Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘poppies’

Tuesday, 2 June 2015

Jo’s garden

We began our workweek at Jo’s garden, catching up on the weeding and adding some Cosmos ‘Antiquity’.

Jo and Bob's guest cottage

Jo and Bob’s guest cottage hosts many friends.

squeezed more cosmos in here

squeezed more cosmos in here

Jo's garden

Jo’s garden, northwest side

Allan’s project, requested by Jo, was to cut back a barberry in a barrel…hard.

Allan's photo, before

Allan’s photo, before

Allan's photo, after

Allan’s photo, after

Jo wants it to be just a little mound.  I am sure it would come back from nothing, so I went in and trimmed the little twiggy bits off after Allan took the above photo.

Allan's photo:  His further project, before, weeding along the southwest path.

Allan’s photo: His further project, before, weeding along the southwest path.

Allan's photo, after

Allan’s photo, after; this is one place I have not tried to get out that pink hardy geranium…yet.

Allan's photos of the rhododendron at the end of the path.

Allan’s photos of the rhododendron at the end of the path.

close up

close up

Imagine, this garden was once all and only rhododendrons.

Weeding Jo’s is a pleasant and rewarding job.

Then we went on to the dreaded…

Bolstadt beach approach garden

and started in on one of the thirteen sections that looked the worst.  (There are actually more like 12.5 sections, as I count two separate shorter end pieces as a section.)  We weeded one section and one end piece.

before

before

THREE hours later, it had taken six person-hours of non stop weeding to do just one section and an end piece.  I will leave you to do the math about how long the job might take.  It is sort of a satisfying project, and difficult because of being the same movement over and over.  At least the weather was calm, just slightly misty at times, and not windy.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo; I had to resort to the pick at a spot where a path had been forged across the garden, making a hard pack of weeds.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

after

after

I have been wanting to explain how Bolstadt got its name and had been unable to find any history on it, even though I had heard the story.  As I write this post, our local paper has just published a story about the state patrolman Gene Bolstadt who lost his life during a surf rescue here.

Back on March 19th, Allan had weeded the westernmost section of the approach.  He walked out to see how well his job had held up.

March 19th

March 19th

June 2

June 2nd; it still looks better than the section we were working on today.

On the way back through town, we stopped to check Fifth Street Park.  I can’t remember why I walked down as far as the smoke shop planter.  There I found THIS.

a lily broken right off

a lily broken right off

the broken off flowers

the broken off flowers

This particular lily’s background is that it was stolen from who knows where and put into the planter by the thief, who thought he was doing everyone a favour.  The staff of the smoke shop are wonderful at trying to protect the planter.  This time I am the one who removed the lily entirely, and planted it in a park; it is too fragile to be right next to the planter’s bench and I don’t like lilies in these planters anyway as it is too hard to conceal their dying foliage.

Ilwaco

On the way home, we stopped at the Ilwaco boatyard just to admire it.

Ilwaco boatyard garden

Ilwaco boatyard garden

The poppies are coming on.

The poppies are coming on.

The blue globe thistle...which usually gets picked.  I hope it is spared this year.

The blue globe thistle…which usually gets picked. I hope it is spared this year.

We went on to Time Enough Books, where all I had intended to do was add a few cosmos to the garden boat.  I suddenly found myself pruning down the ceanothus.  It is a shame, but if allowed to reach its full height, it would block the sign.  I had waited for it to finish blooming.  Now it has a sinuous, sea-serpenty form, as it also had to be cut back from the sidewalk.  While the cultivar is a semi prostrate one, it still would like to get about as tall as me.

after pruning

after pruning

May 3

May 3

no longer threatening to block the sign.

Today: no longer threatening to block the sign.

On the way home:  Beautiful blue Ceanothus

Here it was on April 30th.  It would have begun to block the sign from the view of a car.  Sort of.

Ok, to tell you the truth, I wish I did not have to prune it, but once one cuts off the part that is swallowing the sidewalk, then the dead-ish inside is exposed and the only solution is to cut off the stubs and turn it into a bonsai.  Sigh…  The other solution would be to cut it all the way down to a flat stumps and see what happens.

Allan's photo, while dumping the Ceanothus debris.

Allan’s photo, while dumping the Ceanothus debris.

At home, tired, I had just enough energy for a quick bit of garden admiration while watering the ladies in waiting.

Dicentra scandens

Dicentra scandens over the water barrel

Dicentra scandens

Dicentra scandens.  I just learned this is now Lamprocapnos scandens.  Sheesh.

Rose 'Paul's Himalayan Musk'

Rose ‘Paul’s Himalayan Musk’

At last, I got to cross one beach approach section off the work board….and was filled with optimism that we would get another section done on Friday.

