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Posts Tagged ‘Physocarpus ‘Dart’s Gold’’

Sunday, 1 March 2020

Allan went off shopping across the river, partly for a new string trimmer and partly for pandemic supplies—in other words, enough canned goods, rice and beans and other staples to enable us to avoid shopping for a month if, heavens forfend, there is a coronavirus pandemic here. We should be able to go to work since our work can be pretty much non-peopling. I’m not scared, exactly, but I am depressed to have to think about all this, and worried for friends who are in fragile health, and sad because Seattle Carol (a Seattle metro bus driver) will probably cancel an early April visit during this uncertain time. Of course, I am made for being a recluse but would rather not have such a potentially dire reason.
Today I did a bit of propagating for my plant sale, wondering if fate will even allow The World’s Longest Garage Sale to take place as usual on Memorial Day weekend in late May.
The big plan was to prune all my roses that are not the old fashioned kind. The ramblers and shrubs I just let do what they will except for removing dead wood.
After the front garden roses, I got distracted with other projects….

Weeding a small front garden bed…

Yesterday ….

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Today….

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I removed yet another Ilex ‘Sky Pencil’ that had suddenly died, as they seem wont to do…

4B339961-5D3B-4C2C-AE12-77746D5BDBCCIn the background, behind the Melianthus, said ilex had been fine till it turned up its toes just last week. I probably won’t replace it with another shrub since the Melianthus would shade it out unless I put in something quite tall to begin with.  My budget doesn’t run to that.

I decided I must get the celandine out from the two beds by the front gate. Its pretty bright yellow daisy flowers set a bad example, making passersby think that it is a lovely winter bloomer that they should have.
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It has smothered out some choice small flowering bulbs that I used to have in that area. Because its root clumps leave tiny earth colored nodules behind, it will be back next year no matter how much sifting I do, thus the removal is not impressive as it might look.
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In the far back garden where I dug and sifted and fretted over every nodule last spring, the celandine now looks like this, stronger than ever.
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Utterly maddening.
In Modern Nature, Derek Jarman says this about a childhood memory of celandine.
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Instead of pruning all of the back garden roses as planned, I allowed myself to be distracted by the second pile of compost and leaves, this pile actually on the back corner of the Nora House driveway, which is a rather rude encroachment even though I know that her granddaughter, Alicia, does not mind.
Yesterday, before and after Allan dealt with the bamboo:

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My leaf bin contents had sunk during the winter and so, after moving the compost debris to the big bins, I was able to fill the leaf bins to the top with the tarped leaves. The rest were strewn onto the driveway garden bed and the final amount filled two oyster baskets.
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My audience:

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I had found it all so exhausting and so very cold that I almost quit several times. To finish the pile was revitalizing enough that I found the oomph to prune my mother’s two tea roses, but no more.
There is still much cutting back to do, including six Stipa giganteas….

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….and two more large roses. I would have done them a disservice to prune them at the end of the day when so very tired and cold.
The last thing I managed was a brief back garden appreciation walkabout.
Oh no, some stray celandine. Was too tired to get shovel…must remember before this makes a new big patch.
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We did not get cold enough weather to kill the Azolla that covers the ponds.

3FDE589F-018C-4169-B3A2-EB6C5FACB3F1In better news, I found….

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Pulmonaria

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Physocarpus ‘Dart’s Gold’

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Corylopsis pauciflora

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Crocuses

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Thick new shoots of Dranunculus vulgaris

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Yellow hellebore

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Narcissi in the Bogsy Wood

…and in the greenhouse…

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Echeverias flowering

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Salvia Africana-lutea

…and in Allan’s garden at dusk some crocuses toning well with a hebe.
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Tomorrow just had better be an all day Jarman reading day. I’m tired of waiting!

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Thursday, 6 April 2017

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Smokey waiting for morning rain to stop

We were surprised when the weather cleared up midmorning.  Rain, wind, or sunshine, we had been planning to tidy the Ilwaco planters and street trees.  Doing so in pleasant weather was a treat.

Ilwaco

First, we did a bucket’s worth of weeding at our volunteer post office garden.

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Post office garden has little offseason structure, leaving room for an explosion of summer flowers.


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Fritillaria meleagris, and me weeding


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Muscari ‘Ocean Magic’


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southernmost planter: finger blight evidence shows why it looks so drab.


