Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘painted ladies’

Bob and Helen Bohnke Garden

from the program: Eclectic English Garden: 11th Street is a happier place for the Boenkes’ splendidly restored home and well-loved garden. This 1895 Italianate, formerly known as ‘the ugly sister’, was built by David Warren of Warrenton fame as one of three identical professional rentals. Snug around the house, beds overflow their borders with lush abundance as diverse grasses and ferns complement roses, daisies, lilies, carnations, African iris and heather, as well as coastal favourites such a hostas, hydrangeas, rosemary and lavender. You’ll find carefully transplanted forest floor plants and delightful pots full of dahlias, geraniums, lobelia, begonias, and fuchsias, all interspersed with driftwood, found objects and sculptures galore. With a ‘live and let live’ credo, the red Japanese maple thriving within the front walking path demands careful skirting. Until recently there was no rear garden and now flora charmingly buffers the driveway. Don’t miss the whimsical flowerbox fence lining the shady south side.

I got breathless with joy as soon as I saw the colourful house.

Bohnke house

Bohnke house

the colour!

the colour!

Crocosmia 'Lucifer'

Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’

wow! zip! pow!

wow! zip! pow!

colour coordinated mailbox!

colour coordinated mailbox!

looking up from the sidewalk

looking up from the sidewalk

a beautiful tour sign

a beautiful tour sign

sign

I was backing and forthing down on the sidewalk and had to explain to the owner of the garden that I was just so gobsmacked I had not got around to climbing the steps yet.

owner Bob Bohnke

owner Bob Bohnke

Bob Bohnke was the cover guy on the garden tour issue of the Daily Astorian!

cover guy!

cover guy!

from the e-edition

from the e-edition

I finally went up the steps and started around the north (downhill) side of the house. You would think from the garden description that it might be a larger garden than it is, but no…it is a narrow city lot, densely planted. My house in Seattle had equally narrow sides (and my grandmother had had them equally densely planted). I felt right at home.

front porch

front porch

historic register

historic register

side of front porch

side of front porch
Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

a porch photo by Allan

a porch photo by Allan

north side path

north side path
driftwood planter along the path

driftwood planter along the path

along the path

along the path

ogre

Canna leaf

Canna leaf

duck

duck

Allan's view

Allan’s view

Around the corner, we came to the back porch.

so colourful

so colourful

At the back corner of the house, just before turning to the south side: cookies and lemonade served by Helen Bohnke.

treats

treats

pouring us some delicious lemonade

Helen pouring me some delicious lemonade

I went down the south side chomping my cookie because the cunning planter top to the fence (or is it a retaining wall?) so captured my attention.

looking back toward the cookie tray

looking back toward the cookie tray

Here, I look toward the front of the house along the south side. I so love this fence.

planter topped fence on south (uphill) side of house

planter topped fence on south (uphill) side of house

looking back again as I admire the planters

looking back again as I admire the planters and Allan gets some lemonade

compost pile!

compost pile!

I loved the tiny little compost pile. Bob Bohnke told us it had been much bigger before the tour.

Coming around the corner and back into the blazing sun…

return to the front garden

return to the front garden

the precariously situated little maple

the precariously situated little maple

front porch again

front porch again

by front steps

by front steps

further ogling of the front porch

further ogling of the front porch

I turned back to return to the back yard, figuring I could find a more dignified exit than inching my way down the steep steps to the sidewalk. I carefully stepped around the little maple; owner Bob had expressed concern that its one sideways branch would survive the tour.

the maple in question

the maple in question

I hope it did!

another detail

another detail

enjoying the south side path again

enjoying the south side path again

We skirted past Helen’s lemonade area to get to the parking lot behind the house where we could get a good view of the back.

east side of house

east side of house

back garden

back garden

The back garden, said to be new, looks well established.

back garden detail

back garden detail

looking up to the back porch

looking up to the back porch

To the south and below the garden is a lawn where we were able to walk back to the sidewalk.

south side of house

south side of house

perfect roses

perfect roses

Allan remarked that the roses had no blackspot!

rose

front porch from south lawn

front porch from south lawn

porch

side garden at eye level from below

side garden at eye level from below

eye to eye with the gnome

eye to eye with the gnome

I hope you enjoy looking at the porch as much as I did.

I hope you enjoy looking at the porch as much as I did.

I crossed the street to get a photo of the front of the whole place. I could easily have walked round again, especially the south side with the planter wall.

the whole shebang

the whole shebang

I have tried to analyze why of all the lovely gardens this was my favourite, and in posting these photos I have figured out that it is because I adore brightly painted houses. Painted Ladies, Daughters of Painted Ladies, and A Gift to the Street are books that I own and treasure about painted Victorian houses. I also realize now that the narrow side gardens remind me of my beloved Gram’s garden on its small Seattle city lot (although her front and back yards were bigger than this).

Brief Intermission

One of the Lower Columbia Preservation Society volunteers at this garden told us that she, too, has a purple house. Allan must have commented to her about the big one up the street from this garden. She kindly gave us the address so that we could go see it and it was well worth the side trip into a different neighbourhood.

a cottage of purpleness

a cottage of purpleness

I love it! Next: a garden full of something I love: quotations in the garden.

Read Full Post »

I’d been to Jeffrey Bale’s garden four years earlier and was thrilled to get to return.  He has two brightly painted houses, is famed for his pebble mosaics, and has the most lovely grotto in his back yard.

intriguing detail by sidewalk

the house from the street

entry stairs from sidewalk

in the shady front garden

the two bright houses

walking between

mosaic path

exterior details

the other house

wall and water

detail

in the back garden

Because of the clear warm day, the back yard oasis had carpets and pillows out, unlike four years ago when rain had prevented the layering of pillows and carpets.  (But the rain had made the pebble mosaics glisten wonderfully).

the grotto wall

I’ve noticed how many more vibrantly bright houses I see on tours in Portland or Seattle.  Perhaps the city has more creative house painters, or perhaps in a small town some are more worried about offending the eye of staider neighbours.  I appreciate anyone in a small town who indulges in bold colours.  Jeffrey Bale so kindly opened his house to the Hardy Plant members and the inside was just as luscious as the outside.

the back door

the kitchen

in the kitchen

kitchen cupboards

beautiful blue counter

The cabinets speak to me of India.

the living room

the bathroom…a floating world

a sumptuous bedroom

even the computer is decorated

Looking down into the garden; kitchen is to left.

I appreciate getting the chance to see into the heart of an artist’s life.  I haven’t followed through yet on the inspiration to paint our own kitchen, but I miss the intense colours I had in previous homes and intend to follow through eventually.

Also, I want to get this book!

Kitty by Jeffrey Bale

Read Full Post »