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Posts Tagged ‘ponds’

3 March: bin three

Sunday, 3 March 2019

At home

I returned to my compost project, once again a bit worried about being a bad neighbor by running The Toy intermittently for hours to chop up dry compost materials for faster decomposition. Although I had an idea for a different project of the day, I noticed my neighbors to the east (near the bins) seemed to be gone and so I did all of the noisy work in their absence. When I next see them, I’ll ask if The Toy is loud. They might not even notice its gentle buzzing, especially when compared to the local pressure washers and forklifts.

Bin three gave me a disappointingly low volume of sifted compost, just this much:

It was enough to mulch my irises by the pond.

Most of bin three got piled onto bin four….

…with some saved to add back in with fresh material.

I even found some whole apples that will please my canine friends next door.

After I had all the new material chopped and layers (green and brown mixed), bins one and two look quite promising.

A look from the back side reveals some woody material underneath so it won’t be all delicious siftings.

While adding my bit of mulch to the irises, I noticed the small pond was so low that the tops of the planting baskets showed.

This was most disconcerting. Then I remembered evaporation. Google informed me that even in winter, especially when the air is as dry as it’s been this week, evaporation of an inch or more per week is normal.

Fortunately, a rain barrel with a faucet is fairly close to the ponds.

(You can watch my beloved Christine Walkden speaking about water butts right here. )

The pond looked grand topped up with rain water and with a third papyrus added at the back.

I pondered adding one more pond, inspired by an episode of The Great British Garden Revival in which Charlie Dimmock demonstrated a simple pond idea.

Charlie says don’t forget your level.

Other than ordering and awaiting the liner, Allan and I could do this in a day, I bet.

My idea is for it to go here:

It would tie in to the look of the water boxes…

…which are just across a piece of lawn.

I like the way Charlie’s plan includes a bog garden at one end.

This will have to wait at least a week! We probably have to go to work tomorrow through Wednesday, and then my dear friend Seattle Carol will be visiting for three days.

In the garden:

Meanwhile, Allan had gone questing for tadpoles in the ponds along the meander line south of our property.

The only pond that is year round is the one behind The Lost Garden two doors down.

I don’t mind that he didn’t find any tadpoles yet. I am interested in the claim that if you build a pond, frogs will find it, and I sort of want to wait and see how long that takes.

Tonight, I am going to have a look at Christine Walkden’s more recent show, Glorious Gardens From Above, even though I should be checking out my seed arrivals and placing an order of much desired plants with Annie’s Annuals. My iPad tells me that my screen time is up.

Little does it know that a couple of those days were eight or more hours of The Great British Garden Revival.

Here I go down another rabbit hole.

Here is Christine …. Within the next month, we will each turn 64.

I do love her so!

Oh, OH, look where she is going to land!

I am in heaven.

Beth was 91 when this segment was filmed; the broadcast was in 2014.

What treasures these women are.

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Saturday, 23 June 2018

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend

presented by the Northwest Perennial Alliance

Thompson Garden, Edmonds

I loved the trees in the front garden; I am assuming they are paper white birch.  I overheard someone say they are not seen much anymore.  If true, I wonder why?

Old tools adorned the fence as one walked toward the back garden:

the gates to the back garden

The paths were narrow and soon dropped off into small flights of stone steps.

I pondered the railing-less steps to the deck.

Cornus controversa ‘Variegata’. I have always wanted one of these.

I was feeling kind of lightheaded so I did not cross the bridge to the greenhouse.  There was an alligator in the pond below!

I did find my way up onto the deck to see a cute little garden shed.

Allan’s photo

From the deck, I had great views of the enviable upper pond.  The water comes under the fence from the property next door.  How delightful. It made me miss my much smaller spring fed natural pond at my previous home in Ilwaco.

across the pond, the greenhouse and the summerhouse

I was not the only person with a cane just observing from the deck.

Many people were on the bridge and stairs to the summer house.

Allan in the blue shirt

I knew Allan would take good photos for me of all the lower garden…and here they are.

the tiers of Cornus controversa ‘Variegata’, the wedding cake tree

waterfall

the glass house

the glorious interior of the summerhouse

the side fence

If I could explore this garden on my own, I’d be able to find a way to all the dreamy areas.  I could happily live in that summerhouse.

