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Posts Tagged ‘public gardening’

Tuesday, 25 September 2018

Being the social director of yesterday’s tour, arranging to visit each private garden (all but one at a time when the gardeners would be home), trying to set a date when all who wanted to could attend, fretting over social anxiety and feeling out of my league with two Big Name Gardeners, turned out to be well worth it as everyone agreed it had been a wonderful tour day.  However, both Allan and I slept extra late this morning! I had planned an easy work day, mostly watering, with two small projects (or so I thought).

I met two darling dogs over the fence next door to the post office.

I don’t normally put my hand into a dog’s yard.  This one was clearly friendly with a happy circling tail.  I wish they were there every day; I have only seen them the once. The dog’s affection for its ball reminded me of Monty Don’s dog, Nigel, star of Gardeners’ World.

Long Beach

We removed a very woody and tatty lavender from one of the planters.  Its inside was dark and gloomy and devoid of foliage.

before

after, with replacement soil and lavender

Helichrysum italicam

I have told people that although this plant smells strongly of curry, it is not edible.  It appears I am wrong about that, according to this article.  Although it smells of the strongest curry, the taste is said to be not like curry.  The flowers are inconsequential yellow things that I usually trim off.  I love the smell of the plant and its silver foliage. The linked article says that the flowers taste of bleu cheese, which I also love!

We added two curry plants to the planter we had redone last week.

The Shelburne Hotel

75 degrees F as we arrived at the Shelburne.

Speaking of curry plants, here is one we recently added to a planter on the room four deck.  The dahlia is out of scale but it requested that I not move it to the garden till later because it is quite happy in the pot.

Allan’s photo

center deck nandina, Allan’s photo

room 11 deck (Allan’s photo)

We watered and weeded. I trimmed tall non blooming cosmos to better reveal the signage.

front garden, looking north in shadow

the back garden

wedding candles still hanging in the laurel

the pub deck

the back garden

The candles were the battery powered ones.  I did not know that would work in jars of water.  I googled; they seem to be a special floating kind.  That would be great Halloween decor.

Ilwaco

After the Shelburne, we tried clearing a small garden on Howerton Avenue at the port of the roots  where the port crew had pulled out a sightline-blocking escallonia with a backhoe.  Or maybe pulled it out by truck, with a chain.  I had a few plants ready to plant, but was thwarted by the job being harder than I expected.  The root mass was especially  thick around a CoHo Charters sign that had been skillfully undamaged.

roots and black plastic under the soil and lava rock

Although we got it almost done, my anxiety level was high because Allan had to water the Ilwaco planters, a two hour job from start to finish (including watering our two volunteer pocket gardens).  A friend stopped to give us a political campaign sign (the wonderful Carolyn Long for Congress!) and we ran out of time and had to stop the Howerton bed before we were done.

Allan took the water trailer and watered the planters.

Cosmos ‘Xanthos’ at city hall before he deadheaded…

and after.

I walked the planters, checking on them for weeds (mostly chickweed) and deadheads. I finished at the planters by the boatyard…

Aster ‘Harrington’s Pink’

…and then walked home, looking for the feral cats along Main Street.  I felt bad that I scared them off a chicken dinner that someone had left on a plate.

one of three storage lots where the wild cats live

waiting for me to leave so that dinner could resume

In the book I’ve been reading, Wind-Harps by Marion Cran, she learns that her new Siamese cat is actually related by blood to her beloved Tatty-Bogle, a Siamese whose death she still mourned.  I realized then that perhaps the soft looking and so shy grey cat who lives in the feral colony would perhaps be related to my late much lamented Smoky, who was born wild in Ilwaco just a couple of blocks from there.  I have only seen grey cat twice; he may be the shyest of all.

I deadheaded in the almost dusk at the volunteer Post Office and Fire Station gardens.  Allan was not happy that he finished up in almost darkness, dangerous in traffic.  The day ended on a stressful note. More like a medley of stress.  I will be so glad when watering season is over.  It is the one task that creates the most pressure because when the plants are dry, it must be done.  Shorter days make it harder to fit in an evening watering job like Ilwaco planters.

Allan has decided that he will participate in a local book fair with his self published guide to paddle trips in SW Washington and NW Oregon.  You can find him on Saturday, Oct 6th, at this event:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Monday, 25 June 2018

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend

presented by the Northwest Perennial Alliance

McMenamins Anderson School with Gardens Manager Riz Reyes

We were surprised to awaken to rain.  At 9 AM, after loading all our traveling possessions into our van to be ready to leave, we walked out into the garden of the Anderson School Hotel for what was listed in the study weekend program as a 20 minute lecture by Gardens Manager Riz Reyes.  I had thought that it could not possibly be a disappointingly short 20 minutes…and I was right.