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

I had planned another all Ilwaco day for Friday because our friend Patt was going to be passing through town. She’s a former resident who had to move away because of her spouse’s job, and she takes every chance to come back and visit.

We began at Larry and Robert’s, where I realized that their Escallonia is the wonderul white Escallonia ‘Iveyi’, old and large. I think of it is rare down here, so I wonder how that happened!

very big and white Escallonia

very big and white Escallonia

I watered while Allan dug the birdbath pedestal into the ground. The base was cracked, and we want to make sure it will not tip over onto one of their little dogs. Allan made it good and solid.

backyard birdbath

backyard birdbath

Then on to Mayor Mike’s; the rambling rose that is climbing into his tree needed a lot of dangling canes clipped with the long handled pruners.

Mike's rose

Mike’s rose

In Mike's garden:  Eryngium 'Jade Frost'

In Mike’s garden: Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’

Kitty corner from Mike’s is Cheri’s garden where we weeded and deadheaded and pulled out a lot of spent Rose Campion.

Cheri's front garden

Cheri’s front garden

We timed it pretty well as when we stopped off at home, we were only running about fifteen minutes late for a coffee klatsch at Olde Towne. I tried to pick Luanne a nice bouquet. However, I was feeling exceedingly tired and could not seem to find enough flowers to make a lush arrangement.

This was the best I could do....

This was the best I could do….

I wish my sweet peas had done as well this year as last year. I suppose I can blame the weather. They are lacking in all “my” gardens compared to last year’s amazing bounty…except for Klipsan Beach Cottages where they are doing well.

Patt had arrived and was already enjoying her time at Olde Towne with Judy and Tom and Donna and MR. Luanne got to take a break and join us.

left to right...Donna, MR. Tom, Allan, Judy, Luanne and (just her shoulder), Patt

left to right…Donna, MR. Tom, Allan, Judy, Luanne and (just her shoulder), Patt

The delicious veggie sandwich on a croissant was mine.

Donna herself took some excellent photos. Here she is behind her big camera:

Donna

She edits her photos in Picasa with all sorts of delightful effects.

Patt and me, photo by Donna McKinley

Patt and me, photo by Donna McKinley

MR and Tom, photo by Donna McKinley

MR and Tom, photo by Donna McKinley

Olde Towne's darling Luanne, photo by Donna McKinley

Olde Towne’s darling Luanne, photo by Donna McKinley

Luanne kept visiting with us till about half an hour after closing time (which is 4 PM); then Allan and I went back to work in Ilwaco. He watered the planters while I weeded and watered at the boatyard.

the planter closest to the boatyard

the planter closest to the boatyard

As almost always, there was boat work going on while I watered from behind the fence.

Pacific Breeze

Pacific Breeze

I had an incident while watering. As I stood behind the chainlink fence, hidden by a tall bronze fennel, I saw a couple walk by. The man does not register with me in particular but the woman stands out because she has a large dog and tattoos and piercings. (All three of those things are shared by a number of my friends.) She walks around a lot with her dog. She has made comments to Allan while he waters that imply she knows something about gardening. This time, I saw she was picking a very LARGE bouquet. I stepped out into a view and said (not shouted) “Hey, no picking!” and added the usual: “If everyone did that, there would be no flowers left.” “Sorry”, she said, seeming sincere. I saw what was in her other hand from the one holding the LARGE bouquet: Professional looking red handled garden clippers. I said, “I am SHOCKED. You even brought clippers!” “Sorry,” she said again and she and her friend and dog walked on. I went out after a bit and thought I should take a photo from afar of finger blight in action (the bouquet in her hand as they walked away) but a car got between me and them. Maybe just as well.

As I went down the garden side of the fence pulling weeds, I saw some more finger blight. As always happens, someone had pulled the flowers off the Echinops (Blue Globe Thistle). It seems to be irresistible to finger blighters wherever I plant it. At least I know the attempt to twist off the flower stem was not from the woman with the red clippers.

finger blight

finger blight

I am amazed and pleased that the Alliums have for some reason been immune to picking, maybe because they are low to the ground. They are teetering due to our recent heavy wind but still there.

Allium albopilosum

Allium albopilosum

The big poppies are just going to seed…

red poppy

red poppy

big fluffy white peony poppy

big fluffy white peony poppy

Allan helped me finish weeding….

You can tell the gardening is entering the less flowery midsummer time...