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Monday, 7 March 2016

Although I had every intention of staying home and working on the scrapbook blog, I did have an errand to run: delivering one of the scrapbooks to a friend who has access to good scanning equipment and wishes to scan the pictures that appeal to her most.  Just in case the weather changed, I asked Allan to put the work trailer on.

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Three danes at the Beachdog office, where our friend works.

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Wendy appreciates how cool the scrapbooks are.

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love these doggies

Surprisingly, even though we had left the house in rain, the sun emerged, so we went to city works, filled all our buckets with mulch, and fluffed up the garden in the northeast quadrant of Fifth Street Park.

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all fluffed up

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Allan mulched in the SE quadrant.

More sun called for more mulch.  On the way back to City Works, we paused to weed the little monument garden at Culbertson Park.

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More buckets of mulch improved the west side of Fifth Street Park.

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Next came the deadheading of the Long Beach welcome sign.

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before

I did the front side, and Allan the back (or the “welcome” side and the “thank you” side).  I had said to shear back the flowers.  Unfortunately, there was a misunderstanding.

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Allan’s sheared narcissi, to the left

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my version of sheared narcissi

This will be an interesting experiment to see if cutting the foliage all the way back will prevent the bottomed-out clumps from blooming vigorously next year.  Don’t try this at home.

I am thinking of moving a lot of these narcissi into a park, as they are too tall for the front and the old foliage wants to hide the new tulips that got planted behind.  Next fall I could replant with the shortest cultivars.

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after, front

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back (Allan’s photo)

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after

Just as we finished (both doing the job and having an argy bargy re what it means to “shear” plants), the wind picked up considerably, so we headed home.

We swung round the port gardens to see how those narcissi are doing.

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Ilwaco boatyard

The little area under the red sign has never looked better, although I did not want our van’s reflection in the photo.

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Seeding some calendula in here did work!

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Theron was just coming in.

Not many narcissi could be seen in the boatyard garden.  I hope people are heeding the “please leave the flowers for everyone to enjoy” signs.  Along the port was better, although still not as showy as I would like:

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by Ilwaco Pavilion

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by Wade Gallery

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by the old Port Bistro

We got home with time to weed a bucket full of shotweed out of the center back yard garden.  (Allan scraped moss off the front sidewalk.) As I weeded, I had a revelation.  In her scrapbooks, my Grandma posted over the years several clippings showing ponds with stone edges.

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I had shared this dream but, like my grandma, had never realized it.  My former Ilwaco garden had a lovely natural pond, and in this one, I had not been able to figure out a place to put a pond like any of the above.  Today came the revelation to put it in the center bed!

It would echo the water in the water boxes:

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So should it go toward the end, where the sundial is?

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Oh! The sundial could even sit IN it like in an overflow pond in my old garden.

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lower pond in my old garden

Or should it be behind the sun dial?  I could transplant the Geranium ‘Rozanne’ stream to open up and encircle the sides of the new pond.

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decision: set back aways or at the end??  And how to make it!???

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Meanwhile, I have the water boxes and the bogsy wood rain puddle.

I also decided that I had to move that Hamemelis ‘Glowing Embers’ that I had planted too close to the Allan’s narrow grass path.  Brainstorm:  I moved the columnar silver Salix up there.  The Hamemelis went up by the front fence, after another one had been dug up and moved to under the purple leaved plum tree.

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I hope Salix ‘Silver Column’ lives up to its name.

And then the rain came in earnest.

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Smokey ran for the porch!

And out came a double rainbow.

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looking east on Lake Street

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The pot of gold was on School Hill.

Allan’s photos:

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The weather calls for two days of rain…good days to work on scrapbook blog, I hope.  I have an MRI and an ultrasound scheduled for next week so…TICK TOCK!  I have all the scrapbooks set up in 24 pre-scheduled blog posts except for the last one which, because it is a cloth book of mostly baby photos, is of less fascination to me so will be just one entry.

Ginger’s Garden Diaries

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from my mother’s garden diaries of two decades ago

1997 (age 72):

March 7:  I started using the wood in the shed.  Instead of using wheelbarrow and piling it on the porch, I’m bringing in an armload right into the house.  The wood burns good but it also burns fast.

