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Posts Tagged ‘private gardens’

Saturday, 11 February 2017

I got these in the mail from a friend:

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On my last full day of uninterrupted staycation reading, I finished the huge history of WWII and then felt restless because of the sudden emergence of sunshine.

No winter gardening had taken place because of unusually cold weather.  Books (and a sore back, now all better) had won out over my plan to mulch with 6-8 yards of topsoil.  Now the first crocuses are out and can’t be buried with mulch.  I emerged from the house to see them.

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the first crocuses

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at the base of tetrapanax

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more clumps, and shotweed

The apricot scent of Hamamelis (witch hazel) wafted all over the front garden.

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raggedy yellow flowers with the most powerful scent

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a bronze Hamamelis

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not as fragrant as the yellow

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another pale one

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I added several new ones last summer.

I found myself gardening and got some more hellebores clipped back.

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before

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after

Soon, though, one more book called me back inside.  It had been recommended by a friend, had 450 small print pages and was due back at the library in four days.  I had intended to have it all read by now and instead was just beginning.

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By the end of the day, I can tell you that this is a shocking must read for citizens of the USA who were not taught by life or by school about the enormous number of small towns (many in the north and in the west!) which through violence and discrimination remained almost totally white even into the 1990s (and beyond?).

Meanwhile, in Oysterville, Dave and Mel were helping to dig up and move an enormous rhododendron several blocks down the road to THE Oysterville garden.

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Melissa’s photo

Sunday, 12 February 2017

Good weather would have had us starting work today had not two events intervened.  The first was a two hour long meeting of a local Indivisible group.  The town of Naselle, a half an hour away, had been chosen for the meeting because that location allowed an easier drive for folks from north county.  We had a group of thirty concerned citizens, sprung out of a larger Indivisible group from north coast Oregon.  Indivisible groups are forming all over the nation by those of us who are deeply concerned at the dark and ominous and non egalitarian turn our country is taking.

It was a joy to attend a gathering of like minded folk from as far north as Aberdeen, as well as the Peninsula and South Bend and Rosburg.

Next door to the meeting place was a most glorious private garden which we admired from the parking lot.

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a large Naselle garden

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Allan’s photo

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next door: the Naselle Library garden

Back in Ilwaco, we went straight (and late for the party) to Salt Pub, pausing only to look at work waiting for us in a curbside garden at the port.

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pondering work

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soon….

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Allan’s photo

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5 PM view from Salt Pub

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a private party at Salt

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Allan’s photo

The occasion was the birthday of Boreas Inn Bill, who said he did not even know he had that many friends on the peninsula!  Dave and Mel joined us because they now care for the Boreas Inn garden.  It has been good for us to have their great gardening business, Sea Star Gardening, to recommend as we cut back to a manageable amount of work.

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Pink Poppy Bakery cakes

In  the evening, I got through another 75 pages of Sundown Towns.

The cats are going to miss staycation reading days, as will I.

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lapcats Frosty and Smokey

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Frosty at bedtime

Sundown Towns is going to be a couple of days overdue by the time I’m done with it. On Monday, work season begins (with more rainy reading days sure to come before too long).

 

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 Tuesday, 5 July 2016

apples at home (Allan's photo)

apples at home (Allan’s photo) and one scabby pear

Mike’s Garden

A few blocks east is the mayor’s garden, which we tidy up every couple of weeks.  Today:

from across the street

from across the street

from the corner

from the corner

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Mike's Escallonia iveyi

Mike’s Escallonia iveyi

I am pretty sure that this escallonia is grown from a cutting of the Escallonia iveyi at the Anchorage Cottages (originally from Heronswood Nursery, because the Anchorage was owned at one time by Dan Hinkley’s husband’s sister).  In 2003, Carol Jones of The Elves Did It Gardening worked with me there and took some cuttings. Later, she designed and installed Mayor Mike’s beautiful garden.  The ironic thing is that my own garden lacks this stunning pure white escallonia.  I tried cuttings last year; maybe some are out there and not big enough to bloom yet.

the fruit of the native wild cucumber vine

the fruit of the native wild cucumber vine in Mike’s shaded back garden.

Long Beach

We watered and groomed all the main street planters and the street tree pocket gardens.

by Lewis and Clark Square. The man with a red shirt (left) is reading his way along plaques that describe Lewis and Clark's journey.

by Lewis and Clark Square. The man with a red shirt (left) is reading his way along plaques that describe Lewis and Clark’s journey.

Big planter in L&C Square. That is Cotoneaster 'Coral Beauty' on the edge, planted 16 years ago or more. It got sort of made fun of in the lecture at Hardy Plant weekend, about new and much improved cotoneasters. I still rather like this one.