You can tell the gardening is entering the less flowery midsummer time…

…and then we went to check on the Port Office gardens to make sure they looked excellent for the annual Tuna Classic event. Allan went up on the port office balcony to get some photos of the sporty tuna boats that come to town for the event.

marina overview

marina overview

And he snuck a photo of me working on the south side of the port office.

at work

at work

I was not feeling happy because both of my eyelids were stinging and burning, especially the right one. I thought (and still think) it might be because when I was weeding and clipping at the boatyard, I leaned into the Stipa gigantea ornamental grass to cut some broken stems, and the flower of the grass might have brushed against my eyelid when I closed my eyes to protect myself from the dreaded ornamental grass cut. (I should wear goggles when I do that.)

At home, I did the blog for the day while Allan made dinner and then we watched a show as we ate. The whole time, I fretted and fretted because of the burning eyelid syndrome. This had happened before, twice, in the previous two years, with unpleasant results. In a state of extreme anxiety I almost wept because the very next day was the Gearhart garden tour. I had been counting the days and had indeed been looking forward it it ever since last year’s wonderful Gearhart tour. What if I couldn’t see? What if I had to go to the hospital? Oh, the distress.

The horror!  Above, 6 AM.  Below: 9 AM

The horror! Above, 6 AM.
Below: 9 AM

And indeed, when I woke up at 6 AM my right eye was swollen almost shut, just as I feared.

I took photos to email to Judy to garner sympathy. I did not think I would get a wink more sleep after 6 AM, and fretted about how I could enjoy the tour on only four hours of sleep…but I did fall back asleep for two more hours. There was little pain involved, just some eyelid burning, and my eyes themselves were fine, or I might have had the sense to go to the emergency room (or, er, waited till after the tour and then gone immediately). Fortunately, I had a pair of dark glasses so that my still swollen eyelid and under-eye bag would not scare the other tour guests. So off we went across the bridge.

There was the usual bridge work slowdown.

bridge work

bridge work

The usual complete halt, allowing for a photo through the bridge rails (for which I removed the cold washcloth that I had kept pressed to one stinging eyelid).

view

view

And the slowdown allowing a closer look at the bridge itself as we go nice and slowly up the highest spot.

bridge

And then, after all my suspense and fear of missing the tour, we were on to Gearhart for Gardens by the Sea!

Read Full Post »

I learned just in time to call it by the right name for this entry that this garden is known as Pink Poppy Farm!

from the program:   The Dickerson garden:  Allow yourself time to explore this expansive, one acre country garden where edibles and flowers grow in harmony, surrounded by mature conifers which provide privacy and some wind protection. As you enter the front gate, see swirls of lavender and rosemary filling deep perennial beds.  After circling a ring of dahlias,  head for the cutest chicken house ever, “The Imperial Chicken Palace,” which is filled with 13 gorgeous hens.  Meandering through the property you will see  2 poly tunnels which shelter tomatoes, cucumbers, basil, peppers and more.  Masters of edible landscapes, the owners have lived and worked on the grounds for 19 years.  The garden is full of clever ideas for watering, fencing, and decor.

Expansive indeed, this garden is going to make for a long entry!

Our friend Kathleen got this good shot of the entry gate:

photo by Kathleen Sayce

photo by Kathleen Sayce

Inside the gate, we saw to our right a lavender garden and ahead, a circle of dahlias and other flowers.

entry garden

entry garden

To our left is the front porch and behind us the bright red door of the garage.

photo by Kathleen Shaw, looking east

photo by Kathleen Shaw, looking east

north side of house

north side of house

After an amazing tour of this garden we will exit through that narrow passageway.

front porch

front porch

NW corner of house

NW corner of house

a detailed garden

So far, it seems like a normal, nice, restrained garden.  Then, coming around the west side of the house….

west lawn and garden bed...

west lawn and garden bed…

…we get the first indication of the special delights of this garden.  Below, Sheila sees the Imperial Chicken Palace!

just wow!

just wow!

ICP

Imperial Chicken Palace

Imperial Chicken Palace

ICP

side view

side view

chicken palace window box

chicken palace window box

There, I am back in love with Petunia ‘Phantom’!

the girls; top photo by Kathleen Shaw:  dust bath time

the girls; top photo by Kathleen Shaw: dust bath time

nesting boxes accessed by an exterior hatch

nesting boxes accessed by an exterior hatch

Although it was hard to leave “the girls”, we walk east along the south side of the house.

looking east

looking east

chairs and a photo album I wish I had taken time to look at

chairs and a photo album I wish I had taken time to look at

up a slope of lawn, looking back

up a slope of lawn, looking back

Below, Allan and Debbie from Rainyside Gardeners, who sets up for a photo while garden owner Mike Dickerson walks forward to greet them.