1998 (age 73):

March 7:  1:00-3:00  Cloudy and cool.  I moved the containers of spring bulbs over to the RR ties along patio path.  They were so heavy (the tall ones) that I had a headache in just a short while.  I shoveled the soil (mud) from the plastic into the empty containers and pulled plastic over the mushroom compost in back.

 

 

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Saturday, 2 May 2015

rhodietour

Long Beach Peninsula Rhodie Tour

Klipsan Beach Cottages

from the programme:  As you walk into the property, view the prolific lilacs peaking over the gray private backyard fence to your right. The park-like setting west of the dunes has landscaping surrounding a small pond which is refreshed by three little waterfalls. Explore a fenced deer-proof garden with artistic rebar gates, full of roses and collectors’ choice perennials. Wander by the charming clamming shed and picnic area, next to woodland gardens with shrubs and perennials.

As you leave Klipsan Beach Cottages, stroll the big lawns to the north between two tall conifers to view a semi-circle of old rhododendrons at the entrance of the road to the beach cottage next door. You are welcome to walk up that road to view the rhododendrons by “Joanie’s cottage”.

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our KBC gardens

KBC gardens

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I had every intention of getting to Klipsan Beach Cottages in time to help host guests at the Rhododendron tour.   It was not to be as all the other gardens were so fascinating.  We did not get to KBC until about 3:20.  Owner Denny told us that all the guests had been well behaved and pleasant and he sounded  delighted when he told us how one of the plein air painters had set up her easel and done two painting of the garden while tour guests watched.

A few more guests arrived, even after “closing time”.  I’ve worked in this garden for almost twenty years so it’s a great pleasure for me to see people enjoying it.

Rhododendron 'Cynthia' by the pond.

Rhododendron ‘Cynthia’ by the pond as you enter the grounds.

a tour guest tries out the bench

a tour guest tries out the bench (her dog was very tired of being in the car, so got to come, too)

the pond garden

the pond garden

more of the pond garden

more of the pond garden

Klipsan Beach Cottages, just outside the fenced garden

Klipsan Beach Cottages, just outside the fenced garden

south side of fenced garden

south side of fenced garden

fence

Euphorbia characias wulfenii outside the deer fence

Euphorbia characias wulfenii outside the deer fence

a clematis peeking through the lattice

a clematis peeking through the lattice

Meconopsis cambrica (Welsh poppy)

Meconopsis cambrica (Welsh poppy)

Clematis (photo by Kathleen Shaw)

Clematis (photo by Kathleen Shaw)

Pieris japonica

Pieris japonica with the beach cottages on the ridge in the background

the deer fence

the deer fence

looking in the south gate; center of garden has four columnar golden yews

looking in the south gate; center of garden has four columnar golden yews

inside the deer garden: Dutch Iris

inside the deer garden: Dutch Iris

bee

bubbler in the fenced garden

bubbler in the fenced garden

nectro

Allium bulgaricum

 

below the house deck: Mary's decorated dry fountain

below the house deck: Mary’s decorated dry fountain

Tiger Eyes Sumac and Cynthia

Tiger Eyes Sumac and Cynthia

tree

 

boxwood ball outside the east gate

boxwood ball outside the east gate

Cynthia and the pond with its three little waterfalls

Cynthia and the pond with its three little waterfalls

Cynthia's trunk structure

Cynthia’s trunk structure

waterfall

waterfall

tour guests

tour guests

bench

bench

Cynthia, painted by Cynthia Pride

Cynthia, painted by Cynthia Pride for the garden tour

pulmonaria growing underneath Rhododendron 'Cynthia'

pulmonaria growing underneath Rhododendron ‘Cynthia’

Tour guests were invited to walk further in to the property.

Tour guests were invited to walk further in to the property.

red rhodies with the A Frame in background (one of the vacation rentals)

red rhodies with the A Frame in background (one of the vacation rentals)

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by a woodland area that not long ago had an understory of narcissi

up by the cottages

up by the cottages

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looking east down the road from the cottages

looking east down the road from the cottages

the south side of the pond garden (photo by Kathleen Shaw)

the south side of the pond garden (photo by Kathleen Shaw)

back in the garden:  Allan and local tour guests Dave and Melissa of Sea Star Landscaping

back in the garden: Allan and local tour guests Dave and Melissa of Sea Star Landscaping

sit spot in the fenced garden

sit spot in the fenced garden

sword ferns and columbine

sword ferns and columbine

The unfurling shows so beautifully when the old fronds have been removed in early spring.

