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Sunday, 29 March 2015

at home

I did indeed take the day off, although when I looked out at the weather I thought it might turn out to be a reading day.  That would have been a fine thing, as I have a daunting number of books from the library all of a sudden; I should have staggered them better.

Have too little reading time now.  Started with the Anne Tyler.

Have too little reading time now. Started with the Anne Tyler.  Allan just read the Anne Hillerman (daughter of Tony) mystery and thinks I will like it.

I am having a terrible time with The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay.  I know it is good, and made it to chapter 7.  Something about it does not grab me even though it is so well written and on a fascinating subject.  I had to return it and check it out again, and yet the other books are of more interest to me.  I could probably read several chapters in the time it takes me to write the daily blog, which has become an entertaining obsession and a useful work record and can’t be skipped during the work months.

I’ve managed to read one small and excellent book: The Measure of My Days by Florida Scott-Maxwell, a memoir of aging that was recommended in a book by Susan Wittig Albert.

Meanwhile, the book Allan is reading had a quotation that I liked.  Here’s the book:

Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity by Katherine Boo

Review:  “The author of this book is an American Pulitzer Prize winning journalist who is married to an Indian man. She has spent the last few years doing scrupulous research for this book which is a realistic portrayal of life in a Mumbai slum. All the people are real. All the incidents really happened. And the writing itself is so good that it hooked me from the very beginning and kept my eyes glued to the pages.”

And here’s the passage about the effects of agricultural labour vs. city life:

How I feel this!!

How I feel this!!

I said to Allan that the older women admiring her fairer skin sounded kind of racist, but he said it was because she was working indoors, not outdoors in the sun.

Much as I wanted to read today, I simply had to plant my sweet peas.  I thought I might do it in the garage, in plastic window box liners, to stay out of the weather.  However, when I went outside, the weather was not bad after all…only a slightly annoying wind and no showers.  So the day was lost to reading.

I had second thoughts about using the window box liners (or whatever you call long rectangular containers) when I saw the amount of snails that had collected on one.

These don't cause me the nauseated horror that I would feel about this many slugs.

These don’t cause me the nauseated horror that I would feel about this many slugs.

This might explain why my sweet peas in these containers did nothing last year.

I discovered that the containers from the same area with less rim had many fewer snails.

two different kinds

two different kinds

way fewer snails

way fewer snails

Ideally, I’d like a container with a small rolled lip and no underneath rim for snails and slugs hidey places.

Due to this problem, I decided to put the seeds right in the ground as I had done the first summer here.  Then, they had little competition from other plants and perhaps the snails had not discovered them so they did very well.  I hope that clearing a trench and fertilizing and mulching will help.

sweet peas planted

sweet peas planted

In the Egyptian Walking Onion patch in the foreground lurk many snails.

JUST SHOCKING!

JUST SHOCKING!

I am going to have to apply Sluggo every day if I want any sweet peas at all.  A more toxic product like Deadline would work better but is bad for other critters.

In the front garden, I did plant some sweet peas in the rectangular containers just inside the wooden fence.  There, I can put some Deadline between fence and container where no cat can get into it.

Allan’s project was to make a sturdier stand for my birthday birdbath; it had fallen over but fortunately had not broken.

birthday present from Allan; he bolted the stand onto a wooden base.

birthday present from Allan; he bolted the stand onto a wooden base.

While planting some more sweet peas in two long containers on the south wall of the house, I admired this:

an exquisite species tulip bud on a plant table

an exquisite species tulip bud on a plant table, Tulip batalinii, I think

I got my three new shade plants into the new spot that I’d added soil to yesterday.

two pulmonarias and a corydalis

two pulmonarias and a corydalis

I hope this Corydalis comes back for me year after year.

I hope this Corydalis comes back for me year after year.

Then I tackled an area of wild impatiens (touch me not, jewel weed) thinking it might give me room for my new azalea.

a carpet of jewelweed

a carpet of jewelweed

The croaking of a frog nearby reminded me to check on the seasonal pond (ditch) for frog spawn, as Mr. Tootlepedal had been showing some excellent photos of such.

The water was muddy and I did not see any frog spawn.

The water was muddy and I did not see any frog spawn even though this area abounds with tree frogs.

I think Mr T’s frogs, being bigger, might produce bigger spawn.

I remembered to admire my patch of scilla...outside the deer fence.

