courtyard garden.

from Golden Sands newsletter

from Golden Sands newsletter

Thus we segued into the work day and after going north past Nahcotta on the bay to pick up a free plastic pond (more on this later), we checked on Marilyn’s garden. My intention was to do nothing but deadhead the narcissi and move on, but oh dear…horsetail was on the march and had to be dealt with…and then my eye fell on a problem that had been bothering me for some time.

This giant Miscanthus had ended up in the foreground of the garden where it blocks the view of the Helianthus behind it. It bothers me every year.

This ornamental grass will get taller than me, and is in the wrong place.

This ornamental grass will get taller than me, and is in the wrong place.

I worried at it with the pick for a short while. Its roots are like iron. Allan decided to have a go so I went back to the horsetail, and returned to this satisfying result.

what an accomplishment

what an accomplishment!

It’s a challenge to find anything evergreen and tall to block the view of the neighbours’ driveway and garage because deer practically live in this garden…so I rely on tall deciduous plants.

Marilyn's today, looking north from back porch

Marilyn’s today, looking north from back porch

There is much to do here, especially since the plan is for this garden to be on the Peninsula garden tour in July of this year…but we had to move on to have time to check three more gardens.

At the Wiegardt Gallery, the lilac is close to bloom:

Wiegardt lilac

Wiegardt lilac

Tulip 'Lilac Wonder' opens wide in the faint sunshine.

Tulip ‘Lilac Wonder’ opens wide in the faint sunshine.

The narcissi are still looking fine, but how did scilla get into the garden? I most certainly did not plant it.

narcissi...and scilla

narcissi…and scilla

This thug will be bad news. I wonder if someone else planted some bulbs to be nice? Because they are so pretty.

the dreaded scilla invasion

the dreaded scilla invasion

I have three other thugs in this garden: sweet woodruff and the bad aster that came from who knows where, and geranium ‘A.T. Johnson’ that I once thought a very fine plant indeed.

Eric’s brother sometimes plants a very choice treasure, and I am hoping that these Eremurus that he put in two years ago might flower this year.

Here's hoping for some foxtail lilies

Here’s hoping for some foxtail lilies…

We still have lots more to do at Wiegardt’s (sounds so familiar) but we had to get on to Klipsan Beach Cottages. On the way, we did a quick check up at Oman Builders Supply in Ocean Park.

There is the exciting new ‘Green Star’ tulip. Have I been calling it ‘Green Ice’?

You have to get Green Star against a dark background or it does not show up well.

You have to get Green Star against a dark background or it does not show up well.

It's a lily flowering tulip and a green tulip all at once.

It’s a lily flowering tulip and a green tulip all at once.

There were three but someone swiped one, and the finger blight evidence of twisted stem shows the person did not even have clippers but just worried the stem till the stolen tulip was theirs.

The shattered star shape of the stem is evidence...

The shattered star shape of the stem is evidence…

At Klipsan Beach Cottages, we had delegated a rhododendron removal job to another landscape business, and had not expected the end result to be a bed all askew and us with no time to fix it. My fantasy was that we would find the job all done. Silly. Realistically I probably should not have hoped that a backhoe would be brought in, huge rhododendrons pulled, and then the edging put back all nicey nice (by whom?) All we could do today was deadhead the narcissi and check for weeds. Next weekend we can deal with the other problem, maybe.

narcissi in cottage windowbox

narcissi in cottage windowbox

Tulip clusiana 'Lady Jane'

Tulip clusiana ‘Lady Jane’

in the garden

in the garden

In a pot I had six Tulip ‘Green Star’ and in this safe haven, no one had picked any.

Green Stars

Green Stars

Green Star

Green Star

The first year I saw this in the Van Engelen catalog, I waited too long to order and they had sold out. So it was a year and a half before I had it in bloom, and I am a little obsessed with it this month.

Green Star

Green Star

in the garden...

in the garden…

two matching pots

two matching pots

and some Blushing Ladies

and some Blushing Ladies

I wonder if this year at long last the Tetrapanax papyrifer ‘Steroidal [not very] Giant’ will get the size I have seen it elsewhere. It has been sulking for three years.

still only as tall as a daylily

still only as tall as a daylily

sword fern...I like our pruned ones better than mother nature's messy ones!

sword fern…I like our pruned ones better than mother nature’s messy ones!

Lathyrus vernus from Joy Creek Nursery

at KBC: Lathyrus vernus from Joy Creek Nursery

A rain squall decided our stop time at KBC but by the time we got home, the sky had cleared again. I thought I was too cold, and extra tired from getting up “early” for beach clean up, and that all I had the oomph to do was look out the window.

back garden window view

back garden window view

Then I remembered the pond form and had to go think about where it might go.