Big planter in L&C Square. That is Cotoneaster ‘Coral Beauty’ on the edge, planted 16 years ago or more. It got sort of made fun of in the lecture about new and improved cotoneasters at Hardy Plant weekend. I still rather like this one although I do regret planting something so big…I just wanted to keep people from sitting on the planter.

Public gardening: I had my bucket on this bench, and a jacket someone had left, and was just hooking up the hose when a woman came and shoved the bucket and jacket aside and lit up a cigarette. I did, softly and kindly (really!), get her to move to the planter nearby that I had already watered. (!!!)

Public gardening: I had my bucket on this bench, and a jacket someone had left, and was just hooking up the hose when a woman came and shoved the bucket and jacket aside and plopped down and lit up a cigarette. I did, softly and kindly (really!), get her to move to the planter nearby that I had already watered. (!!!) It was not her jacket.

One of my painted sage (late to bloom this year) was pulled totally out of the soil. It had happened so recently that it had not wilted at all and I think i saved it. Note to self: Geranium 'Rozanne' here next year.

One of my painted sage (late to bloom this year) was pulled totally out of the soil. It had happened so recently that it had not wilted at all and I think I saved it. Note to self: Geranium ‘Rozanne’ here next year.

Town was still busy.

Town was still busy.

On the busiest weekends, the stoplights are turned off to avoid traffic jams, so pedestrians cross every which way.

On the busiest weekends, the stoplights are turned off to avoid traffic jams, so pedestrians cross every which way.

lambs ears, and the new little round silver plant whose name I have forgotten, and santolina

three silvers: lambs ears, and the new little round silver plant whose name I have forgotten, and santolina

I encountered a young man with a guitar lounging supine on the bench and using a clump of Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ as a pillow while smoking a cigarette.  I asked him to get up.  He did not.  I told him to move.  He did not.  I threatened to water him.  No motion.  I said I might call the police as he was smoking illegally close to a shop doorway.  Finally he moved.  By then it was funny and we both laughed.  I told him that public gardening can be rewarding but sometimes works my last nerve.  He said “Sorry in advance for my language, but I am sorry for being such a dick.”

sedums used as pillow

sedums used as pillow; plaque goes back to long gone planter volunteer days

Later the same guy told Allan “You’re using a LOT of water!” while Allan was watering the tree.  Allan felt it was in a reproving tone.

Just the Eryngium (Allan's photo)

 Eryngium in street tree garden (Allan’s photo)

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue' in Fifth Street Park

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ in Fifth Street Park

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Bees love it.

Busy town: Fifth Street Park (Allan's photo)

Busy town: Fifth Street Park (Allan’s photo)

Full sidewalks make navigating tricky with hose and bucket. (Allan's photo)

Full sidewalks make navigating tricky with hose and bucket. (Allan’s photo)

When open, these lilies colour coordinate with the Benson's sign.

When open, these lilies colour coordinate with the Benson’s sign.

Carousel

Carousel

deadheading and watering...under the very big hanging basket

deadheading and watering…under the very big hanging basket

lavender that looks good on just one side. (The back is bare and woody). Allan's photo

lavender that looks good on just one side. (The back is bare and woody). Allan’s photo

Eryngium variifolium under a street tree (Allan's photo)

Eryngium variifolium under a street tree.  I love them all. (Allan’s photo)

two dogs. (Allan's photo)

two dogs. (Allan’s photo)

Hardy fuchsia and agastache in my favourite planter by Dennis Co. (Allan's photo)

Hardy fuchsia and Agastache ‘Acapulco Salmon and Pink’ in my favourite planter by Dennis Co. (Allan’s photo)

This pleases my fannish heart (and shows how crowded the sidewalks were). (Allan's photo)

This pleases my fannish heart (and shows how crowded the sidewalks were). (Allan’s photo)

Fish Alley (Allan's photo)

Fish Alley (Allan’s photo)

Later, Fifth Street Park was quieter. (Allan's photo)

Later, Fifth Street Park was quieter. (Allan’s photo)

We worked on the center berm. Eventually we will be able to cross it off the work list! It is the only project on the list right now.

We worked on the center berm. Eventually we will be able to cross it off the work list! It is the only project on the list right now.

Cries of WHEEEE from the little fish rides nearby.

Cries of WHEEEE from the little fish rides nearby.

A local businessman who owns several well run local businesses has bought the rides and they will soon be refurbished, we hear.

Center berm is SO boring and may end up just getting string trimmer treatment.

Center berm is SO boring and may end up just getting string trimmer treatment.

Allan's photos: before

Allan’s photos: before (most of this was the rather pretty annual Briza media (quaking grass) that has now gone dry.

after: quick strimmer solution

after: quick strimmer solution for hardpacked miserable area

I should give up and plant more rugosas in the bare areas. Giving up because i did not want a monoculture of roses.