The unfurling shows so beautifully when the old fronds have been removed in early spring.

Cynthia from inside the fenced garden

Cynthia from inside the fenced garden

Knock Out roses inside the fence

Knock Out roses inside the fence

As we left, we walked over to look at the semi circle of old rhododendrons by the road into “Joanie’s Cottage”, another vacation rental that is managed by KBC.

looking west: the road to Joanie's cottage

looking west: the road to Joanie’s cottage

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enormous old rhodos

enormous old rhodos; some will bloom later this month

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more

looking south to the KBC outer lawn

looking south to the KBC outer lawn

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red

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lawn

Thanks for joining us on the rhodie tour, whether you attended in person or just followed along here in the journal.  Here, from Bay Avenue Gallery in Ocean Park, are some of the plein air painting from the tour:

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by Eric Wiegardt

by Eric Wiegardt

 

 

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Wednesday, 28 January 2015

(January outings, part three)

Garden Tour Nancy and I spend a spontaneous afternoon checking out a garden for the first ever Peninsula Rhododendron Tour.  Under the auspices of Water Music Festival, the tour, which is being organized by Nancy and by Steve and John of the Bayside garden, will take place on May 2nd.

eggs from Nancy's flock

eggs from Nancy’s flock

Nancy arrived with some eggs from her chooks and then drove us all the way up to Surfside for lunch at the Great Day Café.  Although it’s one of my favourites, I don’t get there often as it is the furthest away café from us on the Peninsula.

It's in the parking lot overlooking the Surfside Golf Course

It’s in the parking lot overlooking the Surfside Golf Course

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view to the east

view to the east

menu cover with map

menu cover with map by Artist Don Nisbett

"Keep calm, I'm making your lunch."

Chef Steve Pollock: “Keep calm, I’m making your lunch.”

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soup du jour: chicken, leek, and apple

soup du jour: chicken, leek, and apple

We had our soup at one of the two counters, from which we had a view of Steve cooking.  Then, as the place cleared out from a bit of a lunch crowd, we were able to get the corner table.

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I had the special salad....

I had the special salad….

with a delicious lime dressing.

with a delicious lime dressing.

And then, off to preview of a garden which will very probably (I’d say for sure, but I’m not the organizer) be on the Rhododendron Tour.

Nahcotta Rhododendron Garden

We were welcomed by Mike, the owner, and two of his three dogs.

Bruce and I immediately became friends.

Bruce, a quiet and friendly mini-pin Chihuahua mix, and I immediately became friends.

Camper warmed up just a little bit more slowly.

Camper warmed up just a little bit more slowly.

Camper and "the one ball he won't lose".

Camper and “the one ball he won’t lose”.

Nancy and Mike entering the gate.

Nancy and Mike entering the gate.

the back deck

The back deck….

...overlooks this pond.

…overlooks this pond.

Nancy and Mike were joined by a third dog, Riley.

Nancy and Mike were joined by a third dog, Riley.

Riley and Bruce

Riley and Bruce

Join us as all six of us stroll the path ar0und the pond.

Camellia on north side of pond

Camellia on north side of pond

pink petals in the water

pink petals in the water

Bruce, north side of pond

Bruce, north side of pond, and a variegated Ilex

Riley and the variegated Ilex

Riley and the variegated Ilex

West side of pond

West side of pond

looking east over the pond.  The camellia is to the left.

looking east over the pond. The camellia is to the left.

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camellia

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Camper paused for a lie down while we all talked about the garden.

Camper paused for a lie down while we all talked about the garden.

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Bruce, Riley, and Camper on the south bank of the pond

Bruce, Riley, and Camper on the south bank of the pond

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Next to the south side path, a mahonia in bloom was surely popular with hummingbirds.