It probably won't look very real...

It probably won’t look very real…

pondering

pondering

We decided to install it next to the boat. Because of my upcoming mini-vacation (why???) we won’t have time for awhile.

While I uploaded photos to the Grassroots Garbage Gang Facebook page, Allan mowed the lawn. He reports that it takes an hour and a quarter. Less than it did last year because of my winter expansion of the garden beds.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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But first!  The bouquet that I took to a wonderful International Women’s Day potluck at Queen La De Da’s Art Castle at the Port of Ilwaco last night:

Bouquet with Hellebores, Narcissi, and mustard flowers

Bouquet with Hellebores, Narcissi, and mustard flowers

The Hellebores were a hit; some women had not seen this flower before, ever.

So….Today we went to Marilyn’s to begin the waking up of the garden.  I thought blithely that we would get a load of debris from Marilyn’s, dump it, then go to Klipsan Beach Cottages and trim the sword ferns, then a full clean up at the Golden Sands garden, but it was not to be.  Marilyn’s was quite absorbing, so we had time only for a quick chop of dead perennials at Golden Sands and no KBC at all.

The befores and afters:

looking south, before

looking south, before

looking south, after

looking south, after

looking north by back porch, before

looking northwest by back porch, before

looking north by back porch, after

looking northwest by back porch, after

I am looking for a new view to follow through the seasons in a slide show at the end of the year.  In  2009, I used the view from where we park.  This year, I am going to use the view looking north and the view from the back porch looking west, to show how everything grows up and hides the neighbours’ drab garage.

I have had a hard time getting anything big and evergreen to succeed as a backdrop here because the deer ate Escallonia and California wax myrtle….and Evergreen huckleberry grows sooooo slowly.  I don’t want a greedy plant like Laurel.

today, before chopping the big Miscanthus

today, before chopping the big Miscanthus

today with a clean slate

today with a clean slate

We have not even gotten to the river rock swale behind the house…

And we have a new project, to clean up the always neglected area out by the street that dips down into a big patch of salal.  The garden is supposed to be on the Peninsula garden tour this year (July 20th!) so we really do need to tidy this area up.  I will not choose to fight the rampant montbretia or the salal, but at least it can be cleaned up blackberries.

Below, two “before” photos, because I probably will not remember to stand in the right spot for the after photo.  We did not arrive anywhere near “after” today.  Marilyn’s lot ends just about where that birdhouse on a pile stands.

before

before

before

during

during

By the end of today, it looked even worse than before, because we filled up our trailer to the top with debris and had to throw more debris into this area to get next time, on which day I fervently hope to clear all the dead montbretia leaves and native blackberry out of here.

My Seattle friends and basket makers Pat and Phyllis could utilize the native blackberry vines.  They would wear heavy work gloves and run the pliable thorny stems through their gloved hands to remove the prickles and then weave the vines into rustic baskets.

This is the classic Marilyn view:  from my seat in the car just before we drive away.

back soon, I hope!

back soon, I hope!

We spent an hour at the end of the day trimming plants in the courtyard at Golden Sands Assisted Living, where the garden needs so much help.  It desperately needs good mulch, but one has to wheelbarrow any supplies down a long carpeted hallway, which is not going to make it easy to deliver what the garden really wants:  about two years of washed dairy manure.  It has the worst soil I have ever worked with unless I were gardening right by the dunes.  Thin, poor, mossy.  Maybe I should just go with it and plant only things that will grow on pitiful soil.  But I still envision it being a paradise, especially since it completely safe from deer.  I just need more time…

I had every intention of mulching it during my staycation but found that mulching my own garden was all I wanted to do.

There is still the beach approach garden to do in Long Beach, a job that takes over 26 solid hours, and a park we have not yet touched, and two clients whose gardens we have not even been to yet.   Tomorrow we will help our good friend Patti in her garden for four hours, but we really should be doing our regular clients’ places.  And then the rain is supposed to return.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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On the May trip, I visited with Carol in the north Seattle neighbourhood of Ballard, just over the hill from my old garden. Usually I was only there in February for the garden show so it was wonderful for me to see the gardens, including this one near her house, at their peak.

Bamboo grove

Bamboo grove

Years ago, I felt I had been one of the first Seattleites to have a parking strip garden.  Now they abounded, to my delight.

