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Posts Tagged ‘Pacific tree frog’

Thursday, 21 September 2017

Ilwaco post office garden


I always think I do not like the yellow evening primrose. And yet look how pretty this accidental one is.

Long Beach

We began Long Beach at city hall with the plan of pulling a lot of the Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ and then then clearing out the boring Geranium ‘Johnson’s Blue’ planter by the gazebo, getting new soil in buckets from city works, and redoing the planter with the plants we had brought with us.

cars and flowers meet at the edge of the parking lot

There is a whole wall of Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ on the south of the west side (not planted by us! I would have picked something else.)

before


I set out to clip back the Miscanthus ‘Variegatus’ from the sidewalk.

I then noticed that one of the two escallonias had produced three feet of new growth and decided to clip it away from the building.  Look who I found while clipping:

Pacific tree frog and snail

I am so glad I got that photo just before froggie jumped off.

As I clipped the escallonia, Parks Manager Mike drove by and called out a request, that we clip back the roses on the big pop out, one block south, because of sight line issues.  That changed the day’s plan considerably.  Soon after, I decided to cut the escallonia down very low so that it would better match the much smaller one at the other end of the garden.  Meanwhile, I asked Allan to take the pick and remove the big armeria on the corner by the escallonia; it was a haven for creeping buttercup and was too far out over the wall.

Allan’s photos: before…


and after


after

While Allan finished, I clipped back the huge Aruncus (goats beard) on the north side.

during


after

The aruncus has gotten too big for that spot.  Later this fall, we plan to dig it out and put it somewhere in Fifth Street Park (with a division going to my garden; it originally came from my previous garden).

Very little Crocosmia got pulled. 

The one thing we went there to do hardly got done at all.

Before even going to the pop out, we had so much debris that we had to dump.  We need revitalizing, yet the coffee drive through had four cars waiting so Allan said “Let’s go to the two guys.”  I knew exactly what he meant: Abbracci Coffee Bar, owned by Tony and Bernardo.

a Pink Poppy Bakery shortbread


fifteen minutes of relaxation


and a dulcimer player


Allan’s photo

While we were by Fifth Street Park for our coffee break, we went ahead and deadheaded there.

fall crocus (Allan’s photo)


At two o clock, the post-tourist season town was so quiet.


SW quadrant looking grand with Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’.


9-21-17

Next: the big pop out project.  As we parked, I thought that there was no way the sightline could be blocked by the rugosa roses.

before: You’d look left, and you’d look right when you were further out….

However, in recent years we have taken the pick and tried to push the roses back (to no avail, but at least they stayed shorter for the summer).  I did not mind cutting them.  I had told Mike I wished we could redo the whole thing, rebuilding the wall and putting in all new soil.  By we, I mean the city crew and big equipment.

after; we will prune the rest of the roses down hard later.

As we were working on this, a fellow on a motorcycle stopped and wanted to give us a $20 tip.  The same thing, with a different man, happened in Long Beach a couple of weeks ago, and that time I was able to kindly refuse.  Today’s gentleman would not take a refusal; he tucked the $20 in among the stems of the rugosa roses (and we did not leave it there).

A kitty came to visit.


Her roundness reminded me of my Mary.

With another full trailer, we made another run to city works, and this time we filled buckets with soil for the original project, redoing a city planter. 

While Allan got started digging the boring old geraniums out of the planter, I walked four blocks worth of planters to deadhead.

I saw a pug.


And the pug saw me.