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Allan’s photo

Even though they are still blooming, we will soon be replacing the woody old Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’.

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They have gotten too tatty looking at their bases.


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The tree gardens need some mulch.


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amazed this windblown tree has not fallen yet.


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wish I had not let the bad aster take over a couple of the tree gardens…


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Col Pacific Motel’s mini garden


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Allan’s photo


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“yellow hoop petticoats” (Allan’s photo)


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Narcissus bulbocodium (Allan’s photo)


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downtown Ilwaco (Allan’s photo)

The weather got so warm that we went back home for summer shirts.

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Look who I found snoozing together!


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secret buddies Frosty and Calvin

I also noticed a joyous sight: a special trillium from Dancing Oaks Nursery, that had been ever so tiny and that I thought had died, had popped up after all.

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We did a bit more weeding at the community building.

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Ilwaco Community Building

Long Beach

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Deer have left us the tulips at the welcome sign.

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They are even prettier inside.

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The back of the sign should have pastel tulips soon.


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I met a very nice labradoodle named Curly.


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checked up on the city hall garden, one of our best….

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trillium, which I rescued years ago from the road next to my old house when the road was being widened.


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Allan’s photo

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Pure white resists being photographed.


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hellebore


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Physocarpus ‘Dart’s Gold’


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Peggy’s Park, sprawling old hebe…


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cut back

Peggy’s Park, on the east side of city hall, was planted by Gene and Peggy Miles and remained in memory of Peggy, who died of ovarian cancer far too young and is still much missed.

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Brunner ‘Looking Glass’, a perennial forget me not planted soon after she died.


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I think this is hosta’s best moment.

Just inside city hall, this sign made me think:

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Even when I am at my crabbiest and most anti social, it is highly probable that one of our gardens makes someone smile every day.

Next, Allan weeded and groomed Coulter Park because there will be an art show at the old train depot building over the weekend.

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Allan’s photo; wind had the narcissi all facing backwards.

I deadheaded the two north blocks of planters and had a quick visit with Heather at our favourite shop, NIVA green (and refreshed my stash of photos for the shop’s Facebook page.)

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just north of NIVA


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That corner has also become a deer crossing so will not get new tulips next year.


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outside NIVA green (New, Inspired, Vintage, Artful)


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inside

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Walking back north to meet Allan, I saw more evidence that 2nd North is now a deer intersection.

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Drat.

I felt a sprinkle and looked south, to see rain heading our way from Ilwaco.

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By the time I rejoined Allan, the rain was coming down in earnest.  He had the bright idea of cheating and knocking down the last of a weedy bit with the string trimmer.  It worked a treat.

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By then, I was in the van, watching.

I thought we would have to skip my idea of getting some mulch for Fifth Street Park.  But by the time we had dumped our debris at city works, the sun was back and so we filled just four buckets with mulch.  A sight there made me decide to save the rest of the mulch.  I knew exactly where these plants came from: the southernmost planter on the east side of Pacific.  I would need the rest of the pile to eventually fill it back in.

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distinctive plants from a particular planter

I’m glad that planter got dug out.  It was too shrubby, going back to volunteer days.

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The pile is getting small.

While Allan weeded in Veterans Field, I did two more blocks of trees and planters.

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muscari in Vet Field (Allan’s photo)


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muscari (Allan’s photo)


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Allan’s photo


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anemone (Allan’s photo)


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red white and blue (Allan’s photo)


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Tulip acuminata


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more Tulip acuminata (a favourite of mine)


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Delicate species tulips look best after our extra rainy month of march.

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The more showy tulips, like this four year old ‘Gavota’, get smaller flowers every year.


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This year the double and parrot tulips look just miserable so far.  Maybe no more next year…even though I love them so.


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note to self: dig out most of this horrible ivy soon


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It was challenging getting through the spring break crowds with my weed bucket.


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lots of narcissi under the trees


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and in the planters


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I thought my new “cushion bush” had made it through the winter.  No…all dried up.


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Zoltar offered to tell my fortune.

On my way back to meet Allan at Vet Field, I encountered a woman and little girl with a big bouquet of narcissi and grape hyacinths.  I said, “Oh, gee, I hope those did not come from the city planters.”  “No, she picked them on the beach!” said the mom.  “You must mean the beach approach garden,” I said, and she replied “No, they were on the beach.”

