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Posts Tagged ‘Perovski ‘Lacey Blue’’

It kind of bothers me that local gardeners are missing out on the wonderful collection of perennials offered by The Basket Case Greenhouse at 12106 Sandridge Road.  Maybe because a lot of them are not yet blooming, people do not realize how beautiful they will be.  Basket Case owners Fred and Nancy try to close the nursery each year sometime in July (reopening in very early spring), so get them while you can! I would not even reveal the secrets of this outstanding collection if it were not for the fact that I have already bought mine!

Here are some of my favourites.  Get ’em while you can!

Lobelia tupa

The tag says “Devil’s cardinal flower”.  This perennial might not come through a cold wet winter, but with good sized plants like these, you should get a good show the first year.

Lobelia tupa

Lobelia tupa

It has been a plant of great desirability for me ever since I saw it almost in bloom at Joy Creek nursery some years back.

in bud

in bud

It was so hard to find that I searched for it in Seattle nurseries and was able, at the time, to find only three!  Yet here they are at the Basket Case just waiting for you….Unless I decide I have to have them all.  (I think I have already purchased almost a full flat!)   My great gardening friend Sheila says she has killed it twice, and I have heard other tales of woe, but if one has it for one season it would be worth it.  Check out the gallery of images.

Perovskia ‘Lacey Blue’

There is only ONE of these left.  I bought all the others or talked clients into buying them.  This Russian sage is worthwhile for the gorgeous foliage alone.

Perovskia 'Lacey Blue'

Perovskia ‘Lacey Blue’

It is supposed to be compact, so might be good for containers.

Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’

I have these in almost every one of my gardens.  It has the usual coreopsis flowers but on stems that get up to eight feet tall.  I just find it so very fun and amusing to grow!  One you have a good clump of it, you can divide it and give it to friends.  That’s the only reason I have not purchased many more of these plants this year.

Coreopsis 'Flower Tower'

Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’

Protect it from slugs;  they seem to like the new shoots, but I have not lost a plant of this to slugs OR weather in three years.

Here it is blooming as tall as the greenhouse at Klipsan Beach Cottages in October 2012.

fun!

fun!

Sanguisorbas

Nobody but me seems to “get” the burnets!   The sanguisorba collection at The Basket case is not your usual herby burnet that seeds around and has small flowers.  These have assorted big feathery plumes that I love and have sought out every since I saw a seminar slideshow by Piet Oudolf at the Seattle garden show years ago.

Sanguisorba 'Red Thunder' and another

Sanguisorba ‘Red Thunder’ and another

The “Red Thunder’ one is new to me this year.  I have forgotten which is the one on the right, above, but there is only one of it left.  I bought all the others!  You will see an assortment of three or four kinds in the park in front of Captain Bob’s Chowder and Marsh’s in Long Beach this summer, and in my own garden I have as many kinds as I have been able to find over the years.  The only thing that has prevented me from buying all of those ‘Red Thunder’ ones is that the deer do eat sanguisorbas so that limits the gardens I can plant them in.

Chelone obliqua

It used to be most unusual to find this in a nursery.  I had to mail order mine before this year when Basket Case started to carry them.  The “turtlehead” flowers bloom in the late summer.  The only reason there is still a batch of these at Basket Case is that I have not got around to buying them yet, but I will, if someone does not beat me to it.  It likes part shade and moisty soil.  It bloomed for me last year in dry shade but the foliage did not look happy so I have moved mine into a wetter area.

Chelone obliqua...pink turtlehead

Chelone obliqua…pink turtlehead

I had one in my former, dampish garden along a stream that was spectacular in late summer, but I didn’t have a digital camera during most of my time there so I don’t have a record of its glory.

Scrophularia variegata

With a name like that, no wonder the tag says variegated figwort.  This is another plant that is still at the Basket Case only because we have a small car and can’t fit everything in that we want.

variegated figwort

Rene Eisenbart wrote in the Oregonian:  “one of the choicest variegated foliage plants the perennial world has to offer. Extremely bright and full of optimism, with conspicuously large and crinkled leaves, it has a rigid upright habit that makes it a beacon in the garden.”

I had better get back there and buy all the rest of these, unless someone beats me to it.  I need them!

