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Posts Tagged ‘Port of Ilwaco boatyard’

Saturday, September 21, 2013

A beautiful day was the last sort of day I expected.  The forecast had called for rain, some wind, thunderstorms, and small hail.  I expected to sleep and then get caught up on the computer.  Instead, I found myself walking down to the Saturday Market at ten fifteen!

evidence of yesterday's rain

evidence of yesterday’s rain

Just as I took the above photo two houses east of ours, I saw Devery and Tuffy coming toward me on their way to the market, so we walked down together.

It was a social occasion for Tuffy.

It was a social occasion for Tuffy.

Mr. TuffMan

Mr. TuffMan

Devery bought some delicious produce from De Asis.  The sight of okra took her back to her childhood on Saint Kitt’s Island.

at De Asis Produce

at De Asis Produce

Then we parted ways as I went on through the length of the market to take more photos for the Discover Ilwaco page.

More produce from De Asis Farm:

peppers

peppers hot

and sweet

and sweet

The market had about half as many booths as usual.  I bought a hoodie from Blue Crab Graphics…a purple zippered one with Kelly’s design one of our lighthouses on it.  Kelly told me that she had set up in the rain and many vendors had not come.  They would be missing a beautiful day.

new hoodie!

new hoodie!

Further on, the English Nursery booth

Further on, the English Nursery booth

reflective pool by the Shoalwater Cove booth

“reflective pool” by the Shoalwater Cove booth

The pedestrian road called Waterfront Way, which is the market promenade on Saturdays, has a slope toward the middle which provides good reflections after rain.

another booth reflected

another booth reflected

The basket from The Basket Case Greenhouse still looks wonderful in front of the Don Nisbett Art Gallery.  Don waters it frequently and lavishly.

Don's basket

Don’s basket

The ones by the Port Office are good, too, although not as lavishly trailing without Don’s extra watering.

Port Office

Port Office

It’s just as well they don’t trail more or they would hide our garden underneath.  (Some of the garden plants also came from The Basket Case:  Eryngiums, Agastaches, Santolinas, Lavenders, Nepeta, and Cosmos and Salvia Viridis from The Planter Box.)

At the Pink Poppy Bakery booth, Madeline was selling some treats to Jim and Jet Neva.  Jim, great friend of port landscaping, may have retired but is still doing a lot for the port.  He was there to put up the second warning flag for tomorrow’s weather (two red triangle flags equal a gale with winds of 39-54 mph).

Jim and Jet at Pink Poppy Bakery

Jim and Jet at Pink Poppy Bakery

flowers from Pink Poppy Farm

flowers from Pink Poppy Farm

I got two Guinness chocolate cupcakes and some shortbread to share with Allan later, then  checked out the westernmost curbside garden on Howerton.

The business for sale is the Imperial Schooner Restaurant.

The business for sale is the Imperial Schooner Restaurant.

And walked past the boatyard…

boatyard

And on up First Avenue, checking the city planters along the way.

the colourful Portside Café

the colourful Portside Café

My destination was a late breakfast at Olde Towne.  Their window display foretells the imminent arrival of autumn.

at Olde Towne

at Olde Towne

In the way of small towns, I ended up having my meal with our client Ann and local masseuse and baker Diane.

Meanwhile, unbeknownst to me, Allan had woken up an hour later than me (lucky to get good sleep!) and gone to the market himself, where he met our friend Donna, her new puppy, Blue, and…some pirates.

Little Blue!

Little Blue!

Donna and the pirates.

Donna and the pirates.

This one looks familiar.

This one looks familiar.

I am sure Queen La De Da had something to do with all this because it was some sort of significant pirate day.  (Talk Like a Pirate Day, I’ll bet.)

While sitting at Olde Towne,  I got a text from Donna that she had Blue over at Judy and Tom’s house.  I had finished my breakfast panini, gulped my coffee, and excused myself in haste so I could hustle home and meet the little pup.

Donna, Blue, and Tom

Donna, Blue, and Tom

Tiny little Blue looked lost in the lawn, which Tom had been unable to mow as often as usual due to weather.

Baby Blue

Baby Blue

After a long visit, during which Allan ambled down to join us (having just returned from the market), I harvested a few things from the garden.  I knew the pole of purple beans in the garden boat would most likely tip over in the wind.

long purple beans

long purple beans

Inspired by the meal yesterday at Himani Indian Cuisine, Allan wanted to make raita.  Maybe because I had found and emailed him a recipe.  So cilantro and mint and a cucumber were harvested for that.  And tomatoes for me and Judy.