Ballard parking strip garden path

Ballard parking strip garden path

parking strip with poppies

parking strip with poppies

street circle garden

street circle garden

Below:  Down the street from Carol a gay Vietnam Vet had the best circle garden of all. Sign says “fairy crossing”:

fairy crossing

fairy crossing

the same street circle

the same street circle

He had used that thing I love:  broken dishes in the garden.

street circle detail

street circle detail

Here was the sidewalk along his apartment, which Carol said had been a dive before and was now all nice.

his sidewalk garden

his sidewalk garden

On Carol and I walked past more parking strip gardens in Ballard.

parking strip mosaic

parking strip mosaic

poppies

poppies

parking strip

parking strip

Ballard parking strip

Ballard parking strip

Now I faintly recall that the trip ended with Carol driving back to the beach with me and staying over (at a motel, since our house is so small) for her usual late spring visit, so I was able to buy a few plants at Fremont Gardens.

Fremont Gardens

Fremont Gardens

I believe that this garden shop is now the excellent Emerald City Gardens.

Fremont Gardens

Fremont Gardens

Fremont Gardens

Fremont Gardens way cool stuff

Fremont Gardens

Fremont Gardens

Stipa gigantea at Fremont Gardens

Stipa gigantea at Fremont Gardens

and poppies

and poppies

And then, back to the beach, until my next escape.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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My old friend Mary (since age 12!) met me at the train in Seattle and the next day we went to the garden open at Heronswood near Kingston. I almost wept when entering the long driveway….It was a pilgrimage onto sacred ground.  I had been mail ordering plants from Dan Hinkley since the nursery first offered them but had never been there.  By the time it had become a tour mecca, I had already moved to the beach.

trees along the Heronswood entry driveway

trees along the Heronswood entry driveway

under the trees

under the trees

A few years before I had heard a lecture by Anne Lovejoy, in Seaside, Oregon, not about gardening but about her trip to the Cloud Forest in Costa Rica (AND she had given me an Edgeworthia chrysantha which she lugged down for me on the train, bless her!). The idea of a cloud forest made me feel way better about my shady Ilwaco garden, and so did the woodsy sections of Heronswood.

Pulmonaria 'Cotton Cool'

Pulmonaria ‘Cotton Cool’

Heronswood

the Gunnera with tiny leaves!

the Gunnera with tiny leaves! magellanica, I think

To be at Heronswood was like a happy dream.  I was thrilled to see in person the famous Heronswood lawn with Hakonechloa macra aureola grass along the edge.

the lawn border that I had seen in many photos

the lawn border that I had seen in many photos

approaching the house garden

approaching the house garden

Mary and I also got to hear Dan Hinkley give a lecture, and she finally experienced first hand how very witty he is.  I was pleased to see that even though she was not at all a gardener obsessed, she laughed and laughed!

the famous (not so) clipped Hornbeam hedge

the famous (not so) clipped Hornbeam hedge

adorable ferns near the house

adorable ferns near the house

In the back of the vegetable garden, you can see the famous hand washing sink created by Little and Lewis.

the vegetable garden

the vegetable garden

Aeonium 'Schwarzkopf'

Aeonium ‘Schwarzkopf’

details

details

The Little and Lewis pillars in the boggy garden

 Little and Lewis pillars 

the top of more pillars

the top of more pillars

I think you would have to go out on the nearby pond in a boat to photograph this whole glorious structure.

detail at the base of the pillars

detail at the base of the pillars

Blue Himalayan Poppy

Blue Himalayan Poppy

poppy

poppy

After Heronswood, Mary and I had a delicious meal at Molly Ward Gardens restaurant.  The food was wonderful. I seem to recall a cold melon soup. The restaurant was housed in an old barn that had once housed a yard shop.

at Molly Ward gardens

at Molly Ward gardens

Peeking into the Molly Ward courtyard

Peeking into the Molly Ward courtyard

the courtyard

the courtyard

Phormium contained

Phormium contained

The Phormium in a small garbage can is an idea I have used several times since then.

in the Molly Ward garden

in the Molly Ward garden

courtyard seating

courtyard seating

And then….back to Bellevue and Seattle for more garden touring.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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In the fall, we got a call from Phyllis, who owned a vacation house midway up the peninsula.  She wanted a beachy garden and because we immediately, upon meeting her and her spouse Robert, we knew we were sympatico with their artistic sensibilities and agreed to add the job.

She then told us that someone had said to her that she would be lucky if we showed up.  We had always been known as reliable, but apparently someone had been disappointed in our not taking on a new job during the early part of the year when Robert had, excuse me! been suffering from a heart attack!  That was pretty annoying.  But Phyllis soon realized that she could count on us.