I should give up and plant more rugosas in the bare areas. Giving up because i did not want a monoculture of roses.  This is one place I will leave salal.

Stipa gigantea on a prettier berm (Allan's photo)

Stipa gigantea on a prettier berm (Allan’s photo)

Ilwaco

I had every intention of weeding at the Ilwaco boatyard garden while Allan watered the Ilwaco planters.  And then I simply could not.  I felt guilty till I realized that Allan would be done working quicker if he did not have to drop off the debris trailer at the boatyard, then pick up the water trailer, then take the water trailer home and come retrieve the debris trailer.  So I went home and worked on the garden tour blog posts and Allan took all the rest of these photos:

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taken while filling the water tank at the boatyard

taken while filling the water tank at the boatyard

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sweet peas on boatyard fence

sweet peas on boatyard fence

another break in the hose

another break in the hose

calendula flowers and seeds

calendula flowers and seeds

This nasturtium grows outside of our dear friend Jenna's Queen La De Da studio so gets extra water from her.

This nasturtium grows outside of our dear friend Jenna’s Queen La De Da studio so gets extra water from her.

 

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On the way to work Monday, we touched up the Ilwaco Post Office garden.

not really work, a volunteer project

not really work, a volunteer project

lily and Eryngium

lily and Eryngium

Then I went off garden touring with Nancy while Allan undertook a Long Beach project on his own: the pond at the corner of Pacific and Bolstadt; it had become a haze of horsetail since our spring cleanup there.

before and after

before and after with weed buckets

He had just finished when I rejoined him and we accomplished the replanting of the Fish Alley planters. The Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ had gotten leggy and tired from fighting the wind.

before...and afters

before…and afters

I am determined to have to water these less, as they are a bucket watering chore, so am going with Sedums, Sempervivums, Thymes.

With that accomplished, we did more weeding at Jo’s garden. A weekly visit between now and the July 20th garden tour will keep it in tip top shape.

Jo's east garden

Jo’s east garden

Jo's, looking west

Jo’s, looking west

one of Jo's feeders

one of Jo’s feeders

adorable youngster

adorable youngster

east side patio

north side patio

Not only did we weed but also did a bit of planting; Jo had gotten some lovely plants to fill in the hole where we removed a daylily last time.

newly planted spot

newly planted spot

We closed Monday out with some planting at Gene’s garden. I wanted the streetside garden to be full and had felt it needed more along the edges. Gene had bought some Dianthus and some Alyssum from the Basket Case and we had a few more plants to add.

Gene has been working hard on new areas.

Gene has been working hard on new areas.

I now feel the garden looks full.

I now feel the garden looks full.

ready for the tour! with a month to fill in

ready for the tour! with a month to fill in

Tuesday, we finally made it back to Casa Pacifica. Increasing rain did not stop us from getting the garden looking satisfactory again. We had intended to put in the day on the Long Beach Bolstadt beach approach garden, to get it spiffing for Doggie Olympic Games on the beach the coming Saturday, but an intense wind changed our garden choice to this sheltered somewhat inland one.

no before picture, but this area had been no longer recognizable as garden!

no before picture, but this area had been no longer recognizable as garden!

before and...improved

before and…improved

lawn island, before and after

lawn island, before and after

Dusty kept a close eye on my work.

Dusty kept a close eye on my work.

Spook continued to be shy.

Spook continued to be shy.

the back garden, south side

the back garden, south side

the back garden, north side

the back garden, north side

rose campion and lavender

rose campion and lavender

Halmiocistus wintonensis draping the rock wall

Halmiocistus wintonensis draping the rock wall

and its flowers

and its flowers

 

groundcover wall

groundcover wall

I would so love to see this garden mulched with yards and yards of dairy manure, and I would so like to avoid being the one to heft yards and yards of it up over those rocks. I must suggest that perhaps this garden owner could find a young person who wants to make a day’s wages shifting lovely non smelly Cow Fiber.

After almost five hours we left. Unusually for us we ended the work day early. There was simply nowhere else close enough by to finish the day out of the blustery wind (although it did die down enough so that we were able to enjoy our own garden!) First we ran an errand to the Basket Case Greenhouse, where their plants told the tale of how windy it had been.

toppled and strewn about!

toppled and strewn about!

We chose a hanging basket to go by our garage. It was a tough choice. Would it be this one?

callibrachoa dark red

calibrachoa dark red

Or this one?

double callies

double callies

Or this one?

blue and pink

blue and pink

Allan picked this one, liking the way that the yellow matched some of the trim on our house:

new basket at home

new basket at home

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Our mission today was to get a lot done at Jo’s, a head start on getting her little paradise ready for the garden tour.  As usual, on the way to a special “all-day” job we often have to stop and check on a couple of other gardens, so June 18th began at the Depot where we staked the Eryngiums.

