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Posts Tagged ‘pond’

Wednesday, 13 February 2019

The good weather today meant we probably should have begun our work year. I felt mildly guilty at not being able to tear myself away from my pond.

In the morning, I had awoken to the memory of some nice river rock that was now hidden against the east wall of the house.

I noticed our sign is also hidden…

…the one that Allan made about this being the historic site of the first double wide in Ilwaco.

I suppose the house needs a bit of washing. NOT pressure washing. I like to do things in a quiet way as much as practical, and the house is manageably small and easy to reach, unlike large local boats that truly do need powerful jets of water.

Here are the rocks I retrieved.

Allan helped me to switch the garden benches. The cat bench ties in with the cat memorial garden that is a rocky beachscape on the other side of the boat.

Even though the shorter bench will allow a better view into the garden bed, it might be too plain.

I realized that with some rearranging of the rock edge of the larger pond, I could create a damp bed for marginal plants.

Skooter was interested in every aspect of today’s project. When scooted away, he chased poor old Frosty all around the garden and up the cat ramp.

While Allan tried to get some office work done, I finished my marginal planting and made a window box pond planter and managed to tip the whole thing over, leaving a skim of soil on the pond. From happy puttering to pond crisis. While I bucketed most of the floating soil out, Allan put together an emergency skimmer from wood and an old t-shirt.

He helped me put the window box back in, this time holding it down till it almost stopped bubbling and was heavy enough to stay in place. Skooter was obsessed with the few remaining bubbles.

Allan and I do have to return to work one of these days soon. I hope we won’t come home one day (or get up in the morning) and find plants tipped into the pond by a curious cat. I think Skooter will have more time to enjoy the pond than I will.

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Saturday, 9 February 2019

The weather was too darn cold, almost freezing, to play around the pond today. All we managed to do was move a viewing bench into place before light snow began to fall.

The wheelbarrow ice has still not melted! I’ve never seen cold last so long here.

Most of the snow left the garden in last night’s rain.

Here is the view from our front porch today…

And here is our old cat, Maddie, in that same garden eight years ago, a memory brought up by Facebook today.

The front garden

Hebe and crocus

Prevented from ponding, we drove three blocks east to the River City Playhouse to see local singing trio The Oyster Crackers, including our friend Christl, who manages the Wiegardt Gallery (one of our former gardening jobs).

This benefit for the local food bank was a full house, with cookies.

Allan’s photos (Rita Smith, Christl Mack, Bette Lu Krause):

Back at home, I found on YouTube some episodes of the Chelsea Flower Show 2018 to enjoy, followed by the first two episodes of Monty Don’s Around the World in 80 Gardens.

Meanwhile…

Sunday, 9 February 2019

Bitter cold and cutting wind did not stop us from finishing the liner-hiding driftwood edge at the back of the bigger pond.

Allan got such a good collection of driftwood on Friday!

Allan aboard the good ship Ann Lovejoy

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

The ponds were both lightly iced over.

The wheelbarrow ice has still not melted.

My plant sale plants are putting up with the cold surprisingly well.

Before going back indoors to write these four ponding posts (on my iPad because I am too lazy to boot up the computer), I took some photos of our project. Other than adding some more river rock around the edges, I must wait for a thaw till the next stage, planting.

I’ve always felt intimidated to make a pond. Monty Don’s shows told me how to do it, and he inspired me to try by saying that even if you fail at a project, you’ll have learned something.

How I long for the day when some frogs move in!

Allan finished a blog post of his own about boating in late January. If you missed it, you can read it here.

We were planning to go back to work on Tuesday, February 12th, to get Long Beach’s Fifth Street Park and Street planters and The Shelburne Hotel garden looking tidy for Presidents Day weekend four days later. With temperatures predicted to be in the 30s and very low 40s all week, I think not. Surely the tourists will not be shocked to see weeds and the ornamental grasses still standing. After all, Monty does not cut his grasses back till Gardeners’ World starts broadcasting in March. And I have many episodes of old GW, Love Your Garden, Garden Rescues, and Chelsea Flower Show to pass the time.

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Friday, 8 February 2019

Note: While on staycation, I mostly take photos with my phone, leading to photos that are a bit softer, unfortunately.)

