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Posts Tagged ‘plants’

After the Cannon Beach Cottage Tour, we stopped on our way home at Back Alley Gardens and The Natural Nook.  Although it was past closing time, we got to peruse the new plant purchases and autumn displays in this delightful collectors nursery located in Gearhart, Oregon.

It must be (almost) autumn!

It must be (almost) autumn!

plant tables

plant tables

pretty little faces of autumn

pretty little faces of autumn

more cool plants from Xera

more cool plants from Xera

It definitely saved me money that the cash register was closed out because…just look at that little hot pink flower!   They also had some Salvia clevelandii ‘Aromas’…at least that is what I called it back when I had a late blooming sage with intensely fragrant leaves.

a planted potbelly stove

a planted potbelly stove

love the way these have decided to grow on the edge of the plant display table

love the way these have decided to grow on the edge of the plant display table

garden art

garden art

We had a pleasant visit and some good plant talk and stories of public gardening and then Allan and I were on our way.  Crossing the Astoria Megler bridge, a construction stop let us get a great view of the ships.

looking east from the bridge

looking east from the bridge

ship and Astoria

ship and Astoria

stairs at the highest part of the bridge!

stairs at the highest part of the bridge!

Looking northwest, we saw the Peninsula had become almost invisible because of a heavy bank of fog and clouds.  I hoped for a rainy Sunday so I could spend the day blogging about the cottage tour.

toward home

toward home

north on the four mile bridge

north on the four mile bridge

And the rainy day that I wanted is exactly what I got!

I took exactly one photo on Sunday the 15th of the rain out my south window.  I was able to write all day and avoid falling days behind again while posting about the cottage tour.

Sunday rain

Sunday rain; love the big pink cosmos in the garden boat

If I am lucky, Monday will be rainy as well and instead of blogging I just might catch up on paperwork.

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First, a flashback to a few photos from earlier in the week, before and after work:

black Centaurea (perennial cornflower)

black Centaurea (perennial cornflower)

That tall...um..Rubus something?? that I wanted for a long time and now have might be a bit vigourous.

That tall…um..Rubus something?? that I wanted for a long time and now have might be a bit vigourous.

front gate view Saturday as we leave for Doggie Olympic Games

front gate view Saturday as we leave for Doggie Olympic Games

an annual poppy

an annual poppy

a lily in the front garden, admired as we left again to work for an hour in the early evening.

a lily in the front garden, admired as we left again to work for an hour in the early evening.

As always on Saturday morning, we took photos at Ilwaco Saturday Market and uploaded them to Discover Ilwaco. Saturday afternoon, the fun and lively annual Doggie Olympic Games kept us busy taking photos and uploading them well into the evening. Sunday I could not make myself go out into the garden because I was absorbed in uploading the rest of the photos…and it was so hot the cats were sleeping on the cool bathroom counter.

a cool spot when wearing a fur coat

a cool spot when wearing a fur coat

You can see our Doggie photos here; later this summer I may make a post of our favourites from D.O.G. and the upcoming Sand Flea Pet Parade as I did a few years back.

Sunday evening, I finally got out into the garden while Allan bucket watered the Ilwaco planters.  I had felt only mildly guilty all day even though I suspected a cool breeze from the Port might have mitigated the heat. We have worked through all sorts of weather lately without much of a rest, and it felt good to just sit.

I had big plans for my evening session….but remembered that I needed to put some fish fertilizer on the beans and water the greenhouse tomatoes and peppers and plant a few more containers of veg seed.

In looking for another container to use, I disturbed someone.

In looking for another container to use, I disturbed someone.

In the interest of not showing only the pretty things, I did NOT get to weeding this area as I had planned this weekend:

bogsy wood east edge still unweeded

bogsy wood east edge still unweeded

bogsy wood front edge still unweeded!

bogsy wood front edge still unweeded!

I realized one of my favourite garden signs had been sucked in to the salmonberry grove and retrieved it.

sign

Just before going in, I went around and took the kind of pretty picture that shows mostly just the good things. I had some company on the excursion:

Frosty

Frosty

Smokey

Smokey

Mary

Mary

I think this daylily is a keeper.

I think this daylily is a keeper.

and this one?

and this one?

Iris

Iris

and another

and another

Penstemon fallen open in rain and wind

Penstemon fallen open in rain and wind

had to telephoto an annual poppy way in the middle of the garden

had to telephoto an annual poppy way in the middle of the garden

I am loving all my Astilbes.

I am loving all my Astilbes.

another

another

just opening

just opening

another

another

and another

and another

more Astilbe and a Phygelius

more Astilbe and a Phygelius

Clematis 'Etoile Violette'

Clematis ‘Etoile Violette’

Etiole Violette has surpassed my dreams for a beautiful clematis on the arbour leading into the back garden.  Too bad she is never in bloom on a garden tour day.

Pink Campanula

Pink Campanula

Pink Campanula, although a more “cup and saucer” sort which I find very hard to come by, figured large in a bouquet from my past that changed the way I looked at flowers.

On the lawn on Sunday, I found a perfect cap that had blown off the top of an elephant garlic.  I modelled it on a metal crow:

a rakish hat

a rakish hat

But Maddy absolutely refused to wear it for me.

Maddy

 

 

 

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I suspect that yesterday will have been the longest day of our work year, but maybe not, as garden tour month approaches and three of the gardens we have a hand in will be on the tour (on July 20th).

