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Posts Tagged ‘Phygelius’

We left home late because of an unexpected visitor: a gentleman from North Carolina who was friends with Jeff and Mary (two doors down) and was here to go fishing with Jeff.  He had heard from Mary about our garden (and from her back porch, there is a view down Nora’s back garden showing an enticing glimpse of ours).  I walked through with him as he took lots of photos to show his wife.  She is, he told me, a painter who likes to paint gardens, and he told me her name so I could Google her website later on.

I was impressed with how well he saw the garden and what he chose to photograph; he noticed the tunnel cut through the salmonberry with a painted door at the end.  Not everyone notices that.

It took me two weeks to get around to looking up her page, Connie Winters Art.  I strongly encourage you to peruse it; she is a wonderful artist!

We began the work day with a quick fix: taking some buckets of water from home to the two most westerly planters on the Bolstadt beach approach in Long Beach.  There had been a misunderstanding:  Allan thought I meant to have him skip watering them because we are so bored with the planting of plain old vinca out there (done by someone else ages ago).  I had noticed them wilting the day before and wanted them refreshed before kite festival.  Had we known what the day’s weather would bring, we wouldn’t have bothered.

On the way we saw these folks photographing their vintage autos by the iconic arch.

the Bolstadt arch

the Bolstadt arch

Next, I had a small mission.  Teresa of The Planter Box had messaged me the day before asking if I wanted a “Pistachio”.  Before she even finished, I asked “Pistachio Hydrangea??!”  Yes!  It had been on my list of plants to acquire for ages, so I got two, one fore me and one for another garden….probably Larry And Robert’s where we can keep a good eye on it, although it would also look good against the greeny colour of the Wiegardt Gallery.

Hydrangea 'Pistachio' from The Planter Box.

Hydrangea ‘Pistachio’ from The Planter Box.

I admired a beautiful Clematis for sale.

I admired a beautiful Clematis for sale.

And then, way up north to Marilyn’s garden….

begonias on front porch at Marilyn's

begonias on front porch at Marilyn’s

Phygelius

Phygelius

I think this is some kind of phlox, but I wish I knew for sure.  It spreads, but not aggressively (so far) and the deer do not eat it:

phlox? wish photo had turned out better

phlox? wish photo had turned out better

?

?

I have inquired on the Plants to Identify Facebook group, as I should do more often.

Helianthis ‘Lemon Queen’ is starting to bloom and will put on a good tall show for a few weeks.

Helianthus 'Lemon Queen', a favourite perennial

Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’, a favourite perennial

I am amazed the deer are not eating Marilyn’s lilies.  Do I dare plant more throughout the garden?  I might try!

oriental lilies

oriental lilies

looking northish from the back steps

looking northish from the back steps

bronze fennel, lovely and thuggish

bronze fennel, lovely and thuggish (too many tiny seedlings)

Next, the usual routine:  Back down to Wiegardt Gallery on the cusp of Ocean Park and Nahcotta.

The bed on the west side of the building is so unsatisfactory to me.  It does not get enough water (not for lack of trying, but soaker hoses just do not work well) and just looks scraggly.  But I have a solution!   Pam Fleming of Back Alley Gardens will be pleased to hear that I want to plant evergreens here.  Because of rampant deer and because Eric did not like it when I used to have two escallonias (too big!) , I am thinking three groups of Ilex ‘Sky Pencil’.  That may be trite, but I know they will work.  And surprisingly few people on the Peninsula use them.  (So they are not trite here…yet.)

terrible, terrible, terrible

terrible, terrible, terrible

If it got more water, the Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’ would be beautifully tall.  I must get rid of the horrible Geranium ‘A.T. Johnson’…have tried…it is a curse.  The nice pine scented Geranium macrorrhizum can stay.  If it were my garden, I would plant some lemony small very columnar gold conifers….

The north bed looks better with three variegated Miscanthus:

grasses

height and repetition

I still love the view to the street (Bay Avenue);

lots of grasses with cotoneasters and a few rhodos

lots of grasses with cotoneasters and a few rhodos

Some drizzling began while we were weeding at Wiegardt’s.  By the time we got to Oman Builders Supply Ocean Park store, we had a serious situation.

rain and lots of it

rain and lots of it

So we went to the Full Circle Café…

driftwood fence, Full Circle on Bay Avenue

driftwood fence, Full Circle on Bay Avenue

drift

inside...nice and dry...

inside…nice and dry…

with pie

with pie

The sad thing is we had just eaten our lunchbox sandwiches or we could have had one of their tasty lunches.