We still have snow.

Front window view:

The temperature was still so cold that in the back garden, not even in the shade, wheelbarrow ice had not melted.

First, I gave biscuits to my friends next door.

I’d had a brainstorm before rising this morning: plastic window boxes would work well for plants on the pond shelves.

I fretted for awhile on whether green or brown would be hidden better under the water. (I can’t plant these up with marginal plants yet because my plants are still frozen into their pots.)

Our friend Mark, a pond owner, reminded me later that algae will hide either color!

The cold water felt painful on our hands. Nevertheless, Allan redid the driftwood edge on the back of the little pond that has gotten dislodged while making the big pond; he inserted blue broken pottery to hide the liner.

I worked on placing rocks and broken pottery “waves”. Just using the rocks we have makes for a rather jumbled effect which I hope to improve on later.

This time, I added some green broken pottery. A friend’s photos of waves at nearby Cape Disappointment State Park have enlightened me that ocean waves contain a lot of green.

Photo by Donna McKinley

Icy cold rain sent me indoors. Allan decided to go, despite the rain, to a secret driftwood collecting spot; we needed some to hide the liner that is tucked up against the boat at the back of the big pond.

On his quest:

Before he returned, the rain stopped and I went back out for more pond edging.

Allan unloaded his excellent collection of driftwood and went into the pond like Monty Don.

He had found the perfect very thin piece of wood to screw into the boat in order to hide and secure the top of the liner.

The long pieces of driftwood will further hide the liner and make good shade for frogs…but not today because daylight ended.

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Thursday, 7 February 2019

Predicted snow did not arrive and so we were able to continue on with the bigger pond. A small land bridge divides the two ponds for several reasons. It will allow me to get to the boat for boat gardening. It lets us avoid a weird L shaped liner fold. And it isolates problems so a leak would be easier to find and fix.

The back garden still had considerable snow.

I raked all around our new work area to remove packed ice.

Those hoses from yesterday were lightly frozen into the smaller pond. When I tossed little smooth rocks on top (to go to the bottom and hide the liner), they just sat.

Allan’s photo:

The second pond had more little rocks to remove (the results of having been a scree garden). Allan deepened the bottom a bit and we sculpted the edges.

Allan’s photos:

Allan is able to hop in and out of the pond more easily than I could.

We siphoned water out of our faucetless rain barrels, bucketed out of others, used every bucket of water we’d had sitting around and every green jug Allan had filled up last week…

…and we still had to use metered water to fill up the last few inches. I could not wait for more rain to see how it looked full.

While the pond filled, I found some marginal pond plants reseeded into the patio (from the water boxes) and potted them up in plain bagged soil, not potting soil, put little rocks on top, and placed the plants at the back of the small pond.  I had hidden the liner there  with some driftwood

There was a sudden crisis when I realized that we had not used the board and level method of making sure the sides were even. The west edge was deliberately higher, but the land bridge was too low for the pond to fill high enough to cover up my pond planters. Fortunately, I had saved a wheelbarrow of the brown sand for just such an emergency. Much rushing about, squabbling, and swearing (mine) ensued but we averted catastrophe and got the land bridge built up and tamped down so that the pond could fill by dark.

I even had time to add just a few rocks.

Snow is again predicted for tomorrow. I hope to have time to work on hiding the liner. We ended up with enough leftover liner and underlayment to make me question our measuring skills. If the extra liner does not have enough of a wide part to make another mini pond or stream, I can use it to make a bog garden. Allan measured it and put it tidily into boxes.

Frosty (age 14) had wanted nothing to do with this icy and challenging project.

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Wednesday, 5 July 2017

Touring Mark and Brian’s Garden

With our workday almost done, we drove almost to Nahcotta to tour a garden new to us.  When garden owner Mark had posted some beautiful photos of it on the Peninsula Gardeners Facebook group, I had commented that I would be hanging over the fence trying to see in if I walked by. I was forthwith invited to come visit.  Because I focus on one thing at a time, I did not look closely at the address until we were on our way from Klipsan Beach Cottages.  Then I said “OH my gosh, I think this is the garden I have wanted to see for a long time!”  Sure enough, as we parked, I knew that it was the place where I HAVE peered wistfully over the front fence, wishing to see what was in the secret garden.