The garden looked unkempt but I took most of the afternoon trying to muster the energy to weed three small sections.

sunflowers by the east fence

sunflowers by the east fence

Allan pointed out that when I had sent him out to retrieve Sheila’s hanging vase from  the shed wall after dark the previous evening,  I had neglected to tell him that the photo that reminded me of the vase also showed a big spider.  He noticed the spider when reading the blog later that night!

and the beautiful hanger made by Sheila (New Leaf Plants and Pottery)

vase from New Leaf Pottery…with spider

In the dark, he had gotten tangled up in the web.  Today, the spider was rebuilding.

determination

determination

I miss the vase but it cannot be up there during autumn winds.

A walk around the garden was in order just in case the predicted wind was terribly bad.

Aconitum in back garden

Aconitum in back garden

Verbena bonariensis

Verbena bonariensis

a very nice daylily

a very nice daylily

heavily flowering Fuchsias everywhere

profusely flowering Fuchsias everywhere

From the south end of the garden, I could see the two flags now flying over the port..

gale warning

gale warning

But we had only the slightest breeze and the evening was warm.

late afternoon light

late afternoon light, looking north from the bogsy wood

My usual garden companions had followed me all around.

Smokey

Smokey

(You can see how the back lawn is mostly creeping buttercup.)

Mary

Mary

She's Smokey's mom.

She’s Smokey’s mom.

Suddenly it seemed essential to have the first and possibly last campfire of the season!  I had checked last month with two VIFs (very important local firefighters) and learned that despite a county burn ban it was ok to have a small campfire in one’s own town garden.  Work, and blogging in the evening, had seemed to get in the way of having a fire until now.

At first the wood was steamy from yesterday’s rain.

steamy

steamy

But then it caught very nicely and we had hot dogs and smores for dinner.

a real campfire

a real campfire

Gunnera by the bogsy wood

Gunnera by the bogsy wood

Smokey thought the fire was a great idea.

my shoulder cat

my shoulder cat

During our fire time, not a breath of wind stirred the danger tree almost right overhead.  By next year’s campfire season, we will have dealt with this tree, if the storms don’t do it for us.  Then we won’t have to wait for completely windless nights, as they are rare here.

a quiet danger tree

a quiet danger tree

I collected some kindling from the bogsy wood.

I collected some kindling from the bogsy wood.

And we shared one tall beer featuring Deadliest Catch's Sig Hansen on the bottle.

And we shared one tall beer featuring Deadliest Catch’s Sig Hansen on the bottle.

I had sent last minute messages to Kelly and to Jenna before our spontaneous campfire.  Jenna did not get the message til the next day, and Kelly had to do something else.  We knew Judy and Tom were in for the evening, so it was just me and Allan and the cats…for most of the evening.

no company!

no company!

Light fades behind the alder grove.

Light fades behind the alder grove.

I had left two of the gates open in case Jenna and Don or Kelly showed up.  When it was good and dark and we were letting the fire die down, I looked over Allan’s shoulder and within three feet behind him stood a deer.  I just said “Oh my god!” while I considered whether or not a photo would capture the event and decided that the flash would make everything look too harsh.  “What, WHAT?” Allan exclaimed; “Don’t just say “Oh my GOD! What is it!?”  He later asked me if I had seen any horror movies lately.  I finally told him what was RIGHT behind him and stood up, and the deer scurried away down one of the paths.  A keystone cops in the dark chase ensued with two humans, two flashlights, two open gates and a deer that kept going round and round the dark paths.  We finally got it herded out the side gate to Nora’s driveway, and Allan made a circuit of the yard to make sure the deer had not brought a buddy.

The whole experience, including the deer’s visit, was so enjoyable I wish that we had done it more often.  Now we can only hope for a nice October evening with no wind (because of Danger Tree) to have one more campfire with company.

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September 19, 2012

Oh, I am so hard to please about the weather.  Today was too darn hot.  Tomorrow a big rain storm is supposed to come, and then a rain and wind storm on Sunday.  I resolved not to complain that I was sweltering today because a cold and windy summer day is far worse.  But…it was hot.  All of  74.8 degrees F.

As we got ready to go to work, I noticed a good example of Cosmos ‘Seashells’ in the garden.  I couldn’t get much of it (my favourite cosmos cultivar) this year so wanted some good photos.  A friend of mine decided he just had to be in the photo shoot.