On my walkabout, I collected some Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’, some creeping succulents, and some cut leaf saxifrage and then joined Allan at the planter project.  The sun had become hot, and the town had become busy with lots of onlookers, and we only had two hours to get the project done before a social event. The Geranium ‘Johnson’s Blue’ roots are so pervasive that we had to dig a lot of soil out.  Even then, I thought maybe we had not dug enough.  I was afraid to put in the two Geranium ‘Rozanne’ that I brought.  Rozanne (blooming from late spring to first frost) is related to Johnson (which blooms for about a month, if that), and if Johnson got mixed up with Rozanne, then Johnson could use Rozanne as a base to try to take over the whole planter again.  I’ll wait to see how much JB sprouts back before I add Rozanne to this planter. Allan took all the photos here.

before


before

after; we salvaged two santolinas and two agastaches.


after


As the sun was setting, we checked on the kite museum garden.


kite museum (Allan’s photo)

During our planter re-do, I had gotten a text that changed our dinner plans.  We had been going to meet Dave and Melissa at El Compadre Mexican Restaurant for our weekly dinner.  Instead, we were all invited to the home of Lynn, who until recently was our beloved server at the Cove.

sun setting as we arrive (Allan’s photo)

Our destination was next door to Gene’s garden, which you may remember from the 2013 local garden tour.

Here was Gene’s garden in 2013:

And here it is now, with the changes that Gene made since then:

good job, Gene!


in 2013…


and now with a new west facing deck


Gene’s cottage

Next door, pretty porch lights welcomed us to Lynn’s cottage.

She had stocked the cooler with our favourite cider.

The cottage inside was every bit as perfectly beachy as the best Cannon Beach Cottage.

windowsill lights with shells

Bitty protecting her lair

Chloe was much friendlier than Bitty (who warmed up to us eventually).

my new friend


Chloe’s nook

We dined with seven friends on a pizza assortment and snacks. With Dave and Melissa, we stayed till late, sharing thoughts and stories.

At home, I found it satisfying to erase “planter re-do” from the work board.

 

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Sunday, 20 September 2015

My gardening energy is most definitely revived with autumnal weather.  I will admit I had been looking forward to a rainy day to stay indoors and read.  Surprising sunshine got me out working on a garden project instead.

This much had fallen overnight.

This much rain had fallen overnight.


The newly painted copper heart looks like a pillow.

The newly painted copper heart looks like a pillow.

I wanted to weed back in the bogsy wood but a brisk wind stopped me.

Instead, I worked on the center bed.

Instead, I worked on the center bed.

Meanwhile, I pondered where I could make a new strawberry bed as I would like to expand my scree garden to all around the boat.

I still have not figured out another place for growing strawberries.

I still have not figured out another place for growing strawberries.


I want more scree.

I want more scree.


scree garden edge expanded

scree garden edge expanded

Just as I finished edging the scree garden, enough rain arrived so that I could spend the rest of the day indoors catching up on this blog.  (As soon as staycation begins, sometime in November, the blog will take second place to reading days.)

Monday, 21 September 2015

I continued to sleep poorly.  My mind is haunted with sadness for a former friend whose loved one has died.  The door of friendship was closed firmly and decisively (from the other side) making it difficult to reach out with comfort and yet my thoughts are with her because I have rarely known a couple so together-y for 49 years of marriage, especially after retirement.  They even went to have their hair cut together.  The best I could come up was to post the wonderful song All of the Good Things on “Our Ilwaco” Facebook page as a sign of sympathy.  While an atheist probably cannot picture the kind of afterlife with wings as described in the first verse, the rest of the song speaks so eloquently of memory, as do the family photos in the video (which are the family photos of the songwriter, Amanda Birdsall):

“I heard your voice today
in this old machine
it made me remember
all of the good things.”

I once made a memory garden for the widow of a couple who were as closely bonded.  One memorial that I incorporated was the Jewish custom of each visitor leaving a small rock on top of a larger one in memory of their lost friend, as in a cemetery pebbles are placed on the gravestone in memory by all who visit.

From the blog I wrote about that garden:

memory

I leave this pebble here in memory.

I leave this pebble here in memory.

Also from that blog entry:

books

Because I just don’t have the ability to envision a guaranteed afterlife, I find the Angelo Patri quotation to be particularly comforting.

Hard work in the garden focused my mind on pruning and weeding.  I worked back in the bogsy wood despite a somewhat disconcerting wind because, after a whole summer of wind, I am tired of putting that area off.

main path to the bogsy woods with the side bed weeded and blackberry tangle removed

main path to the bogsy woods with the side bed weeded and blackberry tangle removed


by the bogsy woods swale, before

by the bogsy woods swale, before


after

after


I got grass, creeping buttercups, and blackberries pulled out of the swale "streambed".