SE corner of house

SE corner of house

from further east

from further east

This garden had been on tour before, but on the same year that my old garden was on the tour, so we did not get to see it,  This time, Mike joked “You’ve finally paid to come see my garden!”

Mike demonstrates a simple clever fence to keep chickens out of the garden beds.

Garden owner Lynn demonstrates a simple clever fence to keep chickens out of the garden beds.

along the south side of the garden...In the background, you can see the compost bins

along the south side of the garden…In the background, you can see the compost bins

further east, hoop houses, "two and a fourth" (small one), Lynn said.

further east, hoop houses, “two and a fourth” (small one), Lynn said.

veg boxes (compost bins in background)

veg boxes (compost bins in background)

Sheila and I always enjoy the true working areas of the garden, like the compost bins.  Here, they are enviably large, running along the middle south side of the property and made of old pallets.

much compost

much compost

Speaking of working areas, we admire the watering system in this garden:

hose manifolds

hose manifolds

Hoses lead to oscillating sprinklers which are mounted on posts.  Each hose connects with a quick connect to the sprinkler which is permanently set for optimum watering pattern.

sprinkler

sprinkler

and another view of the chicken fence

and another view of the chicken fence

We intend to adopt this watering system for our garden as soon as we have time.  It will save lots of fiddling with the sprinklers.

a tour guest walking east

a tour guest walking east

poppies

pre-tour photo showing two hoop houses (looking east)

pre-tour photo showing two hoop houses (looking east)

on tour day

on tour day

The first and smaller hoophouse:

house

one of the the hoop houses

 north door

inside

inside

south door

south door

looking east

looking east

The big hoop house and raised beds:

approaching a big hoop house

approaching  big hoop house

I loved the raised box of nasturtiums (photo taken while pre-touring in June)

I loved the raised box of nasturtiums (photo taken while pre-touring in June)

hoop

inside the hoop house

inside the hoop house

a prolific crop

a prolific crop

tomatoes

tomatoes

Allan was interested in the details of how it was constructed, and you might be, too:

how to

how to

how to

how the windows open

how the windows open

Way up at the top of garden by a house (which is also part of the property but lacks amenities) is another, smaller hoophouse where Madeline and Jacob grow their produce for the Saturday Market.  The garden also provides food for a few CSA boxes.

the littlest hoophouse

the littlest hoophouse

garden tour guests

garden tour guests
friends

guests

boy

Donna and M.R.

Donna and M.R.

Because this was the most central garden of the tour, we ran into some of our touring friends there.  We found our friends Donna and M.R. photographing flowers on the route from the hoophouses to the north side of the garden.

bachelor buttons

bachelor buttons

Set in a fenced garden of its own, the garden shed charmed everyone with its old windows and shingled sides, and windowboxes.

taken on pre-tour day, late June

taken on pre-tour day, late June

shed windowboxes

shed windowboxes

neatly cut edges in the  shed garden

neatly cut edges in the shed garden

an old swingset used as trellising near the garden shed

an old swingset used as trellising near the garden shed, in late June

on tour day

My, how the flowers had grown since June 24th when I first visited the garden!

right...the smaller hoophouse...left...the garden shed

right…the smaller hoophouse…left…the garden shed

cornflowers and just a glimpse of the "stage" area

cornflowers and just a glimpse of the “stage” area

Coming around a grass path from the garden shed, we followed the beautiful music to the green stage setting for the Mozart Chicks.

The Mozart Chicks

The Mozart Chicks

classical quintet

classical quintet

music appreciator

music appreciator

I took an iPhone video walking from the musicians’ area around the garden which you may be able to view here.

One garden bed after another abounded with food and flowers mixed together.

produce

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

sunflowers against the "extra house"

sunflowers against the “extra house”

mix

dahlias

dahlias

The Pink Poppy Bakery booth at the Ilwaco Saturday Market offers bouquets of flowers from this garden.

After going round and round the garden, we came to the patio on the east side of the house where delicious treats awaited.

handsome steps down to the patio area

handsome steps down to the patio area

treats

treats

You can see in the background, above, how popular the Pink Poppy Bakery treats were!

treats

 

This garden will also be on the Peninsula Edible Garden Tour...

This garden will also be on the Peninsula Edible Garden Tour…

patio detail

patio detail

The patio wraps around the corner of the house.

The patio wraps around the corner of the house.

view from just inside the house

Around the patio, many tour guests converged and lingered and chatted, even though we all had more gardens to see.

M.R. photographing flowers

M.R. photographing a birdhouse

house

We photographed it, too.

(right) garden owner Mike Dickerson

(right) garden owner Mike Dickerson

Mike and Sheila

Mike and Sheila

Mike and M.R.

Mike and M.R.