Cosmos 'Seashells'

Cosmos ‘Seashells’

cos

cos cos

Smokey has on his BirdsBeSafe collar.  He usually does not look this sinister.

Cosmos 'Seashells'

Cosmos ‘Seashells’

We did our usual compost buckert switch stop at Olde Towne…where more out of town bicycle tourists were enjoying the great ambience.

Olde Towne Café

Olde Towne Café

And then went to Seaview to have a look at a couple of landscaping needs at the Sou’wester Lodge.  Oh what memories it brought back to be there because for my first year on the Peninsula, that is where I lived.

Sou'wester in snow, Dec. '92

Sou’wester in snow, Dec. ’92

Now under new ownership, The Sou’wester has a plants for sale area by the front door.

plants

To the north of the front door, the garden I planted years ago has turned to an area of large shrubs and trees.

part of my old garden

part of my old garden

In the almost twenty years since I left there, many of the garden beds around the cabins have turned back to plain lawn, as one would expect, but some plants remain including the rose Felicité et Perpetué.   I did not take as many pictures as I should have because of having an interesting time talking with new owner Thandi Rosenbaum.

I had not been back into the big historic lodge since President’s Day weekend of 1994. It was wonderful to be there again and brought back memories good and bad, but all worth having.

I had forgotten much, like what the fireplace looked like, even though I must have cleaned the hearth many times.

I had forgotten much, like what the fireplace looked like, even though I must have cleaned the hearth many times.

We looked at the four nightly rental apartments on the second floor of the lodge.  The “honeymoon suite” has a different lace curtain hanging over the sleeping nook but has the same magical feeling.

On the second floor.

Lacy sleeping area…On the second floor.

The Sou’wester is known for its vintage trailer accommodations and Thandi has  commissioned some trailer art.

trailer paintings in apartment three

trailer paintings in apartment three

I have always loved the way the light falls through the windows of the lodge.

probably in apartment two

probably in apartment two

I think two is the one with the lacy bed…one the one with a red rug…and three and four the two west facing ones.  It has been a long time!

This window of number four faces the second story porch.

This window of number four faces the second story porch.

I took this photo from the same window in 1992.

I took this photo from the same window in December 1992.

I love the postcards over the bed in one of the apartments.

postcard art

postcard art

The view from apartment four made me think about how now I would know better than to plant that beech under the power lines.  I NOW remember that I thought it was going to be a short, weeping tree.  I got it from Hall Gardens, a wonderful home nursery that existed near Nahcotta way back then (and later became the private home called Gypsy Pond).

view with a potentially too large tree

view with a potentially too large tree (planted by me in 1993)

Amy, the housekeeper who has worked there for many more years than I did and who also sells plants there, asked me if I could identify two shrubs out by J Place.  One we thought must be an Osmanthus.  The other…I can almost remember.  I got it from Heronswood mail order, probably.  Thandi stands next to it for size:

She's 5'2".

She’s 5’2″.

Here’s a close up of the leaves…not very good because it was such a hot sunny day.

mystery shrub

mystery shrub

leaves

leaves…what is???

We looked inside the amazing two story trailer called The African Queen, of which I had fond memories just because I liked it.  When Amy spoke of not loving to clean it, I do remember it was a challenge with all its nooks.  I also learned that in later years the previous owners of the lodge, cabins and trailers, for whom I had worked, had the staff (staff? before, it was just me!) just put sheets and bedding in the trailers and not make up the beds.  I had to make every bed, and..with eighteen or so apartments, cabins and trailers, there were…oh I don’t even want to remember.  The trailers were, of course, the hardest, being built in tightly.

While we looked at the interesting vintage RV, Thandi and her friend Alex pulled Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’, after we told them it could be pulled and not just cut back.

next to the African Queen

next to the African Queen

I used to have African Queen Oriental lilies and an African Queen Buddliea planted by The African Queen…I had forgotten the latter even existed till Amy reminded me.  (It is still there, planted long before Buddleias made the invasive list….)

I said the volunteer tree should be cut down so the trailer mural shows!

The mural on the Disoriented Express still shows up well.

The Disoriented Express

The Disoriented Express

I told Thandi, looking at the remains of my old garden and at the shrubs which would look so much better deadwooded, that I could imagine, if I lived in walking distance, coming over just for the fun of bringing some of it back.  She offered to have me chauffeured from Ilwaco.  Hmm.

one of my Sou'wester garden beds in 1993

one of my Sou’wester garden beds in 1993

Through making this garden I met Maxine…and her daughter Jo…and my gardening career started so it was worthwhile.