Mahonia

Mahonia

Mahonia

Mahonia

Mike told us that between owners, much of the garden had gotten so overgrown that you could barely see the banks of the pond.

from the south side

from the south side

path leading to the house garden

path leading to the house garden

a narrow-leaved rhodo

a narrow-leaved rhodo

Because this used to be a collectors nursery, one where I bought plants in 1993, it has choice and rare specimens throughout the garden.

two rhododendrons

two rhododendrons

a tiny pond with convincing artifical koi

a tiny pond with convincing artifical koi

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a cotoneaster right by the house

a cotoneaster right by the house

sinuous trunks

sinuous trunks

We were invited into the house by Mike and his wife. Bonnie, to look at old plans of the garden.  It had been rich in an understory of collectible perennials but most had been lost to neglect during years when the property was between owners.

I clearly remembered a feature of the house that I loved when I saw the garden on tour in 2007:

a river rock channel just inside the front door.

a river rock channel just inside the front door.

Mike had a stunning selection of photos from later in the year when the rhodos are in bloom.  Here are some of his photos of the garden at its peak:

entry drive

entry drive

with good dog Riley

with good dog Riley

with Camper

with Camper

layers of colour

layers of colour

dazzlers

hot dazzlers

cool

cool

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Of course, they all bloom at different times and so we are hoping that May 2 this year will be a good time to see an assortment at their peak at the various gardens that will be featured on the tour.

I’ve been thinking about the three wonderful dogs as much as I’ve been thinking about the glorious pond and garden.

Next: we return to work for just one day.

 

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Friday, 11 July 2014

Garden Bloggers Fling

a fourteen hour day!

a reminder of our action packed fourteen hour day!

Old Germantown Gardens

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After an exciting time on the narrow Old Germantown Road, with a steep drop off on one side and a very large tour bus on a narrow two lane road, we got to the garden of my dreams.

This garden is one I have visited before, once in 2007 and again in 2011. On those two occasions, I was able to get around the whole garden, which certainly was not true this time. If you would like more details of the lower gardens, you might want to peruse those entries. Also, here is an article about the garden.

It is quite possibly my favourite garden of any I have ever visited.

garden in the entry, drive, down a long steep hill

garden in the entry, drive, down a long steep hill

There was some excitement as the bus almost backed down the hill to make the descent easier for a passenger with a bad knee, and one of the owners rushed out, crying out “Noooooo!” and waving his arms to stop it. The bus chugged and churned as it heaved its way back uphill again. Turns out that they have had a bus and a dump truck stuck down there and a regular tow truck was not enough to get them out!

dahlias and alliums in the entry driveway

dahlias and alliums in the entry garden

When one walks around the house onto a big patio with a greenhouse, one comes to one of my favourite features of this garden: my favourite water feature ever.

It starts with this round pool by the large greenhouse (full of exotics, but in 90 plus degree weather, I did not go in).

It starts with this round pool by the large greenhouse (full of exotics, but in 90 plus degree weather, I did not go in).

round

From the round pool, a rill runs across the patio.

From the round pool, a rill runs across the patio.

and curves down beside the stairs

and curves down beside the stairs

with a little waterfall

with a little waterfall

into this deep, deep pool.

into this deep, deep pool.

I was entranced with it all over again.

the view from the greenhouse terrace

the view from the greenhouse terrace

Tetrapanax beside the little deep pool terrace

Tetrapanax beside the little deep pool terrace

My other posts about this garden have a better story of how this area fits together; heat was addling my brain during this visit so the continuity is lacking.

He guards the sit spot by the little deep pool.

This gator guards the sit spot by the little deep pool.

Below the gator:  several bloggers were smitten with this plant.

Below the gator: several bloggers were smitten with this plant.

exotics over the low wall

exotics over the low wall

long flowers of I wish I knew what draped on the wall

long flowers of I wish I knew what draped on the wall

I found I could get down the stairs from the terrace to the beginning of the dry garden but me sore leg would not go down the sloping gravel path.

round and spiky, yuccas? reminiscent fo Cistus Nursery.

round and spiky, yuccas? reminiscent fo Cistus Nursery. Huh. I forgot to straighten that photo, didn’t I!?

So I went back up the pool terraces and around the house to the driveway, then down a sloping path (very carefully) into the shady side of the garden.

gravel path

gravel path

the boggy shade

the boggy shade

I wanted to get to a pool that I remembered from before.

from below, looking to the house

from the shade below, looking to the house

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A little pond

A little pond

a quiet pool

a quiet pool with a stream at one end

that feeds into the back of this pool, on the end where the shady bench is

that feeds into the back of this pool, on the end where the shady bench is.

pond koi

pond koi

plantings by the pond

plantings near the pond

bee

a fish sculpture in the pond

a fish sculpture in the pond

and another

and another

Allan got some photos from the same spot...