The Depot garden

The Depot garden

We had some dianthus for Jo and also some red ones for Veterans Field in Long Beach.  Rather than schlep them back and forth we went straight to the field to plant them.  The wind was fierce, and I blame that and one other thing for the Vet Field garden no longer being up to my standards.  The other thing is that it was planted too early to be ready for the beginning of May dedication, and the annuals have suffered, as I predicted.  So now we are filling in with more plants to spiff it up.  But:

a pretty big rain!

a pretty big rain!

Allan kept planting, saying it was not raining.  I call this rain, and sideways rain at that, so I waited it out in the car, not wanting to be cold and wet for the rest of the day at Jo’s.  The edge of the sky was bright to the south, from whence came the wind, so the storm blew over fairly quickly.

Veterans Field garden; the perennials look best.

Veterans Field garden; the perennials look best.

We did not put in all the little plastic-y flags and frankly, I am not thrilled about it.  It’s not the Fourth of July, Veterans Day or…Flag Day, so…why?  I wouldn’t say it bothers me; my reaction is not that intense, but I would prefer the garden be just red white and blue on its own!

I swear it looks better in the photo than in real life.

I swear it looks better in the photo than in real life.

Finally: to Jo’s!  where we were greeted by Jo, Bob, and by darling Coco.

Coco

Coco

the cutest girl!

the cutest girl!

Not only did we have a friendly pup to amuse us but also young birds.  They were capable of flying, but were not afraid of us at all.

on the feeder

on the feeder

bird

poised to fly

poised to fly

It flew over to the water feature.

It flew over to the water feature.

and got good and wet when the bucket splashed!

and got good and wet when the bucket splashed!

Then two little birds sat on a railing to dry off.

all fluffed up

all fluffed up

birds

You can see Allan in the background, above, taking photos with his iPhone.  They show how close the birds let me get to take pictures.

photo session

photo session

bird

Oh…work did get done.  Here is a before photo of the newest area:

before

before

We decided a great big boring daylily should come out, and Jo said, “Should it come out today?”  Why…yes!

Jo and Allan

Jo and Allan

after, with the new plants showing better.

after, with the new plants showing better.

Jo is excited about getting a new plant for the new empty spot when she goes to Back Alley Gardens (on our recommendation) later this week.

As always, her garden is so pretty it is a great pleasure to work in and will be a big hit on the tour.

entry

entry

looking west

looking west

Beyond this garden, Jo and Bob also own a big grassy lot.  Since she had said after last year’s tour that she wanted her garden to look just like mine, and we had therefore added more perennials in the area out of which we took that daylily today, I told her I had figured out how her garden could REALLY be like mine:  Make three very large mixed beds out on that great big lawn!  Hmmm….

Some more details of her garden:

roses

"Maxine's white rambler", from a cutting from Jo's mom's garden.

“Maxine’s white rambler”, from a cutting from Jo’s mom’s garden.

Cosmos 'Double Click'

Cosmos

bee deep into the rhododendron flowers

bee deep into the rhododendron flowers

roses

roses, catmint, daylilies

geraniums, catmint, daylilies

We left our pleasant afternoon at Jo’s at around six and then spent two hours working on the Fifth Street Park in Long Beach (Allan) and weeding and deadheading all the trees and planters (me).  I did not take many photos because I was simply tired.

Allan absorbed in weeding

Allan absorbed in weeding

across from Home at the Beach

across from Home at the Beach

Home at the Beach

Home at the Beach

Thanks be for the good rain which meant that we did not have to water the planters!  (The rain came soon after watering; when the planters are dry, no amount of rain will get through the foliage to wet the soil which is why people sometimes marvel to see us out there watering in a drizzle.)

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We are coming to the end of annuals planting hell.  The dregs of it will drag  into next week with the planting of a few six packs of cosmos here and there but today we finished a couple of jobs that can be crossed off the annuals list now.

First: two six packs of Cosmos, one of painted sage, and a Gaura ‘So White’ went into our volunteer garden at the Ilwaco post office.

post office

cosmos installed

cosmos installed

Ilwaco

Two partial buckets of weeds came out.  Reminder:  do not plant the charming Euphorbia ‘Fen’s Ruby’.  The bits that came in with plants from my mom’s garden, even though I had tried to eliminate every root, had marched halfway back into the post office garden.

beware

beware; nurseries still sell this bad guy

Next we planted Cosmos, painted sage, a Thalictrum ‘Black Stockings’, Phygelius ‘Snow White’ and a new Echinacea (coneflower) called ‘Green Jewel’ in Larry and Robert’s garden.  Green Jewel is supposed to keep its colour without fading the way Green Envy does.