I got grass, creeping buttercups, and blackberries pulled out of the swale “streambed”.


Now standing rainwater will look more attractive this winter.

Now standing rainwater will look more attractive this winter.


long shadows in the bogsy wood

long shadows in the bogsy wood


outside the gate: why I worry about working out here in the wind.

outside the gate: why I worry about working out here in the wind.


I refined the salmonberry tunnel.

I refined the salmonberry tunnel.


view north from the bogsy wood

view north from the bogsy wood

I even had time to work on a bed that has escaped my attention all summer:

east side garden, a big mess, before

east side garden, a big mess, before


after

after


Smokey examined a sad hydrangea aspera. I moved it here this summer from a spot that was too dry, and I still have hope.

Smokey examined a sad hydrangea aspera. I moved it here this summer from a spot that was too dry, and I still have hope.

Meanwhile, Allan had been working on a project of his own: making strips of wood to top the new arbour in the front garden:

DSC00226

making strips

making strips

DSC00228

painting them

painting them


a time-consuming task

a time-consuming task

Outside his shop, he photographed this big fat flower bud:

on Fatsia japonica 'Spider's Web'

on Fatsia japonica ‘Spider’s Web’

Before dusk I took a walkabout around the garden.

fire circle with cleaned up bogsy woods behind

fire circle with cleaned up bogsy wood behind


I noticed how big this Chilean tree has grown.

I noticed how big this Chilean tree has grown.


The leaves do smell wonderful.

The leaves do smell wonderful.


Clematis 'Rooguchi'

Clematis ‘Rooguchi’


Kniphofia 'Earliest of All' (from Todd)

Kniphofia ‘Earliest of All’ (from Todd)


I remembered to take some macros!

I remembered to take some macros!

DSC09751

Dicentra scandens (bleeding heart vine)

Dicentra scandens (bleeding heart vine)


Verbena bonariensis

Verbena bonariensis

I went to pick a Cripp’s Pink apple and look who I found.

DSC09762

Cripp’s Pink (Pink Lady) with Pacific Tree Frog


I did not pick that one.

I did not pick that one.

I am glad I don’t have the competition for apples that my former client Ann has.  A couple of days ago, she posted these photos of her apple trees in her garden a few blocks uphill from me:

photo by Ann Saari

photo by Ann Saari


photo by Ann Saari

photo by Ann Saari


photo by Ann Saari

photo by Ann Saari


bear3

photo by Ann Saari


the three bears, photo by Ann Saari

the three bears (mom and two cubs), photo by Ann Saari

I also realized that Mr. Tootlepedal might enjoy seeing this card that I have pinned to a bulletin board.  It looks very much like Mr. Grumpy.

Great Blue Heron in the Rain by Dli Leger

Great Blue Heron in the Rain by Dli Leger

Next: If all goes well, we will accomplish some more fall projects at work this week.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Not to worry, the last meals are because our favourite waterfront restaurant (and one of our favourites of all time), Pelicano, is closing, leaving no dinner restaurants at all in our tiny town.  Charter fishing is thriving here, and the wonderful Time Enough Bookstore is doing well, and Don Nisbett Art Gallery continues to please customers.  We hope someone opens a good dinner restaurant here soon; it was a treat having one less than two blocks from our house.

But first…some gardening.

Sunday, 28 September 2014

Allan's photo:  Jeweled Chain fern (Woodwardia Ungemmata) from garden blogger's fling (never allow to dry out) planted in August is putting out a new burgundy frond backed by a Japanese waterfall grass and a Molton Lava Oxalis

Allan’s photo: Jeweled Chain fern (Woodwardia Ungemmata) from garden blogger’s fling (never allow to dry out) planted in August is putting out a new burgundy frond backed by a Japanese waterfall grass and a Molton Lava Oxalis

Allan's garden, where the red fern grows

Allan’s garden, where the red fern grows

I was not filled with enthusiasm for gardening, so I forced myself to start a couple of small fall clean up projects.  Of course, once I began I was soon in the gardening “zone” with no desire to stop.

west side of front garden

west side of front garden (during)

west side of front garden, after

west side of front garden, after

I must post this to a plant ID site.  Got at Steamboat Island Nursery (I think)...lost the tag.