We had much to do yesterday, and our main goal was to get many jobs done and get to Andersen’s RV Park by five to do a lot more weeding before the Sisters on the Fly group starts to arrive this weekend.

Larry and Robert’s garden

We began just down the street at Larry and Robert’s garden with the continuation of changes to their back yard.  

before and after

before and after

We added an Azara microphylla (an excellent small tree with fragrant winter blooms) and some pea gravel and river rock and some edging from materials that were on the property.  I have in the past had an aversion to scalloped edging.  Now I cannot remember why, because I think it looks just grand here.  Now we need some more river rock for against the house and some sort of plant to fill in the narrow border there that is somewhat resistant to three small dogs (nothing too delicate).

Ilwaco intermission

We then planted an Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ in our volunteer garden at the Ilwaco Post Office.

Ilwaco Post Office

Ilwaco Post Office

As we headed out of Ilwaco, the man who sells firewood on 2nd SW waved us down and gave us two hollow rounds of wood that could be used as planters, he said in appreciation of our volunteer work in town.  I told him we do get paid to care for the planters and the boatyard (although the latter did start out as a volunteer project years ago) and that the post office is our only volunteer garden now.  He still insisted we should have the planters.  (He has them for sale sometimes over at 2nd SW and Eagle.)

a garden gift

a garden gift

Might I add, those things are very heavy!

Diane’s garden

Next, we stopped at Diane’s garden and The Red Barn Arena (next door to each other): Allan fertilized the whiskey barrel planters at the barn and Diane’s containers while I deadheaded and weeded along the road.

at Diane's

at Diane’s

That roadside garden clearly needs more plants.  I’ll add some of the inexpensive Dianthus from the Basket Case next time we go there.

Anchorage Cottages

After Diane’s, we went to The Anchorage Cottages where we were requested to prune a branch off of the Ceanothus so that the parking sign for cottage one would show.  The shrub was thick with bees.

Ceanothus

Ceanothus (California Lilac)

Ceanothus (California Lilac)

Even though the bees were gentle, they got pretty agitated when I tried to lop a large branch, so I settled for quickly cutting one small piece and then scampering well back while they swarmed toward me…then…whew!!…resettled on the flowers.

The number one just barely showing.

The number one just barely showing.

Plant emergency of the morning:  thrips on a lily!  Doused it with a cup of mild dish soap well diluted with water.  Fingers crossed.

cured, I hope

cured, I hope

I was reminded of this New Yorker cartoon, long a favourite of mine.

 

george-booth-aphids-on-the-heliotrope-new-yorker-cartoon

Anchorage center courtyard

Anchorage center courtyard

New Dawn rose

New Dawn rose

We did not spend as long there as I would have liked because our mission remained to get to Andersen’s by five.  Our next stop was The Basket Case to pick up some plants for Andersen’s garden shed border which I felt had looked a little bare after the previous evening’s weeding there.  I also got two Lobelia tupa for Sheila as she and Harold are coming to visit us soon!

at the Basket Case, what a deal!

at the Basket Case, what a deal!

Wiegardt Studio Gallery

Next we went all the way up to Nahcotta/Ocean Park to the Wiegardt Gallery where again we went round the garden in haste but I hope effectively.

at Wiegardt Gallery with manager Christl

at Wiegardt Gallery with manager Christl

Allium schubertii

Allium schubertii and albopilosum

Wiegardt

Alliums white and purple

Alliums white and purple

Allium albopilosum and Allium moly 'Jeannine'

Allium albopilosum and Allium moly ‘Jeannine’

front walkway

front walkway

west side of gallery

west side of gallery

It occurs to me that next time we are there, I will take you inside!  Eric Wiegardt is a renowned artist and the gallery is beautiful.

Ocean Park intermission

We were doing well as it was only three o clock, so we had time to stop at Jack’s Country Store for what we call “Jack’s snacks”.   Of such tiny luxuries are happy moments made.

Bliss:  The Jack's Snacks Cooler and my potato salad in the car

Bliss: The Jack’s Snacks deli cooler and my potato salad in the car

I think this is the first time since the beginning of May that we have had time, when at the north end, to stop for a treat.

Next up:  the small entry garden at Oman Builders Supply.  But first, we did a U Turn to get a better look at a garden near Jack’s that is looking fine.  Garden tour next year?

an Ocean Park garden

an Ocean Park garden

driftwood and toadflax

driftwood and toadflax

lupines

lupines and foxgloves

a work in progress

a work in progress

Doing another U turn to get back to OBS, we saw that the poppy garden behind Jack’s is still there.  Jack himself started it, or his wife perhaps, and it is being carried on.

east wall of Jack's

east wall of Jack’s

Oman Builders Supply

After those distractions we got to Oman Builders Supply garden.

OBS garden

OBS garden

Mainly I wanted to make sure that the Eryngiums ‘Jade Frost’ and Lobelia tupa that we had planted last week had no transplant shock.  They were fine.  We could have spent quite awhile deadheading the Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ but more work called to us to keep moving.

The remaining deadheads can wait till next week.

The remaining deadheads can wait till next week.

hebe flowering at OBS

hebe flowering at OBS

Klipsan Beach Cottages

We pulled into our parking area at Klipsan Beach Cottages at a quarter to four.  Still on track for our day’s plan.  I knew the garden would be in good shape and that we could get it done in an hour.

Klipsan Beach Cottages

Klipsan Beach Cottages fenced garden

Allium albopilosum (Star of Persia)

Allium albopilosum (Star of Persia)

Allium schubertii

Allium schubertii

Rose 'Jude the Obscure'

Rose ‘Jude the Obscure’

The names of some of the roses are lost to us!

