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Sunday, 12 March 2017

Because we had a political meeting in Naselle this afternoon, we had decided to leave home in time to drive half an hour further and visit a museum in Skamokawa.

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driving along the Columbia River

I was not best pleased that it was a beautiful day and would have been excellent for weeding the boatyard garden.

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two wrecks?

Here is what the white remnant of a boat looked like in 1995, in the same little bay:

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For some reason, it had been deemed unsalvageable.

As we drove along, I pondered the fact that the many conifers along our roads are why our landscapes look more somber than the airier ones that Mr Tootlepedal photographs in Scotland.

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scenery heavy with evergreens

We arrived at our destination in Skamokawa: Redmen Hall, which I had read was hosting an exhibit about tugboats and steamers on the Columbia.

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The view from the parking lot

A back door offered easy access without all those stairs…and a disheartening sign.

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NOOOOOOOO

Across the highway, below, is a general store and café where we have stopped before.  I thought that, because of Skamokawa being such a small town, I might luck into a museum docent there.

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looking down on the grocery store and post office

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Redmen Hall from below

In a room right on the river, behind the store, an antiques sale was on for the day.

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antiques in a light filled room

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I used to have an apple like this till my good friend Sophie (a dog) broke it…for which she was forgiven.

I found two things to buy.  One is a present so I cannot show it!

And sure enough, when I mentioned having driven from Ilwaco to find the museum was closed, I learned that one of the docents was ill, and another one offered to open it for us.

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behind the store/café

Off the deck by the store, a boater was buzzing around.  I am sure Allan wished he was out boating, too.

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Allan’s photo

We followed the docent back up to Redmen Hall.  The hall was once a school house.  Amazingly, it used be down where the highway is.  When the road was put through, the building got moved up the hill with “steam donkeys” (not really donkeys!).

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The old school house remembered.

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Allan went straight up to the bell tower. (I did not.)

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Step on a pedal to open the shutters for the view.

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The views from the bell tower.

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river town from high above (and a boat ramp)

On the second floor, well designed historical panels go all around the walls of a big open room.

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What Skamokawa means

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interpretive panels

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the kind docent who let us in.  The way the panels are put together reminds me of my grandma’s scrapbooks.

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when the road went through

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a dance where “ladies may walk on their partners feet, and no questions will be asked”.

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another strong woman

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river pictures (Allan’s photo)

A glass case held birds provided by the Audubon Society…

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an erstwhile Mr Grumpy had fine plumage.

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the view

We dropped a contribution into the money jar and also spent a pretty penny in the well -stocked gift shop, including two books (quiet, because one is a present), a documentary called Work is Our Joy (about gillnetting), and some notecards.  If we’d had time, we could have watched Work is Our Joy right in the museum.  I will enjoy it from my comfy chair at home.  I already identify with the title.

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One of three nooks of books.

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Well represented: the books of Grays River author Robert Pyle

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Musician Doug is the spouse of our friend Beth; they live nearby but we had had no time to look them up.

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river town art

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most of our purchases

The hall is open Thursdays through Sundays from noon to four.  We recommend a visit.

We had a little over half an hour to to get back to our Indivisible meeting in Naselle.  I could not resist a side trip to the historic 1905 Grays River covered bridge.

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on the way

Tying in with our visit to Redmen Hall: author Robert Michael Pyle lives in a house with a view of the covered bridge.  I thought it would be kind of nosy to add a photo of his house, so here is the bridge.

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under the bridge (Allan’s photo)

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The river running fast and high.  (Allan’s photo)

In particularly stormy times, the river has flooded the valley.

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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Here we go.

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the other end

Before we turned around, I had to get a closer look at two trees beside  the parking area.

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going in for a closer look

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moss and licorice fern

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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assorted critters

Ooops.  I suddenly realized time had slipped by and we would be 25 minutes late to the meeting at Hunters Inn, Naselle.  I told myself that it was ok; we have been to almost every liberal political meeting available since November so we could be late to just one.