Finally, we did have to tear ourselves away because we had three more gardens to see…

walkway between garage and house

walkway between garage and house

back to the entry garden

back to the entry garden

back

And with wistful looks back, we departed for the rest of our tour.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Wednesday July 17th

Ah, the view from my window with no time to walk out into the garden except to water the tomatoes in the greenhouse…

screened window view

screened window view

I started the day in a saddish mood because my friends Sheila and Harold had been going to come stay at Andersen’s RV Park for five nights so that Sheila could attend the garden tour. A friend of theirs was ill and needed their help (because they are the best kind of caring neighbours) so she thought she would not be able to attend after all. I had a brainstorm that maybe Sheila could come on her own for two nights; she agreed it was doable and Harold could check up on their dear neighbour, and I was able to find her a room in a motel just a couple of blocks from my house. Joy! (We are all getting older and less inclined to crash on a friend’s living room floor or couch.)

Our first mission was to drive half an hour or so north to Marilyn’s garden in Surfside and mow her lawn. This is normally not our job but we wanted to make sure it got done in time and also by mowing it ourselves we could be assured the lawn mower would not spray grass all into the garden beds at the last minute before the tour. That often happens and would be a traumatic surprise to find on tour day.

mowing a tiny lawn with a small electric mower

Allan mowing a tiny lawn with a small electric mower

By doing the lawn ourselves, we also could make a nice arced pattern, not that it would last till the weekend. I started out mowing lawns on the Peninsula and enjoyed making attractive patterns.

one sad Dianthus

one sad Dianthus

The very last of the plants affected by the Round Up fiasco got pulled out. It never did recover and I had left it as long as I could. It pulled my eye right to its sad condition. Maybe I can revive it at home. I replaced it with a fresh new Dianthus that I had with my which had been intended for Andersen’s RV Park.

We deadheaded the Cosmos to make sure they had as many beautiful blossoms as possible on tour day.

Cosmos

Cosmos

Then we weeded and deadheaded at the Wiegardt Gallery…

Wiegardt Gallery, looking south from the parking lot

Wiegardt Gallery, looking south from the parking lot

and Klipsan Beach Cottages, where Riley wanted to be in the picture.

Riley and the driveway garden

Riley and the driveway garden

in the fenced garden

in the fenced garden

an eccentric elephant garlic

an eccentric elephant garlic

sit spot, with the Tetrapanax papyrifer 'Steroidal Giant' FINALLY big enough to see behind the bench.

sit spot, with the Tetrapanax papyrifer ‘Steroidal Giant’ FINALLY big enough to see behind the bench.

Next, Andersen’s RV Park. With Sheila not staying there after all, we did not spend as much time as we might have otherwise (imagining her checking out every single garden bed!), and that turned out to be a very good thing.

a different view of the picket fence garden (looking north from center gate)

a different view of the picket fence garden (looking north from inside center gate)

picket fence garden, looking south from inside center gate

picket fence garden, looking south from inside center gate

lilies and alliums in the picket fence garden

lilies and alliums in the picket fence garden

west side garden

west side garden

Poppies in the west side garden

Poppies in the west side garden

After six, we headed down to Long Beach where, as we drove south through town, I noticed with a feeling of doom that a painted sage looked wilted in one of the northernmost planters. The further into town we got, the more I noticed subtle signs of distress in the planters and I realized that we absolutely had to water them even though we still had a bit of essential watering to do in Ilwaco, as well. It would have worked to wait till the next morning (although they would be a bit more distressed by then) but I had scheduled a Peninsula Cash Mob event for The Planter Box garden center and we would have to be there by eleven fifteen to take photos for the Facebook page. By noon, the planters would really have their tongues hanging out…so we started watering at six thirty PM, soaking each planter thoroughly and spraying down the foliage as well.

distress at the base of the Salvia viridis!

distress at the base of the Salvia viridis!

At the top, most of the planters still looked good…

looking happy across from Home at the Beach

looking happy across from Home at the Beach

but by looking down into the plants, I could see that they were thirsty.

inside

inside

My plant to water Tuesday and Thursday is the one I should have stuck to. By waiting till Wednesday, we would have to water again on Friday. This filled me with woe because I wanted to be done early on Friday to visit with Kathleen and Debbie who both were arriving from points north for Saturday’s garden tour. As I watered and brooded, a nice woman came up to me with a sweet little dog who wanted to say hi. Petting the pooch cheered me up some. When we finished watering at 8:15, I was also perked up by the sight of three cannas showing up well in the park by the Fifth Street public restrooms, an effect I had been trying to achieve.

three Canna pretoria

three Canna pretoria

In Ilwaco, we had to water the garden boat by Time Enough Books…and just in time as it was also looking a little wilted. Oh dear, focusing so much on the three tour gardens had created some neglect in other gardens. I thought we would have to water the gardens by Queen La De Da’s gallery and by the port office as well, when who should I see out watering but artist Don Nisbett, whose gallery is by the port office. What a relief! He and Jenna have been regularly watering those and the Queen La De Da gardens.