We started with a day of prep collecting driftwood for the garden.

collecting driftwood from our best secret place

collecting driftwood from our best secret place (NOT the state park)

Below, a trailer full of driftwood.  We were now using a Jeep because our van had given out.  I liked the Jeep very much.

bounty

bounty

Below:  the entry garden, after digging out the sod:

entry garden

entry garden

Because we wanted to be able to plant bulbs that autumn throughout the garden, we dug it out rather than using the newspaper method.

entry garden day two

entry garden day two

The yard on the west side of the house went up to (and actually was partly on) state park land, so nothing would ever be built to spoil the view over the dunes.  All the way up the peninsula are odd little “piano keys” of park land, sometimes only two lots wide.  This was one of the piano keys.

west side, day one

west side, day one

day one, defining edges with the half moon edger

day one, defining edges with the half moon edger

west side, end of day one

west side, end of day one

the pile of soil for Sea Nest

the pile of soil for Sea Nest

Escallonia hedge going in on north side of the west garden

Escallonia hedge going in on north side of the west garden

Robert’s brilliant idea and creation was the driftwood temple in the corner of the west side garden.

temple

temple

detail of temple entry

detail of temple entry

newly planted west side garden

newly planted west side garden, with grass planted in driftwood

newly planted west side garden, with grass planted in driftwood

We placed a driftwood “treasure bench” by the gate leading in from the dunes path.

treasure bench

treasure bench

We met the nice neghbours to the north, Bobbi and June (who had met playing softball back in the era of World War II and been together ever since).  The invited us up to see the garden from their window.

Bobbi and June's view of the garden

Bobbi and June’s view of the garden

Here’s a window view from inside Seanest of the garden before:

from living room, before

from living room, before

and after

and after

This would be the last garden that Robert and I created together.

Although Phyllis and Robert sold the house a few years, it is still a vacation rental and we care for the (now simplified to need less watering) garden to this day.  I miss Phyllis and Robert.   On my new-at-the-time website, I have a page of Seanest owner Robert’s poetry about the garden and beach life, and beautiful entries by guests who wrote in the house journal.  I am adding the house journal entries here because I am simply in love with journal entries written by vacationers.

The new garden makes us smile. We love the creativity and gentle nurturing and amazing knowledge of beach gardens that Skyler and Robert of Tangly Cottage bring to us. Soon we’ll have our rose covered cottage that I always dreamed of. What wonderful surprises we have ahead!

– (Phyllis Ray)

In Sea Nest we are able to dream with angels, near heaven, at the sea, at the beach.

– (Brad Lee Miller)

Windless night, almost full moon, silent silver seagrass standing still. Short shadows precede us down to the beach. The sea flirts with kissing our feet.

– (Phyllis Ray)

We got such a lovely surprise when we arrived here as we are visiting from the UK and to see such a large beach house, as back home a beach house would be the size of a garden shed.

– (guests from the UK)

A weekend at the beach brings back all the good memories from childhood staying at grandma’s house. Just what I was needing…mission accomplished. I sure do miss her and the days at the beach.

– (Kimberley)

Ag 2 99 Flowers. The flower beds in Long Beach…and meeting Schuyler from Tanglewood Cottage – the master gardener who is responsible for many of the gardens that caught my eye. I began to see her signature…could tell which gardens she does.

– (Phyllis Ray)

“The world today is sick to its thin blood for the lack of elemental things, for fire before the hands, for water welling from the earth, for air, for the dear earth itself underfoot.”   Henry Beston, 1928, from The Outermost House

– (quoted in Sea Nest house diary)

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In 2001, we were hired to work on the garden at the Glenn House, that iconic house that I had photographed in 1974, a photo I had had on my wall for years back in Seattle.

1974 photo of the house

1974 photo of the house

2001 with empty boat

2001 with empty boat

boat planted up with cosmos

boat planted up with cosmos, 2001

boat with cosmos and perennials

boat with cosmos and perennials

view from the widow's walk of the house during 4th of July party.  Big flag marks the boat.

view from the widow’s walk of the house during 4th of July party. Big flag marks the boat.

It was Robert’s clever idea to add a sort of mooring post at the front of the boat, and idea I have used for garden boats since then.

the boat in early spring '02

the boat in early spring ’02

We also, in 2001, planted up this entry garden by the porch of the big house:

entry garden

entry garden

Behind the big house sits a little cottage, whose resident in 2001 was Paul Wainamo, then manager of the Sanctuary Restaurant.

Paul's cottage gate

Paul’s cottage gate

His tiny garden was exquisite.

Paul and Peaches

Paul and Peaches

cottage door

cottage door

gate to the street

gate to the street

in Paul's garden

in Paul’s garden

seating

seating

So sorry, can’t make the photos bigger unless I find the prints and rescan them!

In 2011-12, we took on the project of bringing back the little cottage garden, so I will be sure to photograph it this year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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