The weather made for perfect garden touring because it kept all the other guests out of the courtyards.

the route from our room entrance to the meadow garden

Hardy Plant hardy souls and Riz

Allan’s photo

I had not met Riz before and found him a complete delight.  And I am happy to report that the walking and talking lecture was two and a half hours long, not just 20 minutes.  It could have been twice as long as that and I would have enjoyed every minute.  As we walked, we paused and examined pretty much every aspect of the garden which is spread over 5.41 acres of hotel grounds.

Allan’s photo

with Holboellia coriacea ‘Cathedral Gem’ (pretty sure)

Some of us had brollies. Looking at meadow garden from undercover, I was glad Allan and I had packed our raincoats.

meadow garden pavers are reused from part of the old school

in the meadow

Sometimes guests do not understand the meadow and expect a more formal entry garden.  Sillies—it is so wonderful.  It was put together quickly as the hotel was about to open and Riz had to work around a lot of construction.  He will continue to refine it.

We looked at plants along the foundations of the buildings.

hardy schefflera that makes my heart go pitter pat

1. I am numbering some of these photos. Please feel free to use these numbers to help ID the plants that I don’t know. I am assuming this is some sort of allium with these lilies. Or maybe not.

looking across the meadow

We now walked along the street side of the old school.

Riz describes how he cuts back variegated comfrey (Symphytum x uplandicum ‘Axminster Gold’) when it gets tatty looking (my words). This one had been cut back a couple of weeks ago.

He left this one (right) to show what it looks like not cut back.

2. My notes just say “silver oak” about this beautiful tree.

3. Allan took this closeup of the leaves earlier this weekend.  I am not good an IDing a lot of trees but doesn’t look oaky to me.  Help?

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Hypericum ‘Ignite’ in center

a newish allium, ‘Red Mohican’, must have!

Riz defended Alchemilla mollis (lady’s mantle), which a lot of people (including me sometimes) go off of because it reseeds so much. He uses the flowers in bouquets.

By the way, floral design is another of Riz’s gardening passions and he is renowned for his work.

One of the best features of alchemilla is the way it holds raindrops in its leaves.

Allan’s photo

White Daphne ‘Eternal Fragrance’ on the edges of this corner of the garden.  Riz is showing us Datisca (false hemp).

Allan’s photo

Luma, which I have from Xera Plants. Riz says the berries are edible.

something cool!

Allan’s photo

We walked past the wine cask containers that were outside our room’s corridor; Riz has no prejudice against common annuals like coleus and Dichondra ‘Silver Falls’.

We proceeded up the walkway to the various restaurant courtyards.

chain fern of some sort

Thalictrum ‘Spendid White’

We passed a fragrant rose I had been admiring all weekend.

Rose ‘The Poet’s Wife’ (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Riz also recommended earlier in the walk the roses called the Kordes series, with names like ‘Easy Does It’.

‘Jude the Obscure’, which I remember Riz saying was his favourite rose.

Pseudopanax ferox at the edge of a courtyard

Wish I still had this! On my list it goes. (Allan’s photo)

Edging to keep people out of the gardens.

Riz had been waiting for this lily to bloom. (Allan’s photo)

Riz botanizing in the wilds of the Anderson School (Allan’s photo)

Jeff Allen is the metal artist, per Allan’s notes.

Stacked recycled concrete is known as urbanite.

ornamental pink-tipped kiwi clambering up bamboo clad posts

Allan’s photo

We walked on to the kitchen garden.  Although it does not produce enough for the everyday use of the restaurant kitchens, it does provide ingredients for banquets and special events.

kitchen garden path

Allan’s photo

The new building, which went up after the garden was planted, has not cast too much shadow.

more construction in the distance

sampling peas planted on netting against a wall

espalier fastening (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

We walked on to the xeriscape garden by the far parking lot.

Allan’s photo (Sesili gummifera, moon carrot, in the foreground)

I learned from Riz that Baptisia won’t flop if grown in dry soil. (Allan’s photo) I am going to try it at the port.

Allan’s photo

The aeoniums get brought in for winter. (Allan’s photo)

Amorpha fruticosa? (with the long flowers)

the furthest reaches of the garden

A couple of us walked down to see this patch of sarracenia.

turns out it was planted in a container of some sort

We walked on to the tropical themed garden around the Lagoon.

Allan’s photo

Container planting in an outdoor dining area (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Alstroemeria ‘Rock and Roll’; Riz thought it was a bit much.

In order to care for the window boxes that hang above the salt water swimming pool enclosure, Riz and his assistant have to set up long ladders in the swimming pool to climb up.

At a little before 11:30, the lecture was over and Allan and I got coffees to go in the hotel store.

On the way to our van, we passed by the wheelbarrow where Riz was getting ready to plant his acquisitions from the study weekend plant sales.

I had especially enjoyed the parts of the talk about the trials of public gardening: plants that get stood upon or broken when folks walk into the garden to take photos of themselves among the flowers, special plants from his own collection that get damaged…and on top of that, the garden has rabbits.

And I liked what brings him joy in his work: The pleasure of having knowledge, “the effect of plants on people”, and the satisfaction of making a career in plants and flowers after being that little kid picked on for wearing flowers in his hair.

You can see many more photos of the Anderson School garden in our two other posts of this weekend, here and here.  And in two excellent posts by Danger Garden, a more knowledgeable plantswoman than I, starting here.

I have absolutely no idea what Allan’s closing photo from Anderson School is.  Perhaps he can enlighten us.

Jeff Allen, the metal artist, soldered together fancy plumbing for some of the restrooms (that the women didn’t see).

I thought so!

 

 

 

 

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Sunday, 4 May 2014

Long Beach, Washington

We have a different point of view on the annual Long Beach parade than most people, as we have always spent a few days beforehand working on getting all the parks, planters, and street tree garden patches looking as good as possible.  This year, we were hampered by some difficult weather, first in the 90s and too hot to work comfortably and then cold, wet, and windy.

After brunch at Nancy and Phil’s house nearby, we walked the three blocks to the parade route in a breezy drizzle.    This tells the gardeners’ story, with some satsifaction at how great certain plants looked and some agitation (inwardly) about the plants getting stood and sat upon.  Because of the weather, there was a much smaller audience than usual so not much damage.  You will see why we wait to plant delicate trailing plants and some of the upright plants till after this parade.

One of our parade photography methods is to split up and be on the move, trying to get different background, after the year we sat in one spot and each photo had the same background.

My first thought is I must plant more Tulip 'Formosa' this year as it bloomed so late and so well.

My first thought is I must plant more Tulip ‘Formosa’ this year as it bloomed so late and so well.

Only one snapped off in the wind.

Only one snapped off in the wind.

A group of bikers started the parade.

A group of bikers started the parade.

Allan's photo, shows our trees and planters on one half a block

Allan’s photo, shows our trees and planters on one half a block

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

a columbine and some bikes

a columbine and some bikes

geranium and biker

hardy geranium and biker

Verbascum 'Eleanor's Blush' in Fifth Street Park

Verbascum ‘Eleanor’s Blush’ in Fifth Street Park

Usually there are way more planter sitters.  The drizzle kept most of the people standing rather than sitting on the damp edges.

Usually there are way more planter sitters. The drizzle kept most of the people standing rather than sitting on the damp edges.

Allan's photo; he clearly was having the same thought as I was!

Allan’s photo; he clearly was having the same thought as I was!

Feet in the tree garden!  Feet in the tree garden! Woop woop woop! (alarm sounds in my head)

Feet in the tree garden! Feet in the tree garden! Woop woop woop! (alarm sounds in my head)

I am really fairly philosophical about feet in the tree gardens nowadays.

I am really fairly philosophical about feet in the tree gardens nowadays.

Allan's photo; many watchers were under whatever shelter they could find.

Allan’s photo; many watchers were under whatever shelter they could find.

Erysimum 'Bowles Mauve' and the carousel

Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ and the carousel

whimsical hats

whimsical hats

As the weather lightened up a bit:  sign outside The Wooden Horse gift shop

As the weather lightened up a bit: sign outside The Wooden Horse gift shop

brollies

Cosmos 'Sonata' held up to Saturday's wind:  Lewis and Clark Square planter

Cosmos ‘Sonata’ held up to Saturday’s wind: Lewis and Clark Square planter

dog rain fashion

dog rain fashion

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

While waiting for the parade to officially start, I checked Veterans Field.  Yay, the Tulip 'Flaming Parrot' was still blooming in the red white and blue garden.

While waiting for the parade to officially start, I checked Veterans Field. Yay, the Tulip ‘Flaming Parrot’ was still blooming in the red white and blue garden.

I found a narcissi that needed deadheading!

I found a narcissi that needed deadheading!

Veterans Field with tulip and salvia

Veterans Field with tulip and salvia

Veterans Field garden

in the Veterans Field garden

Allan's photo shows that Saturday's wind was hard on the tulips.

Allan’s photo shows that Saturday’s wind was hard on the tulips.

Allan's photo: a woman reading one of the plaques at Veterans Field

Allan’s photo: a woman reading one of the plaques in the flag plaza at Veterans Field

and a military man

and a military man

back to the parade route...usually these bleachers would be overflowing with people

back to the parade route…usually these bleachers would be overflowing with people

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

waiting for the parade

waiting for the parade

another bulldog

another bulldog

bundled up

bundled up for a chilly parade day

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan knows I love puppies.

Allan knows I love puppies.

later.  This is why the trees just mostly have fairly dull and tough plants under them, like this hardy geranium.

later. This is why the trees just mostly have fairly dull and tough plants under them, like this hardy geranium.

love the brolly

love the brolly

dutch iris and baby moon

dutch iris and baby moon and blue oat grass; Allan’s photo

Allan's photo, another cute dog for me

Allan’s photo, another cute dog for me

a very windy day

a very windy day

The parade arrives!  (It had started about ten blocks north of here.)

The parade arrives! (It had started about ten blocks north of here.)

We love our Coast Guard.  The flags were whipping around into their faces.

We love our Coast Guard. The flags were whipping around into their faces.

Coast Guard

Coast Guard

This group helps out our local Coasties.

This group helps out our local Coasties.

Coast Guard Auxiliary in their parade boat.

Coast Guard Auxiliary in their parade boat.  Allan’s photo

respect, Allan's photo

respect, Allan’s photo

American Legion, Ilwaco

American Legion, Ilwaco, Allan’s photo

(I bet they would love my favourite song, Luckiest Man Alive.)

The parade often brings a tear to me eyes,

The parade often brings a tear to me eyes,

The lovely Long Beach trolley

The lovely Long Beach trolley

This big engine is impressive, but part of its lettering says "One Nation, One Language", with which I heartily disagree.  Infinite Diversity in Infinite Combinations is what I would like to see.

This big engine is impressive, but part of its lettering says “One Nation, One Language”, with which I heartily disagree. Infinite Diversity in Infinite Combinations is what I would like to see.

Pipers in the rain

Pipers in the rain

piper

sponsors of the pipers including some friends and clients of ours

sponsors of the pipers including some friends and clients of ours

raincoats

raincoats

These girls are coordinated with the background colours.

These girls are coordinated with the background colours.

our town's high school

our town’s high school

Allan's photo of the band backed with the cranberry farming mural on the south wall of Dennis Company

Allan’s photo of the band backed with the cranberry farming mural on the south wall of Dennis Company

Ilwaco High School Float

Ilwaco High School Float

 

 

This adorable looking dog harmonized with every band.

This adorable looking dog harmonized with every band.

Baby Moon Narcissi!

Baby Moon Narcissi!

Next fall with plants a few hundred more 'Minnow' Narcissi as well.

Next fall with plants a few hundred more ‘Minnow’ Narcissi as well.  They bloom at the right time for the parade.

Astoria's float with replica of Astoria Column

Astoria’s Regatta float with replica of Astoria Column

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

These are some of the children who got rained out of the children's parade on Saturday.  Was glad they were in the big parade.

These are some of the children who got rained out of the children’s parade on Saturday. Was glad they were in the big parade.

Golden marjoram, putting on a great show, and wet enough to be safe from sitters.

Golden marjoram, putting on a great show, and wet enough to be safe from sitters.

Rodeo Queen and Baby Moon

Rodeo Queen and Baby Moon

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I further admire 'Minnow'

I further admire ‘Minnow’

During a long gap between parade marchers, I occupied myself pulling Vinca out of a planter where it wants to return along the edges.

During a long gap between parade marchers, I occupied myself pulling Vinca out of a planter where it wants to return along the edges.

Baby Moon...and Li'l Senoritas not much liking a rain squall.

Baby Moon…and Li’l Senoritas not much liking a rain squall.

Baby Moon, with a truck

Baby Moon, with a truck

Here is a sequence of assorted Tootlers for Mr Tootlepedal.

tootle

tootle

tootlers

tootlers

The Beach Belly Dancers hail from Painted Lady Lavender Farm in Ilwaco.

The Beach Belly Dancers hail from Painted Lady Lavender Farm in Ilwaco.

the Painted Lady herself

the Painted Lady herself

And our friend Jenay, who said "I had to tie my hat on because it kept blowing off!"

And our friend Jenay, who said “I had to tie my hat on because it kept blowing off!”

Erysimum 'Bowles Mauve' and a marching band

Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ and a marching band

Allan's photo.  Maybe this year we will finally get around to redoing this planter that has way too much vinca.  (No vinca is the right amount.)

Allan’s photo. Maybe this year we will finally get around to redoing this planter that has way too much vinca. (No vinca is the right amount.)

trying to stay dry, Allan's photo

trying to stay dry, Allan’s photo

Sedum 'Autumn Joy', which we will cut back by half now that the parade is over, so it won't get floppy (Allan's photo)

Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’, which we will cut back by half now that the parade is over, so it won’t get floppy (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo.  I have no words.

Allan’s photo.   I had just planted new plants in there on Friday.  In the rain and wind.

more cute and cheering headgear

more cute and cheering headgear

The Astoria clowns, rained out of Saturday's parade, returned for this one.

The Astoria clowns, rained out of Saturday’s parade, returned for this one.

Allan's photo.  I fear clowns but this one looks friendly.

Allan’s photo. I fear clowns but this one looks friendly.

Allan's photo sequence: One clown was giving treats to dogs.

Allan’s photo sequence: One clown was giving treats to dogs.

This dog was afraid of clowns...

This dog was afraid of clowns…

but then ate the treat

but then ate the treat

P1070792

Allan's photo:  Chinook tribe canoe

Allan’s photo: Chinook tribe canoe

Fifth Street Park, Allan's photo

Fifth Street Park, Allan’s photo

Sparky, the fire station mascot

Sparky, the fire station mascot, Allan’s photo

I liked the Star Wars people.

I liked the Star Wars people.

boba2

The marching band from Tenino all had animals masks.

The marching band from Tenino all had animals masks.

animal mask drummers

animal mask drummers

a serious tractor

a serious tractor; usually the parade has a long line of tractors, but this was one of few.  I guess the owners did not want them to get rained on.

planter fern and band

planter fern and band

Erysimum 'Bowles Mauve' and the Long Beach Volunteer Fire Department

Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ and the Long Beach Volunteer Fire Department

Ilwaco Volunteer Fire Department

Ilwaco Volunteer Fire Department

a nautical truck

a nautical truck

Baby Moon and a little horse

Baby Moon and a little horse

llama farm

llama farm

You can see the wind in the llama's coat

You can see the wind in the llama’s coat

llama2

More Baby Moon

More Baby Moon

I've been planting 100 more Baby Moon in the planters each fall for three years, and finally have a very good show.  Next year, will plant them under the trees and hope cute puppies stay out.

I’ve been planting 100 more Baby Moon in the planters each fall for three years, and finally have a very good show. Next year, will plant them under the trees and hope cute puppies stay out.

Allan's photo; Erysimum 'Bowles Mauve' and a band.

Allan’s photo; Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ and a band.

a fierce tuba

a fierce tuba

Allan's photo: more cute headgear

Allan’s photo: more cute headgear

From a small inland town

From Hoquiam, a timber town

logger girls

logger girls

Asphodeline (which I wish I had more of) and drummers

Asphodeline (which I wish I had more of) and drummers

Most of the parade had come to end when the rain reappeared in full force.

Most of the parade had come to end when the rain reappeared in full force.

On my way back to Nancy's house, I again admired Tulip 'Formosa' and resolved to plant a hundred or so more in the fall.

On my way back to Nancy’s house, I again admired Tulip ‘Formosa’ and resolved to plant a hundred or so more in the fall.

And I thought to myself I should plant many more Dutch Iris under the trees, where its tatty foliage won't show as much as in eye level planters; it also blooms well at parade time.

And I thought to myself I should plant many more Dutch Iris under the trees, where its tatty foliage won’t show as much as in eye level planters; it also blooms well at parade time.

Allan's photo:  after the parade

Allan’s photo: after the parade, Lewis and Clark Square park

Our city crew (which has its own Facebook fan club) immediately starts taking down the parade paraphernalia.

Our city crew (which has its own Facebook fan club) immediately starts taking down the parade paraphernalia.

P1070843

a big line of hungry paraders at the Hungry Harbour Restaurant (Allan's photo)

a big line of hungry paraders at the Hungry Harbour Restaurant (Allan’s photo)

It may seem like you have virtually attended a very long parade.  However, on years with better weather it was longer yet, with more vintage autos (whose owners do not want them to get spotted with rain) and with a precision shopping cart drill team (sorely missed this year; they were on the printed schedule but not in the parade) from a local supermarket.  We are just glad that the charming small town parade happened this year despite the stormy weekend.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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August 13, 2013

We began at the Depot Restaurant garden, where an errant bindweed taunted us with white flowers way up on top of the wall of hops.

Allan undaunted

Allan undaunted

Solidago 'Fireworks' will soon burst into golden flames.

Solidago ‘Fireworks’ will soon burst into golden flames.

Persicaria 'Firetail' at the Depot

Persicaria ‘Firetail’ at the Depot

Then we tackled the Bolstadt beach approach garden in Long Beach.

looking east from the west end of the garden

looking east from the west end of the garden

Unlike the huge and days-long spring weeding of the garden, all we wanted to go was get big weeds out and grassy sections improved.

and cut back old flowers from santolina...

and cut back old flowers from santolina…

and cut some of the more unsightly lupines...

and cut some of the more unsightly lupines…

The set up for the weeklong Kite Festival would begin the following Sunday.  Kite Festival is singularly responsible for our choosing to change this garden from a carefully cultivated long bed of beautiful flowers to a pretty much monoculture of rugosa roses…the only thing that will stand up to what used to be days of garden trampling.

The first year after planting a few experimental rugosas, even they got trampled to blackened mush.  Now they are strong enough to hold their own.

roses with hips

roses with hips

I noticed new banners on the poles, and am not thrilled about them.  I have much sympathy for anyone who for economic reasons may have joined the military for educational and job opportunities.  I especially think they need support after returning home.   However, I think a nice kite banner might be more appropriate for happy, strolling tourists than this fierce eagle.  (I can think of plenty of political type slogans that could be on banners:  Feed the Hungry, Stop Violence against Women, House the Homeless, none of which would be perfect for a beach stroll, in my opinion.)

banner Downtown seems like a better place for this banner than on the beach approach.  (It could distract, perhaps, from the hotel whose gift shop flies, and I am not kidding, a confederate flag.)  There is a way that the Peninsula supports the troops:  Specials for Service Members.   I walked along weeding and thinking about war and its consequences on drone-bombed civilians and on my veteran friends with PTSD and was not in as cheerful a mood as I had started out in.

Anyway.  We got to the last section of the garden and I decided the rugosa roses needed to be cut back to make plenty of room for kite festival crowds.

during and after

during and after

We always get lots of questions about what the rose hips are…Some folks think they are tomatoes (which is why the one of the rose’s common names is The Tomato Rose).

I had sort of thought about trying to water the beach approach garden until I realized it had been so long, over a year, since I had done so that the water sources (faucets under metal plates in the lawn) were so overgrown with lawn grass that I could not find them without a metal detector.  This certainly proves that the roses are drought tolerant.

rose hips

rose hips

and just a very few late roses

and just a very few late roses

We then dumped a trailer load of rose debris at city works.  Allan took a trailer full of buckets of water out to water the Bolstadt planters while I began the task of watering all 37 of the main street planters (and six whiskey barrels and the two planters at Veterans Field).

northernmost planter on east side of Pacific

northernmost planter on east side of Pacific

Tigridia (Mexican shell flower)...held for the photo because of wind

Tigridia (Mexican shell flower)…held for the photo because of wind

Fortunately, the broken bottle in this planter showed well enough so that I did not stick my hand into it while grooming the plants.

???!! why?

???!! why?

When I got to the two planters at the Veterans Field stage, I would have been deeply mystified at their newly mismatched appearance….

left: with Salvia patens (blue) in the center.  right: No Salvia patens.

left: with Salvia patens (blue) in the center. right: No Salvia patens.

However, I had already gotten a message from my friend who organizes the Jake the Alligatorman Birthday Party and its events the previous Saturday on this very stage.  She had written, “I feel bad the beautiful pot to the right of the stage got squished. It was a local who was drunk and him and a friend were throwing themselves around aggressively and one landed in the planter. Missy got him out and gave him a scolding.”  I replied, “ARGH! Drunks! Oy! Well, these things happen, and it will probably revive. We will check it on Monday!  What can ya do!  Tell Missy awesome for giving him a scolding. Do you have a pic of that moment? Would be great for me blog.”  She wrote, “Darn no pic! Everyone was just kind of disgusted he was an ass. Should have snapped a pic, he was slumped with a cig in his mouth.”  I can picture the scene from similar ones in my punk rock background.  Let me reassure Wendy again that the Jake event does very little damage to the plants and flowers.  (The broken bottle in a planter was nothing new or particular to that weekend.)  The more “genteel” crowds at the kite festival do FAR more damage (or used to, before the Rugosa Rose Solution) than the Jake crowd ever has, as do the Rod Run sitting-on-planters-and-watching-cars-go-by people on the second weekend in September.

While Allan watered some of the south end of downtown planters, he took a nice photo of someone on the Benson’s Restaurant porch indulging in an old fashioned pastime.

the reader

the reader

And a funny bumper sticker:

newfie

After Long Beach, we went back to finish weeding the boatyard garden.  Blues and Seafood would take place Friday and Saturday night at the Port of Ilwaco, and Art Night would be Thursday, resulting in many passersby.  Our lives are scheduled by festival preparation year round.

at the boatyard...I love Geranium 'Rozanne' mingling with Artemisia 'Powis Castle'.

at the boatyard…I love Geranium ‘Rozanne’ mingling with Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’.

gorgeous 'Hopley's Purple' oregano

gorgeous ‘Hopley’s Purple’ oregano

four o clocks reseeded from last year, with cosmos

four o clocks reseeded from last year, with cosmos

and on their own

and on their own

After the boatyard was weeded well enough, we fluffed up the gardens to the south and north sides of the Port Office.

on north side of Port Office along Howerton (looking east)

on north side of Port Office along Howerton (looking east)

south side of port office

south side of port office

Agastache 'Navajo Sunrise' and Knautia 'Thunder and Lightning'

Agastache ‘Navajo Sunset’ and Knautia ‘Thunder and Lightning’

The marina was like a mirror…

marina

and the angled light at the late hour made it hard to keep working, which made a good excuse to go home and have a wander through my own garden.

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Our plan had been to return to work on Feb 10th.   That seemed like a good time, being right after a Saturday Peninsula Cash Mob event.  Starting the Cash Mob having been one of my staycation projects.  BUT February 9th dawned bright and beautiful.  By midmorning that fact registered with us.  (We are not morning people.)  And we decided we had to work.  I could not think of one more staycation garden project to keep us at home.

Our first job as always was the Long Beach parks and planters.  A go round of all the planters kept me plenty busy for the first day while Allan worked on the Fifth Street Park.  The early crocus rewarded us, but I did not see the snowdrops I had expected.  I wonder if they came and went while we were at home!

in the Long Beach planters

in the Long Beach planters

The day almost ended inauspiciously with a dead battery caused by leaving the lights on, but Allan got a jump from a nearby Active Enterprises truck  (Thanks!!) and we had time to plant two clumps of Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’ in Nancy’s garden on our way home.

Nancy's new garden bed

Nancy’s new garden bed

February 10th brought another day in Long Beach and the downtown parks got groomed to our satisfaction, still leaving Coulter Park just north of downtown and the dreaded beach approach weeding job for later.  Public gardening can be a joy when friendly happy tourists want to talk about plants, but it has its downside.  Day one in Long Beach had two boozy fellows wanting me to hire them.

cig butts in the park...after I had picked most of them up

cig butts in the park…after I had picked most of them up

Day two in Long Beach had a barmaid from a tavern getting quite shirty with me because I dumped a pile of ten cigarette butts from the adjoining park next to but not into their butt bucket, as I often do.  As always, I would walk around the fence later and deposit them with other butts.  (Usually I have my own bucket, but that day I had a wheelbarrow for hydrangea prunings.)  When I tried to exercise diplomacy by saying my name and that I do the Long Beach parks and planters, she called me a “lying bitch” and informed me that she knows the planters are all done by volunteers because “signs on the planters say so”.  I remained  calm and diplomatic so as not to disturb the nearby tourists. Finally, possibly frustrated by my refusal to engage in a heated argument, she stormed back inside, leaving me pondering whether or not it was be nicer to toddle into old age doing only private gardens.  It’s an idle thought because I’d find the Long Beach planters very hard to abandon.  Nevertheless, it was surely the worst start to a work year that I’ve ever had.

On February 12th, we turned our attention to the Port of Ilwaco.  (Plenty of rain days make for a choppy schedule at this time of year.)

Allan cutting ornamental grass down at the Powell Gallery.

Allan cutting ornamental grass down at the Powell Gallery.

In  the Marie Powell Gallery garden and on either side of the nearby Time Enough Books entrance are some of the few remaining Phormiums in any of the gardens we care for.  How I have gone off them!  Their tatty old side blades need to be trimmed off, but we will deal with that later.

messy Phormiums

messy Phormiums

At Time Enough’s garden I averted my eyes from the Phormiums and enjoyed the crocuses while pulling dandelions and little weedy grasses.

Time Enough Books garden

Time Enough Books garden

On February 13th we tackled the big ornamental grasses at the Depot Restaurant.  Our luscious coating of washed dairy manure on the new section of the ornamental border had promising spears of bulbs coming through.

north side of deck at Depot

north side of deck at Depot

chopping the Depot grasses....Allan found a tiny tree frog.

chopping the Depot grasses….Allan found a tiny tree frog.

next up on the south side of the Depot deck

next up on the south side of the Depot deck

As soon as we make the wake up call to all the other gardens, I want to get back to the Depot and dig out all the weed grass and Crocosmia bulbs from this area and turn it into a proper herb garden for chef Michael.  We didn’t plant the Crocosmia and it has quite taken over and seems like a useless plant for outside a kitchen door.

I picture a lot more rosemary, chives and oregano.  It will be wonderful and fragrant and so much more attractive than a plant which, nice though it is, blooms for only two weeks out of the year.

Another mission I had that day in Seaview was taking some photos for a local real estate page.

Just around the corner from the Depot, the local florist’s building is a garden in itself.

Artistic Bouquets

Artistic Bouquets

Near the Seaview beach approach, Allan photographed a quintessentially beach garden boat.

washed into a garden

washed into a garden

We got some photos for the Long Beach real estate page as well, including this garden-y one with rose hips.

in south Long Beach

in south Long Beach

Oh, the garden I would have around that old house!

Next:   We head up North to wake up some more gardens.

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One day recently we did a brief drive down the Bolstadt beach approach road, where the garden needs weeding if only I had the time, and we saw from the car a woman walking with a group of four people, carrying proudly in her hands a bouquet of tulips and other flowers which she had picked from the approach garden.  “Finger blight” is one term I have heard for the audacious stealing of flowers from public gardens. She must have gotten just about the last of the tulips.  I shrieked like a banshee but as she was just leaving the approach I did not feel we could appropriately chase her down …If only I had seen her actually picking I would have pointed out the sign that reads “Please don’t pick the flowers; they are here for everyone to enjoy.” What makes people think it is appropriate to make a bouquet from a public garden?…not only the woman, but her companions?  Don’t they see that the garden is long but narrow and has a finite number of flowers, and that if 50 people or more walk there each day during tourist season, and each person picked a bouquet, there would be pitifully few left?  Why did she feel entitled to pick public flowers and take them home to a vase on her own table?  And why did her friends not stop her? I well understand the term “seeing red” when I observe such disregard.  One woman who had stolen quite a large bouquet once had the nerve to inform me that it was job security because the city would pay me to replace the flowers!  I was so aghast that I could not even manage to reply that the city has a limited budget and once she picks ALL the tulips (which comprised most of her armful of plants, as they did the woman’s recent bouquet), there will be no more for that year!

Another phenomenon which to some well-meaning people seems harmless is when they walk along and collect poppy seeds for their own gardens, thus leaving few seeds behind to reseed.   Each person must think their own paper bag of seeds is so small, but if a more than a few people do it, the reseeding is destroyed.  I saw a streetside wildflower garden in Seattle with a big sign imploring people not to gather the seeds.

Even worse has been the theft of entire plants; once I planted Crimson Pygmy barberry, thinking the thorns would deter theft.  Six of them were missing the next day, leaving gallon sized holes.  It happened right before Mother’s Day, so perhaps some mother was gifted with a miniature barberry hedge.  I know that Lois, who voluntarily plants and tends the Seaview Beach Approach garden, has met with similar discouraging thievery of newly planted shrubs, as have the Long Beach street planter volunteers.

My friend Mary photographed a wonderful sign at the Hulda Klager Lilac Garden in Woodland, Washington:

Now, personally I have no problem with someone drinking alcohol as long as they don’t fall into the garden beds, nor do I care if someone brings a truly well behaved dog as long as it doesn’t romp through the flowers and snap them off…but if only people would stop picking those bouquets!

The beach approach poppies are best left to reseed themselves for the                              enjoyment of all.

[2012 note:  In the years since then, we have replaced the delicate strip of poppies and other reseeding flowers with tough rugosa roses that have pretty much taken over the entire approach garden.  They are pretty, but not as pretty.  The flower pickers and especially the trampling of the garden during kite festival was too disheartening.  The rugosa roses defend themselves.]

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