I am incorporating into this story some of Mark’s photos that drew me into this hidden paradise.

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the front garden

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beginning our tour

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front garden

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by the woodsy edge of the front garden

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cool and wavy trellises

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cosmos!

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deep blue Salvia patens

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washing machine tub planters!

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talking about the assorted raised boxes

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Now I want a kitchen garden just like this.

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The sides come off.

I’d put a kitchen garden like that in the sunny spot between our fence and Devery’s garage parking pad so we could both harvest.

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Allan’s photo: fence between front and back garden

At last, I got to go through the gate to the back garden.

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having entered the secret garden (Allan’s photo)

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view upon entering

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Immediately, we heard the sound of a waterfall and found the source: a large pond with stream and two waterfalls.  Mark said when they bought the house, it was a strawberry bed, and as he cleaned it out, he found a big cement pond.  He and Brian then constructed the stream bed that runs down a slope from behind.

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pond.jpg

Mark’s photo

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Mark’s photo

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up the slope to the waterfall

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I did not quite succeed with this photo of the pond from under the maple branch.  Let’s just call it impressionistic.

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Allan’s photo

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maple admiration society

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at the pond’s edge

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Allan’s photo

We turned our attention to the garden on the west side of the house, which I had been thrilled to see was a double wide, like ours, but with better windows and nice wood siding.

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Mark’s photo

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looking across to the pond, what a view! (Mark’s photo)

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Mark’s photo

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west facing deck with strong shadows

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on the porch

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Mark’s photo

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Mark’s photo

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west side flower garden

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dierama (Mark’s photo)

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Mark’s photo

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a deer fenced area…The additional height on top was added because deer jumped this!

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just done blooming

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on the shed wall

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Allan’s photo

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roses protected from deer (Allan’s photo)

Beyond the house is a luxuriously large chicken coop.

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just part of the multi-roomed coop

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friendly girls

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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an old door recycled from Penttila’s Chapel

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up the ramp, in the door, hoping for a treat

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by the greenhouse

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echeverias

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geranium with great foliage

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on the corner of the deck

We began to wend our way out of the garden because we had more watering to do in Ilwaco before day’s end.

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love these grasses in wooden boxes

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another view of the pond

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Allan’s photo

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hydrangea (Allan’s photo)

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Allan’s photo

Soon we are going to have Mark and Brian over to have a walk about in our garden.  I felt so lucky to have gained entry to theirs.

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Sunday, 9 August 2015

Long Beach Peninsula Edible Garden Tour

The annual edible garden tour, presented by the Long Beach Grange, is a benefit for local foodbanks.

 

 

Millner Garden (The Planter Box)

A constantly changing garden that has fed a large family for over 40 years.

The garden is behind Ray and Barbara Millner’s house, next door to the Planter Box.  Ray and Barbara are the mom and pop of the garden center, who have now mostly retired and passed the business on to their daughter, son, and daughter in law.

Some of the photos are from a pre-tour taken by me and Garden Tour Nancy on July 24th.

Next to the kitchen garden: Hardy fuchsias and hydrangeas waiting to be planted in a new park-like area.

Next to the kitchen garden: Hardy fuchsias and hydrangeas waiting to be planted in a new park-like area.

bees

bees

The main part of the kitchen garden

The main part of the kitchen garden

Actually, the kitchen garden has gotten so big that I don’t even know if it is fair to call this the main part.  I’m sure it is the original area of kitchen garden.

beans, pre-tour, 7-24

beans, pre-tour, 7-24

a classically tidy kitchen garden

a classically tidy kitchen garden

garden

Vaccinium 'Pink Lemonade' blueberry

Vaccinium ‘Pink Lemonade’ blueberry

strawberry cage

strawberry cage

netted strawberries, 7-24

netted strawberries, 7-24

the chooks

the chooks

The flock has a large field and a spacious chicken coop.

The flock has a large field and a spacious chicken coop.

enjoying a fruit snack

enjoying a fruit snack

pecking order

pecking order

friends

friends

Allan's photo: The north side of the chicken run and the first part of the eastward garden extension.