I remembered to admire my patch of scilla…outside the deer fence.

I admired a Darmera peltata blooming in the garden...

I also admired a Darmera peltata blooming in the garden…

and an established pulmonaria by the bogsy woods.

and an established pulmonaria by the bogsy woods.

Despite these diversions, 45 minutes later the patch of jewelweed looked like this:

done

It seemed too rough a spot to put my spider azalea.  Some pondering led to the realization that it could go in the newly filled area behind the fallen tree logs.

My spider azalea from Monkey Business 101 nursery in Cloverdale...and behind it, another nest of jewelweed.

My spider azalea from Monkey Business 101 nursery in Cloverdale…and behind it, another nest of jewelweed.

Even though my energy was dwindling, I decided to do one more big area of jewelweed (AKA Policeman’s Helmet).  The plant is easy to pull, and I could go back later for creeping buttercups.  Last year, I did not get it out of this area before it got four feet tall.

before

before

Frosty arrives to inspect my work.

Frosty arrives to inspect my work.

forty minutes later

forty minutes later

Meanwhile, Allan had surprised me a few hours earlier by deciding to go to work.  He had been feeling bothered by the thought that the lawn at Golden Sands Assisted Living courtyard might be getting long.  I had pointed out that next time we go there, it will be with mulch and therefore without room to carry the mower.  So off he went, on his own volition.

Golden Sands

hauling my mom's small rechargeable mower down the hallway

hauling my mom’s small rechargeable mower and a strimmer down the hallway

The lawn was not as long as he had imagined.  It is mostly moss; I’d like it to be ALL moss.  One of the workers there described it as having once been like a fairyland of moss and little flowers till someone applied mosskiller.  Our hope is that the moss takes right over.

DSC00011

before

after

after

I am thrilled that he brought back a photo showing the trees by the dining room limbed up.

Whoever did this: Great job, as it opens the view to the garden

Whoever did this: Great job, as it opens the view to the garden

some tulips and a rosemary

some tulips and a rosemary

a few more tulips

a few more tulips

Next on the work agenda is to get mulch in to this garden (a difficult job because we have to wheelbarrow down the hallway) and plant poppy seeds.

back to the hallway to exit the job

back to the hallway to exit the job

The residents are starting new plants on my mom's old plant table.

The residents are starting new plants on my mom’s old three tier plant table.

African Violet collection

African Violet collection; my mom and grandma  would have loved these.

On the way home, he even stopped at Coulter Park in Long Beach and pruned the last sword fern.

evening at home

When he returned, he found me weeding.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I had been on various missions all day and had done no pleasant “piddlefarting around the garden”.  That’s the term that the mother of one of the Sylvia Beach Hotel innkeepers used to use for those pleasant days when you just do a bit of this and that in the garden all day.  Those sorts of lovely days happen after spring clean up and planting season, usually between June and October.

Allan suggested a fire and sausages for an early dinner; I said as long as I didn’t have to stop weeding to do anything to make it happen.

Allan starts a fire

Allan starts a fire.

I could weed no more, even though an awful lot of shotweed is about to go to seed.

center bed with lovely returning tulips and enormous shotweeds

center bed with lovely returning tulips and enormous shotweeds mixed with good plants

another batch of tulips that has returned for five years now.

another batch of tulips that has returned for five years now.

pink flowering currant

pink flowering currant

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo, with bellows and dampish wood

fire2

Through the campfire smoke, I admire my ornamental rhubarb.

Through the campfire smoke, I admire my ornamental rhubarb.

an early dinner (as we usually dine at ten)

an early dinner (as we usually dine at ten)

Neighbour cat Onyx visited and ran all around.

Neighbour cat Onyx visited and ran all around.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

While sitting around the fire, I checked my email on my phone (as one does) and learned to my delight that we have been laid off a small private garden job due to the owners’ plan to redesign (I would guess to make it more dog friendly, or to make parts of it dog-proof, as the resident dogs are quite the garden diggers).  It’s a garden where we have just done maintenance and have had little creative input as the owners designed quite a nice garden on their own before we took it on (and before they got two dogs).  It will only save us perhaps four hours of work a month…but that’s four more hours I can spend in my own garden, so I was over the moon.  (For regular readers with good memories: It isn’t Casa Pacifica where my good dog friends Spook and Dusty live.)