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part of the gathering

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postcards laid out on three booths

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One member brought this.

We discussed, shared ideas, and laid some plans for future events.

On the way home, Allan and I detoured to look at a garden we had admired when attending last month’s meeting.

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The garden in question is next door to Naselle Timberland Library. (Allan’s photo)

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lots of narcissi about to bloom (Allan’s photo)

Next door: a large garden which I intend to look at every time we have a Naselle meeting.

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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pieris and the church next door

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Right across the street sits another charming house.

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I wonder if there will be sweet peas on that fence in summer. Or that could be a dog path!

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wrap around porch

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a tree with personality

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Allan’s photo

As we got close to home, I looked at the weather forecast and must admit I did begin to fret about losing what might be the only nice gardening day this week.  Remembering that we now have light till after 7 PM (yay for daylight saving time!), I resolved to get two hours work done in my own garden.

While clipping some Joe Pye weed, I gave an experimental dig at a large fuchsia.

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one of two many fuchsia magellanica

To my surprise, it shifted, so Allan helped me pull it out.

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after…Ok, he pulled, I watched and encouraged.

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project: clean up middle bed, before…

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and after

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Woe!! One of two matched asophedels has disappeared from the right hand pot.

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I will snag this asphodel from a different pot.

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Frosty

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bogsy wood swale

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Oh for more time in the garden; so much to do.

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Skooter obsessing about the frogs.

The unfortunate forecast:

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Resolved: no more daytime meetings on nice days till we have spring clean up done!

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Saturday, 11 March 2017

I can tell you the library joke now, shared by Maggie Stuckey at her talk two days ago.  I found a version online:

A chicken walks into the library. It goes up to the circulation desk and says: “book, bok, bok, boook”. The librarian hands the chicken a book. The chicken tucks it under her wing and runs out. A while later, the chicken runs back in, throws the first book into the return bin and goes back to the librarian saying: “book, bok, bok, bok, boook”. Again the librarian hands over a book, and the chicken runs out. The librarian shakes her head. Within a few minutes, the chicken is back, returns the book and starts all over again: “boook, book, bok bok boook”. The librarian gives her yet a third book, but this time as the chicken is running out the door, the librarian follows. The chicken runs down the street, through the park and down to the riverbank. There, sitting on a lily pad is a big, green frog. The chicken holds up the book and shows it to the frog, saying: “Book, bok, bok, boook”. The frog blinks, and croaks: “read-it, read-it, read-it”.

Bad weather made me happy today because we had an afternoon meeting: an ACLU training session focused on supporting undocumented immigrants.

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The Long Beach welcome sign today

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both sides

On the way, we ran a couple of errands in Long Beach.  I was started to see that the planter just north of Dennis Company has been completely browsed by deer.

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The planter looked raggedy.

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every tulip nipped by deer

I am beginning to wonder if any place in Long Beach is safe for tulips.  I just hope they don’t take a liking to the tulips in the welcome sign garden.

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container outside the Adrift meeting room (Allan’s photo)

People Power ACLU meeting

Today’s ACLU  meeting was one of 2000 simultaneous watching parties across the country, with 200,000 people signed up to attend a broadcast of the actual live meeting in Florida.  We had 22 in attendance, one all the way from Westport.  We all appreciate Adrift Hotel providing the meeting room for free.

Since the election, membership in the ACLU has swelled from 400,000 to 1.2 million members (including me).

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sign in and cookies

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Resistance Training on the big screen

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discussion time afterward (A few folks had departed.)

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It saddened me to hear, again, that there have been immigration raids on at least five local families, with fathers taken away.  These are men who are known to be hardworking good folk, certainly not the stereotypical “criminal”. It is difficult and can take years to become documented, especially for folks from Mexico and Central America; it is not a matter of laziness or wanting to be “illegal”. (By the way, it is considered much kinder to refer to someone as “undocumented” rather than “illegal”.)  Many folks in the room had grandparents who were immigrants, in one case, by illegally stowing away on a ship.  Mine on my mother’s side were immigrants (and invaders)…of the Mayflower type.
If you would like to watch the presentation that we saw today, it is said to soon be available for viewing right here.