Allan got some photos from the same spot…

including how the small upper pond feeds into the bigger one

including how the small upper pond feeds into the bigger one.

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and a view from the bench, where I briefly plopped down next to another blogger to take a photo.

and a view from the bench, where I briefly plopped down next to another blogger to take a photo.

more fish admiration

more fish admiration

I miss my natural spring fed pond at my old house. Especially the smell of fresh water.

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Leaving the pond with some reluctance, I made my way to the bottom of the lawn that slopes up to the house, remembering a photo the garden owners had shown tour guests last time, of a herd of elk meandering through before the entire garden was securely fenced.

lawn

a nice level path

a nice level path

a sit spot under an open gazebo

a sit spot under an open gazebo

tall fragrant lilies

tall fragrant lilies

lilies and clematis

lilies and clematis

bloggers on the deck

bloggers on the deck

through an arbour

through an arbour

nearer to the house

nearer to the house (Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’)

beside the path...I love a gravel garden

beside the path…I love a gravel garden

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down a slope, a sculpture

down a slope, a sculpture

at the corner of the house

at the corner of the house; I believe that’s the greenhouse roof showing

looking down

looking down

I remembered a secret little circle of down there somewhere, with a couple of chairs, up some stone steps, but I just could not get down there to find again. Allan went all the way to the bottom of the hill, but none of his photos show it, either. I know it’s in one of my two older posts.

I was not lacking for sights to see on higher ground.

I was not lacking for sights to see on higher ground.

path with Eryngium giganteum, Allan's photo

path with Eryngium giganteum, Allan’s photo

some steps; I kept circling around the paths trying to find the levelest ways to walk.

some steps; I kept circling around the paths trying to find the levelest ways to walk.

The garden is on such a big acreage that the bloggers were wandering freely.

The garden is on such a big acreage that the bloggers were wandering freely and sometimes in solitude.

the dry garden from below

the dry garden from below

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verticality (Pam Fleming would like this).

verticality (Pam Fleming of Back Alley Gardens in Gearhart would like this).

rose arches

rose arches

looking back

looking back

Here I came to the end of where I could walk; I just could not bend my sore calf to get down a slope like this.

Here I came to the end of where I could walk; I just could not bend my sore calf to get down a slope like this.

telephoto of huge terraced tomato growing further down the slope

telephoto of huge terraced tomato growing further down the slope

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back to the gravel gardens

back to the gravel gardens

dry

I keep trying to grow such a handsome Lobelia tupa; I just don't think we have enough heat at the coast.

I keep trying to grow such a handsome Lobelia tupa; I just don’t think we have enough heat at the coast.

I want this tall yellow verbascum; mine don't seem to branch like that.

I want this tall yellow verbascum; mine don’t seem to branch like that.

I find a mostly level way around the house, here just about to go under the deck.

I find a mostly level way around the house, here just about to go under the deck.

the lawn from just below the house

the lawn from just below the house

They have so much room for conifers.

They have so much room for conifers.

Oregano rotundifolium (I think) atop a wall

Oregano rotundifolium (I think) atop a wall

I turn back because of some stone steps and have another attack of Lobelia tupa envy.

I turn back because of some stone steps and have another attack of Lobelia tupa envy. The wall is to the terrace with the pool and greenhouse.

bloggers from England at rest

bloggers from England at rest

just so much richness

just so much richness in plants

looking down on the rose arches

looking down on the rose arches

I have made my way back up the steps to the terraces, into the house, and onto the deck.

I have made my way back up the steps to the terraces, into the house, and onto the deck.

the lawn from the deck

the lawn from the deck

looking down from the deck:  Allan's photo

looking down from the deck: Allan’s photo

Meanwhile, Allan had a different experience of the garden. He started making his rounds with his two cameras, one that kept going out of focus and one with a low battery, so I lent him my iPhone.