Indoors at dusk (still light after 7 PM!), I was able to erase the sweet pea list from the work board.  I still have some seeds and am still toying with a late planting of them along the boatyard fence, if all the other plantings are successful and don’t need to be redone.

board

I would love to take tomorrow off to weed some more….but there are lilies to be planted at the boatyard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Saturday, 28 March 2015

Empty Bowls event

Strangely, I found myself in bed and falling sleep by 1 AM instead of 2 last night so was awake at the bright hour of 9 AM!  This would have been a shock to Allan so I checked my email and Facebook for half an hour.  Thus, we were at the Empty Bowls event by 11 AM.  From the event page:

This annual event brings handmade bowls created by local artists and elementary students together with handmade soups and bread made by local restaurants to help fund local food service organizations. Each year bowls are made and at the event are sold for $10 each. With that donation you get a lunch of soup and bread. After the event you keep your bowl to remind you of all the empty bowls in the world. Open to the public.

This is part of a national outreach to educate and empower communities through art and understanding.

Empty Bowls is held at the Peninsula Church Center, which has a tidy garden outside.

Empty Bowls is held at the Peninsula Church Center, which has a tidy garden outside.

The rose garden must be lovely in summertime.

The rose garden must be lovely in summertime.

Inside, bowls were still being added to the display.  It was hard to choose!

Inside, bowls were still being added to the display. It was hard to choose!

Many of the bowls at this event are made by grade school children.  I asked local potter and event organizer Karen Brownlee if that is unusual, and she said yes, most of the similar events around the country have more “grown up” bowls (my words).  There are plenty of “grown up” bowls mixed in to the choices at our local event.  The children’s bowls add a great deal of charm and are a great way to introduce kids to this mix of art and community.

picking a bowl

picking a bowl

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Several different restaurants donated soup.

Several local restaurants donated soup.

Just last night on Facebook, I saw Karen put out a request for a donation of butter to make the bread better.  The butter arrived, and the bread was rustic and delicious.

bread and butter

bread and butter

Our bowls (you can buy more than one).

Our bowls (you can buy more than one).

In the background, above, Karen’s spouse is bringing our soup, as the event includes table service.  It was later pointed out to me that the two green and yellow bowls that I chose are in the colours of an Oregon sportsball team.  One even has the letter O in side!  The completely went over my head as I don’t follow sports.  I believe our good friend Susie is a fan of the team known as the Oregon Ducks (but I won’t part with my pretty green and blue bowl!)  Allan always likes to get one with a bird’s head.

Our soup arrives!

Our soup arrives!

Allan's egg drop soup and his bowls.  I wanted the red one so he got an extra as well as his usual bird selection.

Allan’s egg drop soup and his bowls. I wanted the red one so he got an extra as well as his usual bird selection.

We were graced by the presence of local artist Rose Power, who sat with us.  I had figured out (by asking around) that she was the woman at yesterday’s art event who had such nice things to say (in a delightful English accent) about our gardening.

We had to tear ourselves away from the good company in order to begin the workday. As we left, we met a most handsome dog who was just quietly lying outside.  He stood up and licked my hand when I sweet talked him, then wandered off so I guess he had just come to visit where a crowd of people gathered.

a handsome boy

a handsome boy

The Basket Case Greenhouse 

Our second pre-work stop was at the Basket Case Greenhouse, which was on our way to stops three and four.  I needed just one thing, a bag of potting soil for planting sweet peas at home, and also took the opportunity to snag some new photos for the Basket Case Facebook page.

Walter: Allan's photo

Walter: Allan’s photo

red Geum and Erysimum 'Bowles Mauve'

red Geum and Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’

Papaver 'Wonderland Orange'

Papaver ‘Wonderland Orange’

Fred and me...somehow I ended up buying a few plants.

Fred and me…somehow I ended up buying a few plants.

I didn’t get much, just a red Monarda for Jo, and one for the red white and blue Veterans Field garden.

When we looked over at the van, we could see Shadow the poodle all the way inside, and Walter had been thinking about getting in.  This is not surprising for Shadow, as this used to be “his” van before we bought it from Fred and Nancy (thus VASTLY improving our lives) in autumn of 2013.

Shadow is in there.

Shadow is in there.

They've been called back to the greenhouse by Fred and Nancy.

They’ve been called back to the greenhouse by Fred and Nancy.