Don said he would water the La De Da garden as well. I walked down to check for any sort of plant crisis because there would be an art night at the port on Thursday (the first one since 2010 that I would not have time to attend). The wind really whips this garden bed and it is looking bare at the east end. In the fall, I will do my best to remedy that. Now is not a good planting time for gardens that need tough things.

needs more!!

needs more!!

As dusk drew in I walked back to where Don was watering by the port and Allan was watering at Time Enough Books. Don thought it would be very funny if I took a photo like this:

nisbett

I told him my blog is much more genteel than that, so I took this photo instead:

as the sun sets

as the sun sets

Read Full Post »

July 10:  It is easier to go to work while the cats snooze than it was during wild late winter weather.  They seem to pick such uncomfortable places…

Mary and Smokey

Mary and Smokey

We began with a check up on Diane’s Sandridge garden.  I am happy with the way the roadside bed is filling in (thanks in part of Larry’s good watering).

It looks even better if (right) I use a slight telephoto effect and squeeze the plants closer together.

It looks even better if (right) I use a slight telephoto effect and squeeze the plants closer together.

Next door, the garden by the Red Barn is looking better…

Red Barn garden

Red Barn garden

And in the barn, I could not resist going to look at a burro (or donkey?)

donkey

And a horse, maybe named Peace or maybe that is the sentiment of the horse’s person.

peace

peace

From there, we stopped at The Basket Case so I could get myself one of those Banana Cream daisies, and I also picked up some Geranium ‘Rozanne’ to add to the Long Beach planters.  I will probably hold them till better planting weather in fall.

Lobelia tupa is coming into bud!

Lobelia tupa is coming into bud!

Echinacea looking fabulous

Echinacea looking fabulous

Then on to Peninsula Landscape Supply to dump debris and get half a yard of Soil Energy to add to Marilyn’s.  We arrived at an exciting time when a big delivery of stone arrived.

much activity

much activity

Garden tour poster in the window

Garden tour poster in the window

Peninsula Landscape Supply will be one of the ticket sales points for the July 20th tour.

In the midst of all the action, Colleen loaded us up…

Colleen

and off we went to Marilyn’s.  The garden is looking pretty tour worthy!

tour ready

shasta daisies and painted sage and more

shasta daisies and painted sage and more

I took lots of photos so that I could get the deer page ready by Friday when tickets (with the link) were to go on sale.  We had the strimmer and used it along the backside of the garden so it now looks good from all angles.

behind the garden

behind the garden

The two Rozannes ended up at Marilyn’s along the driveway after we had added the mulch to that area and to another path spot behind the back porch…and then we were off back south to the Wiegardt Gallery in Ocean Park.

Wiegardt Gallery front garden

Wiegardt Gallery front garden

Eryngium 'Jade Frost'

Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’

Gallery manager Christl expressed amazement that the Eryngium just keeps getting more intensely blue.

Eric Wiegardt himself showed up with a new painting, and lots of cars arrived for a workshop he was about to teach.

The Artist

The Artist

We left for Klipsan Beach Cottages to do weeding and deadheading.  Two slightly different views than the usual:

the garden view people get when they check in

the garden view people get when they check in

a view from inside a garden bed while weeding

a view from inside a garden bed while weeding

I am not just weeding out weeds but trying to get rid of damnable Japanese anemone, a plant I once liked till I found how invasively it runs through a garden.

The sweet peas at KBC are doing better than mine.  So are the ones at Andersen’s…I think because they got more care than mine at home!

sweet peas and Crocosmia 'Lucifer'

sweet peas and Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’

sweet pea and Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

sweet pea and Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

We then went to Golden Sands Assisted Living, where I took the usual pictures of the four quadrants.  We had to water around the edges again but this time I had a great talk with the maintenance man who is going to address the powers that be about getting some better sprinklers set up.  The ones they have a pretty twirly things that get baffled by plants growing in to them and that do not reach the edges of the gardens.  We discussed how I could get the courtyard looking good enough to be on the garden tour if the water situation got resolved and if we had some help cleaning up the pitifully weedy and drab areas outside the quadrants, where I actually think bark mulch (NOT RED) would help.

outside the quadrant

outside the quadrants

southwest  quadrant

southwest quadrant

detail: Sanguisorba

detail: Sanguisorba

NW quadrant...still needs mulch!