We passed this year’s possible landscaping job at Sou’wester on to our friend Ed Strange who has a young(er) helper who might feel more inclined that we do to tear out an overgrown garden bed.  Then we can help plant it with something better than Siberian iris and the blah running yellow kind of Hypericum.

After all this goofing off, we went up to Long Beach to deadhead.  With rain predicted, we skipped watering the planters.  The soil was damp, yet the plants looked a little thirsty….but a good rain will be effective because of the already wet soil in the planters.

painted sage still looking grand

painted sage still looking grand

It better HAD rain or we will have to go back and water!

painted sage and cosmos

painted sage and cosmos

Oh, big news….I know the names now of the three cultivars of painted sage (Salvia viridis, sometimes called horminum):  Marble Arch White, Blue, and Pink…looked at the seed packets at The Planters Box for a friend who needed the information.

Every year, when I see the dahlias in a couple of the planters, I think I simply must plant more “patio” dahlias.

fabulous dahlias

fabulous dahlias

Maybe in 2014 I will remember to do so.  They come back every year and bloom like crazy.

Speaking of crazy, check out the nasturtium…this one gets extra liquid fertilizer when the city crew waters the hanging basket overhead.

in front of Home at the Beach

in front of Home at the Beach

trailing into the street!

trailing into the street!

by the door of the Wooden Horse gift shop, very beachy

by the door of the Wooden Horse gift shop, very beachy

We next went to the Anchorage Cottages.  I intended to do nothing but quickly deadhead the containers, as we had done a lot of pruning there on Monday.  Somehow, more pruning ensued today.  Manager Beth asked if we could limb up a tree so she could get to the outside of the office window.

done, and looks great although I forgot before pics!

done, and looks great although I forgot before pics!

The volunteer hebe that was under a low limb is getting sun for the first time!

We also pruned the Ceanothus so that the number one shows really well at last.

Ceanothus, pruned

Ceanothus, pruned

During the course of getting tools in and out, I photographed our rake in the back of the van.

Yesterday, I told Allan this rake makes us look poor.

Yesterday, I told Allan this rake makes us look poor.

We like the style very much and cannot seem to find a new one like it.

After The Anchorage, we deadheaded cosmos and weeded at the Boreas Inn.

Boreas Inn, west garden, with the sun cooling off a bit at last.

Boreas Inn, west garden, with the sun cooling off a bit at last.

The only Lobelia tupa that bloomed for me this year still looks magnificent even as it goes to seed.

The Boreas tupa....

The Boreas tupa….

a garden doodad backed with Phormium

a garden doodad backed with Phormium

If the Lobelia tupa is blooming here because it is happy next to the Phormium, we have a problem…because I like to get rid of Phormiums now whenever I can!

Boreas, looking east

Boreas, looking east

Allan remembered that we had to deadhead the Long Beach welcome sign; I might have forgotten.

back side of welcome sign with Acidanthera

back side of welcome sign with Acidanthera

Six Agyranthemum Butterflies later, we departed to water again at Crank’s Roost.

Crank's, view from the back porch

Crank’s, view from the back porch

Finally, in the last hour of daylight, we filled water buckets at the boatyard and Allan watered the Ilwaco planters while I groomed them.

Ilwaco boatyard

Ilwaco boatyard

I happened to see Thandi and Alex from the Sou’wester again as I deadheaded near the Ilwaco Antique Gallery.  After another pleasant conversation they went off to walk along the port and watch the moonrise.  While I did the last few planters, I suddenly had this vision of living in an old trailer at the Sou’wester again and bringing back my old gardens.  In an alternative universe, that would be fantastic.  In this one, I guess I can’t go back!

Allan and I dropped off the trailer at home as the sun set….

looking west on Lake Street

looking west on Lake Street

We had a choice between making a fire in the back yard fire pit before the rains come and get our alder wood all wet…or going to see the harvest moon rise at the port.  It would be too hard to set up a campfire at the last minute in the twilight, so the port moonrise won.

harvest moon

harvest moon

moon

The sky seemed to get lighter as the big moon rose.

moon

 

moonlight path

moonlight path

Allan’s photos:

moon

Allan did the best job of getting the moon's face.  (We both have dinky cameras.)