We took the Heucheras and primroses out of the garden boat and planted them under the triangle of trees and put Cosmos ‘Cutesy’ and ‘Happy Ring’ into the boat for summer, along with one Salvia patens.

the boat garden

the boat garden

all cosmosed up

all cosmosed up

front porch

front porch

The tulip viridis is STILL in bloom.   I love the green tulips more than any others and yet this is the first year I have realized that they are also the latest to bloom.

Tulip Chinatown

Tulip Chinatown and Green Wave

watering aprés planting

watering aprés planting

I’m liking the new gold tree (Robinia pseudoacacia ‘Frisia’).

Here’s how Larry and Robert’s garden relates  to that of our good friends Tom and Judy:

Lake Street sidewalk

Lake Street sidewalk

looking east:  Hornbuckle garden is across Pearl Avenue.

looking east: Hornbuckle garden is across Pearl Avenue.

The Hornbuckles were home and showed me the new improved water feature in their courtyard.  I snuck back to get a photo.  With a wider basin and more rocks around it, bathing birds won’t splash all the water out.

a better bubbler

a better bubbler

Tom and Judy also redid their “back forty” to replace some junipers (I think? nice ones, not hideous “tams”) that passing dogs had sprinkled on.  Lavenders have taken their place.

the back forty

the back forty

Next, we replanted the Ilwaco planter that we had emptied of soil due to bad drainage.  I had emailed city hall to remind them to have a hole drilled in the base.  Turns out the hole HAD been drilled.  It was just so small we did not see it.  I forgot to photograph it from inside before Allan put the soil in, so I stuck my camera under the edge of the planter.  The hole is on the side and so small that Allan could not put his little finger in it.  Hmmm.

I couldn't see where I was aiming the camera under there.

I couldn’t see where I was aiming the camera under there.

newly planted and hoping for adequate drainage

newly planted and hoping for adequate drainage

It now has an Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’center, three painted sage, three Diascia, a Calibrachoa, two Sanvitalia and a trailing rosemary.

Next we went to Nancy’s home in Long Beach to deliver some Cosmos and painted sage to the new flower border we helped install last October.  She organizes the Music in the Gardens tour and we think next year her garden will be ready to be on it.

I am very impressed with her vegetable garden:

Nancy's potager

Nancy’s potager

potager

potager

potager

lilac in bloom

lilac in bloom

looking from the veg garden to the new flower border

looking from the veg garden to the new flower border

Viridiflora tulips still hanging on

Viridiflora tulips still hanging on

Design hint I learned from Ann Lovejoy:  always figure out the flow of your garden.  It was clear a path would be needed to the neighbour’s garden so we left two passages unplanted, one for garden access and one for neighbourliness.

path toward the neighbour

flower garden coming on

flower garden coming on

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

I had been so smitten with Nancy’s veg patch that I forgot to take a long photo of the whole flower border.

Next we went through downtown heading for Jo’s.  As I do every time we drive through town, I eyeballed the planters all the way looking for any problems.   I would be wealthy if paid for the amount of time I spend thinking about work!  The weather did this:

passing through Long Beach

passing through Long Beach

But not for long.  It was fairly pleasant working at Jo’s.  I did the planting while Allan weeded.  In went 18 godetias, 6 or more six packs of snapdragons, a few perennials.  It is a beautiful environment in which to work.

the best use of annual geraniums ever

the best use of annual geraniums ever

While planting in the newly revamped colourful entry area, I had a sudden brainstorm.  I was so excited I forgot to take a before photo, so dredged up this one from earlier this year:

before

before

I suddenly realized that one of the two red flowering azaleas had to go.  We had thought of this earlier but had decided to wait.  Now I was convinced.  Jo and Bob returned from an outing just then and agreed, and by then I already had my loppers and saw and just cut it to the ground.  A big fern came out as well.  It made a wonderful improvement as the focus is now on the new perennials and annuals.  The root mass can come out later or perhaps be kept as a very low shrub.  (I would definitely get rid of the oxalis too; it is very invasive.)

enormously better

enormously better (The blue pot is where the azalea was.)

When we were done…Well, not quite done, as we have more weeding to do that must wait till next week….I walked through and took some photos.

entryway

entryway, container by Basket Case Greenhouse

guest house windowbox

guest house windowbox

middle courtyard

middle courtyard

middle

to west garden

to west garden

wiggly Coco

wiggly Coco

and some birds for you know who:

feeder

bird

With that, we decided to quit work early (seven!) and have dinner at the Depot Restaurant.  On the way we did stop to bung seven plants into a couple of Long Beach planters, and after our delicious dinner (slightly work-related when we realized we must go back tomorrow to deadhead the last of the Depot tulips!!), we loaded the car at home with all the assorted plants we will need to finish the Long Beach planters tomorrow.