“Even when we lose we must not despair, for there is dignity in entering this battle”, said ACLU executive director Anthony Romero.

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“As DT is going about his amendments of hate, we need to live our love”, said Faiz Shakir, ACLU political director.

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Allan’s photo

We heard three other speakers as well, Louise Melling (deputy legal director), Andre Segura (an ACLU attorney), and Padma Lakshmi, a star of Top Chef,whose mother was an immigrant and who said “I want my daughter to live in a country of compassion, not fear.”

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I fell in love with audience member Daisy. (Allan’s photo)

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so soft

This is all going to lead to a whole ‘nother set of meetings, all with a productive and well informed agenda.

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the beachy view from our meeting room

at home

By the time we got home, we had an hour and a half of daylight and a cessation of rain and wind.  Some front garden clean up was suddenly possible.

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before

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Skooter inspects, 20 minutes later.

That was a favourite sit spot for Skooter.  He may have liked it better before.

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before

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after, much weeding still to do. I look forward to it.

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hellebore

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Clematis ‘Freckles’ has been blooming on west garage wall all winter.

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narcissi

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Skooter’s way in (where a bottom piece is missing)

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front path looking east

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hellebores

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the floppiest hellebore

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double white hellebore

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“black” hellebore…with mulch of last autumn’s apples

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Pieris finally sizing up and blooming (left)

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Iris histroides ‘Frank Elder’

Because it was at the same time as the ACLU training, we missed today’s postcard party.  Here are a couple of photos (by Michele) of the latest efforts.  You can stop reading now if you don’t like the postcard efforts, because they comprise the end of today’s post:

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ingredients

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Bannon is the most terrifying of all…

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Dang! I wish I’d been there.

Tomorrow (Sunday): an Indivisible meeting which we are planning to combine with a brief and, we hope, photogenic side trip to Skamokawa.

 

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Monday, 6 March 2017

I woke to sunshine and thought we could work…until I took a look out the window.

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view out the south cat door

Never mind.

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Skooter, staying in.  (Allan’s photo)

Allan took some snowy garden photos:

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I see a black spotty hellebore leaf that should be removed.

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hypericum

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When he went to the post office and dropped off three books at the library, he took more photos of the community building garden’s crocuses.

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Meanwhile, I was reading.

IMG_0352.JPGIt was difficult to leave the book for an early evening meeting of the Living Liberally Pacific County group.  I had only heard of Swallows and Amazons in the past year and was recently reminded of it by a mention on the Tootlepedal blog. 

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At Adrift Hotel in Long Beach


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Folks barbecuing nearby in icy wind.


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determined to wrest all enjoyment from their vacation


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into the meeting room we go

After another productive political meeting, Allan and I repaired upstairs to the [pickled fish] restaurant.

I’d been wanting to try absinthe for some time, because I’m a fan of artemisias in the garden.  It is made from Artemisia absinthium, which you can read about here. [pickled fish] serves it “in the traditional way”, involved a decanter, a spigot, and the melting of a sugar cube.

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absinthe: licorice, sweet, strong


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delicious fennel sausage pizza

Upon departure, I was especially struck by the beauty of the planters in the foyer.  Perhaps the absinthe enhanced my appreciation.

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some artemisia (but not absinthium)

Swallows and Amazons

During the day and into the night I read Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome.  How did I miss this 1930 classic as a child, especially since I had then sought out British children’s book authors (like Edith Nesbit and C.S. Lewis)?  As I read today, I occasionally felt verklempt about being old.

A few favourite bits from this delightful adventure of children camping on an island in the Lake District:

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…….

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……..

Oh, to have a mother as open to her children having adventures:

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…………….