The names of some of the roses are lost to us!

rose

Last year this one did not open well but this year it looks fine.

Last year this one did not open well but this year it looks fine.

Last year Mary brought back some choice shrubs, and the one below is still in a pot because we have not found the perfect spot for it.  I think it is some kind of callistemon but if I am wrong, perhaps someone will enlighten me.

a recent acquisition

a recent acquisition

One of the two cats put on a charming show for me in the garden.

Sarah, who did get a belly rub

Sarah, who did get a belly rub

The foxgloves are restricting the view of one of the entry signs.

No one can bear to cut them down.

No one can bear to cut them down.

We would have left, as I had planned, by 4:45, but owner/manager Mary and I got into a conversation about Nora’s funeral, and life, and death, and afterlife or not, and walked up to the cottages and back, and so Allan and I did not leave till a little after five.

Corokia cotoneaster

Corokia cotoneaster in late afternoon light

Andersen’s RV Park

At last, we got to Andersen’s at five fifteen.  While Allan planted the new perennials in the garden shed garden, I weaseled out of my least favourite garden task (planting) to discuss with the staff what to do with one of those free planters we had been given in Ilwaco earlier in the day.  Jan came up with a good spot for it, and we waited for Al to return from walking his dog in order to suggest it, because it involved an area for which he had been seeking a design solution.

Al and Chewie return from the beach

Al and Chewie return from the beach

He liked the idea but since his shift was over, another staffer and Allan ended up doing it.   I hope Al was not disappointed the next morning to find it done, because he does like to have a project.  Jan’s idea was so good that it couldn’t wait till morning!

the round hollow wood

the round hollow wood

I snagged three gazania out of planters on the east side of the house where they closed up in the afternoon for lack of sun.

Till eight thirty, Allan and I weeded like mad in the beds behind the office, where the pernicious quack grass had returned; I walked the other beds and planters removing dead bulb foliage.  The results were satisfactory and now, on Monday, all we have to do is a light weeding from one end of the gardens to the other and all will be perfect…at the same time!  This is rare, because as you can probably tell, we have too many jobs to reach that state of glory very often on our larger garden jobs.

behind the office

behind the office

Having time to deadleaf as well as deadhead really makes a garden look perfect.

Buddliea 'Black Night' before...

Buddliea ‘Black Night’ before…

and after picking off yellowed leaves

and after picking off yellowed leaves

If an RVer who is also a gardener camps here, s/he must be pretty impressed with the beauty of the gardens at this time of year in evening light.  Tired though we were, we lingered to take some pictures in the late evening.

poppies and Payson Hall

poppies and Payson Hall

Baptisia (false indigo)

Baptisia (false indigo)

Stipa gigantea, my favourite ornamental grass

Stipa gigantea, my favourite ornamental grass

Stipa and Payson Hall

Stipa and Payson Hall

gold spangles

gold spangles

sunset light

sunset light

On the way out, we swung by the garden shed so I could see the new plants in.  It does look more filled out with the addition of a couple of Gaura ‘So White’, a Cistus, a Phygelius ‘African Queen’ and…something else…I forget what!

garden shed garden

garden shed garden

Al had, earlier in the day, made the gravel path at the very far end look spiffing but it does not show in this photo.

An emergency

Finally we could go home!  As we drove south through Long Beach, I checked my messages on Facebook to get an update from my gardening neighbour (four doors down), Judy.  As I read her fairly reassuring message about her visit to the cardiologist, another message popped up from a client at a commercial establishment.  There were caterpillars all over a shrub, having stripped the leaves, and looking horribly unsightly right next to a venue for an event on Saturday.  Could we come tomorrow (Saturday morning) and cut it down?  I won’t name the business because no one wants to think about horrid caterpillars.  It was on our way home, and Saturday morning was fully booked with events (Saturday market, visiting friends, cash mob) so we had to make an emergency detour with loppers and a chainsaw and cut the shrub (a Leycesteria formosa) to the ground at dusk-thirty.  I felt terrible because a hummingbird was feeding on the flowers; every leaf was gone, but the flowers remained.  One on the other side of the building (away from the next day’s event) was still leafed out, although a bit chewed, and I think the hummer could find it.

In my own garden I would have left the shrub alone to leaf out again, but at a business such ugliness cannot stand, especially if caterpillars are dropping onto customers!

We could not haul the debris.  Nay, would not.  No caterpillars allowed in our work trailer or at the site where we dump.  Fortunately there was a place we could stash the branches till the infestation is gone.

By then it was far too late to blog about such a long day so I made a placeholder entry via my iPhone on the way home…where we collapsed in front of the telly and had a comforting dinner quickly whipped up by Allan and watched Master Chef.  Just before that, as I did the evening spreadsheet on my computer, Allan came in to my office to show me this riding on his shirt.  If anyone knows caterpillars,  perhaps they can tell me what this horrid creature will become.  Nothing nice, I bet.  I shudder to think how many hitched a ride on our clothes.

a garden pest

a garden pest

I am hoping for no more days this long unless they are that long…in my own garden.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Today at the Ilwaco Post Office, the Lollipop Asiatic lilies have popped open.  It is actually not my favourite lily, but I got them for free somewhere, a good price for a volunteer garden.  I will be donating my one remaining Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ because I realized this morning that the post office is lacking one.