Annuals jobs finished today:  Jo, Ilwaco planters, Larry and Robert garden, Ilwaco post office!

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I woke in the night to the sound of rain. On and on. This was good. All the plants we have been planting will get watered.

It was not so good at ten AM when a seemingly ceaseless torrent was falling. We had in the garage five flats of plants for today’s job and I just wanted them out of here. I did not want to be carrying them out to the patio to get light, and then into the car tomorrow instead of today. Annuals hell must end, as weeding jobs are urgently calling to us. As is my own garden.

Mary sets a tempting example

Mary sets a tempting example

But wait…Was there some lightness in the sky to the south? The sky was definitely light around the edges to the south and to the west. I said we should just go to the job. I cited the example of Deadliest Catch, an inspirational tv show about hardworking crabbers on the Bering Sea. Allan looked skeptical about the weather, especially since the forecasts all called for it to worsen hourly all day long. But the rain suddenly stopped. We loaded, and as we did the rain came lashing sideways again. I did not care (much). Surely we could endure and plant twelve whiskey barrels even in a torrent. And yet…if I stayed home I could read a couple more months of the Tootlepedal Blog archives.

But we went to Casa Pacifica, Dan and Leanne’s garden near Wallicut Farms. It is our only job off the Peninsula (unless one is a stickler for the fact that technically Ilwaco is part of the mainland).

When we got there, the sun came out intermittently. And rain came back for a while but not for long.

after a squall

after a squall

Soon raincoats came off and stayed off and all twelve barrels and several smaller containers were cleaned up and planted.

The barrels have Narcissi so we cut the foliage back by two thirds. It must be done in order to plant. My guru Ann Lovejoy would not approve; in this recent article she writes of the importance of letting the foliage mature. And yet once NW garden celebrity Ed Hume (who was as well known as Ciscoe in his day) said in a lecture that narcissi foliage can be cut three weeks after the flower has bloomed.

before

before; unplantable.

before:  last year's boringly overgrown Helichrysum

before: last year’s boringly overgrown Helichrysum

after

after, Helichrysum cut back VERY hard

Planted: An Agyranthemum in the center (“Butterfly’, ‘Spring Bouquet’, or the white one) and around the edges mixed (80!! total) calibrachoas of various colours and sanvitalias and, in the planters closer to the house, some blue felicia as well. In the mid-center of each, three painted sage triangulated around the Agyr. Some have Diascia that came back from last year.

Dusty lives in hope that I will stop to play fetch. It will not happen as then he will not stop pestering. But most of the time he walks with me all around the job with his head just where I can reach down and pet him. I love that and lavish him with smooches.

Dusty

Note Spook in the background.

Dusty

Dusty

Spook continues to be very shy, but it is progress that she stays out from under the deck while we are here.

Spook

Spook

We did not have time to weed, but I did walk along the bottom of the garden casting Sluggo up into it, with camera in hand. (Allan deadheaded narcissi while I talked to Dan and Leanne at the end of the work session.)

the shady end of the long border

the shady end of the long border

I don’t add many new perennials to this garden because it has water troubles in the summer; the well is just not enough for home and garden, too. It might be fixed for this year. It has therefore been a garden that peaks in mid springtime.

Another problem is that I would like to lavish the garden with cow fiber mulch but the lawn where a truck would have to drive to deliver the load close to the garden is also the septic field. And it would have to be wheelbarrowed up at the end of the wall. And if the pile were dumped in the driveway it would be far from the end of the wall. And I am tired just thinking about it. Maybe this fall we will manage to do it. As I have said to myself every year since taking on this job.

long curved border goes from shade to sun

long curved border goes from shade to sun

guardian of the garden

guardian of the garden

geranium and hosta

geranium and hosta

Silene

Silene

hardy geranium

Geranium macrorrhizum

Halmiocistus wintonensis

Halmiocistus wintonensis

Around the north side of the house, in a spot that is usually wet from roof runoff, I found a small blue flower which I think is a kind of Camassia that I planted last fall. I would have rain barrels at every gutter catching water for summer in this garden.

camassia

I surprised Spook in her nap on the hot tub cover and got as close to her as I ever have!

snoozing

she was snoozing

With this, the last of the big batches of annuals is planted, and I can see the light at the end of Annuals Planting Hell. There are still a few days of filling in here and there. The concrete planter in Ilwaco that needs a hole drilled is still undrilled. Andersen’s needs more cosmos and some Salvia patens. Some gaps in the Long Beach planters need filling, and because I had made a careful list of exactly what plant was needed where, we went to The Basket Case to get some more annuals.