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I have learned that the book is the first of a series.  I will be reading more of them.

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public service announcement

Maggie Stuckey, author of one of my favourite kitchen gardening books, The Bountiful Container, is going to be speaking at all four Timberland libraries on the subject of vegetable gardening in containers.  While I would most like to attend the talk at our local Ilwaco branch, it conflicts with an ACLU training session, so we will go to the Ocean Park one.  Allan took this photo at the library today.

 

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Thursday at Ocean Park, Saturday at Ilwaco

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Saturday, 4 March 2017

In the early afternoon, we crossed the Astoria Megler Bridge and joined a roomful of like minded folk for an Indivisible North Coast Oregon meeting.

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a darling small house by where we parked (Allan’s photo).  A sunny garden in front would have no privacy, though.


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Allan’s photo, on the way

Astoria was parked up because of a winter brewery festival. We walked two blocks in the rain, passing one of my favourite little gardens on the way to the Fort George Brewery meeting room.

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Allan’s photo

This ornately fenced garden is built by piling soil (now mulched with washed dairy manure) on top of pavement.

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Allan’s photo


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Allan’s photo: tulip foliage, and pigeon pecking in the manure

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a goodly crowd


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Allan’s photo


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Allan’s photo


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a neat driftwood thing

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Some thoughts from the meeting:

Indivisible is opposed to the ABC of authoritarianism, bigotry, corruption.

A speaker advised that we send postcards to politicians…”even a picture postcard works because I think they stand out,” she said.  This made me smile because of our recent art postcard parties.

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an example from one of our postcard parties

A woman from Germany spoke, saying “who would have thought a little painter from Austria could have killed millions” and she asked, “How could my people not see this coming, how could they look away?”  She said “My life is a series of attempts to make up for the crimes of my ancestors”.  When she goes to a protest, her thought when seeing a photographer is: Is he from the newspaper or from Homeland Security?  She believes she sees the early signs of fascism.  Right here is her recommended reading on the subject.

The following speaker quoted this: “What you would be doing in 1930s Germany is what you are doing now.”

Action item: A member of KMUN radio asks that we write to or call members of the Senate Committee on Appropriations asking that public radio continue to be funded.  Small rural stations like Astoria’s KMUN depend on federal funding far more than city stations do.

Afterwards, we were encouraged to sign up if we had interest in particular topics (education, environment, immigration, health care, equal rights).DSC06882.JPG).

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Allan took the opportunity to buy a women’s march copy of the Daily Astorian.

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Afterwards, we walked by the Fort George Brewery’s lower garden, also freshly mulched.  The ornamental grasses have been cut back since last time we went to the Blue Scorcher Café next door.

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Fort George garden

We walked by the temptations of the Blue Scorcher because we wanted to try out a new restaurant in Seaside, Oregon.

In Seaside, it was too wet and miserably windy to walk around and look at Pam Fleming’s city gardens.

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drive by photo

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Allan’s photo


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a new restaurant (Allan’s photo)


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Allan’s photo

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a warm and simple place


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Allan’s photo


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something so sweet on the menu


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many choices

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I had to try the cauliflower appetizer, hoping that it would be similar to the zahra from Seattle’s Mediterranean Kitchen…and it was.

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Allan’s chicken sandwich

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The tasty baba ganoush had pickled on it; I just put them to one side because I’m not used to that.  All food is made fresh so I bet I could ask for no pickles next time, and there will be a next time.

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the turnaround at the end of Broadway


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Pam’s garden on the turnaround (Allan’s photos)

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We shopped at Costco.  Wouldn’t this elaborate plastic apple container make an interesting little seedling greenhouse?

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stormy crossing of the Columbia on the way home: freighters at anchor, waiting


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light snow and fog on the hills on the Washington side of the bridge


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in the dusk, golden daffodils that someone once planted on the hillside

According to the weather forecast, we are due for several days of bad weather, possibly even light snow.  I will not mind reprising staycation.