Allan’s iPhone photos:

looking back up the stairs to the lower terrace, the one with the small deep pool

looking back up the stairs to the lower terrace, the one with the small deep pool and the gator sculpture

me picking my way along on the level

me picking my way along on the level

photo 5

below the house

below the house

rose arch

rose arch

b3

terraces

terraces from below

down into the lower garden

down into the lower garden

About 80 bloggers had dispersed into this garden.

About 80 bloggers had dispersed into this garden.

down the slope into the shade

down the slope into the shade

steps

steps

photo 5

I remember from before this place where two paths diverge.

I remember from before this place where two paths diverge.

woodsy

woodsy: Allan says several bloggers were trying to capture the light on the flower to the left.

The lower garden abounds in Cardiocrinum giganteum.  If they had been blooming, I would have slid down there on me arse if necessary.

The lower garden abounds in Cardiocrinum giganteum. If they had been blooming (with fragrant white lily flowers), I would have slid down there on me arse if necessary.

b6

cardiocrinum appreciation society

cardiocrinum appreciation society

under the canopy

under the canopy

Every area is full of interest.

Every area is full of interest.

photo 2

swirlies in the shade

swirlies in the shade

gate and fence, debris dumped outside

gate and fence, debris dumped outside; Allan says this is “backstage”.

Allan wonders if tour hosts want their debris piles photographed. I am always interested in the working part of a garden.

b8

looking up to the house

looking up to the house

so much room for trees!

so much room for trees!

photo 2

I see he has made his way back to the lawn.

I see he has made his way back to the lawn.

the blue chairs

the blue chairs

bedecked

 

We reunited back at the house just before it was time to catch the bus.

Back in the house; one of our hosts make cookies; he is famous for always making cookies for garden tours.

Back in the house; one of our hosts make cookies; he is famous for always making cookies for garden tours. (Allan’s photo)

The owners do all of the maintenance themselves (and, at least the last time I visited, they still work, as well). They said that it is sometimes….what was the word, daunting? overwhelming? in the fall.

inside the front door

inside the front door

the driveway garden from the front porch

the driveway garden from the front porch

brollies by the front door in case it rains when tour guests are there

brollies by the front door in case it rains when tour guests are there (Allan’s photo)

near the front door

near the front door

looking from the driveway to the lawn

looking from the driveway to the lawn

above the driveway

above the driveway

atop the driveway wall

atop the driveway wall

a last look before the gate

a last look before the gate

the driveway gate from the bottom looking up

the driveway gate from the bottom looking up (Allan’s photo)

and we head up the steep driveway to where the buses were parked on Old Germantown Road.

and we head up the steep driveway to where the buses were parked on Old Germantown Road. (Allan’s photo)

Oh, that steep driveway! I had thought about it earlier in the day, worried about my ability to walk on such an incline, and remembered it as even steeper than it was. There is a pedestrian gate off to the side of the big gates.

This is still my favourite garden, yet now I am aware that with any frailty, a garden on a steep slope is difficult to navigate, which is why earlier this year I quit our one job (passing it on to a capable and talented local gardener) that is on a steep hill like this.

Next: the final garden of the day, just up the road a piece.

Here is blogger Pam Penick’s view of the Germantown Road garden on Fling day.

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Friday, 11 July 2014

Garden Bloggers Fling

a fourteen hour day!

a fourteen hour day!

Because all weekend long I kept getting my itinerary out of my pocket to see where we were going next, I’m heading every fling post with it. The day was a whirlwind of gardens!

Lan Su Chinese Garden

lansu

Having been to this garden on two previous visits to Portland, I knew it was behind that white wall and started to feel a thrill.

Having been to this garden on two previous visits to Portland, I knew it was behind that white wall and started to feel a thrill of anticipation.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

from the sidewalk...the garden bursting from its confines!

from the sidewalk…the garden bursting from its confines!

I knew this garden would be good for my gimpiness, as there are few stairs. (I had walked part of the way to Timber Press with Kristin, who had had two hip replacements and spent some months in a wheelchair. This garden would even have partly been accessible by chair, I hope.)

gathering in the courtyard

gathering in the courtyard

One enters though the gate in the back of the courtyard.

One enters though the door in the back of the courtyard.

just inside

just inside

Just inside, we were enveloped in intense fragrance.

We were immediately enveloped in intense sweet fragrance.

It is hard to believe this is hardy!  (Allan later acquired one at a nursery.)

It is hard to believe this is hardy! (Allan later acquired one at a nursery.)