My list would have been incomprehensible to another: two uppies here, four trailies there, five herbie flatties there. But I knew what I wanted.

We also got some plants for a big shady planter against the house at Andersen’s RV Park; it only gets morning sun.

I'm trying a big new impatiens there.

I’m trying a big new impatiens there.

and assorted types of begonias

and assorted types of begonias

These might like more sun but they do ok in the east facing planter. The tuberous begonias excel and are the same thing that Andersen’s owner Lorna’s dad used to plant there.

At The Planter Box I stocked up on Cosmos for planting at the Ilwaco boatyard, Larry and Robert’s garden and….soon I hope! my garden. Uh oh, I still need more for my friend Nancy! And more for a few last clumps of Cosmos at Andersen’s, in an area it was too late to weed tonight. I got one flat of the very good Salvia patens plants that Planter Box grew this year.

At The Planter Box

At The Planter Box

Teresa and I talked a bit about when would be a good date for a midsummer madness Cash Mob at the Planter Box, probably in early July.

Planter Box

Planter Box

I saw salpiglossis starts and wanted some for gardens of ours that might be on the tour this year, but we were full up with plants by then.

Salpiglossis has a gorgeous flower.

Salpiglossis has a gorgeous flower.

I also saw just two of this cute little plant I had once found for sale somewhere and planted in an Ilwaco planter. It looked adorable all summer long. Apparently, it is a house plant. I don’t know why it is not sold in quantity for summer containers.

so cute!

so cute!

Then…Andersen’s after six. The wind had come up with a biting chill and the rain returned, but the east facing planter was not at all bad to work in with the house between us and the ocean. I was so tired I did not put on gloves, then regretted it, then could not get them on over wet hands. I just remembered that one of the crew gave me some Hershey’s kisses, as he often kindly does, and I was so busy I put them in my pocket and did not eat a one. (I think that shirt is still in the car….tempting….). I decided to hold off on planting some Salvia patens in the Payson Hall planters, as it is supposed to get down to 44 degrees tonight. I think they will be happier if they wait till we go to Andersen’s (and all other north end resorts) on Friday to fluff it up for the three day holiday weekend.

The last task was to plant 12 tiny little not very promising white petunias in the two west side whiskey barrels that lacked them. They were in little six packs so small that one could hardly tell each held six plants. The wind and rain blew straight from the sea just over the foredune and I thought very hard about Deadliest Catch while planting the little plugs.

I often think in bad weather, "Could be worse, could be crabbing on the Bering Sea!"

I often think in bad weather, “Could be worse, could be crabbing on the Bering Sea!”

It’s on tonight and I look forward to sitting in my chair eating warm food and drinking wine and feeling inspired by the crabbers’ hard work in almost all weather. I have put on hand lotion five times and my hands still feel dry from the wet cold soil. I could never be a crabber…too wimpy.

Home by seven PM! I had had it with the outdoors, but Allan went out and mowed and weed-ate our lawn…in the drizzle. The grass was long and so wet it is amazing A) that he did it and B) that our little rechargeable electric mower got through it at all.

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We began today at The Red Barn, our second visit of the year to that little garden of four whiskey barrels and a narrow strip along the fence. I was pleased to see horsewoman Amy, who had earlier in the year asked us if we could do a spring clean up on her own garden. I had foolishly said yes, and then had to back pedal, and found it a big relief today to learn that she had done the weeding herself and wasn’t upset with us for never getting there.

She told us she was not sure whether or not to mow a plant that had spilled out of the garden by the barn. It is a plant that I know to be a weed, but it is so pretty that I would buy it if it were not so rampant.

a gorgeous weed

a gorgeous weed

one of the barrels

one of the barrels

The barrels no longer get red tulips because a cold wind blows across the pasture on them most of the spring and the tulips got all beaten up. We just pulled weeds out today and will plant annuals after Mother’s Day.

The one barrel that is on the sheltered side of the big barn does much better because it is completely sheltered from wind.

the happiest barrel

the happiest barrel

Red Barn still life

Red Barn still life

Crab pots are ubiquitous on this fishing Peninsula and here they are stacked at the Red Barn’s newish outbuilding.

crab pots

crab pots

I like the horsey view all around this job.

looking north

looking north

Next door to the Red Barn fields we checked on Diane’s garden. The new long bed along the road will fill in more later….I could have sworn I had planted pastel poppies in there but there is not a sign of them! Phooey.

new, still rather empty bed

new, still rather empty bed

Thug of the day: Along the edge of the older, corner bed grows this strawberry thingie. I did not plant it. I swear. But I once planted a potentilla to the side of the bed. Is this some kind of sport of that? There is an ornamental strawberry that is a cross between Potentilla and Fragaria…I think.

vigorous edger

vigorous edger

The leaf texture is gorgeous and the white flowers are nice.

the first of many white flowers

the first of many white flowers

However, it does want to run all through the bed. Every year I think we will get it all removed, and we never have time. So why did I bring some starts home and plant in my bogsy woods? I am sure I will regret it….