The Bayside Garden

Next, we went a bit further north, past our first actual work destination, to deliver a lovely spider azalea which we’d gotten at Monkey Business Nursery for Steve and John.

I got two of these spider azaleas, one for me, and one for Steve and John if they want one.

At Monkey Business 101: I got two of these spider azaleas, one for me, and one for Steve and John.

Here it is in bloom.

Here it is in bloom, and here’s an article about it.

near the front door to the bayside house

near the front door to the bayside house

the drainage swale between the wings of the house

the drainage swale between the wings of the house with Acer palmatum ‘Shishigashira’ behind a Chamaecyparis obtusa ‘Sunlight Lace’.

three rhododendrons

Rhododendron pachysanthum, in a bed of Arctostaphylos uva-ursi (Kinnikinnick)

by the front door

by the front door

When Steve and John invited us in for coffee and a slice of a peanut butter and chocolate “Elvis” cake, we could not resist.  (They make an excellent and flavourful cup of coffee and John is an accomplished baker.)  We then had a brief tour of part of the garden.  You may notice some lines of dug up soil, as an irrigation system is being installed by renowned local landscaper and rhododendron expert Steve Clarke’s capable team.

garden

by the driveway

rhodo

Rhododendron campylogynum Myrtilloides.

detail

detail of Rhododendron campylogynum Myrtilloides.

rhodo3

Rhododendron ‘Capistrano’ (has a yellow tint that the camera ignored) 

a prostrate form of taxus backed with a Daphne, still blooming (as it was on our last visit)

a prostrate form of taxus backed with a Daphne, still blooming (as it was on our last visit three weeks ago)

garden 4

There’s that stunning white variegated Euphorbia ‘Tasmanian Tiger’ gathering the light.

Hostas just emerging.

Hostas just emerging.

Steve and John had recently visited The English Nursery in Seaview, whose owner, Dirk Sweringen, sells an impressive variety of hostas.

a garden of well defined shapes

a garden of well defined shapes

garden5

garden6

Waterlogued

Waterlogued

Pittosporum

Pittosporum ‘Tasman Ruffles’

moss2

the woodland, which Steve and John have painstakingly edited for beauty

moss

a natural cup of moss

a natural cup of moss

Have I told you that this garden is going to open for touring on May 2?

rhodietour

We had to get to work, and Steve and John were off to the art show in Long Beach.  Our first work destination was just a couple of blocks to the south, where we got a yard of Soil Energy mulch and headed to our first job.

Peninsula Landscape Supply

Peninsula Landscape Supply:  Mike bringing us a scoop

Peninsula Landscape Supply: Mike bringing us a scoop (Allan’s photo)

They have some handsome heucheras for sale.

They have some handsome heucheras for sale.

The Boreas Inn

I had one major goal for today, to get that yard of Soil Energy spread at the Boreas and then to plant two plants and some poppy seeds in Long Beach.  While Allan got the mulch moving, I delivered the red bee balm plant to Jo’s, had a brief visit with her and little dog Coco, and then hightailed it back to the Boreas to get to work at last.

It went swimmingly and by the time we were almost done, my ambition for the day had increased.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

and weeding

and weeding some of the horrid creeping Jenny out (it’s too invasive)

hard at it

hard at it.  Soon weather will permit the cushions will be brought out for guests to lounge.

IMG_1997 - Version 2

Boreas lawn beds

Boreas lawn beds yesterday

and today, raised up with muclh

and today, raised up with mulch

I always wish for these beds to be level with the lawn, if not raised a little higher.  We might finally have almost achieved that.

Mission accomplished.

Mission accomplished.

The garden suite garden also got mulched.

The garden suite garden also got mulched.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

The lawn beds, finally level with the lawn (for now, at least)

The lawn beds, finally level with the lawn (for now, at least)

Buddha had snail earrings today.

Buddha had snail earrings today. (Allan’s photo)

and then….back to

Peninsula Landscape Supply (again)

Colleen scooping Soil Energy

Colleen scooping Soil Energy

and dumping it into our little trailer, which holds just a yard and a bit.

and dumping it into our little trailer, which holds just a yard and a bit.

Instead of planting two plants and some seeds in Long Beach, my goal had changed to mulching the Port office garden and an area in my garden and then finishing the little gravel project at the Port office garden.