I see a Hydrangea aspera and again ponder where I am going to plant the two I recently acquired.  I like this tucked away spot.

I saw a Hydrangea aspera and again pondered where I am going to plant the two I recently acquired. I like this tucked away spot.

Throughout the garden are sculptural stones from China.

Throughout the garden are sculptural stones from China.

Beside the garden walkways: intricate gates into other rooms.

Beside the garden walkways: intricate gates into other rooms.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

an ornate bridge over the pond...The sun was already hot and bright, casting dramatic shadows.

an ornate bridge over the pond…The sun was already hot and bright, casting dramatic shadows. Note the blogger getting a great shot!

leafy

A heat advisory had been called for Portland with temperatures well up into the 90s. Even this early in the morning, the temperature had this misty beach dweller slightly reeling.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

a view from the bridge

a view of the pond

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

There were plenty of shady spots in which to take a break from the sun.

There were plenty of shady spots in which to take a break from the sun.

drifts of green in the water

drifts of green in the water

On a visit to this garden in 2003 with my friend Terran, we saw workers wading through the ponds tidying up the foliage. What a great job that would be on a hot day.

The easy walking path goes all the way around the enormous pond.

An easy walking path goes all the way around the enormous pond.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo:  I did not see any fish!

Allan’s photo: I did not see any fish!

Off to the sides of the path are rooms and courtyards.

Off to the sides of the path are rooms and courtyards.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

pebble paving

pebble paving

Blogger Lisa from Spain told Allan that the pebbles are set in a way so that when you walk on them, they massage your feet.

Blogger Lisa from Spain told Allan that the pebbles are set in a way so that when you walk on them, they massage your feet.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

a little boat toward the back of the pond

a little boat toward the back of the pond

a healthy stand of impatiens omeiana

a healthy stand of Impatiens omeiana (pretty sure)

bloggers in a moon gate

bloggers in a moon gate

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

window into a courtyard

window into a courtyard

bonsai resting on a windowsill

bonsai resting on a windowsill

another bonsai with little horses

another bonsai with little teak horses; later we would get a “swag bag” and in it would be a box with two little horses like this.

a narrow side courtyard

a narrow side courtyard

the same scene through Allan's lens

the same scene through Allan’s lens

mimosa tree; Allan's photo

mimosa tree; Allan’s photo

A friend in Seattle had a mimosa tree. I want one very much; I had forgotten.

for the sure of balance

for the sure of balance

at the back of the garden, a waterfall in a grotto.

at the back of the garden, a waterfall in a grotto of Chinese stones.

bamboo

fallen leaves of bamboo

fallen leaves of bamboo

Allan's photo: a rhodo for Stephen and John

Allan’s photo: a rhodo with lovely brown indumentum for Stephen and John

window, water, weeping willow

window, water, weeping willow

This was near the spacious tea house where one can sip tea, eat small cookies and view the water. For some strange reason, neither Allan nor I took photos in that room.

Perhaps for Allan that was because his camera problems continued at the Chinese garden. The previous evening, both his pocket cams were in our van in valet parking and we could not get at them in time for the soirée. On Friday, this happened with his Lumix camera:

the same problem I had with every Lumix pocket camera I owned (all five of them, repeatedly replaced on a warranty)

the same problem I had with every Lumix pocket camera I owned (all five of them, repeatedly replaced on a warranty) See end of post for our camera story.

 

banana

One could almost forget the bustling city outside the walls.

One could almost forget the bustling city outside the walls.

More fling bloggers:  Here is the Gardener’s Roost view of the Chinese garden.

Next, onto the tour buses and a trip to the west of Portland for four more gardens.

(An aside re our camera woes: When the Lumix went all blurry, Allan switched to his little Olympus, and its battery died about halfway through the day. The spare was sitting at home by his desk in Ilwaco. Then his iPhone ran out of charge, so by the fifth stop of the day, he was using my iPhone for photos, and by the sixth stop my iPhone was out of juice. The Lumix decided to work again, but not reliably as it sometimes went out of focus. The next day, he carried his Lumix charger. Since each garden stop was long enough, he was able to recharge at garden hosts’ homes, and he noticed that bloggers were frequently taking such opportunities to recharge their iPhones.)

 

 

 

 

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