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Posts Tagged ‘poly tunnels’

August 10, 2013

I am certainly not tired of seeing photos of Pink Poppy Farm, even though this was the fourth time I had been there in a little over a month.

From the Edible Tour program:  Allow yourself time to explore this expansive, one acre country garden where edibles and flowers grow in harmony. Hens live happily in “The Imperial Chicken Palace.” Meandering through the property you will find two “and a quarter” poly tunnels that grow food for the family, the Pink Poppy Bakery market booth, and a few CSA boxes.  Masters of edible landscapes, the owners have lived and worked on the grounds for 19 years.  The garden is full of clever ideas for watering, fencing, and decor.

As usual, folks gathered by the gorgeous Imperial Chicken Palace.

Garden owner Mike Dickerson conferring with tour organizer Lisa Mattfield

Garden owner Mike Dickerson conferring with tour organizer Lisa Mattfield

looking east

looking east

Japanese anemone; this garden has room for thugs.

Japanese anemone; this garden has room for thugs.

One thug Lynn says she deeply regrets introducing is Aegopodium (bishops weed, ground elder) which came in with a plant and has run rampant.

squash

squash

entering the medium poly tunnel

entering the medium poly tunnel (Patty, Lynn Dickerson, Deanette, Lisa, Mike Dickerson

Lynn Dickerson and Deanette

Lynn Dickerson and Deanette

lettuce

lettuce

Even with all their space, I find it interesting that they grow lettuce in containers.  I find it much easier to do as one is somewhat less likely to find a slug on it.

pp

colourful kale

colourful kale

looking toward the big poly tunnel

looking toward the big poly tunnel

I love the arbour with nasturtiums on top.

I love the arbour with nasturtiums on top.

the big poly tunnel

the big poly tunnel

inside

inside

looking out the west door

looking out the west door

tomatoes, etc,  growing tall

tomatoes, etc, growing tall

The Dickersons pick a lot of leaves off their tomatoes.  I started doing this in my little greenhouse, as well.

Lynn shows Deanette the tiniest poly tunnel

Lynn shows Deanette the tiniest poly tunnel

sunflowers

sunflowers

shed on north side of garden

shed on north side of garden

 o so clever swing set bean support

o so clever swing set bean support

back to the house

back to the house

steps to the house level

steps to the house level

There were several guests there, family members as I recall, to help with prep for the garden tour.

prepping

prepping on the patio; pretty sure this is Lynn’s mum come to help

ingredients for garden art

ingredients for garden art

a gathering of gardeners

a gathering of gardeners

ppbeans2

ppbeans

garden discussion

garden discussion

more discussion and garden admiration

more discussion and garden admiration (Allan, Patty, Deanette, Lynn)

How I love this garden!  But we had to move on with two more garden for the group to see and then two more for Allan and I to visit for photos (while I mildly wondered if I really felt our own garden was perfectly ready for tour day tomorrow).

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Aug 7, 2013

Every year, Ann S’s garden club from Vancouver, Washington comes to the Peninsula for a post-Music in the Gardens tour.  Usually Ann picks her favourite gardens on tour day and asks the owners if she can come back in three weeks, on a weekday.  This year, she herself was unable to make the big tour, so I decided to take the day off and go with the group to most of the gardens that were on the tour.  (Last year, Ann’s own bayside garden was on the Music in the Gardens tour.)

Allan dropped me off at Ann’s house, where the group came down the stairs sounding like a flock of exotic birds.  Off we went in three vehicles to Marilyn and Nancy’s “healing garden”.  Nancy was there when we arrived (left in photo below); as owner of the wonderful Depot Restaurant, she knew that the group would be having a delicious meal there at the end of the day.

The garden club at Marilyn's

The garden club at Marilyn’s

at Marilyn's

at Marilyn’s, noticing the variegated Knautia ‘Thunder and Lightning’

This variegated thyme also caught their eye.

This variegated thyme also caught their eye.

Of course, the painted sage was a hit, as always.

Of course, the painted sage was a hit, as always.

I made sure to take them next door to see the great outdoor fireplace made by the neighbour’s son.    The ladies loved this.

I made sure to take them next door to see the great outdoor fireplace made by the neighbour's son.

Don’s fireplace, built by his son.  Don is on a ladder at upper left.