I must post this to a plant ID site. Got at Steamboat Island Nursery (I think)…lost the tag.

Allan added some green paint to the porch posts.

Allan added some green paint to the porch posts.

Allan’s photos of a little Pacific tree frog on a half moon edger that he found languishing in the garden (oops) and put away.

IMG_1774

IMG_1775

And then….another meal at Pelicano Restaurant, this time with Michelle who used to do cash mob with me (I’ve gone on hiatus from that) and Sondra, owner of the Cove Restaurant (our Thursday tradition) and Cove staff member Carmen.  We had had this reservation made before we knew the restaurant was closing.

Pelicano Restaurant

This was to be the last night.  However, Pelicano owner Shelly told us that they had added Monday night, as well, with a light menu prepared from whatever was left.

one of Shelly's beautiful flower arrangements

one of Shelly’s beautiful flower arrangements

and our table bouquet

and our table bouquet

Michelle and I got the last two Escarlata cocktails (and then the grapefruit simple syrup was gone), and Allan had an Aviation.

Michelle and I got the last two Escarlata cocktails (and then the grapefruit simple syrup was gone), and Allan had an Aviation.

The menu was changing daily at this point.

The menu was changing daily at this point.

menu2

spicy calamari salad

spicy calamari, black bean and avocado salad with cilantro-roasted garlic dressing

shrimp and green bean salad with mustard-thyme dressing

shrimp and green bean salad with mustard-thyme dressing

We all do like our freshly ground black pepper.

We all do like our freshly ground black pepper.

Michelle ordered a bottle of champagne.

Michelle ordered a bottle of champagne.

restaurant owner Shelly, spouse of chef Jeff McMahon

restaurant owner Shelly, spouse of chef Jeff McMahon

shelly3

 

I think the champagne is why the food photos did not include all the tasty items on the table.

cod and mushroom shu mai with soy ginger sauce

cod and mushroom shu mai with soy ginger sauce

Michelle and Sondra

Michelle and Sondra

Baked Pacific cod with kalamata olives, tomatoes, onions, and salsa verde

Baked Pacific cod with kalamata olives, tomatoes, onions, and salsa verde

chocolate pot de creme with Maldon sea salt

chocolate pot de creme with Maldon sea salt

Sondra of the Cove, who looks like she should BE in Downton Abbey, is simply longing for the next season to begin.

Sondra of the Cove, who looks like she should BE in Downton Abbey, is simply longing for the next season to begin.

We began our repast at 6 and were still there at 8:30.  By then, Susie of the Boreas had hoped to arrive but will STILL feeling poorly, and Allan and I decided that we would take the opportunity to join her and Bill for the real last Pelicano supper on Monday night.

Monday, 29 September 2014

Continuing our new slacker habit of three day weekends, we took the day off.  We would have anyway, as the predicted rain had come.  I thought I would completely catch up with my blog.  Imagine my dismay when the weather turned nice in the late afternoon.  I had longed for an entire day of guilt-free indoor time, and could not shift gears to go outdoors and garden.  Allan was much more ambitious, and I saw him going back and forth outside being productive.

While weeding his garden, he heard croaking from above and found a Pacific tree frog in a cup on the old apple tree.

He searched several cups before finding the frog.

He searched several cups before finding the frog.

IMG_1059

in a cup on the old apple tree

froggie croaking

froggie still croaking

I finally felt so terribly guilty indoors that I went out and did some weeding on the east side of the front garden, and felt much better for doing so.

Allan's photo of me in the thick of the garden

Allan’s photo of me in the thick of the garden

I picked a tiny spot behind the house, really a silly little garden bed, for one more tiny project.

before

before

after: this rather useless little bed, overhung with a large Solanum vine, gets ignored most of the time.

after: this rather useless little bed, overhung with a large Solanum vine, gets ignored most of the time.