Allan did the best job of getting the moon’s face. (We both have dinky cameras.)

higher

higher

and higher still

over the tidal flat

over the tidal flat

moonlight on the water

moonlight on the water between the port and Stringtown Road

And then, home….to pick some eggplants, as the edible harvest continues.

another little harvest

another little harvest

These are the first eggplants I have ever grown.  I hope they were picked at the right stage.  Allan has prepared them according to Joy of Cooking while I wrote this, and now it is time to eat them.!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Wednesday, September 4, 2013

Almost always my workday in other people’s gardens begins with some thoughts about our own.  Today, the view from the kitchen sink window…

sink view

sink view

…inspired me to get a photo of a beautifully silvery corner of Allan’s ferny shade garden.

fern collection edged with ajuga

fern collection edged with ajuga

During a brief stop at Olde Towne to switch compost buckets, I added some Alliums to a dried bouquet I had started there earlier in the week.  It seemed to me that the Alliums that blow down in the boatyard garden will get a bigger audience in a vase on the Olde Towne counter.

at Olde Towne Café

at Olde Towne Café

We did not linger because we needed to start at our furthest north garden, Marilyn’s.

Marilyn's garden, the usual view

Marilyn’s garden, the usual view

Eventually I hope to do a reprise post of how this view changed over the year.

Next, the Wiegardt Gallery:

Wiegardt Gallery garden

Wiegardt Gallery garden

Japanese anemone, north side Wiegardt garden

Japanese anemone, north side Wiegardt garden

I would not let loose the Japanese anemone in a flower border but it seems to behave all right back here in the shade among the ferns.

Then came the weekly deadheading at the increasingly drought tolerant Oman Builders Supply garden in Ocean Park.  Today was not a day with extra time to stop for a snack at Jack’s Country Store.

OBS garden

OBS garden

Gaura 'Whirling Butterflies' and some late poppies at OBS

Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies’ and some late poppies at OBS

At Klipsan Beach Cottages we try to spend at least an hour a week grooming the garden.

KBC, looking into the fenced garden

KBC, looking into the fenced garden

some annual colour that Mary added by the pond

some annual colour that Mary added by the pond

Hydrangea 'Izu No Hana'

Hydrangea ‘Izu No Hana’

Look how tall that Eucryphia is!

Look how tall that Eucryphia is!

I needed to talk with Mary about something so went up to the cottage she was cleaning.  The place was unusually empty at mid week and the ocean view decks looked so peaceful.

west facing cottage decks at KBC

west facing cottage decks at KBC

At our next stop, Andersen’s, we weeded the box by the road because car-watchers would for sure be sitting out there during Rod Run, a classic car event that would take over the Peninsula on the upcoming weekend.  The cars cruise all around the Peninsula and car lovers sit and watch.

Pacific Highway and 138th

Pacific Highway and 138th, with staffer Al in the background mowing by the road

My energy was low and I helped myself along with a handful of wake up beans (coffee beans covered in dark chocolate).

The Andersen's poppy field is pretty much poppyless now.

The Andersen’s poppy field is pretty much poppyless now.

At Andersen’s, two great big car-hauling trailers were already parked in which guests had transported  their rods.  (“Trailer Queens”, these cars are called, the ones that are not driven in.)  And a couple of rods rumbled into the park.  (These are classic American cars made prior to a certain year, sometimes souped up for more speed.   I personally prefer a nice British or Italian car but never mind.)

We got back down to Ilwaco and to our weeding at the boatyard.   It’s a long strip and to finish it in time for Slow Drag at the Port, we had to fit it in around other jobs.

Ilwaco boatyard

Ilwaco boatyard

The least attractive part of the garden is a section that the port crew did not entirely clear so I reclaimed it by adding some soil and doing some weeding…oh, a couple of years ago.  It never got a fresh new set of cool plants so once the poppies are done has very little structure.

before and after

before and after…adding good plants will be another improvement project for fall

We worked till dusk again…but remember, we don’t start early in the morning.

sky over the boatyard

sky over the boatyard (with Stipa gigantea)

looking north past the oil tanks

looking north past the oil tanks

and south over Jessie's

and south over Jessie’s

Thursday, September 6, 2013

Morning home garden thought:  I love the big puddle that forms in the Lake Street depression outside our driveway when it rains.  Allan always hopes the city will fill it in.  (I’ve told him to just ask them to, and I think they will.)  But I like the way it gives me a raindrop weather report and its reflective quality for photos of the house!

raindrops in our puddle

raindrops in our puddle from our front window

Thursday:  the big push to make the Port of Ilwaco gardens perfect for the Slow Drag.  By Friday morning we figured (correctly) that flagged ropes would be run down the side of Howerton Street making garden access difficult for weeding.