Ilwaco

On the way to Ilwaco, I added to my goal the planting of sweet peas at our Ilwaco post office garden, as having some mulch to add would help them along.

post office garden, before

post office garden, before

after

after

I DO hope I have some luck with sweet peas in this spot.  The last two years I have tried and failed for various reasons: lousy soil, not enough water, snails.

Post office garden today

Post office garden today, after some work

with Tulip 'Green Star'

with Tulip ‘Green Star’

With that done, we drove to the port office and added soil to make the garden fluffy and happy.

Port Office before

Port Office before

after mulching

after mulching

just across the lawn from our mulching job

just across the lawn from our mulching job

Next, we applied the rest of the Soil Energy at home…

on a mulch mission at home

on a mulch mission at home

filling in an edge by the bogsy wood

raising an edge by the bogsy wood

raising an edge by the bogsy wood

every last scoop of precious mulch

every last scoop of precious mulch; Allan kept the wheelbarrows filled.

And then we went back to the port, got some gravel from their supply, and finished making the backsplash for the office garden.

view from near the gravel pile

view from near the gravel pile

gull

gravel and mulch both applied!

gravel and mulch both applied!

After all that, I declared tomorrow a day off.  I had been able to erase more from the work board than I had expected.  And perhaps while walking around my own garden, I had been so horrified by the amount of weeds that I just had to have a day off.  I just hope I get more done than just “piddlefarting around the garden.”

plants need to be planted

plants need to be planted

The shotweed is shocking!

The shotweed is shocking!

Horsetail is popping up all over!

Horsetail is popping up all over!

and I must pull the dangblang touch-me-not!

and I must pull the dangblang touch-me-not!

Pretty things soothe my anxiety about the garden:

a marmalade Heuchera

a marmalade Heuchera

epimidium

epimidium

Smokey walking with me and flopping down in front of me

Smokey walking with me and flopping down in front of me

fringed tulip 'Cummins'

fringed tulip ‘Cummins’

the garden boat

the garden boat

The Ann Lovejoy

The Ann Lovejoy

Waterlogued

Waterlogued

Oh!! A lost ho mi in the mini scree garden!

Oh!! A lost ho mi in the mini scree garden!

tulips and gold acanthus

tulips and gold acanthus

a sentimental hosta given to me by Mary Fluaitt before she moved away

a sentimental hosta given to me by Mary Fluaitt before she moved away

Where Allan found the energy to mow our lawn AND Nora’s tonight I just cannot imagine.

allan

But he did.  I went inside and caught up on the Tootlepedal and Miserable Gardener blogs.

Mission accomplished: a new red bowl for tea bags!

Mission accomplished: a new red bowl for tea bags!

and a much decreased work list.  Tomorrow if I do my own sweet peas, I can erase sweet peas altogether.

and a much decreased work list. Tomorrow if I do my own sweet peas, I can erase sweet peas altogether.

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Monday, 23 March 2015

Ah, it looked like a good rainy, windy day to be inside and work on my Sylvia Beach Hotel full immersion blog.  BUT I got the message that there was a new availability list to peruse at the Basket Case Greenhouse.  The order needed to go out by Tuesday, so we went to have a look at what we might like the nursery to carry.

Basket Case Greenhouse

Basket Case Greenhouse

perusing the list (Allan's photo); picked out some agastaches, penstemons, and much more.

perusing the list (Allan’s photo); picked out some agastaches, penstemons, and much more.

our good friends Shadow and Walter (Allan's photo)

our good friends Shadow and Walter (Allan’s photo)

Nancy came forward to visit from the back greenhouse, where she was planting the hanging baskets for which she is famous.  She couldn’t visit long, and called for the dogs to return with her.

Walter is moving very slowly as he'd like to stay and visit for longer.

Walter is moving very slowly as he’d like to stay and visit for longer.

Fred and Allan in the greenhouse

Fred and Allan in the greenhouse

Fred shows off a new deep red annual geranium.

Fred shows off a new deep red annual geranium.  He’s teasing me because I don’t use them much.  I like the deep clear colour of that one.

the perennials house (Allan's photo)

the perennials house (Allan’s photo)

santolinas in three colours, one of my favourite perennials

santolinas in three colours, one of my favourite perennials

Fred showed me the tag for a new plant.  Our friend Ed Strange had it last year and said it bloomed prolifically and long.

plant

a cross between Echinacea and Rudbeckia; the plants are small and not available for sale yet.