Mistake of the day: Diane likes pastel colours, and yet…these tulips in one of her pots turned out so bright. I am pretty sure these are ‘Blushing Lady’, the one that started out with a beautiful swirled pointed bud of gentle colour. And now…much too bright!

not very gently blushing

not very gently blushing

'Cummins', a favourite tulip, got wrecked by rain...

‘Cummins’, a favourite tulip, got wrecked by rain…

but 'Cool Crystal' looks good.

but ‘Cool Crystal’ looks good.

I hope Diane’s earlier tulips were successful because the later ones are a disappointment!

The narcissi are allowed to be bright.

The narcissi are allowed to be bright.

Next door to Diane’s are more horses to admire.

The goat and donkey were out of sight today.

The goat and donkey were out of sight today.

I was a horse crazy city girl. My horses were made of china and plastic, but I loved them and books by Walter Farley and Marguerite Henry.

Before we moved on to our next job, we found it advantageous to be at one of those great locations where we can dispose of debris rather than hauling it away.

the joy of dumping debris on the edge of a field

the joy of dumping debris on the edge of a field

Next, Allan planted some Salvia ‘Hot Lips’ at Veterans Field in Long Beach while I deadheaded some planters on the main drag.

on Pacific Way...more brazen Blushing Ladies

on Pacific Way…more brazen Blushing Ladies

Fish Alley with Erysiumum 'Bowles Mauve'

Fish Alley with Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’

I returned to Veterans Field with a treat from Sweet Celebrations: Chocolate Ganache cupcakes.

more elegant than the usual Tiger Paws!

more elegant than the usual Tiger Paws!

We then checked the raised planters on the Bolstadt approach but (joy!) did no ground level weeding except the occasional dandelions. Our weeding job of a few weeks ago had held up reasonably well. I do wish the city crew had time to mulch this long stretch of garden…

beach approach garden, looking east from the end

beach approach garden, looking east from the end

After deadheading at city hall, we tried to drive nonstop through town but had to stop to deadhead unsightly narcissi.

this cannot stand!

this cannot stand!

a fringed tulip basks in the sun

a fringed tulip basks in the sun

Two pink Gauras went into a planter that too-tall sanguisorbas came out of last week…

Allan planting:  I weaseled out of planting by "making a plant list"...

Allan planting: I weaseled out of planting by “making a plant list”…

And then: The Boreas. We had a mission to widen one of the narrow lawn beds because it just has always looked too small.

before

before

end of day

end of day

I had the brainstorm that the two westernmost beds need to be longer as well as wider. Tomorrow we will bring a yard of soil. I had something completely different (some weeding at Andersen’s RV Park) planned for tomorrow afternoon, but this needs to be finished.

Various aches and pains had me hitting the wall at work well before sunset, but at home I did manage to plant nine more Nicotiana langsdorfii and one Verbascum. While planting, I tried not to let myself fret about going out of town while two of the beds still have unweeded horsetail areas.

I should stay home and pull horsetail!

I should stay home and pull horsetail!

While planting down the west side of the garden, I had a thrill. I could see plants of Eremurus (foxtail lily) coming up in a large healthy way. I could never grow them in my old shady garden, and when I planted some in fall of 2011 the results were disappointing. Maybe 2013 will be their year. My friend Sheila grows amazing tall ones in her sunny Oregon garden.

great excitement!

great excitement!

I could see several in the two big beds, east and west. Joy!

By the front steps, the Dicentra scandens vine is getting longer!

yes!

yes!

In other at home garden news:

Epimidium

Epimidium

rhubarb

rhubarb

Persicaria bistorta superba

Persicaria bistorta superba

shade bed...weeded but not trimmed up

partial shade bed…weeded but not trimmed up

new bed next to the bogsy woods

new bed next to the bogsy woods

foreground: my young Salix magnifica

foreground: my young Salix magnifica

ornamental rhubarb

ornamental rhubarb

golden cutleaf elderberry

Sambucus ‘Sutherland Gold’: golden cutleaf elderberry

And finally, one of the hostas that my friend Mary F. gave me when she moved away:

thoughts of a much missed gardening friend...

thoughts of a much missed gardening friend…

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