We waited for awhile and saw the sky looking brighter to the southwest…so set off again optimistically.

The café is almost this close to the ocean.

The café is almost this close to the ocean.

The Klipsan Beach Cottages garden awaited us.  Even the birds looked rather hunched and miserable, as we had called the weather wrong and the rain soon returned.

hunkered down

hunkered down

After awhile, I took shelter from the torrent in the garage.  Allan was off working under some trees.  Neither of us were prepared with proper coats for this weather.

unfinished job

unfinished job

Mary, garden owner, had come out to chat and commiserate.  At first I told her we would bail out for the day and come back.  Then I realized that the weather already had us running behind and it is a long drive back to KBC, so we perservered and worked through the weather.

in the fenced garden

in the fenced garden

sweet peas

sweet peas

Veronicastrum virginicum

Veronicastrum virginicum…

with lilies

with lilies

After getting thoroughly soaked, we bailed on the rest of the day and went home.  I managed two photos on the way to check the greenhouse tomatoes:

Sarah Sloane's bird

Sarah Sloane’s bird

And a quotation; a reader has asked me for more photos of quotations in the garden.  Eventually, I hope to do a post with all of them together.

This seems to be a favourite!

from “The Pleasures of Merely Circulating”

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Our day began with a brief stop at the Basket Case to buy three plants to fill spaces in Long Beach planters.  Of course, we bought a flat of plants once I had walked through a couple of times, including another Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’, so now there are but three left!

Of other plants that I feel are treasures of which only a few are left, you can see (below) on the left, an Azara microphylla, beautiful little tree (one left!) with vanilla or chocolate scented flowers in late winter, and on the right, Thalictrum ‘Black Stockings’ (only a couple left) and a wonderfully crisp looking white Phygelius.

choice selections

choice selections

We then met Nancy, garden tour organizer, at one of the 2013 gardens to get some teaser photos for the Music in the Gardens tour Facebook page, and I was deeply impressed.  I don’t want to give too much away but:

sneaking a peak!

sneaking a peak!

It is one of my favourite kinds of gardens, with room after room, each with a different feel.  It is the sort of garden I especially admire (ironic because of my business!), where all the work is done by the owners.

We tore ourselves away reluctantly.  Allan went to work at Andersen’s RV Park while Nancy and I went south to see two other gardens that would be on the tour.  She was impressed with both.  While at the first garden (Jo’s), I got some birds for Mr. Tootlepedal.

a baby?

a baby?  It could fly.

a hummingbird.  I need to learn how to change the shutter speed on my simple digicam.

a hummingbird. I need to learn how to change the shutter speed on my simple digicam.

Nancy and I then went to the nearby Boreas Inn so I could show her our deer resistant west side garden beds there, and I took the opportunity to show off the inside of the inn, as well.  It is an honour to be associated with such a gorgeous place.  This gave me some different views of the garden.

looking at entry garden from upstairs

looking at entry garden from upstairs (through impressionist screen)

the best west window view, all the way to the ocean

the best west window view, all the way to the ocean

That’s the tree featured in our post about having to clean up after other garden services!  I would drop a couple of feet off the top of it so one is not always fighting it for the view.  Or I would, shockingly, cut it down and plant another Eucalyptus off to the side.  They grow fast and I do love them.

After this pleasant hour or more of goofing off, I rejoined Allan at Andersen’s and we both worked on weeding the big west side garden.

west garden

west garden, 2:28 PM

I had three brainstorms while there.  The first was to widen a path to make it more inviting to walk past the blowsy poppies to the bench, moving rocks and replanting some small poppy seedlings further in to the bed.

in progress

in progress

The second was that the area around the big piece of driftwood should turn back into lawn.  The plants there are infested with couch grass, and it is the last place we get around to weeding.

2:28 PM, a big "before" mess

2:28 PM, a big “before” mess

The very energetic Al is a staffer there who is always looking for a project.  All I had to do was mention my idea to him, and he was off to get the big weedeater.

2:33 PM, "No Sooner Said Than Done" Al.

2:33 PM, “No Sooner Said Than Done” Al.

3:12 PM

3:12 PM

3:23 PM (Payson Hall is in the background)

3:23 PM (Payson Hall is in the background)

I also made a straight rather than curved line at another edge of the west garden, to eliminate a dull and weedy area that would better off as mown grass.

more sensible

more sensible

I hope I am getting older and wiser and not just older and lazier, but it makes sense to remove a few difficult spots in order to put more attention on the beautiful parts of the garden.

west bed, 3:37 PM

west bed, 3:37 PM

Payson Hall planters

Payson Hall planters

picket fence garden

picket fence garden

We made a quick trip to the Planter Box to get one plant (a red Geum) that I needed to balance a Long Beach planter, and while we were there, we picked up some annuals for an area that the inimitable Al had weeded for us earlier that day.  That was so wonderful because the weeding had been on my list of projects and I did not have to do it!

two hardworking Allans

two hardworking Allans

Al hung some floats on the fence that used to be on the driftwood around which he had weedeated, while Allan planted the annuals and I weeded a sweet pea area.  Those two are the two hardest working people I have ever known.

My original plan had been to do Klipsan Beach Cottages and Wiegardt Gallery as well as Andersen’s, but at almost five o clock I decided we should save them for tomorrow and head back south to do the Anchorage Cottages garden….

Anchorage courtyard

Anchorage courtyard

…and plant the rest of the Long Beach plants so I can call that planting project done for 2013!  What an accomplishment.  Every space in every planter is now filled, or so I believe.  I had time to check the block and half of tree and planter gardens that I skipped yesterday so we could go nursery shopping.

under a street tree:  This looks like a conifer, but it is Hebe 'Boughton's Dome'

under a street tree: This looks like a conifer, but it is Hebe ‘Boughton’s Dome’

There are a few street trees under which I would like to add more perennials, perhaps hardy fuchsias.   The tree gardens are a pain to water, so I may have missed the time frame when the plants would easily establish and not need coddling.

7:18 PM, a planter glows with golden marjoram

7:18 PM, a planter glows with golden marjoram

Finally, we weeded the streetside garden at Time Enough Books, long overdue for the removal of tiny grasses.   The difficult to work in light of late evening brought the day to a close….

Time Enough garden, 8:11 PM

Time Enough garden, 8:11 PM

light over the boat storage yard

evening light over the boat storage yard

Home at last, Allan mowed some lawn while I dealt with tomorrow’s plants (for Gene’s garden) and picked up some of the empty flowerpots strewn around the garden.  If we can get Gene’s planting, weeding at KBC and Wiegardt Gallery, and a brief stop at Golden Sands done tomorrow, we can have the next day off!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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It kind of bothers me that local gardeners are missing out on the wonderful collection of perennials offered by The Basket Case Greenhouse at 12106 Sandridge Road.  Maybe because a lot of them are not yet blooming, people do not realize how beautiful they will be.  Basket Case owners Fred and Nancy try to close the nursery each year sometime in July (reopening in very early spring), so get them while you can! I would not even reveal the secrets of this outstanding collection if it were not for the fact that I have already bought mine!

Here are some of my favourites.  Get ’em while you can!

Lobelia tupa

The tag says “Devil’s cardinal flower”.  This perennial might not come through a cold wet winter, but with good sized plants like these, you should get a good show the first year.

Lobelia tupa

Lobelia tupa

It has been a plant of great desirability for me ever since I saw it almost in bloom at Joy Creek nursery some years back.

in bud

in bud

It was so hard to find that I searched for it in Seattle nurseries and was able, at the time, to find only three!  Yet here they are at the Basket Case just waiting for you….Unless I decide I have to have them all.  (I think I have already purchased almost a full flat!)   My great gardening friend Sheila says she has killed it twice, and I have heard other tales of woe, but if one has it for one season it would be worth it.  Check out the gallery of images.

Perovskia ‘Lacey Blue’

There is only ONE of these left.  I bought all the others or talked clients into buying them.  This Russian sage is worthwhile for the gorgeous foliage alone.

Perovskia 'Lacey Blue'

Perovskia ‘Lacey Blue’

It is supposed to be compact, so might be good for containers.

Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’

I have these in almost every one of my gardens.  It has the usual coreopsis flowers but on stems that get up to eight feet tall.  I just find it so very fun and amusing to grow!  One you have a good clump of it, you can divide it and give it to friends.  That’s the only reason I have not purchased many more of these plants this year.

Coreopsis 'Flower Tower'

Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’

Protect it from slugs;  they seem to like the new shoots, but I have not lost a plant of this to slugs OR weather in three years.

Here it is blooming as tall as the greenhouse at Klipsan Beach Cottages in October 2012.

fun!

fun!

Sanguisorbas

Nobody but me seems to “get” the burnets!   The sanguisorba collection at The Basket case is not your usual herby burnet that seeds around and has small flowers.  These have assorted big feathery plumes that I love and have sought out every since I saw a seminar slideshow by Piet Oudolf at the Seattle garden show years ago.

Sanguisorba 'Red Thunder' and another

Sanguisorba ‘Red Thunder’ and another

The “Red Thunder’ one is new to me this year.  I have forgotten which is the one on the right, above, but there is only one of it left.  I bought all the others!  You will see an assortment of three or four kinds in the park in front of Captain Bob’s Chowder and Marsh’s in Long Beach this summer, and in my own garden I have as many kinds as I have been able to find over the years.  The only thing that has prevented me from buying all of those ‘Red Thunder’ ones is that the deer do eat sanguisorbas so that limits the gardens I can plant them in.

Chelone obliqua

It used to be most unusual to find this in a nursery.  I had to mail order mine before this year when Basket Case started to carry them.  The “turtlehead” flowers bloom in the late summer.  The only reason there is still a batch of these at Basket Case is that I have not got around to buying them yet, but I will, if someone does not beat me to it.  It likes part shade and moisty soil.  It bloomed for me last year in dry shade but the foliage did not look happy so I have moved mine into a wetter area.

Chelone obliqua...pink turtlehead

Chelone obliqua…pink turtlehead

I had one in my former, dampish garden along a stream that was spectacular in late summer, but I didn’t have a digital camera during most of my time there so I don’t have a record of its glory.

Scrophularia variegata

With a name like that, no wonder the tag says variegated figwort.  This is another plant that is still at the Basket Case only because we have a small car and can’t fit everything in that we want.

variegated figwort

Rene Eisenbart wrote in the Oregonian:  “one of the choicest variegated foliage plants the perennial world has to offer. Extremely bright and full of optimism, with conspicuously large and crinkled leaves, it has a rigid upright habit that makes it a beacon in the garden.”

I had better get back there and buy all the rest of these, unless someone beats me to it.  I need them!

Penstemons

I have found penstemons to be drought resistant and so far the deer have left them alone except for the occasional experimental nibble.  Basket Case has a good selection, including this one new to me:

Penstemon 'Burgundy Brew'

Penstemon ‘Burgundy Brew’

There are not very many of these left, and I just thought of how a client of ours who likes wine really should have one of these.  And now I can think of two clients who are wine connoiseurs.  Make that three.   Are there even enough of these left for me?  Basket Case has also had ‘Apple Blossom’ and ‘Thorn’ this year and I have bought some of each.  Burgundy Brew is said to have unusually large flowers.  Good thing I am going back to Basket Case within two days so I can snag at least one more of these.

Verbascum ‘Jackie in Yellow’

Verbascum ‘Clementine’ was a big hit earlier this season at the Basket Case and I think it is sold out, but there is still perhaps only ONE plant of the gorgeous, drought tolerant, sunny border plant ‘Jackie in Yellow’ left.

Verbascum 'Jackie in Yellow'

Verbascum ‘Jackie in Yellow’

I have never tried these as cut flowers but Google tells me they are good in bouquets.

Knautia ‘Thunder and Lightning’

Fred tells me I am the only one who has bought this plant, and I am astonished.  The foliage is striking.

Knautia 'Thunder and Lightning'

Knautia ‘Thunder and Lightning’

But when it blooms, it should be a knock out.  The plain green leafed Knautia macedonica is one of the most admired plants in our garden at the Wiegardt Gallery.  Looks like this one will have the same dark flowers.

Knautia at Wiegardt Gallery

Knautia at Wiegardt Gallery (the tall burgundy one)

I just bought six more ‘Thunder and Lightnings’ today but there are a few left.  For now.  I have decided they might look spiffing in some of the Long Beach planters!

Phygelius

There are at least three cultivars of this available. They are all good, deer resistant and sun loving, drought tolerant plants.  Hummingbirds love them.  They can be runners but I have never found them to be a problem because I like getting the offshoots.  The one that really struck my fancy this year was the white one (I think it is called ‘Snow White’) because it is unusual.

Phygelius

Phygelius

I do not understand why these are not being bought up!  Note on the left of the photos, you can just see the one (I forget the name) with gorgeous gold foliage.

Rosa mutabilis

This rose was spectacular in my old garden.  I think there are three left of the six that Basket Case got in this year.  I bought the other three.  Don’t miss out!

Rosa mutabilis

Rosa mutabilis

Here it is in my old garden:

Rose

Agastache (Hyssop)

The Agastaches that I planted from Basket Case last year were the hit of my garden when it was on the garden tour and through the summer whenever someone visited.