Penstemons

I have found penstemons to be drought resistant and so far the deer have left them alone except for the occasional experimental nibble.  Basket Case has a good selection, including this one new to me:

Penstemon 'Burgundy Brew'

Penstemon ‘Burgundy Brew’

There are not very many of these left, and I just thought of how a client of ours who likes wine really should have one of these.  And now I can think of two clients who are wine connoiseurs.  Make that three.   Are there even enough of these left for me?  Basket Case has also had ‘Apple Blossom’ and ‘Thorn’ this year and I have bought some of each.  Burgundy Brew is said to have unusually large flowers.  Good thing I am going back to Basket Case within two days so I can snag at least one more of these.

Verbascum ‘Jackie in Yellow’

Verbascum ‘Clementine’ was a big hit earlier this season at the Basket Case and I think it is sold out, but there is still perhaps only ONE plant of the gorgeous, drought tolerant, sunny border plant ‘Jackie in Yellow’ left.

Verbascum 'Jackie in Yellow'

Verbascum ‘Jackie in Yellow’

I have never tried these as cut flowers but Google tells me they are good in bouquets.

Knautia ‘Thunder and Lightning’

Fred tells me I am the only one who has bought this plant, and I am astonished.  The foliage is striking.

Knautia 'Thunder and Lightning'

Knautia ‘Thunder and Lightning’

But when it blooms, it should be a knock out.  The plain green leafed Knautia macedonica is one of the most admired plants in our garden at the Wiegardt Gallery.  Looks like this one will have the same dark flowers.

Knautia at Wiegardt Gallery

Knautia at Wiegardt Gallery (the tall burgundy one)

I just bought six more ‘Thunder and Lightnings’ today but there are a few left.  For now.  I have decided they might look spiffing in some of the Long Beach planters!

Phygelius

There are at least three cultivars of this available. They are all good, deer resistant and sun loving, drought tolerant plants.  Hummingbirds love them.  They can be runners but I have never found them to be a problem because I like getting the offshoots.  The one that really struck my fancy this year was the white one (I think it is called ‘Snow White’) because it is unusual.

Phygelius

Phygelius

I do not understand why these are not being bought up!  Note on the left of the photos, you can just see the one (I forget the name) with gorgeous gold foliage.

Rosa mutabilis

This rose was spectacular in my old garden.  I think there are three left of the six that Basket Case got in this year.  I bought the other three.  Don’t miss out!

Rosa mutabilis

Rosa mutabilis

Here it is in my old garden:

Rose

Agastache (Hyssop)

The Agastaches that I planted from Basket Case last year were the hit of my garden when it was on the garden tour and through the summer whenever someone visited.

Agastaches

Agastaches

I think I bought all the Golden Jubilee and the apricot and salmon coloured one might be gone, but there are still some Acapulco Orange and some with the very amusing name ‘Black Adder’ and possibly some violet-blue ones.

The leaves often smell deliciously of licorice.  I am in love with all of these.

an Agastache from Basket Case last summer in my garden

an Agastache from Basket Case last summer in my garden

Eryngiums

Finally, my favourite perennials, the Eryngiums.  The Basket Case has two on offer, the first being one that was introduced just a few years ago and cost about $30 a gallon then.

Eryngium 'Jade Frost'

Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’

Because I collect them, I had to have it then.   I have found that the pretty foliage tends to want to revert to green after a year or two, but the flower is so spectacular that I love it anyway.  Now that Basket Case has them for a reasonable price, I will just get new ones each year for the foliage colour.

There are still four left!

There are still four left!

Here it is flowering, with blue thistle-like balls, in my garden last year on tour day:

Eryngium 'Jade Frost' in flower

Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’ in flower

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ is probably THE most asked about flower in any of my gardens.  I use it in every single one.  The deer leave it alone, the flowers are an incredible blue, and they dry on the plant in an attractive way.

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

People go into businesses, even the Port Office, and ask what this plant is.  The Basket Case is on its second shipment of these and has a few left.

Here it is in the Hornbuckle garden on May 8th this year:

green buds

green buds

Here it is yesterday in my friend Nancy’s garden:

just colouring up, 5-23-13

just colouring up, 5-23-13

June 2012, a bee magnet

June 2012, a bee magnet

2011, at the Wiegardt Gallery

2011, at the Wiegardt Gallery

It’s a wonderful plant that never fails to get attention and compliments.

So when you visit the Basket Case, don’t just look at their wonderful selection of annuals.  Look closely at the tags in the perennials house, because all those plants that just look green and maybe not very exciting now will do great things in the garden, and they long to get out of their pots and into the ground.

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