A monsoon begins.  I make it into the van; Allan is stuck in a greenhouse.

A monsoon begins. I make it into the van; Allan is stuck in a greenhouse. 

Allan's photo of me escaping the torrent in the van.

Allan’s photo of me escaping the torrent in the van.

Fred has plenty to do in the shelter of the greenhouses.  (Allan's photo)

Fred has plenty to do in the shelter of the greenhouses. (Allan’s photo)

Ah, the rest of the day was spent at home catching up on this blog by writing about one of my favourite topics, the Sylvia Beach Hotel room journals!

Tuesday, 24 March 2015

Sunshine called us out to a mission to plant sweet peas in Long Beach, and maybe Anchorage and Boreas, too.

Long Beach

Long Beach city works has a nice pile of Soil Energy for us to use on areas that need fluffing.

tarped to keep weeds out

tarped to keep weeds out

buckets for fluffing up Fifth Street Park

buckets for fluffing up Fifth Street Park

I weeded and applied mulch and Dr Earth fertilizer all along where I planted the sweet peas in Fifth Street Park, and applied much sluggo at the end in hopes of better results than last year.  Allan took photos:

before

before

mulched garden

mulched garden (after)

after

after planting sweet peas and mulching

While I worked on the sweet pea project, he weeded here (before)

While I worked on the sweet pea project, he weeded here (before)

after

after

At my request, he did some pruning (before)

At my request, he did some pruning (before)

after

after (As far as I am concerned, that whole mugo pine should disappear.)

What the heck am I doing here? Oh yeah, pruning some cotoneaster in the little park by Lewis and Clark square.

What the heck am I doing here? Oh yeah, pruning some cotoneaster in the little park by Lewis and Clark square to reveal some lost astilbes and primroses.

Anchorage Cottages

We had time to plant sweet peas and do some weeding and deadheading at The Anchorage Cottages.

shady bed with trilliums and pulmonaria

shady bed with trilliums and pulmonaria

sweet tiny narcissi in a windowbox.  This new Olympus pocket camera does not seem to focus well on flowers.

sweet tiny narcissi in a windowbox. This new Olympus pocket camera does not seem to focus well on flowers.

the center courtyard

the center courtyard; there’s a new pelican statue 2/3 of the way down the garden

courtyard planter

courtyard planter

more courtyard narcissi.  A innkeeper from years ago planted that heather...not me!

more courtyard narcissi. A innkeeper from years ago planted that heather…not me!

more courtyard narcissi

more courtyard narcissi; narcissi are my favourite flower

tulips by the office

tulips by the office

Tulip 'Green Star'

Tulip ‘Green Star’

The parrot tulips that usually bloom into early May are awfully early this year.

The parrot tulips that usually bloom into early May are awfully early this year.

planted sweet peas by the chimney, where Tulip 'Gavota' still looks fine except for the focus problem.

planted sweet peas by the chimney, where Tulip ‘Gavota’ still looks fine except for the focus problem.

Manager Beth tells me that Dennis Co again had the little lemon cypress trees like this one that she got.  (When we go, right after work, they are all out again!)

Manager Beth tells me that Dennis Co again had the little lemon cypress trees like this one that she got. (When we go, right after work, they are all out again!)

After the Anchorage, we were too low in energy to start planting sweet peas at the Boreas Inn, so we dumped a few more buckets of mulch in Long Beach’s Fifth Street Park and went home before dusk.

Wednesday, 25 March 2015

Even though we had a fine rainy day, we had to leave the house to meet with our nice accountant.

Her office has two lovely tulip bouquets.

Her office has two lovely tulip bouquets.

a red one

a red one

and a yellow one

and a yellow one

Her sweet dog Helen lay under the desk while we concentrate on our tax numbers.  The meeting went well and we left all the figures in her capable hands and took a drive past the boatyard and along the portside gardens just to reconnoiter on the way home.  I was pleased that all the big horsetail had not sprouted yet in the boatyard garden.  Allan fixed a “Please don’t pick the flowers” sign, and we discussed (him) making new ones. I noticed a lot of narcissi deadheads along Howerton Way to be dealt with tomorrow if the weather allows.

rain and a drooping sign at the boatyard

rain and a drooping sign at the boatyard

And then…home to blog like fury, so that I will be finally caught up and can spend the next day of computer time catching up on Mr. Tootlepedal and that new puppy on the Miserable Gardener blog.

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