The Phormiums and the pampas grass that I so wanted to get the port crew to remove from the street garden by Marie Powell’s Gallery looked…okay today.  I might lose my incentive to get this done and be stuck with them for another year!

Looking east from Powell Gallery

Looking east from Powell Gallery

The spot by the Ilwaco pavilion (restrooms) that we decided to take on before Blues and Seafood showed the effect of having had dandelions gone to seed there for years…  I forgot the after photo so took one on Slow Drag evening (the next day)

before and a belated after

before and a belated after

As soon as the weather is reliably moist, I’ll put some starts of small grasses and santolina in here.  Oh, maybe that gorgeous reddish unidentified grass (might by pink muhly grass) from my garden! What’s in there now is Pacific Reed Grass which I find a bit dull (though native and all).

At the west end of the port we just had to do a small amount of weeding at the garden by Queen La De Da’s.

down by Queen La De Da's

down by Queen La De Da’s

There was a restaurant sign that kept falling down at this end so there is nothing planted there.  It’s fixed now (bolted to a post) so I could fill this area in.

an Agastache 'Acapulco Salmon and Pink' still blooming

an Agastache ‘Acapulco Salmon and Pink’ still blooming

Even though the poppies are gone, there is still enough going on here to make it interesting.  (And the big test?  During Slow Drag, this garden did not get walked on (much) even though it was by the starting line of the race…so it looked enough like a garden to keep people off… More on this during the Slow Drag blog entry!)

At the Time Enough Books garden, I cut back the Ceanothus that was overhanging the street in order to make plenty of room for pedestrians.

It was out as far as where the sidewalk is damp.

It was out as far as where the sidewalk is damp.

This did NOT look enough like a garden, apparently, because during Slow Drag some people put their chairs right in it!  (Yes, there will be a photo of that!)

With the Port gardens put to rights we headed north, first deadheading the cosmos at the Depot Restaurant.

The Depot, same old view!

The Depot, same old view!

and more admiration for Solidago 'Fireworks'

and more admiration for Solidago ‘Fireworks’

When we drove through downtown Long Beach, we could tell Rod Run was imminent.

long beach

North of town we weeded and deadheaded at the Anchorage and I did a limbing up of Viburnum by cottage 6.  Here is the “before” from last week:

What was I thinking?

two weeks ago

And the after.  I think the two long curvy branches on the sides of the one to the right should go, but Allan disagreed.

after

after

I also have a problem with the squatty short trunk on the left side.  It has to be low to let the number of the cottage show….But if I cut it to the ground, the left hand shrub will look lopsided.  What do you think?

nearby, a favourite of mine:  Fuchsia 'Hawkhead'

nearby, a favourite of mine: Fuchsia ‘Hawkhead’

The pots were windblown.  I hope they have a certain weather-sculpted charm.

Picotee petunia with a chunk missing

Picotee petunia with a chunk missing

While I was deadheading sweet peas in the office patio I heard a deep rumbling.  Sure enough, a guest with a hot rod had arrived.

at The Anchorage

at The Anchorage

As I put my tools in our van, Allan chatted with the owner about…cars.

car talk

car talk

Thanks to a good rain, the Long Beach planters did not need watering but we did check most of them for deadheading.  The Rod Run audience was already setting up chairs in the street to see the cars come in.   The most avid fans start their vigil on Thursday and watch cars till they drive away on Sunday or Monday.

car watchers

car watchers

I appreciate the ones who bring chairs.  I can guarantee there will be much planter sitting over the weekend.

At least the hanging baskets will be unscathed...I hope.

At least the hanging baskets will be unscathed…I hope.

Oh dear, how will the city crew get through the throngs of people to water the baskets?  Probably at 7 AM!

We went back just north of downtown to the Boreas.  I do like to do jobs in order from north to south or vice versa but earlier our friend Ed Strange had been parked in “our” spot while mowing the lawn!

after deadheading at the Boreas

after deadheading at the Boreas

As we drove south through Long Beach again, I saw that the planter sitting had begun.  There were two men parked on this one, but one of them is behind the two women.

planter sitters

planter sitters

A nice Veronica is under that one man’s butt  (That’s a flowering plant, not a person!).  This does not bother me as much as you might think.  Over the years, I have gotten inured to what Rod Run audiences do to the planters.  I just observe in amazement, really.