Allan’s photo: The north side of the chicken run and the first part of the eastward garden extension.

trellised vine

trellised vine

an edible tropaeolum vine

an edible tropaeolum vine

I wish I had taken notes as good as Garden Tour Nancy’s on the day of our pre-tour; I was more thinking of taking photos.

squash

squash2

Allan’s photo

The garden continues east along the pond.

berries by the pond; the water level is startlingly low this year

berries by the pond; the water level is startlingly low this year

looking south across the pond

looking south across the pond

I've never seen this pond with so much mud exposed in August.

I’ve never seen this pond with so much mud exposed in August.

looking back (west) toward the main kitchen garden

looking back (west) toward the main kitchen garden

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pondside garden

pondside garden

Flowers to attract pollinators are interspersed with fruit and vegetables.

Flowers to attract pollinators are interspersed with fruit and vegetables.

hoops

looking east toward a grape arbour

looking east toward a grape arbour

The cover protects the grapes from dew.

The cover protects the grapes from dew.

Ray on our pre-tour, 7-24

Ray on our pre-tour, 7-24

Ray says next time he would make the cover a dome, as the vines need more room.

Ray says next time he would make the cover a dome, as the vines need more room.

And they say you can't grow grapes at the beach!

And they say you can’t grow grapes at the beach!

grapes4

flowers2

A long awaited bridge was built by Ray’s son, Raymond, right before the tour.

bridge of recycled lumber and pallets

bridge of recycled lumber and pallets

This open up the area to the east of the pond, which Ray intends to turn into a parklike setting with hydrangeas and hardy fuchsias.

looking west from across the bridge

looking west from across the bridge

Ray leading a guided tour of the garden (Allan's photo)

Ray leading a guided tour of the garden (Allan’s photo)

looking west over the pond

looking west over the pond

Allan saw several dragonflies by the shoreline:

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looking north across the pond

looking north across the pond

Ray describing his parkland vision. (Allan's photo)

Ray describing his parkland vision. (Allan’s photo)

Several hundred feet east on that green road is Ray’s potato patch.  He put it far enough out that it encourages him to take a good long walk to check on it.

We caught up to Ray’s guided tour as they left the third part of the kitchen garden, behind the greenhouses of the Planter Box garden center.

Ray and tour guests

Ray and tour guests

east of The Planter Box itself, another garden area...

east of The Planter Box itself, another garden area…

built on compost and garden debris from the nursery....

built on aged compost and garden debris from the nursery….

lush thriving plants

lush thriving plants

garlic harvest drying in a shed

garlic harvest drying in a shed

It’s a spectacular kitchen garden that feeds an extended family with produce left over for friends and Grange members.  While I took lousy notes (ie. none), I share with you here some plant names that Nancy noted on our pre-tour day:

Caroline raspberry best for fall

Territorial fall and winter blend

Valley girl tomatoes

White runner beans

Gray grillers zucchini for grilling.

Julia tomatoes good for canning and dry

Wild treasure BlackBerries

Eating on the Wild Side book

As we were about to depart, I picked up a few plants for the Long Beach planters, and we also added Planter Box Teresa to our touring party for the remainder of the day.

front display at Planter Box; still lots of good plants for sale.

front display at Planter Box; still lots of good plants for sale.

Cosmos

Cosmos

Celosias

Celosias

We were glad Teresa was able to get away from the nursery and come with us to see the rest of the gardens.

Next: three of the smaller gardens.

 

 

 

 

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Saturday, 2 May 2015

rhodietour

Long Beach Peninsula Rhodie Tour

Nahcotta Rhododendron Garden

From the programme: “This 8 acre property, overlooking a large 1/2 acre natural pond was once the site of Hall’s Gardens, the former collectors nursery of Don and Marva Hall.  It is filled with mature specimens and trees, including many Rhododendrons.  Enjoy taking the path that meanders through the plantings around the water’s edge.  Stop by the deck overlooking the pond to meet the current owners and view the original plans of the garden, which include the identification of all of the plants.”

The pond is a glorious feature; If I could have any property on the Peninsula, I'd choose this one.