Ilwaco post office

Ilwaco post office

We went to Basket Case to pick up three Erysimum for the Ilwaco planters, an Azara microphylla for Larry and Robert, a Lobelia tupa for our own garden, and some Dianthus for Jo’s garden.  I sorted out the Sanvitalia situation.

Sanvitalia, a favourite annual

Sanvitalia, a favourite annual

Sunbini and Aztec Gold

Sunbini and Aztec Gold

Of the two cultivars offered at the Basket Case, I think Sunbini is a little tougher and can hold up better in the truly challenging conditions of the Ilwaco street planters.

Next time we go to the Basket Case, I hope to have room to finally get two hanging baskets for our garden, now that we will have a little more time to water them.  (Who am I fooling? With three gardens to get ready for the garden tour, when will that extra time be?)

Petunia 'Pink Lemonade'

Petunia ‘Pink Lemonade’

Here are the plants I wish people would go buy because they need to be in the ground!  First, ALL the Agastaches would love to have their roots in the soil.  Then, the lovely Sidalcea is getting so tall it is bending over!

Sidalcea...a favourite of my grandma

Sidalcea…a favourite of my grandma

The Lobelia tupa is an exciting plant that it seems no one but me is buying because it is not flowering yet.  The two Brunnera, Looking Glass and Jack Frost are excellent for shade.

Brunneras

Brunneras

There are still some hardy geranium ‘Rozanne’ available.  It has won the Royal Horticultural Society award for plant of the century!  Inspired by Adrian Bloom’s  photo of his river of Rozanne, I now have my own Rozanne river in my garden.  I think one of the reasons I moved to our sunny lot was just so I COULD have a river of Rozanne.

Adrian's Rozanne river, my Rozanne river

Adrian’s Rozanne river, my Rozanne river

His is curving and I like the effect of the grasses so much that, now that I look at his photo, I think I might add some grasses on either side of mine.

On to work!  We had dithered away the morning with sleeping late because of rain, waiting for rain to stop, and shopping.  We had two big projects to accomplish today at Andersen’s RV Park.

At last, on the east side of the house semi-shade bed, my weeding project:

before

before

and after

and after

The west side of the house behind the office was Allan’s project:

before

before

after

after

Allan's before and after set

Allan’s before and after set

There is some newspaper under the mulch to try and keep the pernicious quack grass from coming back too quickly.  Both projects were mulched with Cow Fiber (dairy manure) from The Planter Box.

Meanwhile, energetic park staffer Al was looking for a project, too, so I showed him an awful place in the garden shed garden.  A trench had been dug last year for some sort of plumbing or electrical fix, and had never been filled in because I was never sure the fix-it project was done.  Now we were running out of time to get it looking nice by summer.  I suggested it could be covered with rock, not made back into a garden, and in an amazingly short time Al fixed it.

Al accomplished this in one hour.

Al accomplished this in one hour.

This is a good spot to be graveled because sometimes a rig is parked by here and has to hook up to electric and cable.  I could put a pot here if we ever need a plant in this area.  It was a wonderful quick fix to a very unsightly area, full of quack grass that would have taken back over with a vengeance had I tried to weed it and plant it.

Al also weeded a raised bed with three blueberries in it and has cheerfully agreed to add liquid fertilizer every ten days when it is his shift to water the assorted planters.

Here are some beautiful things:

Allan's photo of Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

Allan’s photo of Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

I don’t know the name of the perennial poppy, below, that I got from Joy Creek nursery but it is just the sort of colour that Lorna most likes.

poppy

poppy

The picket fence garden today

The picket fence garden today

the poppy field, with Al walking by the back

the poppy field, with Al walking by the back

by the office

by the office

Agyranthemum 'Butterfly' and Petunia 'Pink Lemonade'

Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ and Petunia ‘Pink Lemonade’

A quite heavy rain came along at seven, so we went to dinner at the Depot Restaurant.  I had been anxious to see the garden, because I had been told that Susie of the Boreas Inn has taken Ciscoe by there to see it!  We had not checked on it over the weekend because our car was out of order, so I hoped it had looked good.  It did…till I got to the corner by the front door and found a big dead branch on the Cistus.  Oh no!   Allan lopped it off, and here it is, a great embarrassment, in our trailer.

It was really bringing down the tone.

It was really bringing down the tone.

Next Wednesday the Sisters on the Fly club will be at Andersen’s, and now that we have ALL the big clean up projects done at last, we just need one day to weed from one end of the gardens to the other and it will look spiffing.

Even more important, my friends Sheila and Harold will be staying at the park next month on garden tour weekend, and I want the gardens to be impeccable for that happy occasion!

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Our day began with a brief stop at the Basket Case to buy three plants to fill spaces in Long Beach planters.  Of course, we bought a flat of plants once I had walked through a couple of times, including another Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’, so now there are but three left!

Of other plants that I feel are treasures of which only a few are left, you can see (below) on the left, an Azara microphylla, beautiful little tree (one left!) with vanilla or chocolate scented flowers in late winter, and on the right, Thalictrum ‘Black Stockings’ (only a couple left) and a wonderfully crisp looking white Phygelius.

choice selections

choice selections

We then met Nancy, garden tour organizer, at one of the 2013 gardens to get some teaser photos for the Music in the Gardens tour Facebook page, and I was deeply impressed.  I don’t want to give too much away but:

sneaking a peak!

sneaking a peak!

It is one of my favourite kinds of gardens, with room after room, each with a different feel.  It is the sort of garden I especially admire (ironic because of my business!), where all the work is done by the owners.

We tore ourselves away reluctantly.  Allan went to work at Andersen’s RV Park while Nancy and I went south to see two other gardens that would be on the tour.  She was impressed with both.  While at the first garden (Jo’s), I got some birds for Mr. Tootlepedal.

a baby?

a baby?  It could fly.

a hummingbird.  I need to learn how to change the shutter speed on my simple digicam.

a hummingbird. I need to learn how to change the shutter speed on my simple digicam.

Nancy and I then went to the nearby Boreas Inn so I could show her our deer resistant west side garden beds there, and I took the opportunity to show off the inside of the inn, as well.  It is an honour to be associated with such a gorgeous place.  This gave me some different views of the garden.

looking at entry garden from upstairs

looking at entry garden from upstairs (through impressionist screen)

the best west window view, all the way to the ocean

the best west window view, all the way to the ocean

That’s the tree featured in our post about having to clean up after other garden services!  I would drop a couple of feet off the top of it so one is not always fighting it for the view.  Or I would, shockingly, cut it down and plant another Eucalyptus off to the side.  They grow fast and I do love them.

After this pleasant hour or more of goofing off, I rejoined Allan at Andersen’s and we both worked on weeding the big west side garden.

west garden

west garden, 2:28 PM

I had three brainstorms while there.  The first was to widen a path to make it more inviting to walk past the blowsy poppies to the bench, moving rocks and replanting some small poppy seedlings further in to the bed.

in progress

in progress

The second was that the area around the big piece of driftwood should turn back into lawn.  The plants there are infested with couch grass, and it is the last place we get around to weeding.

2:28 PM, a big "before" mess

2:28 PM, a big “before” mess

The very energetic Al is a staffer there who is always looking for a project.  All I had to do was mention my idea to him, and he was off to get the big weedeater.

2:33 PM, "No Sooner Said Than Done" Al.

2:33 PM, “No Sooner Said Than Done” Al.

3:12 PM

3:12 PM

3:23 PM (Payson Hall is in the background)

3:23 PM (Payson Hall is in the background)

I also made a straight rather than curved line at another edge of the west garden, to eliminate a dull and weedy area that would better off as mown grass.

more sensible

more sensible

I hope I am getting older and wiser and not just older and lazier, but it makes sense to remove a few difficult spots in order to put more attention on the beautiful parts of the garden.

west bed, 3:37 PM

west bed, 3:37 PM

Payson Hall planters

Payson Hall planters

picket fence garden

picket fence garden

We made a quick trip to the Planter Box to get one plant (a red Geum) that I needed to balance a Long Beach planter, and while we were there, we picked up some annuals for an area that the inimitable Al had weeded for us earlier that day.  That was so wonderful because the weeding had been on my list of projects and I did not have to do it!

two hardworking Allans

two hardworking Allans

Al hung some floats on the fence that used to be on the driftwood around which he had weedeated, while Allan planted the annuals and I weeded a sweet pea area.  Those two are the two hardest working people I have ever known.

My original plan had been to do Klipsan Beach Cottages and Wiegardt Gallery as well as Andersen’s, but at almost five o clock I decided we should save them for tomorrow and head back south to do the Anchorage Cottages garden….

Anchorage courtyard

Anchorage courtyard

…and plant the rest of the Long Beach plants so I can call that planting project done for 2013!  What an accomplishment.  Every space in every planter is now filled, or so I believe.  I had time to check the block and half of tree and planter gardens that I skipped yesterday so we could go nursery shopping.

under a street tree:  This looks like a conifer, but it is Hebe 'Boughton's Dome'

under a street tree: This looks like a conifer, but it is Hebe ‘Boughton’s Dome’

There are a few street trees under which I would like to add more perennials, perhaps hardy fuchsias.   The tree gardens are a pain to water, so I may have missed the time frame when the plants would easily establish and not need coddling.

7:18 PM, a planter glows with golden marjoram

7:18 PM, a planter glows with golden marjoram

Finally, we weeded the streetside garden at Time Enough Books, long overdue for the removal of tiny grasses.   The difficult to work in light of late evening brought the day to a close….

Time Enough garden, 8:11 PM

Time Enough garden, 8:11 PM

light over the boat storage yard

evening light over the boat storage yard

Home at last, Allan mowed some lawn while I dealt with tomorrow’s plants (for Gene’s garden) and picked up some of the empty flowerpots strewn around the garden.  If we can get Gene’s planting, weeding at KBC and Wiegardt Gallery, and a brief stop at Golden Sands done tomorrow, we can have the next day off!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Today was not a hellish planting day because the batches of plants were small and very few of them were in time consuming and fiddly six packs.

I think we have every garden pretty much planted up now!

We made two stops at the Depot Restaurant, first to assess the situation and plant a couple of Rosemary, then back to plant some more yellow annuals in the east facing whiskey barrel. Still not much going on with the Cosmos other than green growth.

still coming on

still coming on

Then a stop at Gene’s garden to assess how many perennials are needed to fill out the streetside bed, and then on to the nurseries.

At The Planter Box, I got one flat of short cosmos for the Long Beach welcome sign. The Cosmos for sale are looking just wonderful, and I wish people would go buy some to make the whole Peninsula more beautiful. They are my favourite annual.

Planter Box Cosmos

Planter Box Cosmos

I also very much like these annual Coreopsis:

the brown and white one is 'Jive'

the brown and white one is ‘Jive’

We also got some of their annual Salpiglossis (also an unusual find; when it starts to bloom it will sell like mad) and some of their excellent variegated thymes (for the Bolstadt Beach approach).