We next drove south to Pink Poppy Farm, where we were greeted by garden owner Lynn who had a little time before going to work.  In the circle garden inside the front gate, a flower was admired.  A friend had given Lynn the seeds, and she gave me some.  She said she was told it is a “South African pearl daisy…Arctotis grandis”.

cool plant

cool plant

As always happens, I saw new details in the garden this time around, like this pile of ingredients as one comes around the side toward the chicken palace.

good stuff

good stuff

Of course, the garden club was wowed by the Imperial Chicken Palace.

new container holder in front of chicken palace

new container holder in front of chicken palace

clever idea for attractive display of big plastic pots

clever idea for attractive display of big plastic pots

The Imperial Chicken Palace

The Imperial Chicken Palace

palace

admiring the Chicken Palace

the happy girls

talking to the happy chickens

Onward across the rolling lawns, we progressed to the poly tunnels.  The ladies were a little worried about their nice shoes.  It was not from watering that the grass was wet; there had been a very heavy dew.  As someone who is always dressed for one occasion, gardening, this is not a problem I had even thought of in advance.

across the dewy lawn

across the dewy lawn

medium poly tunnel

medium poly tunnel

the other side (north door) of the medium tunnel

the other side (north door) of the medium tunnel

admiring the nasturtium arbour

admiring the nasturtium arbour

the big poly tunnel

the big poly tunnel

The wonders of the produce in the poly tunnels completely chased away thoughts of damp shoes.

in the poly tunnel

in the poly tunnel

lemon cukes

lemon cukes

in the big poly tunnel

in the big poly tunnel

the littlest poly tunnel

the littlest poly tunnel

There is a spare house in the back of the property (east end) by which this little tunnel sits.  It lacks electricity, but I have told Lynn that she is lucky I like my own garden so much or they might find me squatting there, I love Pink Poppy Farm so very much!

sunflowers on the empty house

sunflowers on the empty house

We made our way across to the north side of the property and the garden shed gardens.

admiring the sweet peas

admiring the sweet peas

Hm, their sweet peas were not a failure like mine!  These look like mine looked last year, darn it!

club

something else I had missed till now

something else I had missed till now

shed

shed

swing set bean trellis

swing set bean trellis

more sunflowers

more sunflowers

shed detail

shed detail

above the garage

above the garage

pumphouse and "pollies"

pumphouse and “pollies”

steps down to patio

steps down to patio

leaving in a happy mood

leaving in a happy mood

Next: a garden club reprise of more tour gardens.

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I learned just in time to call it by the right name for this entry that this garden is known as Pink Poppy Farm!

from the program:   The Dickerson garden:  Allow yourself time to explore this expansive, one acre country garden where edibles and flowers grow in harmony, surrounded by mature conifers which provide privacy and some wind protection. As you enter the front gate, see swirls of lavender and rosemary filling deep perennial beds.  After circling a ring of dahlias,  head for the cutest chicken house ever, “The Imperial Chicken Palace,” which is filled with 13 gorgeous hens.  Meandering through the property you will see  2 poly tunnels which shelter tomatoes, cucumbers, basil, peppers and more.  Masters of edible landscapes, the owners have lived and worked on the grounds for 19 years.  The garden is full of clever ideas for watering, fencing, and decor.

Expansive indeed, this garden is going to make for a long entry!

Our friend Kathleen got this good shot of the entry gate:

photo by Kathleen Sayce

photo by Kathleen Sayce

Inside the gate, we saw to our right a lavender garden and ahead, a circle of dahlias and other flowers.

entry garden

entry garden

To our left is the front porch and behind us the bright red door of the garage.

photo by Kathleen Shaw, looking east

photo by Kathleen Shaw, looking east

north side of house

north side of house

After an amazing tour of this garden we will exit through that narrow passageway.

front porch

front porch

NW corner of house

NW corner of house

a detailed garden

So far, it seems like a normal, nice, restrained garden.  Then, coming around the west side of the house….

west lawn and garden bed...

west lawn and garden bed…

…we get the first indication of the special delights of this garden.  Below, Sheila sees the Imperial Chicken Palace!

just wow!

just wow!

ICP

Imperial Chicken Palace

Imperial Chicken Palace

ICP

side view

side view

chicken palace window box

chicken palace window box

There, I am back in love with Petunia ‘Phantom’!

the girls; top photo by Kathleen Shaw:  dust bath time

the girls; top photo by Kathleen Shaw: dust bath time

nesting boxes accessed by an exterior hatch

nesting boxes accessed by an exterior hatch

Although it was hard to leave “the girls”, we walk east along the south side of the house.

looking east

looking east

chairs and a photo album I wish I had taken time to look at

chairs and a photo album I wish I had taken time to look at

up a slope of lawn, looking back

up a slope of lawn, looking back

Below, Allan and Debbie from Rainyside Gardeners, who sets up for a photo while garden owner Mike Dickerson walks forward to greet them.

SE corner of house

SE corner of house

from further east

from further east

This garden had been on tour before, but on the same year that my old garden was on the tour, so we did not get to see it,  This time, Mike joked “You’ve finally paid to come see my garden!”