They may not know that, at least at one time, there was a fine for sitting on the planters (except for the benches, of course, which are on the sidewalk side).  Or so I was told by then city administrator Nabiel Shawa, who may have been just humouring me.  And if it existed, it was never enforced.  (Long Beach town could get rich on that fine during Rod Run weekend.)

We finished the day doing more weeding at the boatyard garden.  Lots of people would be driving and walking by there the next evening for the Slow Drag at the Port.

a beautiful reseeded four o clock at the boatyard

a beautiful reseeded four o clock at the boatyard

Gallardia continues to dazzle.

Gallardia continues to dazzle.

I adore Oregano 'Hopley's Purple'

I adore Oregano ‘Hopley’s Purple’

Cosmos, Gaura 'Whirling Butterflies', Artemisia 'Powis Castle'

Cosmos, Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies’, Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’

For some reason I have thought the white Gaura looks great in a garden but the pink Gaura only looks good in containers.  This pink one might make me change my mind.

I think it's 'Passionate Rainbow'.

I think it’s ‘Passionate Rainbow’.

Rain threatened after forecasts of thunder and lightning.   The Kaisha Lanae had her lights on out in the water.

a dark evening

a dark evening

The rain held off long enough so that we had time to weed the garden at the very east end of Howerton…one that has not had any supplemental water for a couple of months.

Howerton and Elizabeth, looking west

Howerton and Elizabeth, looking west

Stipa tenuissima in the wind

Stipa tenuissima in the wind

What a good sense of accomplishment.   We had gotten all the port gardens done and finally freed up a day to for weeding Ann’s garden.  With Rod Run traffic, a Friday job just  a few blocks from home would be perfect.

Friday, September 6, 2013:  before Slow Drag

At home garden thought:  Can anyone tell me what this cool plant is in my front garden?  It’s right by when I get into our vehicle in the morning.

probably from a Hardy Pant Study Weekend plant sale!

probably from a Hardy Pant Study Weekend plant sale!

I had been quite pleased with the accomplishment of getting all the Port gardens done, till I realized I had forgotten the one on the south side of the Port Office.

Allan weeding at the port office

Allan weeding at the port office

The morning was one of those still ones with the water like a mirror.

rumrunner

After that, we got back to Ann’s at last,  We had left last time to go to the Pacific County Fair, thinking we would be back the following week, and then got rained out.   In bad weather it is all we can do to get our city and resort gardens done.

The neighbour cat came over and said hello while I was weeding.

a pretty and friendly cat with a big fluffy tail

a pretty and friendly cat with a big fluffy tail

S/he may or may not have been welcome in Ann’s garden but got quite comfy on the back porch.

right at home

right at home

Allan was working on the side of the house so the wheelbarrow was far from me.  I carried my bucket down to the dump area at the bottom of the sloping lot.

admiring some 'Bright Lights' chard on the way

admiring some ‘Bright Lights’ chard on the way

And got a different view from the house.  It reminds me of a farm in the city.

at the bottom of the hill below the fenced veg and berry gardens

at the bottom of the hill below the fenced veg and berry gardens

I divided up some golden marjoram and spread it around the flower garden.  This might add some cohesiveness.

imagine a nice repeating gold along the edge

imagine a nice repeating gold along the edge

I put in a start of shasta daisy, some toadflax, some Phygelius.  (The deer might nibble the latter but they let it bloom at Marilyn’s garden.)   Now I know it also needs some Solidago ‘Fireworks’.

some new garden art by a friend of Ann's

some new garden art by a friend of Ann’s

I’m pleased to report that we got around the entire garden and were able to leave by a quarter to four to go to Slow Drag.  Last year we had also chosen Ann’s as the best place to work on Rod Run Friday and had gotten so absorbed in weeding (it was a new job then and we had a lot to do there) that we missed the first hour of the drag and some of the best photo opportunities of cars going round and round and round and round.

Walking down to the Port I paused to contemplate the pruning going on, quite visible from the street, in the “lost garden” that I think I will soon have to call the formerly lost garden.

oh dear...

oh dear…

The Hawaiian shaved ice booth was just arriving….

cone

Next, some Slow Drag photos.  It sort of relates to gardening because, well, our gardens are there.

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