Then on to The Basket Case, where I admired Rosa mutabilis in bloom…

It is only around $12 in a gallon pot!

It is only around $12 in a gallon pot!

and wondered why no one but me is buying the amazing Lobelia tupa:

Lobelia tupa (Devils' Cardinal Flower), very choice and unusual.

Lobelia tupa (Devils’ Cardinal Flower), very choice and unusual.

There are still many gorgeous baskets. I just don’t have time to think about getting one or more for me right now.

Nancy's basket artistry

Nancy’s basket artistry

On the beach approach, plants from the two nurseries combined to fill up the planters with plants that will take the salt and wind and little water. The one thing they will not survive is people who swipe them, so we hope these will not be too tempting. (Actually, they might survive just fine in a thieves garden, but they are lost to Long Beach and me when that happens.)

beachy planter on the Bolstadt beach approach

beachy planter on the Bolstadt beach approach

We still need more plants in Gene’s Peggy Memorial Garden, but after today’s additions, it is coming along. Soon the flowering will begin and it will be a pleasant surprise for passersby, we hope.

Gene and Peggy's garden

Gene and Peggy’s garden

The one big established plant in the streetside bed is the lavender at the corner. Bees were all over it.

all abuzz with bees

all abuzz with bees

The backside of the Long Beach welcome sign (the side that says “Thank you”) had been showing colour with some Cosmos ‘Sonata’. My big idea of using just Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ for a big yellow show on the front side was not working out yet because the Agyrs were not flowering, so we put 24 cosmos ‘Cutesy’ on the “Welcome” side.

The back was just better, but now they match.  Bulb foliage will be removed soon.

The back was better, but now they match. Bulb foliage will be removed soon.

The annuals on the edge are also slow to bloom this year…so much cold and rain. But I much prefer this for planting weather than the hot spell we had a couple of weeks ago. We are saving lots of time by not having to water everything in.

After our second stop at the Depot Restaurant, we went back up to Jo’s garden in Long Beach to plant just eight more plants, some short Cosmos, three Salpiglossis, a Verbena bonariensis…and dashed away without even a hello and no time to weed. I just wanted to get all the plants in! Doing Jo’s AFTER the Depot meant backing and forthing but we wanted to get the Depot done before they open at five.

At Larry and Robert’s in Ilwaco, we planted pots on their front steps and added some more annuals (Sanvitalia and Salpiglossis) to the boat. There the Cosmos ‘Cutesy’ or ‘Sonata’ are showing a bit of colour.

garden boat

garden boat

Then came about the umpteenth squall of the day, this time a fierce one, so we went home since we were but half a block away and hoped it would pass.

from the garage

from the garage

I passed the time by planting four more tomatoes in my greenhouse, out of the rain. (Planter Box had some nice new ones for sale today.) From the greenhouse door, the sky looked promisingly light around the edges.

to the south and to the west

to the southwest and to the west

You can see it got worse before it got better…but there was that white edge.

I ran out of potting soil and ended up putting a tomato in a pot that once held a Datura. I hope it will be safe to eat!

In the house, a poppy glowed on the kitchen windowsill, promising me the weather was brightening up.

poppy

We decided we had to go back out, and in a light drizzle planted a few perennials in the garden at the west end of Howerton (mostly Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies’). Then down to the east end we went with hopes of weeding that bed at last. Cold wet windy rain ensues so we postponed the job again…

east end...pretty but very weedy.

east end…pretty but very weedy.

The very last three Gauras were slated for the boatyard. We drove down Lake Street and saw the classic “light around the edges” view but still had to plant in the rain.

heading west on Lake

heading west on Lake

With the Gauras in, I gave up on the outdoors and decided to do the very necessary task of transferring a month’s worth of paper plant lists onto spreadsheets for each job. I booted the computer, got myself a cup of tea…and the weather became glorious. Of course.

from my window

from my window

How frustrating! But I knew I had better do the paperwork. Allan offered to go back out and weed that east end garden. By now it was 7. Two hours later, he returned with a report that he got over halfway done….and with much difficult thinking and adding and deciphering my notes, I took the same amount of time to transfer all my scribbled lists.

And now….these are the only plants that remain to be planted:

three artichokes for Leanne, one four o clock for Golden Sands!

three artichokes for Leanne, one four o clock for Golden Sands, one green echinacea for Wiegardt!!

 

 

 

 

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This was not the final day of planting.  There are still some cosmos to plant in Ann’s garden, a very few plants (about ten!) that I want to add to Long Beach, and quite a few plants for my own garden.  But the big planting jobs are all done now. What a relief.

So as we headed to first job, we got our mail and there was a catalog for….bulb planting hell!

bulb catalog with the last big batch of annuals

bulb catalog with the last big batch of annuals

Bulb hell has its own quality, but is easier.  My clients, who have all become friends, and I go in together for bulbs from Van Engelen, and then there are hundreds of bulbs in my garage while I sort out everyone’s order.  And plant them.  With annuals, we keep having to go out to get more, and more, and more, and although plant shopping is enormously fun, it is time consuming and not very lucrative (because it is hard to charge for the time accurately, since much is spent schmoozing about plants, and we don’t resell the plants at a profit because we want all our clients to get the best plants possible and the biggest amount for their budgets!).  Bulbs hell includes the anxiety of getting them all in the ground, despite weather, by early December.