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Friday, 3 March 2017

If you don’t enjoy progressive politix, you might want to skip this one, because that’s all we have on offer today other than some faux chickens at the very end.

In shockingly cold and windy rain, we drove north to the Naquaiya Studio for the pleasure of participating in a postcard party.

Part of the mission is a mass mailing to the preznit in mid March, coordinated from liberal groups all over the country.  Perhaps all it will do is inspire us.  I don’t expect it to change anything. The meetings are productive in another way as we have excellent conversation throughout.

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An excellent time was had by all.


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a studio filled with art

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me, Judy, and Yudy.

My mind is still boggled by how much Yudy looks and talks and laughs like a Judy I used to know.  The resemblance makes me smile every time.

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fuel

This ongoing group effort by local artists is all old folks, as far as I know.  I am especially pleased with how punk rock the postcards are.

Michelle had printed out all sorts of bits of topical text that she calls “pasties” to add to postcards.  She observed that the news changes so fast that some of them are outdated already.

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inspirational notes:

hope

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Yudy’s ideas for wording


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Yudy’s cards of the day


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a beauty, made by Carole

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also by Carole


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another by Carole

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by Carole’s friend

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Carole’s friend made these with a nice cut out for inserting the address.

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by a postcard-er with a beloved transgender family member


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four cards, fronts


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backs

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Seniors are mad!

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fronts


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backs

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backs

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These original pieces, by someone who wasn’t in attendance today, were especially interesting to me.

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face

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I just the straightforward simplicity of these to the point messages.

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woman

He has said so many terrible things about women.

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I am using seed catalogs to assemble postcards, so mine are pretty pretty.  Two of them are planned to be thank you notes for politicans who are defending the EPA.

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Whoever in government defends the environment next gets this one.

On the way home, Allan and I stopped at Dennis Co for a remarkably cheap sale on Rustoleum spray paint…not for graffiti, mind you, but for the repainting of my bamboo poles.

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Dennis Company store display

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Tomorrow, more politics, possibly mixed with a delicious lunch in Astoria.  I have a sad on that I might miss the next postcard party because of an ACLU training session.  These parties do my heart and energy good.

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Saturday, 25 February 2017

We had the pleasure of lunching at Salt Pub with two regular blog readers and Facebook friends, Lizanne and Gina.

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Allan’s photo

Over lunch, one topic of conversation was real estate, as I had been haunted by the idea of looking at the dreamy four-lot property up north.  Just before we ate, I arranged to do so.

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view from Salt Pub


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nachos


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pub burger

After lunch, I returned the excellent advance copy of Radium Girls to Karla at Time Enough Books…

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and after a quick stop at home to grab our postcard making kit, we joined Lizanne and Gina to prowl around the exterior of a darling house for sale in Seaview.

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Lizanne, me, Gina


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dreamy Seaview

Gina is of Snooter-Doots fame and is a favourite afar of our cats because she made their catnip Kitty Karrots.

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tiny Seaview cottage called Shoebox Inn


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We cared for the garden once a year, several years ago.

Since Allan and I were heading north to look at the enticing property for sale, we decided to join the last half hour of a post card party in progress at Naquaiya Studio in Ocean Park.

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narcissi at the art studio (Allan’s photo)

  This blog is a faithful retelling of the quotidian lives of two working class gardeners, including the non gardening bits.  Some days are focused on non gardening activities, moreso lately. 

The postcard event is an offshoot of Indivisible.  Its main focus is a mass mailing of protest postcards to Preznit DT in mid March.  It may have no effect but to strengthen our resistance, and that is enough to make it worthwhile.  And the conversation among a group of fierce old woman is satisfying.  Like Lawrence O’ Donnell, we hope for impeachment, or perhaps resignation, and that he’ll take white nationalist Steve Bannon with him when he goes home to his luxurious life as a citizen.