NW quadrant…still needs mulch!

NE quadrant

NE quadrant

SE quadrant

SE quadrant

SE quadrant detail

SE quadrant detail

By the time we were almost ready to leave, some of the residents were taking an after dinner walk through the courtyard and we were most pleased to hear their happy words about the flowers.

Not done yet, we spent an hour or so at Andersen’s RV Park.  The main show of poppies in the west garden is declining but some of the newly planted areas are coming on with poppies sown this year rather than reseeded ones.

west garden at Andersen's

west garden at Andersen’s: middle section is petering out

but the south side has new poppies

but the south side has new poppies

and so does the west end.

and so does the west end.

Here’s a different view than the usual one of the picket fence garden on the east side of Lorna’s house.

Usually I take a photo looking south over the fence.  This is looking north.

Usually I take a photo looking south over the fence. This is looking north.

For your amusement: a cute staff dog!

For your amusement: a cute staff dog!  What a face!

and the garden tour poster in the window!

and the garden tour poster in the window!

Read Full Post »

First:  The Music in the Gardens tour is next weekend.  For sneak peeks of some of the gardens, see: Sneak Peeks.

Sunday July 7th began with a visit to Olde Towne Café to celebrate and support the first day of their summer Sunday opening.

Olde Towne Trading Post Café

Olde Towne Trading Post Café

The best part is that we came at a lull and Luanne had time to sit and schmooze with us.

Then it was back home for a busy and productive day in the garden.  Days off have to be productive either in the garden or on the computer since there are so few of them.  No chaise lounging.

Flowers that I particularly enjoyed:

Platycodon, common name balloon flower because of the adorable buds

Platycodon, common name balloon flower because of the adorable buds

And it opens might pretty, too.

And it opens might pretty, too.

One of my sanguisorbas.  I collect them, then lose the tags.

One of my sanguisorbas. I collect them, then lose the tags.

the stunning buttercream lily

the stunning buttercream lily

if only it would last longer!

if only it would last longer!

Lower right, above:  more of the wild impatiens I keep pulling…and pulling…and yet some are flowering now…and I like them…but if they go to seed there will be zillions more to pull next year.

a rose from Heirloom, possibly Hot Cocoa, and Eryngium 'Jade Frost'

a rose from Heirloom, possibly Hot Cocoa, and Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’

If I were retired, I would have have all the names and tags sorted out.

I know this one: Papaver 'Lauren's Grape'

I know this one: Papaver ‘Lauren’s Grape’

The Dahlias are out...and big...and seem kind of early to me.

The Dahlias are out…and big…and seem kind of early to me.

dahlias

dahlias

Dicentra scandens climbing into a hanging basket

Dicentra scandens climbing into a hanging basket

planted hibachi

planted hibachi

Garden tour organizer Nancy came over for awhile to pick up a ‘Banana Cream’ daisy that I had got her and to bring me some of the beautiful garden tour posters to distribute.  As we walked the garden, she was taken with this Japanese iris; this photo is to remind me to share a piece with her later this year.

a Japanese iris from my old garden

a Japanese iris from my old garden

Luanne came over to visit at the same time so we had a lovely confab sitting on the patio.  I decided not to pester them to be photographed for blog fodder.  The cats will do as they provided entertainment.

Calvin was caught out sleeping in the garlic.  He is usually so shy that no visitor sees him.  Here he might be trying to figure out how to escape the attention.

Calvin

Calvin

Mary and Smokey stage a mock battle

Mary and Smokey stage a mock battle

Mary retires to join Frosty at the cat door.

Mary retires to join Frosty at the cat door.

Nancy showed me that the scapes of the garlic (blossom tops) need to be removed so the strength goes to the bulb before harvesting.  Since I usually grow elephant garlic for the flower and its cute little paper cap, I did not know this.  Allan made sauteed snow peas with garlic scapes as part of dinner, and it was delicious.

garlic scapes and peas

garlic scapes and peas: my big harvest

I am still fretting a bit about being on the edible tour because two of the gardens that I know of so far are very serious edible growers….and my garden is frivolous except for spuds, strawberries, blueberries, herbs, raspberries…and some salad bowls.  Peas and beans.  Garlic.  No lovely rows of veg to be found anywhere, though.

I told Nancy I can grow edibles, in fact started gardening exclusively with edibles in my old Seattle garden till a fateful lecture by Ann Lovejoy turned me into a plant collector.  I related how I had asked Allan last summer “If I grow edibles, will you  cook ’em?”  He had not been very interested in that.  Later I found Nancy had had a little talk with him on this subject.  Thus the nice peas and garlic scapes for dinner!