“On the beach, my arse,” I thought but did not say as I walked away.  I knew darn well they were from the beach approach garden because I recognized them as ones I had planted…and they do not grow on the beach.  Allan said he might have asked, “You mean the ‘beach’ area right past the Please leave the flowers for everyone to enjoy sign?”.  I’m trying not to make a tourist’s day miserable so I wouldn’t go that far but…sheesh.

We drove out to check on the Bolstad beach approach planters.

If people would just not pick the flowers, there would be dozens more to brighten everyone’s day.

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These were exactly the kind in the girl’s “beach” bouquet.

Allan dropped me off at the southernmost planters and we had a look at the empty one.  It must be going to be fixed or replaced because last year a car drove into it.

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We have never seen a planter empty before with all the works showing.


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of great interest to us

Allan went to Fifth Street Park to weed while I did the last two block of main street planters.

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My experiment in February of cutting back a big woody santolina seems to have worked.


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happy and multiplying species tulips


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narcissi and euphorbia

You might notice from these photos how much less pedestrian traffic we have on the south blocks of downtown.

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Fifth Street Park, NE side


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lily flowering tulips do well in rain


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Allan’s photo


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note to self: divide these lovely primroses to grow under some other trees, as well.


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note to self: weed southwest corner of Fifth Street Park at least once before tall plants hide it.

Allan had remembered to weed out the bad aster corner in Fifth Street Park.

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before


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after


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mulching

Finally, we deadheaded the planters on Sid Snyder Drive…

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Allan’s photo: That soil depression is the sure sign of another stolen plant.  That was after he brushed soil back into the hole.

…and last, the little garden at the World Kite Museum.

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new concrete pads


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I hope they are going to dig out this row of tatty hebes, too (hint, hint!)

The very last thing we had to do was deadhead narcissi in the window boxes at the Depot Restaurant, and we decided to eat there if they had room for us at the counter.  They did.

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Depot Restaurant and Sou’wester RV Park (Allan’s photo)


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counter view

We wanted to have delicious things that will not be on the summer menu.

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wilted spinach salad


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cinghiale with gnocchi


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French onion soup

At home: The check up list is done.  Of course, all the gardens need regular check ups from now on.  The recent check up list was because of missing almost a month at some jobs due to incessant rain.

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I’m glad we got caught up. Tomorrow’s predicted storm will most likely lay the narcissi and tulips on their sides.

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This is what’s coming. We are the blue bubble about haflway up the coast.

(As I write this on Friday, we are halfway through the storm and have lost and then regained power.  It is noisy; the tarp has blown off the stacked crab pots next door, and one of two highways leading to the Peninsula has been closed because of downed trees.  I think the worst is over, so do not worry.)

 

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                Friday, 24 March 2017

I did not mind the wind and rain because I was still recuperating from a cold. A weather break in the afternoon did inspire a walk through the garden.

Trailing Rosemary by the greenhouse

Reseeded hot mustard. Our neighbour Devery loves these!


The edges and the back lawn were soggy.




Fresh rainwater for Smokey

No campfire anytime soon.

I imagined the satisfaction of pulling the huge shotweeds in the bogsy wood.

I imagined the moss looking prettier with the weed grass gone.

I imagined this bed clipped and weeded.

Physocarpus ‘Dart’s Gold’

Looking north. Allan had mowed between storms.

Leycesteria ‘Jealousy’

Leycesteria ‘Golden Lanterns’. I imagined it deadwooded.

I imagined three pallet compost bins here.

The epimidium’s old leaves should be clipped by now.

New growth on new boxwoods.

White bleeding heart in front garden

Happy to see some sprouts at base of melianthus plus plenty of Anthryscus ‘Raven’s Wing’

Weather bowed tulips

I imagined moving all this debris to three new compost bins.

View from next door of two storm flags at the port.

The rain came back.

Flowering plum

Back inside I went with my only accomplishments imaginary ones.

Frosty

Skooter

Started a new book about the modern world.

Allan had a quiet puttering sort of day with just these photos:

His secondary boat was mucky from just sitting.



He wanted it clean so he could park it without shame at the Black Lake Yacht Club, here shown in January.


All spiffed up:


A brief break in the late afternoon rain:




More rain:


And a sunset.

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