And then, again, another farewell meal at Pelicano.

We'll miss the Ginger Snap, and Escarlata, and Allan's favourite, the Aviation.

We’ll miss the Ginger Snap, and Escarlata, and Allan’s favourite, the Aviation.

view

Susie, while still feeling poorly from her flu shot, could not miss Pelicano's last evening and her last Ginger Snap.

Susie, while still feeling poorly from her flu shot, could not miss Pelicano’s last evening and her last Ginger Snap.

food

Ginger Snap, Greek Salad, Buccatini Pasta, Lemon Cheesecake with blackberry sauce

sunset

sunset

There’s a sad feeling at the port with this restaurant now gone; I hope someone takes the business opportunity to open a new one in one of the five former restaurants along Waterfront Way.

next: four days of work

 

 

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Sunday, 20 October, 2013

A day off at last.  We worked 19 days in a row, one of the 19 being at least a very short day…one a medium day…the others days the usual or extra hard work.  I honestly thought I did not have it in me anymore.  But we managed to soldier through all the work.  So… much sleeping occurred this morning, and then some dear friends dropped by.  We stayed indoors as the morning weather was deliciously cold.  Allan served brownies and oranges.  As they left, our friends apologized for keeping us from our day off.  I assured them that they had made the day MORE restful by inspiring us to sit indoors till after noon.

I had only one clear mission for the day:  to clean out the greenhouse of the tomato and pepper plants so that it is ready to take in the tender perennials when frost arrives.

before

before

I found an Eryngium coming up in one of the tomato pots….can’t imagine how it got there, but I was glad to see it.

a volunteer

a welcome volunteer, now planted in the garden

I was able to save three garbage cans full of potting soil, another welcome surprise.  I thought the roots would have solidified in each pot, but not so.  I will reuse it as base soil if I follow through with my plan to get a couple of really big horse troughs for a kitchen garden planting next year.

found this critter in one of the empty garbage cans

found this critter in one of the empty garbage cans

autumn light

autumn light

At last the pseudo summer seems to have broken into a cool autumn day, weather that I so much prefer to blazing warm sun.  Note, I said warm, not hot, because I do get made fun of when I complain about being hot at 61 degrees!

The garden still has lots of colour.  I took one tour around while dumping debris in the far back corner.

red salvia

red salvia (Uh oh, the kitty chair slipped a piece!)

Geranium 'Rozanne' still somewhat blue

Geranium ‘Rozanne’ still somewhat blue

I could trim all the brown areas from the river of blue and make it look better...or not...

I could trim all the brown areas from the river of blue and make it look better…or not…

When the sun came out, it showed me some maple seedling from the tree in Ann's garden.

When the sun came out, it showed me some maple seedling from the tree in Ann’s garden.

Where in the world (of my garden) can I plant a beautiful but rather large maple?  Oh!!  If I can get Danger Tree cut down, it could go next to the trunk…

hardy ginger in decline....

hardy ginger in decline….

a pale Pulmonaria in Allan's garden

a pale Pulmonaria in Allan’s garden

lost the tag from this plant from Back Alley Gardens...blooming with small blue flowers.  What are you?

lost the tag from this plant from Back Alley Gardens…blooming with small blue flowers. What are you?  And where the heck am I going to put you (and all your unplanted friends)?

hops aglow in late afternoon sun

hops aglow in late afternoon sun

Golden Delicious pineapple sage and Dahlia

Golden Delicious pineapple sage and Dahlia

Near the debris pile, I took a moment to spread out the sequoia needles that I brought home from the hydrangea job.

Near the debris pile, I took a moment to spread the sequoia needles that I brought home from the hydrangea job.