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The creative party had been going strong for 2 1/2 hours before we got there with impressive results.  I may have blurred out a word or two for those with the most delicate of sensibilities:

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Good job, postcard artists.

I concentrated in my brief half hour on my own little idea: To send a postcard of thanks to the Associated Press, Time Magazine, and USA today for refusing to attend a press conference in which the NY Times, CNN, and other news outfits were denied entrance. Allan made three postcards, as well.

I do hope that someone at a office desk will get some pleasure and amusement from them.

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Allan’s and mine

Our friend and artist Joe Patina had been leaving as we arrived.  He’d left behind a pile of vintage postcards which are much to lovely to go to DT.  I am in the process of photographing them to share on my Grandma’s Scrapbooks blog.

Now it was time to drive north and get a look inside the tall gates we had peered over on Friday.  That will be tomorrow’s post.

Afterwards, on the way home in the late afternoon, we saw swans on Black Lake.

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Allan’s photo

I noticed Lake Street looking colorful.

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While I blogged, Allan string trimmed the garden bed edges and gathered up and cut to firewood size the fallen branches of the winter.

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hellebore, dogwood, alder fall


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an animal path going into the south end of Nora’s garden next door.

Tomorrow: an artist’s haven for sale

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Saturday, 14 January 2017

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On another cold and icy day, we headed out. with a stop at the post office three blocks east.

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I decided the gaura MUST be trimmed.  We just had time.

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Our destination was mid-Peninsula to one of my favourite gardens.

Of course, I took a self guided garden tour as soon as we arrived.

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a netting of old nasturtiums

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a side view of the Imperial Chicken Palace

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around the other side of the house

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some of the girls

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The round table was one made for the glorious Pink Poppy wedding in summer 2014.

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for fungus lovers

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old swingset beanpole

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viewing platform

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The painting party was taking place in the garage.

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Young Luna had been booted out for getting in the way.

And so I joined the painting party, where Allan was already at work.

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sad this is blurry…you get the idea. Stoopid camera.

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Allan’s photo

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The mom of a rabble rousing millennial

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and a millennial’s dad (Allan’s photo)

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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mine


mine…but I can only carry one  

Still trying to decide on a slogan for the other side of the above…”Tax The Rich, We Don’t Want to Have to Eat Them” or the more placid “Bridges Not Walls.”
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Allan’s (both sides)

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my favourite sign of all

On the way home, we took some photos at NIVA green for the shop’s Facebook page.

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proprietor Heather Ramsay

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one of Heather’s lamps

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a piece by our good friend Joe Chasse!

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by Joe Chasse.  The mouth moves and the plaque says “I just came in for a sandwich.”

Now…two days of reading can ensue before a busy six days begins.

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I started this last night.  It was oft referred to in Modernity Britain by David Kynaston.

Reminder about Wednesday’s lecture, at 6:30 PM (get there early!). It is sure to be good—Debbie has been a speaker on the main stage at the Northwest Flower and Garden Show.

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“There’s no feeling quite like cooking with home-grown carrots or grabbing a fresh handful of cilantro from your own yard. Well, unless you’re growing fruits, vegetables, or grains for brewing that is. Debbie Teashon is a freelance garden writer, author, and award-winning photographer from Kitsap Peninsula, WA. Articles and photographs of Teashon’s work have appeared in magazines such as Fine Gardening, West Sound Home and Garden, Master Gardeners, and The Oregonian among others. She has gardened most of her adult life and written about it for over two decades.

Join Teashon as she discusses her latest book, Gardening for the Homebrewer, as it brings an introduction to the wide variety of plants that you can use for fermentations or infusions. In her experience as a gardener, she writes to help explain if your yard is a perfect site for barley or whether it’s better suited to a fragrant collection of herbs. Teashon spends her time gardening, taking classes or researching plants for articles and the online plant database she maintains on Rainy Side Gardeners (www.rainyside.com), a website to help gardeners in the Pacific Northwest.”

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