Agastaches

Agastaches

I think I bought all the Golden Jubilee and the apricot and salmon coloured one might be gone, but there are still some Acapulco Orange and some with the very amusing name ‘Black Adder’ and possibly some violet-blue ones.

The leaves often smell deliciously of licorice.  I am in love with all of these.

an Agastache from Basket Case last summer in my garden

an Agastache from Basket Case last summer in my garden

Eryngiums

Finally, my favourite perennials, the Eryngiums.  The Basket Case has two on offer, the first being one that was introduced just a few years ago and cost about $30 a gallon then.

Eryngium 'Jade Frost'

Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’

Because I collect them, I had to have it then.   I have found that the pretty foliage tends to want to revert to green after a year or two, but the flower is so spectacular that I love it anyway.  Now that Basket Case has them for a reasonable price, I will just get new ones each year for the foliage colour.

There are still four left!

There are still four left!

Here it is flowering, with blue thistle-like balls, in my garden last year on tour day:

Eryngium 'Jade Frost' in flower

Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’ in flower

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ is probably THE most asked about flower in any of my gardens.  I use it in every single one.  The deer leave it alone, the flowers are an incredible blue, and they dry on the plant in an attractive way.

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

People go into businesses, even the Port Office, and ask what this plant is.  The Basket Case is on its second shipment of these and has a few left.

Here it is in the Hornbuckle garden on May 8th this year:

green buds

green buds

Here it is yesterday in my friend Nancy’s garden:

just colouring up, 5-23-13

just colouring up, 5-23-13

June 2012, a bee magnet

June 2012, a bee magnet

2011, at the Wiegardt Gallery

2011, at the Wiegardt Gallery

It’s a wonderful plant that never fails to get attention and compliments.

So when you visit the Basket Case, don’t just look at their wonderful selection of annuals.  Look closely at the tags in the perennials house, because all those plants that just look green and maybe not very exciting now will do great things in the garden, and they long to get out of their pots and into the ground.

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Standing by the back porch lookingnorth to the lawn, two views:  June 18th and July 18th:

Below:  The back porch, June 18th and July 3rd.  Marilyn’s mum recently told us that M. does not like or even quite approve of beer, and so hops might not have been the best choice of vine for the porch railing!  Oops.  We were assured she does think it is pretty.

18 July, backdrop of hops on porch

Behind the back porch, a drainage area for roof water, with daylilies and Siberian iris and grasses alongside…

river rock swale, stepping stones to faucet

The view from the garage entrance, 3 July and 18 July:

Allan deadheading the Shasta daisies, which get huge…perhaps because of a manure mulch applied the previous fall:

18 July, just your ordinary shasta daisies…

Some views of the long border:

18 June

3 July

18 July

And now…the plants….all proven very resistant to deer.  They’ve munched many things I’ve tried in this garden, including a failed backdrop of Escallonia to hide the neighbours’ garage, but these plants have prospered.

18 June, catmint, santolina, daises

18 June, Nepeta ‘Walker’s Low'(catmint), Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’, California poppies

3 July, Penstemon, Blue Oat Grass

3 July, Salvia ‘May Night’, Anthemis ‘Sauce Hollandaise’, Allium albopilosum, golden marjoram

3 July, Cistus ‘Elma’

3 July, poppy

3 July, Knautia macedonica backed with grasses (Miscanthus variegatus is the white-ish one)

3 July, Knautia macedonica

3 July, feverfew

3 July, Stipa gigantea, my favourite grass

3 July, Allium albopilosum

3 July, daises, Miscanthus, bronze fennel

3 July, Brodiaea ‘Queen Fabiola’, Santolina, Eragrostis curvula (weeping love grass)

3 July, Dianthus

3 July, Achillea (yarrow)

18 July, Phygelius ‘Moonraker’

18 July, Penstemon

18 July, Phygelius

18 July, white painted sage, drumstick allium, feverfew? anthemis?, Scabiosa

18 July, painted sage (pink and blue), Allium albopilosum, feverfew, Shasta daisies, Cosmos

18 July, Echinops ritro (blue globe thistle)

18 July, Brodiaea ‘Queen Fabiola’

18 July, Eryngium (sea holly), Knautia

18 July, Cosmos ‘Yellow Garden’; this one bloomed in July but most of this colour waited till mid September.

13 August, dahlias

13 August, Achillea (yarrow)

9 Sept, Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’

9 September, Allium albopilosum

9 Sept, Eupatorium (Joe Pye Weed), Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’

30 October, Marilyn’s plant table with a stray pumpkin

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