I planted lots of sweet peas along the mesh fence near Nora’s garages/parking area, and as if they knew she was going to be gone, only a few came up.  Now one lonely one is still blooming.

sweet pea

sweet pea

Allan got on a ladder to train the canes of Paul’s Himalayan Musk rose over the top of that same arbour (as if that rose could ever be trained).

arbour work

arbour work

You can see why I think of Nora every time I am in the garden, with her house right there and the fence built transparently to give her a view of the garden.  With her gone, I do wonder every at-home day about the future of that house and what sort of neighbour we might get; I have plans for enclosure on that side of the garden if I ever feel the need for it.  And yet we might someday get an ideal neighbour there.  Time will tell.  I’m a worrier.

In the greenhouse, I found two more frogs, this one:

Pacific tree frog

Pacific tree frog

frog

frogs

and this one:

a little brown frog

a little brown frog

Finally, the greenhouse had returned to almost emptiness with shelves reinstalled.

I had removed the shelving so the tomatoes had more headroom.

I had removed the shelving so the tomatoes had more headroom.

Plenty of room now for scented geraniums and a few other tenders to winter over.

The last of the harvest:

harvest pot

harvest pot

Judy had tomato farmed two days before and got enough for a salad.

tomatoes and tomatillos

tomatoes and tomatillos

I don’t really like dealing with tomatillos and wish I knew someone nearby who wanted some.   Many of the tiny tomatoes had gone soft; I just could not keep up with them.

peppers:  bell, Chocolate Beauty, Cowhorn Cayenne, Golden Cayenne, Serrano

peppers: bell, Chocolate Beauty, Cowhorn Cayenne, Golden Cayenne, Serrano

I spent some time today thinking about the results of taking on really big “extra” jobs.  I wonder how wise it is if it takes us three days to recover and the other jobs get behind.  This is certainly the only time of year (other than midwinter) when we have time for big extra jobs, and every year, without us even seeking one, something comes along for a week in October…

Tomorrow we hope to muster the energy to mulch the garden at Golden Sands…always a problem because we have to wheelbarrow down that long carpeted hallway so it is a job that seems to require so much advance planning that I dread it.  Last time it was not as bad as I thought, and good weather is certainly necessary; a muddy wheelbarrow and carpeted hallways do not mix.  It all depends on being able to connect with The Planter Box folks to get the cow fiber loaded into our trailer at the right time of day…

Then we must get back to Erin’s garden after promises we made about three weeks ago and have neglected to fulfill in any way!

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Friday, September 20, 2013, part one

I was disappointed to be woken at the usual time because I had expected a rainy day off.  And then I heard the gurgling of water in the rain barrel outside my window and looked out to an increasing drizzle.   So at last, it turned out to be the day to go get new shoes.  We were off “overseas” to Astoria.

As often seems to be true, the sky over Astoria and points east was lighter and we were out of the rain as soon as we got through the Chinook tunnel.

bright sky over Astoria

bright sky over Astoria; Columbia River to our right

Because a 55 mph wind is predicted for Sunday, the workers on the bridge were folding up the enormous tarps that cover the highest part.  Last year, they got caught out by the first storm and had to close the bridge because of the dangerous flapping!

Screen shot of news story, in case it eventually goes away as old news:

last year!

last year!

A shoe shopping expedition is not a treat for me.  I find it very hard, and always have done, to acquire comfy shoes.  Last year, in the local Reach Out Thrift Store, I happened upon a pair for $2 that felt soft as butter.  (I had been looking for a work shirt, not shoes, but checked the shoes in a desperate attempt to avoid actual shoe shopping!)  It turned out that they were SAS, an expensive brand, but one that would be worth any amount of money to me.  Since the ones I bought that day were already worn and now have holes by the little toe, today we went across the river to the store that carries them: Gimre’s.  I had the most pleasant shoe shopping experience of my life there and bought two pair, and that is enough about shoes!

Ok, for my friends who do love shoes, here they are:

left: new slip ons, middlle: new laceups, right: thrift store pair

left: new slip ons, middlle: new laceups, right: thrift store pair

I commend SAS for making such great shoes.  I will even try to keep the slip on pair out of the dirt…(We’ll see how long that lasts.)