Saturday, we first we planted at the Ilwaco boatyard in increasing drizzle.  Here is another lesson in Round Up weedkiller damage.  A few weeks back the boatyard crew sprayed behind the fence with weedkiller, trying to kill the horsetail.  While the horsetail is still happy as can be, some of the boatyard plants are still blighted by drift.  (The crew boss promises this will not happen again.)

yellowed poppy foliage, happy horsetail

yellowed poppy foliage, happy horsetail

blue globe thistle was hit

blue globe thistle was hit

I feel fortunate at so little damage.  When I have time I will prune out the bad parts.  If the weedkiller had caused as much damage as it did at Marilyn’s garden, where a one foot or more strip on each side of a path was affected by someone spraying Round Up (Am I still brooding about this?  Kinda.), the long, narrow boatyard garden would have been a goner.

The annual poppies seemed particularly susceptible (and you can see how, in this section we have not yet weeded, the horsetail just brayed with laughter and had no damage at all).

 Poppies are a delicate flower.

Poppies are a delicate flower.

The garden looks fine overall.  We planted the newer areas with cosmos and painted sage, and left the center area, three years old, to perennials and reseeded poppies.

newest section

newest section

Our plans to also weed the middle section were thwarted by heavy rain, so we went to Olde Towne Café for lunch and hoped for the weather to lighten.  It didn’t.

weather view from Olde Towne

weather view from Olde Towne

I have set for myself an enjoyable obligation of photographing the Saturday Market for the Discover Ilwaco Facebook page.  Lately, because we have been working Saturdays, Allan has helped by taking photographs, too.  We feel for the market vendors as this is the second bad weather Saturday in a row!  In three previous years of photographing the market (only missed two Saturdays due to garden events!), I don’t remember two dire weeks back to back.

Allan took this from the Port Office deck.

Allan took this from the Port Office deck.

Japanese maples for sale, and Portside Café booth.  (That's the yellow café in whose street planter we plant yellow flowers.)

Japanese maples for sale, and Portside Café booth. (That’s the yellow café in whose street planter we plant yellow flowers.)

a line up of flowers in stone vases

a line up of flowers in stone vases

Allan and I both photographed the spectacular lupines at the Marie Powell Gallery.  His photo is much more clever.

my photo

my photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Those sea thrift (pink, foreground) are a bugger to deadhead later in the year but I love them.

After a wet walk through the market, it was back to work.   We got perhaps the last batch of cosmos for work at The Planter Box, where the tomatoes were irresistibly healthy looking (so I got three):

Planter Box tomatoes

Planter Box tomatoes

They have dozens of quite a few interesting varieties, so get ’em!

At The Basket Case, we picked up some Armeria (sea thrift) to fill in any spaces we might find in the Bolstadt beach approach planters.

Here are three more perennials that I did not mention in my rave review of Basket Case perennials:

Helenium (Helen's Flower)

Helenium (Helen’s Flower)

Basket Case has at least two kinds of Helenium, a tall mid to late summer plant with warm tones of daisy-like flowers.  I got me one of this new one.   These might not even bloom before Fred and Nancy close in midsummer, so only the discerning buyer will realize how great a plant this is.

Eupatorium 'Gateway'

Eupatorium ‘Gateway’

This Joe Pye weed is a little shorter than the others, claiming to grow “only” to five feet, with great big fluffy pink flowers that butterflies love.  My opinion is that it likes lots of summer water.  I adore this plant and bought one even though I probably already have it (but my Joe Pye gets taller than five feet! which might be just because it is mulched with cow fiber!).

There were only a couple of these left yesterday!

Helianthemum

Helianthemum

This orange Helianthemum is ‘Ben Nevis’.  These plants are great for growing on a rock wall.  I have found they do not bloom all summer, but the trailing foliage remains good.  Also comes in pink and yellow; not sure which other cultivars Basket Case has in stock.  I believe The Planter Box also has some cultivars of Helianthemum (rock rose).  Don’t be confused because Cistus (an excellent shrub which Basket Case also carries) is also called rock rose.

Dianthus 'Raspberry Swirl' and 'Fancy Knickers'

Dianthus ‘Raspberry Swirl’ and ‘Fancy Knickers’

Cute names, gorgeous plants.  “Pinks” are not always pink!  These are nice big healthy Dianthus.   I’m getting myself two more Raspberry Swirls if there are any left next time!

The rain continued to fall and we made the decision that we could not finish the weeding at Andersen’s RV Park this weekend.  We feel that to work in rain, with dripping raincoats, just makes vacationing guests feel sad for us and brings down the jolly weekender feeling!   We hope the guests there will see the pretty things (all the planters and containers are looking great, and plants well outnumber weeds in the garden beds).  I am too tired to give up my two days off because of not meeting the Andersen’s goal that I had set for us.

Allan also said he felt it was more important to check on the beach approach planters because more foot traffic walks by them, so we did.  We quickly used up the perennials we had bought for the Bolstadt approach planters (six Armeria, two Santolina ‘Lemon Fizz’) and found space for about eight more tough perennials which we will buy and add later this week.

Allan weeding the Lisa Bonney memorial planter

Allan weeding the Lisa Bonney memorial planter

One of the planters surprised me with this beautiful columbine!