Mike demonstrates a simple clever fence to keep chickens out of the garden beds.

Garden owner Lynn demonstrates a simple clever fence to keep chickens out of the garden beds.

along the south side of the garden...In the background, you can see the compost bins

along the south side of the garden…In the background, you can see the compost bins

further east, hoop houses, "two and a fourth" (small one), Lynn said.

further east, hoop houses, “two and a fourth” (small one), Lynn said.

veg boxes (compost bins in background)

veg boxes (compost bins in background)

Sheila and I always enjoy the true working areas of the garden, like the compost bins.  Here, they are enviably large, running along the middle south side of the property and made of old pallets.

much compost

much compost

Speaking of working areas, we admire the watering system in this garden:

hose manifolds

hose manifolds

Hoses lead to oscillating sprinklers which are mounted on posts.  Each hose connects with a quick connect to the sprinkler which is permanently set for optimum watering pattern.

sprinkler

sprinkler

and another view of the chicken fence

and another view of the chicken fence

We intend to adopt this watering system for our garden as soon as we have time.  It will save lots of fiddling with the sprinklers.

a tour guest walking east

a tour guest walking east

poppies

pre-tour photo showing two hoop houses (looking east)

pre-tour photo showing two hoop houses (looking east)

on tour day

on tour day

The first and smaller hoophouse:

house

one of the the hoop houses

 north door

inside

inside

south door

south door

looking east

looking east

The big hoop house and raised beds:

approaching a big hoop house

approaching  big hoop house

I loved the raised box of nasturtiums (photo taken while pre-touring in June)

I loved the raised box of nasturtiums (photo taken while pre-touring in June)

hoop

inside the hoop house

inside the hoop house

a prolific crop

a prolific crop

tomatoes

tomatoes

Allan was interested in the details of how it was constructed, and you might be, too:

how to

how to

how to

how the windows open

how the windows open

Way up at the top of garden by a house (which is also part of the property but lacks amenities) is another, smaller hoophouse where Madeline and Jacob grow their produce for the Saturday Market.  The garden also provides food for a few CSA boxes.

the littlest hoophouse

the littlest hoophouse

garden tour guests

garden tour guests
friends

guests

boy

Donna and M.R.

Donna and M.R.

Because this was the most central garden of the tour, we ran into some of our touring friends there.  We found our friends Donna and M.R. photographing flowers on the route from the hoophouses to the north side of the garden.

bachelor buttons

bachelor buttons

Set in a fenced garden of its own, the garden shed charmed everyone with its old windows and shingled sides, and windowboxes.

taken on pre-tour day, late June

taken on pre-tour day, late June

shed windowboxes

shed windowboxes

neatly cut edges in the  shed garden

neatly cut edges in the shed garden

an old swingset used as trellising near the garden shed

an old swingset used as trellising near the garden shed, in late June

on tour day

My, how the flowers had grown since June 24th when I first visited the garden!

right...the smaller hoophouse...left...the garden shed

right…the smaller hoophouse…left…the garden shed

cornflowers and just a glimpse of the "stage" area

cornflowers and just a glimpse of the “stage” area

Coming around a grass path from the garden shed, we followed the beautiful music to the green stage setting for the Mozart Chicks.

The Mozart Chicks

The Mozart Chicks

classical quintet

classical quintet

music appreciator

music appreciator

I took an iPhone video walking from the musicians’ area around the garden which you may be able to view here.

One garden bed after another abounded with food and flowers mixed together.

produce

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

sunflowers against the "extra house"

sunflowers against the “extra house”

mix

dahlias

dahlias

The Pink Poppy Bakery booth at the Ilwaco Saturday Market offers bouquets of flowers from this garden.

After going round and round the garden, we came to the patio on the east side of the house where delicious treats awaited.

handsome steps down to the patio area

handsome steps down to the patio area

treats

treats

You can see in the background, above, how popular the Pink Poppy Bakery treats were!

treats

 

This garden will also be on the Peninsula Edible Garden Tour...

This garden will also be on the Peninsula Edible Garden Tour…

patio detail

patio detail

The patio wraps around the corner of the house.

The patio wraps around the corner of the house.

view from just inside the house

Around the patio, many tour guests converged and lingered and chatted, even though we all had more gardens to see.

M.R. photographing flowers

M.R. photographing a birdhouse

house

We photographed it, too.

(right) garden owner Mike Dickerson

(right) garden owner Mike Dickerson

Mike and Sheila

Mike and Sheila

Mike and M.R.

Mike and M.R.

Finally, we did have to tear ourselves away because we had three more gardens to see…

walkway between garage and house

walkway between garage and house

back to the entry garden

back to the entry garden

back

And with wistful looks back, we departed for the rest of our tour.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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