Back to (mostly) garden theme, with this digression for one of the best hotel advertising slogans ever:

hotel elliot

hotel elliot

I continue to be an ardent admirer of the Astoria planters on Commercial Street and some side streets:

chocolate cosmos on Commercial

chocolate cosmos on Commercial

planter with Fuchsia

planter with Fuchsia

Periscaria

Periscaria

Euphorbia and Verbena

Euphorbia and Verbena

(I hesitate to use Euphorbia in planters because if someone broke off a piece, hurting their eye with the toxic sap would be a high price to pay for finger blight.)

I adore the planters with wire sides and plants spilling out all the way to the ground:

planters

planter

planter

closer

closer

The rain caught up with us in Astoria, so we went to lunch, passing this cute storefront on the way.

store

We also passed a curbside garden on Marine Drive with a name I recognized:

Jessica's garden

Jessica’s garden

I met Jessica some years ago and loved the slogan that she used for her gardening business, which I think was called Wyndlesham Gardening:  “Hand Tool Gardening”, and am pleased to have found this interview with her on that subject.

Chocolate cosmos in Jessica's garden

Chocolate cosmos in Jessica’s garden

Jessica's garden

Jessica’s garden

We dined on the lunch buffet at the wonderful Himani Indian Cuisine.  Guess which plate is mine and which is Allan’s.

messy vs. tidy

messy vs. tidy

I went back for a bowl of raita.  I could eat a mixing bowl of the stuff!  (Yogurt with cucumber.)

On the way back to the van, we peeked into the interior of a building that I remembered from when a tea shop used to be in its basement.

as I remembered:  cool architecture indoors

as I remembered: cool architecture indoors

Our parking spot was very close to the wide Columbia River.

the great Columbia

the great Columbia

and the scent of water and pilings

and the scent of water and pilings

Crossing the bridge again, we found the big tarps completely bundled off to the sides and decided we had better take the coming storm seriously.

Just a few hatches truly needed battening at home.  Allan took the blue bottle hanger (from Back Alley Gardens) out of the danger tree.

rainy day garden

rainy day garden

blue bottles coming down

blue bottles coming down

and time to take down the great wall of china...

and time to take down the great wall of china…

and the beautiful hanger made by Sheila (New Leaf Plants and Pottery)

and the beautiful hanger made by Sheila (New Leaf Plants and Pottery)

Poor spider had to move so we could get Sheila’s pottery down.

The space between the house and shed is a fierce wind tunnel in a storm from the south.

cats underfoot, as pretty much always in the garden

cats underfoot, as often happens in the garden

It seems awfully early for a storm to come and batter the garden.  Before the storm:

before the storm: Dicentra scandens climbing into a hanging basket

Dicentra scandens climbing into a hanging basket

a perfect clump of Dianthus

a perfect clump of Dianthus

boat (The Anne Lovejoy) with cosmos

boat (The Anne Lovejoy) with cosmos

The Solidago ‘Fireworks’ has fizzled out:

browned off now

browned off now

But Lemon Queen is going strong.

Helianthus 'Lemon Queen'

Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’

queen

dahlia

dahlia

I took a walk around because the flowers might be bowed and battered soon.

for Ann who wants more photos of garden signs

for Ann who wants more photos of garden signs

Nicotiana langsdorfii

Nicotiana langsdorfii

some Fuchsias for Mr. Tootlepedal

some Fuchsias for Mr. Tootlepedal

fuchsias

fuchsias against a darmera peltata leaf

fuchsias against a darmera peltata leaf

Fuchsias fronted with Persicaria 'Firetail'

Fuchsias fronted with Persicaria ‘Firetail’

I checked out the bogsy wood because in a high wind it will be too dangerous to go back here.  I tucked the Bogsy Wood sign more safely against a tree.

bogsy wood

bogsy wood

autumn leaves in a salmonberry tunnel

autumn leaves in a salmonberry tunnel

When all the salmonberry leaves fall, we will have our winter view of the port buildings.

The swale under the bridge will fill with water...

The swale under the bridge will fill with water…

Under the danger tree (a big dead alder, died last year) is a shade bed that will disrupted if the tree falls before we have it cut.

shade bed in danger

shade bed in danger

Allan wheeled a blue pot from the base of the tree to a safe spot.

heavy!

heavy!