One of the planters surprised me with this beautiful columbine!

not as miserable a job as it looks because the weather was not cold...

not as miserable a job as it looks because the weather was not cold…or windy

The beach approach garden is weedy again, of course!  But when we get around to doing it again, it will not be as miserable a job as the first weeding of the year.

beach approach, west end

beach approach, west end

Adorably, the Armeria (sea thrift) has reseeded at the end of the lawn.  I have read that it grows wild on the sea cliffs in Wales.

sea thrift

sea thrift

approach garden looking west

approach garden looking west

looking east; rugosa roses about to bloom

looking east; rugosa roses about to bloom

rugosa roses in bud

rugosa roses in bud

The rugosa roses are thuggish and a pain to weed around, but they will earn their keep from now till frost, first with flowers of pink, magenta, or white, and then with big orangey red hips.  They are also known as “The Tomato Rose” because of the size of the hips (about which some tourists ask us, “Are those tomatoes?”) and “The Salt Spray Rose” because they can take beachy conditions.

Dianthus in a beach approach planter, at least seven years old.

Dianthus in a beach approach planter, at least seven years old.

and a hardy geranium

and a hardy geranium

rain brings the colours out

rain brings the colours out

I wish the volunteers, back in the day, had not planted chocolate mint in the easternmost planter.

why?

why?

It has choked out the other plants, except for dog daisies.  Someone in passing commented to me last year how lush and wonderful the planter used to be.  Well…yes, before someone stuck the mint in there and it got well established.  The Nepeta (catmint, not a mint, not invasive) is buried with just one flower showing.

mint vs. catmint: no contest

mint vs. catmint: no contest

With about fifty of these planters to care for, we redo poorly planted old ones at a rate of maybe two a year.  We might eventually get to this one, which would involve having to dig it out, soil and all, and start over…or we might just decide the mint is fragrant and has a pretty flower and just let it be mostly one thing.

We were still in the rain as we left the beach approach for our next job.

the Long Beach arch

the Long Beach arch

We had some plants for the tiny World Kite Museum garden on the Sid Snyder Beach approach.  While Allan weeded it, I walked the approach and weeded the seven planters along its north side.  I must admit some of the weeding was just cosmetic because we had much still to do and it was six o clock.

Kite garden with Cosmos 'Cutesy', painted sage, one one sanguisorba added to the remaining perennials.

Kite garden with Cosmos ‘Cutesy’, painted sage, one one sanguisorba added to the remaining perennials.

There seems to be a big fail in the volunteer mowing, in that it does not include weed-eating, apparently!   We are not really in the weedeating business, but last year after declining to hand weed all along the shrub border, below, we did weed eat it a few times.  I think we will have to step up to weed eat around our little garden, as well.

the shrub parking lot border, which we most decidely do not have time to weed.

the shrub parking lot border, which we most decidely do not have time to weed.

The soil in the tiny flower garden was weird in spots.  When we redid it last year, we mulched with some bagged soil amendments.  Over the winter, it has turned into a weird rooty sawdusty substance in some areas and despite the rain was very dry.  Where are the roots coming from?  They are definitely roots, not fungi.  It is odd.  I pulled some out to have a good look.

weird and unsettling

weird and unsettling

Surely the escallonia on one side or hebe on the other could not be encroaching with this many roots?

We hope to take a yard of cow fiber up to Marilyn’s garden soon to mulch the edges where we had to replant (due to round up, blah blah blah!) and I will save out a few buckets full for this garden.  It could take about a half an inch of mulch.

Next we went back down to Ilwaco.  We stopped at the boatyard to photograph some boats for Discover Ilwaco, and I pondered the amount of horsetail in the middle area where we have not yet weeded.

oh dear, oh dear

oh dear, oh dear

One hopes the two well weeded ends of the garden will keep passersby happy.

in the boatyard

in the boatyard

We finally did the last of Saturday’s planting at the Port of Ilwaco office garden with some Cosmos ‘Cutesy’, since we want the flowers to remain short in order to show off the Basket Case baskets that hang above.  Or maybe I should still add a very few salpiglossis.

port office garden

port office garden

There are some tiny little seedling that we are leaving in the garden till I figure out what they are.  I usually can identify seedlings….but these look like painted sage, which is unlikely as I had never planted it here, nor do I ever find it to re-seed this prolifically.

my favourite perennials, Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue', in the port office garden

my favourite perennials, Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’, in the port office garden

Basket Case plants above and below

Basket Case plants above and below

just south of Port Office garden

just south of Port Office garden

Rain had stopped!  The gardens on the Howerton side of the office glowed with California poppies.

Howerton gardens

Howerton gardens (photo taken earlier in the day)

Finally, at 8 PM, we weeded the gardens at the east end of Howerton.  What had caught my eye when driving past earlier were the dead leaves (now picked off) on the Eryngium there.

bad leaves now plucked!

bad leaves now plucked!  This was caused by the hot spell around Mother’s Day.

Howerton by Queen La De Da's Art Castle

Howerton by Queen La De Da’s Art Castle

The Howerton garden that was most recently done (below) is the very westernmost one;  it was filled in with plants divided from other areas, and they will size up to fill the space but maybe it needs a little something more to be added.

perhaps a few more wind tolerant perennials...

garden to right….perhaps a few more wind tolerant perennials…

Along with Andersen’s RV Park, we did not get to the weeding at the Howerton garden section at the very west end of the street.  And both will have to wait because, having caught up with this blog, I am about to commence on two days off.  (I can feel that Howerton Street weeding project tugging at me, but I will try to resist.)

When I get my own cosmos and painted sage, container plants and perennials,  planted in my own garden, I will officially declare Annuals Planting Hell 2013 over!

I have worked 18 days in a row and Allan has worked 20.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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