The pond is a glorious feature; If I could have any property on the Peninsula, I’d choose this one.

the entry gate

the entry gate

How I love the entry gate to this property.  It reminds me of the handsome screens and accents that I have seen in Portland gardens, especially the gardens done by Laura Crockett.

a long driveway lined with rhodos

a long driveway lined with rhodos

During my first few years living at the beach, I used to shop at Halls Gardens Nursery; the plants for sale were where those cars are parked.

During my first few years living at the beach, I used to shop at Halls Gardens Nursery; the plants for sale were where those cars are parked.

some flowers along the driveway

some flowers along the driveway

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driveway

driveway

Just past the car park area.

the end of the long driveway

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

Below:  We could turn to our left and enter the garden on the home’s east side; instead, come with me as we go through a gate ahead of us and stroll around the pond.

through the gate

through the gate

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to the pond path

to the pond path

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red

Grassy paths also lead to the back garden of the house.

a tour guest (Allan's photo)

a tour guest (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

eucalyptus trunks

eucalyptus trunks

We duck underneath....

I duck underneath….

Allan walked around the pond in the other direction from me so he had a different angle on those eucalyptus trunks.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

To our left the pond view opens up.

To our left the pond view opens up.

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pond3

Rhododendrons line the path all the way around the pond.

Rhododendrons line the path all the way around the pond.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

rhodo

yellow

We are now walking along the back (west) side of the pond.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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west

from west end of pond, looking east to the house

from west end of pond, looking east to the house

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The pond view comes and goes through trees on the shore.

The pond view comes and goes through trees on the shore.

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a wonderland of rhododendron blooms along the path

a wonderland of rhododendron blooms along the path

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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pond

rhodo

yellow

We are now walking along the south side of the pond.

pond

 

pink

Enkianthus, one of my favourite shrubs.

Enkianthus, one of my favourite shrubs.

photo by MaryBeth Kelly

photo by MaryBeth Kelly

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We now leave the pondside and follow the path into glades of rhododendrons to the southeast side of the house.

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rhodo

flower

a magnolia just starting to open

a magnolia just starting to open

south side of house

south side of house

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a rhododendron with variegated leaves

a rhododendron with variegated leaves

peach

peachier

pink

pale

We are now wending our way through rhododendrons on the south side of the house toward the back lawn.

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These two photos provided by the owners of the property show the handsome decking that leads to the back lawn:

one

two

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lawn on the west side of the house

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the owners and one of their dogs, ready to greet guests

the owners and one of their dogs, ready to greet guests

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

near the deck

near the deck

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the owners and Cynthia Pride, one of the artists who painted in the gardens.

the owners and Cynthia Pride, one of the artists who painted in the gardens.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I admire the handsome boardwalks.

I admire the handsome boardwalks.

one of the hosts

one of the hosts

My black lab, Bertie Woofter, used to make that same face.

My black lab, Bertie Woofter, used to make that same face.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

some dog time, of course (Allan's photo)

some dog time, of course (Allan’s photo)

What a doggie paradise.  Bertie would have been swimming daily.

What a doggie paradise. Bertie would have been swimming daily.

Walking back to the entry gate...

Walking back to the entry gate…

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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From the carpark area, let’s go in the path to the front of the house.

in

 

in2

pond

Gunnera by little pond

Gunnera by little pond

beautiful pavers

beautiful pavers

front porch

front porch

window

 

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

 

Our Kathleen had gotten to this garden before we did and was just driving away when we arrived.  She took a gallery of flower portraits as she walked round the pond and gardens, and here they are:

photos and captions by Kathleen Shaw:

a lovely red

a lovely red

...and a lovely white!

…and a lovely white!

azaleas

azaleas

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pink

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Reminiscent of an orchid to me.

Reminiscent of an orchid to me.

white

Kathleen had gone on ahead of us to the last garden, Klipsan Beach Cottages, and I texted her to tell them we were trying to get there.  Our plan to spend a couple of hours helping to host the garden had not worked out as there was so much to see along the way.  In fact, if we had stopped to photograph all the lovely roadside rhodies in the town of Nahcotta, we would not have made it to KBC at all.  As it was, we left the Nahcotta pond property with just forty five minutes left before the end of tour time.

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