We left the lady to fend for herself, and may regret it.

she lost her feet so was inexpensive....

she lost her feet so was inexpensive….but heavy!

blue pot safely tucked by the boat

blue pot safely tucked by the boat

Mary and Frosty take cover from the rain.

Mary and Frosty take cover from the rain.

Mary is not a bird hunter so does not have to wear a BirdsBeSafe collar.

Throughout the garden we could hear frogs.  We had an appointment to keep, so I only found this one.

pacific tree frog

Pacific tree frog

The frog sees me!

The frog sees me!

For a non working day, this has gone on for much too long and we still had two garden visits to make before dark…

to be continued…

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August 20, 2013

Our day began….with a frog on a daisy.  I was watering a few containers in the the back garden when I saw it, and it stayed put till I went into the house and returned with my camera.

daisy

Pacific tree frog

Pacific tree frog

froggie

My first stop was the Depot Restaurant.  Here is a different view from the usual:

the outdoor dining deck

the outdoor dining deck

and the usual garden view

and the usual garden view

and an update on the herb garden (rosemary, oregano, chives and some thyme in the foreground)

and an update on the herb garden (rosemary, oregano, chives and some thyme in the foreground)

Then I walked to meet Allan who was watering at Crank’s Roost.

I love this house sign between the Depot and Crank's.

I love this house sign between the Depot and Crank’s.

I had said goodbye to Crank’s a few posts ago, so I asked Allan if he would take a photo essay of what was most evocative to him of the essence of Crank’s Roost, and here it is:

Allan’s Crank’s Roost photos:

crank

crank

door

door

crank

lighthouse bird

blue

crank

shed

crank

fern

crank

crank

 

You can see that Crank’s Roost is a wonderful place to think a green thought in a green shade.

Jo’s garden and the Boreas Inn

We then worked on the gardens on 6th North in Long Beach:  Jo’s on the south side of the road and the Boreas on the north side.

At Jo's: a large patch of daisies to deadhead

At Jo’s: a large patch of daisies to deadhead

Jo and Bob's bird sanctuary

Jo and Bob’s bird sanctuary

agapanthus

agapanthus

snapdragons

snapdragons

Uh oh, Coco chewed through another sprinkler head!  Fortunately, Allan carried parts to replace it because occasionally we snip one when it is entwined with plant stems.

Oh, Coco!

Oh, Coco!

Poor Coco looked sad after being shown the sprinkler head by Jo and told not to do it again.  It has been rather chronic…

Coco

Coco:  Who, me?

coco

I confess.

Then: The Boreas Inn garden.

looking east toward the Boreas Inn

looking east toward the Boreas Inn

The newly redone beds have been gorgeous this year.

beds

I acquired a few flats of Lobelia tupa this year and planted it in pretty much every garden I could get my hands on….and the one at the Boreas is the only one that has bloomed!

Lobelia tupa, why so temperamental?

Lobelia tupa, why so temperamental?

stunning Lobelia tupa

stunning Lobelia tupa

Only Susie of the Boreas is going to believe me about what a gorgeous plant this is!

cosmos at the Boreas

cosmos at the Boreas…at least I can count on them everywhere

We stopped work a bit early to go the the retirement party for Jim Neva, Port of Ilwaco manager.  He has been such a great friend of landscaping at the port…and has been instrumental in supporting our work in the boatyard garden and Howerton street gardens.

to the right: Jim Neva

to the right: Jim Neva

The party was the the museum and the theme was Hawaiian because Jim is retiring partly to spend more time with his wife Jet’s family in Hawaii.  The food was delicious!

a feast

a feast

food

The new port manager, Guy Glenn Jr, says he is going to be just as much a friend of the gardens as Jim was.  We are very happy about that.

left: Mark, who oversees the boatyard; Guy, our new friend of gardens, and Allan

left: Mark, who oversees the boatyard; Guy, our new friend of gardens, and Allan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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