One project for the weekend was to clean up the east side of the bogsy wood.  I had begun Saturday evening before fireworks but had taken the springy not very good ho-mi back there with me so did not get far.

before

before

Sunday: quite a satisfying after

Sunday: quite a satisfying after

Again I ran across the saying that I quite like and had the bright idea of hanging on the fence.  Allan helped.  Actually, he did all the drilling and wiring and hanging.

sign on old chair back

sign on old chair back

I was thrilled to find some of the beans I had planted and forgotten about had come up.  They got some nice fish fertilizer and Sluggo protection.

at the foot of the purple camellia

at the foot of the purple camellia

Another project: to control (i.e. pull) the nasturtiums.  That’s kind of ironic because they are edible.  But they are swamping the blueberries in one area and that will not do.

before

before

after

after

While I was in there, I got a good look at the poppies in the middle of the garden.

ruffly!

ruffly!

with filipendula

with filipendula

In the center bed, Geranium ‘Rozanne’ is swallowing Alliums, Eryngiums, and Lobelia tupa.  I am beginning to get the idea of how big Rozanne is and will move more plants to give her all the room.

the voracious 'Rozanne'

the voracious ‘Rozanne’

Behind the cat bench another area needed de-nasturtiuming.

before, with the cat bench moved to one side

before, with the cat bench moved to one side

after, just a little less blurry

after, just a little less blurry

I found my lovely white dahlias all sideways under the nasturtiums making it so easy for the slugs to chew upon them.  I hope they recover now that they can see the sky again.

In the greenhouse, I have tomatoes!  Edible!  (Eventually.)

tomatoes

tomatoes

Allan did a marvellous job of weeding the very difficult bed down the east side of the fence: difficult because grass grows in under the fence from next door.

weeded

weeded

And he put up the new sign that we got at Niva green in Long Beach.

over the garage door

over the garage door

from license plates

from license plates

We were both out till dusk, and at the end of the day another lily had begun to open.

twilight in the front garden

twilight in the front garden

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

July 6th:  Saturday had very little gardening time, being bracketed by taking photos at the Market, which you could view here if so inclined and then taking photos at the fireworks show at the Port, which you could view here, if you don’t mind going to Facebook.  I would like to find time to put the fireworks photos up on my other blog, but time eludes me right now.  (I have big plans for my Ilwaco blog…this coming winter!)

The afternoon did allow a few hours in the garden.  In fact, I found it very hard to tear myself away at dusk to get some good pre fireworks photos (but I did, and they came out very well).

In the garden on Saturday

mystery

mystery

I thought aliens had been leaving tracks on the lawn, especially when I saw that Smokey liked to follow the mysterious footprints.  Allan explained that it was something (unfortunate) to do with the new lawnmower and he then spent an hour or so tinkering with its undersides.

new rose

new rose

I love the bloom on one of my new (last year) roses from Heirloom Roses.  It is sort of buried under the rampant blue potato vine so I hope it can battle it out.

I found another rose that I treasure had finally bloomed.  I had brought a cutting of it from my old garden, where I had a large specimen that had come from (my old love of the 80s Bryan’s mother) Louise Runnings.  I am so happy that the cutting took and has finally bloomed.

Veilchenblau rose, a climber

Veilchenblau rose, a climber

Maybe that is why I dreamed about Bryan two nights later.  (It turned into a dream about Mulder and Scully at a restaurant.)  Mixed up with the Veilchenblau is a clematis tangutica and I hope they both climb up into the purple leaved tree on which they are leaning.

Clematis tangutica (or some such)

Clematis tangutica (or some such)

Just for memories:  in June of 1986 (left to right):  Bryan, Gwyneth, Louise, and Morgan Runnings and me, on the porch of the D.O.A. house in Vancouver, BC.

olden days

olden days

Ok, that rose really brought back memories!  Being part of that wonderful family was a great thing, and moving on from those times was the series of seeming mistakes that I referred to a few posts back that miraculously turned into living in beautiful Ilwaco and having right livelihood.  Louise is a Quaker and their song Simple Gifts expresses the process of ending up all right after all:

When true simplicity is gained,
To bow and to bend, we will not be ashamed,
To turn, turn, will be our delight,
Till by turning, turning we come round right

Enough digression!  Back to the garden.

I saw that in the center of the east back garden bed, poppies had seeded themselves and come up; I had to photograph them with a telephoto because they are so far inboard.

poppies

poppies

Calvin sat…

Calvin

Calvin

and Smokey clearly thought the water in the water boxes was too low.  (It has gotten murky so I am using it up for watering.)

Smokey

Smokey

precariously getting a drink

precariously getting a drink

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »