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Posts Tagged ‘Purly Shell Fiber Arts’

Friday 25 December 2021

At home

The cattens had a typically peaceful day.

Nickel and Faerie have the closest bond.

Skooter modeled a gift from Marlene…for a very short time.

behind him, a bookshelf waiting to be organized

Allan continued to work on the 2021 version of his boating book with a rapt audience.

At the suggestion of Mr Tootlepedal, he has added a scale to his maps.

Stormy weather made it a good reading day for me. I finished the fourth memoir by Dodie Smith (I hope to share something about these later) and felt verklempt that they were over, but I have ordered a biography of her. The memoirs left off with over thirty years of her life left to describe! I think she wrote the last one when in her late 80s. I wonder if she hoped to live long enough to write one more.

After opening gifts from each other …..

A perfect pair of garden ornaments from Allan

….and from Montana Mary (delicious condiments and some books!) and Our Kathleen (Penzey’s spices and my very own copy of A Way to Garden!), we had a simple dinner of delicious salmon, caught last summer by our nearby neighbor Jeff Norwood…we’d frozen and saved it for a special occasion…and rice with soy sauce and canned peas, with Christmas cookies from Denny and Mary for dessert.




Saturday, 26 December 2020

Port of Ilwaco

Yes, I actually left the property. (Allan leaves it almost daily to walk to the post office between midnight and 1 AM to get our mail). I had got a message from Heather at Purly Shell Fiber Arts that a bag of discarded wool mixed with wind blown fallen leaves awaited me on the shop patio. Compost makings!

I got to see my friend Jack!

We bagged up some more leaves for a total of three bags full of compostables.

I very much enjoyed the writing on the patio where the Purly women spin wool in good weather.

It’s been in my head ever since.

Just across the lawn…

Folks were dining outdoors at Salt Pub.

In one of the port curbside gardens, a geum bloomed out of season.

We drove to the boatyard to check the garden there for trash that tends to blow in. I do like seeing the encouraging signage that was placed there by our county public health department…and we saw a couple of new boats.

Back at home, I had time to load bagged leaves from autumn into the new leaf bins and some woolly leaf debris into bin one. The new path is so easy to walk on.

While I did have another project in mind, blustery weather arrived and sent me back to a book, and I didn’t mind.

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Saturday, November 29, 2014

images

Today was Shop Small Saturday, and since I wanted to stay very local (and needed to “cover” the event for Discover Ilwaco), we stuck to the Port of Ilwaco.  I was very well chuffed to have friends Kathleen and J9 come by to join us.  On the way down, I found it terribly difficult not to pull some small weeds from a Howerton Way garden.  With Kathleen’s encouragement, I managed to walk on past them.

J9, Kathleen, and I amble along Waterfront Way (Allan's photo)

J9, Kathleen, and I amble along Waterfront Way (Allan’s photos)

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a crisp sunny day, such a contrast from yesterday

We walked by Time Enough Books.

We walked by Time Enough Books.

And OleBob's.  We would return to both later on.

And OleBob’s. We would return to both later on.

Regular readers will be glad to know that after a week off work, I did not need my cane to make it to the port and back.  In fact, I was not even hobbling!

 

entering this year's Ilwaco Christmas Market venue, the former space of Queen La De Da (who moved her shop downtown)

entering this year’s Ilwaco Christmas Market venue, the former space of Queen La De Da (who moved her shop downtown)

The market will be richer in vendors starting next week.  There was a big craft fair, maybe more than one, in Seaside and maybe Astoria today so crafters were spread a bit thin, we think.  NEXT week Pink Poppy Bakery will be there…but Kathleen will be back in her Olympia home and will miss that delight till she returns in two weeks.

In the Saturday Christmas Market:

It occurs to me I need to look at jewelry and compliment it; I tend to ignore it as I don't wear much (except for the very cool jewelry of Debbie Haugsten).

It occurs to me I need to look at jewelry and compliment it; I tend to ignore it as I don’t wear it much. .(The exception is that I always notice the very cool jewelry of Debbie Haugsten; I wish she had a booth at this market.)

An artist in wood....

An artist in wood….

had made a beautiful boat.

had made a beautiful boat.

The miniature charts were actual antiques.

The miniature charts were actually old, he told us.

boat detail

boat detail

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

In the interest of supporting the market, Allan bought an oyster shell ornament.

In the interest of supporting the market, Allan bought an oyster shell ornament.

wreaths

wreaths

signs

signs

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

When I saw market manager Bruce Peterson carrying a wooden star down the street, I realized he must be planning to put the topper on the crab pot Christmas tree.  I left the market and tailed him for a photo opportunity.

approaching the tree at the west end of Howerton Way

approaching the tree at the west end of Howerton Way

tree

Peter and Bruce place the star

Peter and Bruce place the star

star2

"Does it look straight to you?"

“Does it look straight to you?”

Betsy Millard, director of Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum

Betsy Millard, director of Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum

helpers

helpers

zip-tying the lights and greenery

zip-tying the lights and greenery

On the way back, I simply had to stop at the westernmost Howerton Way garden and break the dead stems off of a Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies’.  I had meant to bring my clippers.  Kathleen reminded me that I was on staycation but I could not be dissuaded.  After that excitement, we reunited with Allan and J9 and all went into Time Enough Books for awhile.  Before entering, Allan saw co owner Peter putting up some lights.

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Peter making sure the lights reach down to the Purly Shell yarn shop

In the bookstore, my good friend Scout waited to greet new customers.

scout

scout

scout2

 

scout3

 

Allan's photo; shop dog Scout

Allan’s photo; shop dog Scout

We sat by the fire (Allan's photo)

We sat by the fire (Allan’s photo) and I hope added some ambience.

Allan's photo: lots of patrons for Shop Small Saturday

Allan’s photo: lots of patrons for Shop Small Saturday

Time Enough Books

Time Enough Books

J9, an avid reader, browsing the shelves

J9, an avid reader, browsing the shelves

J9 left us to run assorted errands and head home to her new kittens.  Kathleen and I made a stop into Purly Shell Fiber Arts, right next door to the bookstore.

Purly Shell Christmas tree

Purly Shell Christmas tree

yarn displayed on nautical nets

yarn displayed on nautical nets

in Purly Shell

in Purly Shell (Allan’s photo)

purly2

I tried to start a conversation about the cozy mystery series The Seaside Knitters and how I was loving it so much that it made me want to learn to knit.  This was a missed opportunity as I could at that moment have been easily convinced to take a knitting class.  Allan commented how much our cats would enjoy the yarn.

It does look like a pleasant pastime.

It does look like a pleasant pastime.

Allan departed to work on a home project: getting some Christmas lights hung.  Kathleen and I were starting to feel peckish.  Before lunch, however, we wanted to visit Artist Don Nisbett.

Don in his shop

Don in his shop

cards

cards

tiles

tiles

glasses

glasses

and a marina view...

and a marina view…

We each bought some Christmas cards, and Don signed them for us.

cards by Don

cards by Don

While we were there, a fisherman came in asking for a good place to eat at the port.  Don suggested OleBob’s.  Then the fisherman told us that the boat he’d been on last night was almost the first casualty of the crabbing season.

a fisherman's tale

a fisherman’s tale

The boat called The Hornet had sprung a leak at sea during last night’s windy weather.  The Coast Guard was called.  In choppy seas, some of the expensive crab pots were lost, and crewmate Big John went overboard.  Thankfully, he got back to the side of the boat almost immediately and was saved.  Within just thirty seconds, his legs had gone numb from the cold.  You can see a short Coast Guard video of the rescue here.

Soon Kathleen and I went down the way to OleBob’s ourselves and were pleased to see the fisherman and the owner of the boat ordering a big set of meals for the whole crew.  The boat’s owner told us the leak would be fixed soon and they would go back out.

crab fishermen at OleBob's

crab fishermen at OleBob’s

We waiting peaceably at a corner table while the big order was cooked.

We waiting peaceably at a corner table while the big order was cooked.

views from OleBob's...

views from OleBob’s…

olebobs2

Kathleen had fish and chips (left) and I had crab cakes (right):

I took a bite of the tasty garlic bread before I remembered to take a photo.

I took a bite of the tasty garlic bread before I remembered to take a photo.

On the way out, we had a look at the two maps where visitors to OleBob’s stick a pin to mark how far they have traveled for a tasty crab cake.

map of the USA

map of the USA

map of the world

map of the world

At home, we found Allan still working on the lights in the quite chilly air.  He kept at it till sunset and took some photos from the roof.

He kept at it till sunset...(Allan's photo)

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The Jessie’s star, right

 

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lights partially installed; more icicle lights to come

one string of lights on the back of the house

Kathleen left for her beach cabin in time to get home before the roads  iced up.  As I write this in the late evening, it’s 29 degrees outside and I am looking forward to six days of reading.  Only one more work task remains: the billing for November, and then I can turn to books for several days before next Saturday’s lighting of the Crab Pot Christmas Tree calls us out again.

Sunday30 November 2014

 It took all tedious day to do the billing.  Now that it is done, I REALLY feel like I am on staycation!

The last gardening news for November:

Allan got the darling little cyclamens from Kathleen planted.

Allan got the darling little cyclamens from Kathleen planted.

The wheelbarrow got a tune up in Allan's shop, and the gardening tools got unloaded from the van.

The wheelbarrow got a tune up in Allan’s shop, and the gardening tools got unloaded from the van.

I am sorry to say we already have a call from a client who needs some help with a bulb transplanting project, so a few tools will have to go back in so we can come to her rescue.  (There are always a few job-related tasks that come up to interfere with pure staycation.)

a bouquet of chrysanthemums from Long Beach still in bloom by the window

a bouquet of chrysanthemums from Long Beach still in bloom by the window

Fatsia 'Spiders Web' is still holding up well.

Fatsia ‘Spiders Web’ is still holding up well.

The front garden is pretty well crispy.

The front garden is pretty well crispy.

We have but one small tomato left of the last handful that I brought in before the cold night.

We have but one small tomato left of the last handful that I brought in before the cold night.

And the cats are well settled in for the winter.  For much of the rest of staycation, at least any cold and/or rainy days, I hope to be joining them on this chair:

cats2

cats1

cats3

 

 

 

 

 

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Saturday, 6 September 2014

Although the weather was shockingly hot (almost 90), I did walk down to the Saturday Market at ten, mainly because I wanted to deliver a book I had just finished to the owners of Purly Shell yarn shop. My friend Montana Mary must have given me this book about a seaside knitters group in Maine. It turned out to be well written, more than a lot of cozy mystery series are, and I figured the knitting women might enjoy it.

cashmere

The characters in the book would have felt right at home at Purly Shell.

The characters in the book would have felt right at home at Purly Shell at the Port of Ilwaco.

I strolled only two blocks worth of market due to the heat. I was pleased to be walking with no cane and very little pain.

the condor statue

the condor statue

plants for sale

plants for sale

I got a lemon lime bundt cake from Pink Poppy Bakery...

I got a lemon lime bundt cake from Pink Poppy Bakery…

bought some peaches from De Asis produce...

and bought some peaches from De Asis produce.

Smokey had been waiting for me to come home.

Smokey had been waiting for me to come home.

Just over the recent blast of heat. the lawn had gone brown in part of the back garden.

Just over the recent blast of heat. the lawn had gone brown in part of the back garden.

east garden bed; I must remember to keep watering the geranium I recently tranplanted along the edge.

east garden bed; I must remember to keep watering the geranium I recently tranplanted along the edge.

The heat remained while a grey sky promised some coolness to come.

The heat remained while a grey sky promised some coolness to come.

some of my ladies in waiting

some of my ladies in waiting

I thought about gardening, but it was just too dang hot so after doing enough watering of containers to keep plants alive (especially the ladies in waiting), and picking some tomatoes from the very hot greenhouse, I went indoors and worked on the blog about the previous night’s Slow Drag at the Port.

tomatoes from the greenhouse.  (Only cherry tomatoes do well for me.)

tomatoes from the greenhouse. (Only cherry tomatoes do well for me.)

After the blog entry was done, I set to reading the recent memoir by my favourite New Yorker cartoonist, Roz Chast. (George Booth is my second favourite.) Even though the heat did indeed disappear, I did not find myself outside gardening at all.

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My favourite pages:

I'm always pleased to find out that someone else avoids driving.

I’m always pleased to find out that someone else avoids driving.

my favourite page

my favourite page

a childhood memory much like mine

a childhood memory much like mine

At age 15, I actually counted the days till I was 18 and could move out.

At age 15, I actually counted the days till I was 18 and could move out.

The book is mesmerizing, funny and painful. (Allan read it cover to cover a day later.)

Just about the time I finished the book, Garden Tour Nancy came over with cookies and we sat in the garden, first in the shade, and then in the sun for over an hour.

Nancy's zucchini cookies

Nancy’s zucchini cookies

Because the Rod Run classic car event is well known for not drawing patrons to fine dining restaurants, we decided to have our monthly dinner at Pelicano Restaurant at the Port and show them some support. Little did we know that the big sports bar in Long Beach had closed for the evening because allegedly the owner got sick of rowdy patrons, so Pelicano became very crowded indeed. That did not stop the skilled chef, hostess, and servers from making our experience a good one.

the view from Pelicano

the view from Pelicano

Flamenco!  Tequila, campari, lime simple syrup and lime juice

Flamenco cocktail: Tequila, campari, lime simple syrup and lime juice

Pequillo pepper stuffed with avocado, shrimp, black beans, and Aioli

Pequillo pepper stuffed with avocado, shrimp, black beans, and Aioli

Caesar salad

Caesar salad

baked Pacific cod with Kalamata olives, tomatoes, onions and salsa verde

baked Pacific cod with Kalamata olives, tomatoes, onions and salsa verde

a busy restaurant

a busy restaurant

Sunday, 7 September 2014

Again, I could not motivate myself to garden. I began a book that completely absorbed me for the whole day. It is usually only in winter that I have the pleasure of reading an entire book in a day (although before I became an obsessed gardener, I often did so).

Allan made me a nice cup of Cream Earl Grey (a gift from Kathleen) and I had my share of Pink Poppy lemon lime bundt cake and settled into my chair.

tea

twee

I have been completely unaware that the word “twee” has come to refer to a certain kind of indie pop, gentle, artisanal bread eating, Portlandia style of culture. I could not quite understand how the author managed to drag so many musicians and writers and film makers under the twee umbrella. However, the book was full of just the sort of Nick Hornby type music and book and film analysis that I love and reading it made for a perfect day.

How have I not known about some bands that sound so wonderful to me? My phone enabled me to listen to a song each by The Neutral Milk Hotel and Belle and Sebastian and I want to hear more this winter when I have more time.

screen shot from a video of a song by Neutral Milk Hotel; I was smitten.

screen shot from a video of a song by Neutral Milk Hotel; I was smitten.

Teasers of few of my favourite bits from the book:

I loved this movie when I saw it back in the late 70s.

I loved this movie when I saw it back in the late 70s.

Waterloo Sunset is one of my favourite songs in all the world.

Waterloo Sunset is one of my favourite songs in all the world.

Nick Drake earned many pages, including a fascinating story about how his song Pink Moon was used in an ad that posthumously revived interest in his music.

Nick Drake earned many pages, including a fascinating story about how his song Pink Moon was used in an ad that posthumously revived interest in his music.

several pages listed songs; I intend to listen to the ones I don't know.

several pages listed songs; I intend to listen to the ones I don’t know.

I must be twee because I adore The Smiths.

I must be twee because I adore The Smiths.

“You don’t outgrow the Smiths any more than you outgrow your vital organs,” Spitz writes. “They are unrenouncable.”

I must read this book.

I must read Perks of Being a Wallflower!

The day drifted lazily by, the book was read (and I hope those of you who like that sort of thing will be inspired to read it), we watched some Doctor Who (season seven) and no gardening was done by me at all. I think I might have seen Allan out planting some of his new ferns. He also watered the Ilwaco planters, finding some evidence of the busy weekend. (We could hear the distant roar of traffic all weekend even though we were out of the range of the main event which is centered in Ocean Park and cruises around and around in Long Beach.)

Ilwaco planter, Allan's photo

Ilwaco planter, Allan’s photo with little liquor bottles (not that unusual, really)

Monday, 8 September 2014

We had declared Monday off as we knew the town would still be full of Rod Runners. The event used to take place on Labor Day weekend, until it got so rowdy that it got moved to the following weekend, and many of its attendees still treat it like a three day weekend.

My desire to read was still strong, so I finished Landscaping for Privacy. I had an excuse to stay in today as a drizzle fell all morning (and I actually hoped it would stop as we were planning a campfire in the evening).

privacy

good book, good photos, good ideas

good book, good photos, good ideas

There is a subtle wit in author Marty Wingate’s garden writing. I learned that she has written a series of garden mysteries and tried to get one through inter-library loan only to find that it is only available as an e-book. Oh how I dislike reading ebooks! I may read it eventually anyway but I do wish it were available on paper.

Allan puttered with his motorcycle. It turned out to still have problems so a ride did not ensue.

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He says: It puddled gas out a carb that I had taken apart. Then it started OK, but wouldn’t idle without quitting.

He discovered a mouse test in the toolbox, made of a pink blanket (very twee).

He discovered a mouse test in the toolbox, made of a pink blanket (very twee).

Then I simply had to garden or I would have felt too guilty. The damp weather made it a good time at last to get more of the ladies in waiting into the ground. These were all plants sent me by Todd Wiegardt. I took my iPhone outside and looked up the description of each one as I planted it.

eupatorium

a winter blooming Eupatorium!  went into the front garden where I have winter blooming witchhazel and other midwinter delights to view from the front window.

a winter blooming Eupatorium! went into the front garden where I have winter blooming witchhazel and other midwinter delights to view from the east window.

My favourite in appearance of all the plants had a bulbous root.

My favourite in appearance of all the plants had a bulbous root.

It went into the scree garden.

It went into the scree garden.

plant

plant2

They all got put into the ground in what I hope is the perfect spot for each.

They all got put into the ground in what I hope is the perfect spot for each.

At four-ish, I began to worry that I should call our friend Kathleen and tell her we had to cancel our planned fire and perhaps order a pizza for an indoor dinner. Then the weather seemed to clear; I could see the faint orb of pale sun under the clouds and the drizzle seemed to stop. I went ahead and started to burn.

fire

By the time Kathleen arrived at five, all bundled up in a coat and laughing at how Northwestern the evening had become, the tables and chairs were wet and all we could do was roast our sausages and take them inside to dine at the table.

Just too, too wet.

Just too, too wet.

Although I regretted that we missed the experience of getting to watch the logs turn to coals, we talked around the dining room table until we realized that the clock said eleven PM. I had thought that surely it was only about nine.

Perhaps my most unproductive weekend in the summer had turned out to be one of the most pleasant.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Wednesday, 26 March 2014

Today’s rain lacked gloriousness because we chose to work in it.  We thought, when we woke to light drizzle, that we would enjoy the accomplishment of checking a couple of hauling jobs off of our list.  We grabbed the opportunity to chop down a couple of plants in our front garden and divest ourselves of the resulting debris.  My Rubus lineatus may not even return after this past winter’s hard freezes, and the Australian mint shrub in the foreground had a tattered look and had also got bigger than I thought it would.

before

before

after...much better view of the Hellebores

after…much better view of the Hellebores

Off we drove in a light drizzle to the Depot Restaurant in Seaview, the next beach town north.  We had two piles of debris there from previous work days to pick up, and I went along because I had three more pruning tasks in mind there.

at the Depot: forgot to take a before

at the Depot: forgot to take a before

during...native Spiraea douglasii

during…native Spiraea douglasii

after....old stems removed to encourage new growth

after….old stems removed to encourage new growth

I tackled the Escallonia that had caught my attention a few days earlier.  Not only did it have a bald top, but it is so much the wrong plant for that spot.  It would like to get huge and block the window entirely.  Now, my plan is that it will come back from the base and will then be easier to keep low.

Escallonia before

Escallonia before

and after!

and after!

You may observe that as I pruned, the skies opened and heavy rain began to fall.  It was not pleasant.

with debris loaded and ready to go

with debris loaded and ready to go

Our plan was to pick up the pile we had left after pruning a tree at The Anchorage Cottages.  We swung by Garden Tour Nancy’s on the way to leave a container of mixed sweet pea seeds on her porch, a trade for some purple podded edible peas that she’d dropped off on my porch.  She saw us and beckoned us in.  I left my dripping raincoat and wet shoes on her porch, although my hair was streaming water as I can’t bear to wear a hat while working.  That’s when the day turned better.  Not only did we have a good visit with Nancy and Phil; we were invited to a delicious impromptu lunch!

a tableau in Nancy and Phil's new powder room

a tableau in Nancy and Phil’s new powder room

view from the east windows

view from the east window

view from the south window

view from the south window

and a wonderful lunch with Nancy's homemade pasta sauce, freshly grated Parmesan, and basil

and a wonderful lunch with Nancy’s homemade pasta sauce, freshly grated Parmesan, and basil

After lunch and garden talk, the rain had stopped so we had a quick tour of the garden.

a chicken coop from a kit; soon to be occupied

a chicken coop from a kit; soon to be occupied

garlic rows

garlic rows

the flower border we made a year and a half ago

the flower border we made a year and a half ago

Muscari 'Ocean Magic'

Muscari ‘Ocean Magic’

In the lack of rain, we continued our work day by collecting our branch pile from the Anchorage Cottages just north of Long Beach.

The Anchorage

The Anchorage

Sunday's pruning job looks more defined with the branches removed from behind the tree.

Sunday’s pruning job looks more defined with the branches removed from behind the tree.

On the way to the transfer station (AKA the dump), we stopped at Dennis Company so I could buy more sweet pea seeds.  The tulips in the planter just north of the store looked promising.  A sharp eye can see chickweed underneath them.  We did not have time to deal with it because the local dump closes at four thirty.

city planter: to be weeded later

city planter: to be weeded later

The dump is located east of Sandridge Road.  We could have taken to debris to Peninsula Landscape Supply but I thought they might have closed their gates in discouragement over the torrential rain.  On the way to the dump, we drove past cranberry bogs and saw we were not the only ones working in bad weather.

cran

digging out a bog

digging out a bog

entering the transfer station road

entering the transfer station road

up and over a little hill

up and over a little hill

and here we are; we dump yard waste behind the big blue building.

and here we are; we dump yard waste behind the big blue building.

4:25 PM: On the way back home down Sandridge Road, we were cheered by the sight of our client Diane’s nice display of Narcissi.

heading south past Diane's garden

heading south past Diane’s garden

Oddly, when we got home the weather had almost completely cleared and yet…the power was out.  Our plans to have dinner with visiting friend Kathleen Shaw looked perilous, as we learned that the power had gone out all the way to Klipsan Beach, encompassing every dinner restaurant that we like.  Even stranger, our telephone internet (4G) also disappeared just after I’d managed to learn from the local Facebookers how widespread the outage was.

I’m so happy to tell you that the power returned at 5:45 PM, just in time to fulfil our plan to dine at Mexican Fiesta night at the Lightship Restaurant in Long Beach…the last fiesta night of the winter.

at the Lightship:  Guacamole made tableside

at the Lightship: Guacamole made tableside

We were joined by local artists Don Nisbett and Jenna (Queen LaDeDa) and their son Joe for an even more festive fiesta night.

Kathleen and Jenna

Kathleen and Jenna

I had a feeling that the next day would turn out to be another work day.  I’m still hoping for a storm this weekend that will permit me to read High and Dry!

Thursday, 27 March 2014

Still with the halfway decent weather and no rainy reading day!  (Does all this wanting to stay home and read mean I want to retire?  Maybe.  I spend some time at work these days wondering why we are working so hard when we could afford to partially retire.  The problem is, we really like all of our jobs.)

So we began at the Port, weeding a bit and planting some assorted California poppy seeds in the Howerton Street gardens.

West end of Howerton, looking east

West end of Howerton, looking east

detail

detail

While Allan weeded the Howerton Way beds on the north side of the Port Office, I weeded the little bed on the south side.

Port Office, south side

Port Office, south side

Muscari and Anemone blanda

Muscari and Anemone blanda along Howerton

Muscari 'Ocean Magic' backed with tulips

Muscari ‘Ocean Magic’ backed with tulips

early tulips

early tulips

peacock

I had hoped to have a rainy day get together at Olde Towne Café with our friend Kathleen before she drove back north.  The good weather intervened.  We finally made it there, after Judy (four doors down) had been and gone and Kathleen was done with her lunch.  A half an hour did pass before we got back to work.

the view from our Olde Towne table; I was very taken with that brown coffeepot even though brown is "not my colour"

the view from our Olde Towne table; I was very taken with that brown coffeepot even though brown is “not my colour”.

other patrons at Olde Towne

other patrons at Olde Towne

one of our city planters right outside Olde Towne Café

one of our city planters right outside Olde Towne Café

To further our mission of getting sweet pea and poppy seeds planted, we went to the next (and last!) sweet pea job, the Boreas Inn in Long Beach.  I was pleased to see some of my mom’s dogtooth violets coming up….  I had transplanted them here and there when my mother left her garden.

Erythronium at Boreas Inn garden

Erythronium at Boreas Inn garden

Because grass always creeps under the fence from the neighbour’s lawn into the area where Susie likes to plant sweet peas, I had decided to try a new method: planting them in long, narrow containers.

project, before

project, before

And then I began to plant poppy seeds and noticed that the hole where Ed Strange had removed a Phormium a few weeks before still had no new soil added.  I decided that we should go get a yard of soil as I knew Ed was running behind in his landscape and mowing business because of rain.  Part of what he does so excellently is mowing lawns, and that’s not a job that can wait for very long.  So off we went.  As we departed the Boreas property, a heavy rain began to fall and I felt sunk in gloom, being determined to do the soil job but expecting to be thoroughly and miserably drenched.

On the way to Peninsula Landscape Supply, we stopped at The Basket Case Greenhouse to pick up a few more santolinas and an Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’.

Eryngium' Jade Frost'...I love it so much I always want more.

Eryngium’ Jade Frost’…I love it so much I always want more.

By then, I could see a lighter cast to the southwest sky and got some hope that the rain might stop.

still raining at Peninsula Landscape Supply while our soil was being loaded into the trailer

still raining at Peninsula Landscape Supply while our soil was being loaded into the trailer

While sitting in the van hoping for the rain to stop, I realized I needed MORE Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’ and a few other cool perennials for a long bed next to the squirting clam in Fifth Street Park.  Fred and Nancy were not terribly surprised when we pulled back into the Basket Case parking lot and bought another two trays of perennials.

at the Basket Case

at the Basket Case

the perennial greenhouse

the perennial and herb greenhouse

On the way back to Boreas, we swung by Long Beach City Hall to drop off a plant bill.  The north side display of mostly white flowers is looking even better than last week.  And the rain had stopped!

Long Beach City Hall

Long Beach City Hall

With our yard of soil, Allan fluffed up the Boreas’ Garden Suite bed where he had positioned the new sweet pea planters.

after

after

We added soil to various spots in the lawn beds and, at Susie’s request, used to rest to level out some dips in the lawn itself.

looking west

looking west

It looks rather odd now.

It looks rather odd now.

Brown sand might have been better; I’m wondering if the lawn will now have areas that are too happy because of being in better soil.  However, it needed to be done, and now it’s done, and Ed is happy that he does not have to find time to do it.

looking east toward the inn and the hot tub gazebo

looking east toward the inn and the hot tub gazebo

As we drove off, Susie herself was happily broadcasting some lawn seed.

Susie seeding

Susie seeding

I had high hopes for a big storm coming in the next day so that I would have time to sit down and read High and Dry.

Friday, 28 March 2014

At last…after a good long sleep, I awoke to the sound of pelting rain.  I celebrated with rain photos from every window.

Allan took this photo, from his window, of a robin on the wheelbarrow.

Allan took this photo, from his window, of a robin on the wheelbarrow.

from the kitchen window

from the kitchen window

delicious rain

delicious rain

rain to the east

rain to the east

and the south

and to the south

The work board was peacefully almost empty of first time garden clean ups.

soon the next round of work will be added...

soon the next round of work will be added…but for now there is little guilt.

While breakfasting, before settling down to read High and Dry, I checked my Facebook feed on my phone.  There, I saw that it was Olde Towne Café owner Luanne’s birthday.  That changed the day’s plan.

Allan and I went to the new fiber arts shop at the Port, Purly Shell, to get her a gift certificate for yarn.

Purly Shell, right next to Time Enough Books

Purly Shell, right next to Time Enough Books, with art by Don Nisbett

inside Purly Shell

inside Purly Shell

a cosy place for knitting and crocheting

a cosy place for knitting and crocheting

We popped next door to Time Enough Books.  I had a certain kind of book in mind for Luanne, one that speaks to the joys and strengths of solitude and self discovery.  I was thinking SARK or May Sarton (Plant Dreaming Deep).  Although bookshop owner Karla did not have those on such short notice, she knew exactly what I meant and picked up a copy of Survival Lessons by Alice Hoffman.  I had read it oh so recently on a rainy day and it was the perfect choice.

I also quite liked the “I dress this way…” magnet as it reminded me of the passage I had read just yesterday (in Sing Them Home) about a woman, new to a small town, being critiqued for the way she dressed.

dressing

On the board where customers can recommend a good book, I added Mister Owita’s Guide to Gardening, another wonderful recent read.

book recommendations

book recommendations

And then…Olde Towne Café.  At first, Luanne was too busy cooking and serving to join her own birthday party!

Luanne on the move at Olde Towne

Luanne on the move at Olde Towne

After we sat visiting with Jenna, Cat, and Rosemary for awhile, the lunch crowd thinned and Luanne’s son and coworker Michael took over so she could relax for a bit.

Luanne with a bouquet sent by her daughter back east

Luanne with a bouquet sent by her daughter back east

Luanne opens some tiny buttons from Cat.

Luanne opens some tiny buttons from Cat.

Cat's gift: inspirational mug and buttons

Cat’s gift: inspirational mug and buttons

“Wild and beautiful heart”, ‘Soul sisters teach us how to fly”, “Put on your brave girl boots”.

birthday book and cards

birthday book and cards

Just as the party was almost ending, our friend J9 arrived to get a cup of coffee.

J9 and Luanne

J9 and Luanne

Meanwhile, in the background, Allan talked with Chris about the new Black Lake Yacht Club, which apparently is a real plan (for really small boats), not just a joke.  If Allan’s going to join a “yacht club”, we really will have to find a way to cut back on work.

By the time we got home, the rain had stopped and instead of reading, I had to go out and plant my own damn sweet peas, which led to some weeding, and to another day gone without reading.  Rain is predicted for tomorrow.  Could I possibly be so lucky?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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