Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘rain barrels’

Friday, 7 August 2015

Because of another bout of strong wind, I stayed indoors working on this blog, and with this post I finally have caught up after all the June and July garden touring.  It won’t last long, as the edible tour is on Sunday, and it won’t make the posts publish in real time, as I’m still about ten days behind.

I didn’t even have to water the ladies in waiting today, as Allan had done so while watering his own garden.  Since I didn’t have room to share these photos during the work blog, here are a few of our garden taken four days before:

second wave of lilies coming on

second wave of lilies coming on, looking southeast

lilies and cosmos

lilies and cosmos

Miscanthus and lilies

Miscanthus sinensis ‘Variegatus’ and lilies

hips of Rosa moyesii with Stipa gigantea

hips of Rosa moyesii with Stipa gigantea

looking west

looking west

the west bed, with the last wave of lilies

the west bed, with the last wave of lilies

It’s not all beauty: I must remember to move the poor astilbe, below, which I also told myself to move last summer when the same thing happened.

It is not getting watered and needs a new location, poor thing.

It is not getting watered and needs a new location, poor thing.

Echinops sphaerocephalus 'Arctic Glow'

Echinops sphaerocephalus ‘Arctic Glow’

center bed: river of Geranium 'Rozanne'

center bed: river of Geranium ‘Rozanne’

I take this quiet day as a chance to recommend the book I finished last week:  It’s informative and also personal in perfect combination:

IMG_8988

Cabin Lessons by Spike Carlsen

IMG_8993

from the book

from the book

That reminds me of the work triangle, which says you can get two out of these three qualities: fast, cheap, and good…but never all at once.

The workers that are fast, good AND cheap are probably going to struggle financially.  I speak from experience.

Allan worked on his project, and watered the Ilwaco planters.

He saw a moth on a daisy...

He saw a moth on a daisy…

a new boat in the boatyard...

…a new boat in the boatyard…

and watered a stray poppy...

…and watered a stray poppy…

admired some good nasturtiums in a planter...

…and admired some good nasturtiums in a planter…

and talked with the owner of this boat, in town for the Tuna Classic.

and talked with the owner of this boat, in town for the Tuna Classic.

 Saturday, 8 August 2015

Allan's photo: Our neighbour, Onyx, comes for a drink.

Allan’s photo: Our neighbour, Onyx, comes for a drink.

At one-ish, I walked down to the Saturday Market.  Allan had already started working on his project.

project

Ilwaco Saturday Market

I had a feeling I had better get to the market before it was closed down by heavy 25 mph wind aimed right at the market tents.

looking west down Waterfront Way

looking west down Waterfront Way

Northwest Natural

Northwest Natural

Northwest Natural leaf molds

Northwest Natural leaf molds

bought some Ginger Gold apples from De Asis Farm

bought some Ginger Gold apples from De Asis Farm

Meanwhile, the Oregon Tuna Classic was taking place in the stormy weather; the marina is full of tuna sport fishing boats for this annual event.  Much tuna will be donated to local food banks.

Oregon Tuna Classic

Oregon Tuna Classic

a heavy load of tuna

a heavy load of tuna

tuna catch

tuna catch

icing down the fish

icing down the fish

more fresh produce at the market

more fresh produce at the market

Ankeny Street

Ankeny Street

(We toured a garden on Ankeny Street in June.)

Every week at the market, I see folks admiring the Basket Case Greenhouse’s hanging baskets.

baskets

I found Maddy of Pink Poppy Bakery dismantling her tent because of the wind and managed to buy some lemon cupcakes at the last minute, then went into Time Enough Books to give owner Karla a gardening invoice.

shop dog Scout and a friend

shop dog Scout and a friend

When I departed after a good long chat with Karla, I found actual rainfall outside.

When I departed after a good long chat with Karla, I found actual rainfall outside.

At home, I excitedly checked all the rain barrels.

rain2

Yay!

Yay!

rainbarrel

barrel2

This one had a head start with osciillating sprinkler run off from our low roof.

This one had a head start with osciillating sprinkler run off from our low roof.

Frosty and Smokey observing the weather.

Frosty and Smokey observing the weather.

Much as I would love to see several days of heavy rain, I must request a break from rain from noon to five tomorrow (August 9th) for the edible garden tour.

Now I am at last going to catch up on posts I’ve missed (due to garden touring and blogging about garden tours) in the Tootlepedal blog.

I also plant to finish an excellent gardening memoir:

apprentice

 

 

Read Full Post »

Touring on Study Weekend, hosted by Willamette Valley Hardy Plant Group

The garden we almost skipped due to time factors ended up being the one I most wished was my own.  It was only eight years old in 2008, on 2.5 acres, with “a perennial garden, heath and heather beds, lavender grid, formal vegetable garden and orchard, antique apple orchard, meadow, and creek garden”.

First we walked up the drive because we saw a blessed sight: a sanican!  (Thank you, Bryan and Cassandra Barrett or the Willamette Valley Hardy Plant Group!)  Just past there was this old barn with chickens.

From there we could see a wide rustic path to the unpretentious house…and the beautiful veg patch.

vegetable garden

Over the informally arranged and clearly productive veg garden we glimpsed glorious flowers.

an enticing glimpse

A gravel scree lay between us and the house and garden beds into which we were eager to wade.

scree garden

 For a little while I’ll just let the plants around the house do the talking.

We could see through the lattice a glimpse of the orchard and field beyond:

…and stepping through an opening between the garden areas we looked back at the beds we had just toured.  Then we saw the sloping field.  I am not a big fan of heather in gardens and have never seen it used with complete RIGHTness anywhere other than the natural hills of Scotland and the Bronte Moors until I saw this:

The heaths and heather slope segued into the “lavender grid” and then a wild meadow; of course, we had to wander down and walk through it.  I doubt either of us made many comments because we were in awe.

The mown meadow path led us back up to more gardens around the house.

I’d love to have a sculpture like the one below with a passage from a gardening book on the pages.

Rustic steps led back up into the house gardens.

We looked back at the gardens between us and the meadows, bright with colour even on a grey day.

As we explored the front garden we saw the house we saw the house looked much more old fashioned and bungalow style than it did in the back.

Around the side of the house we glimpsed the old barn where we’d begun.

Every bit of garden around the house was a perfect picture.

We crossed the road (a collection of conifers with various colours of needles protected the house from the road) to the newer garden that the Barrets were developing along the creek.

We meandered back to the deck behind the house.  I loved the fact that the deck needed repair.  Clearly the money was going to the best place:  Into the garden.

The final touch of perfection: The most attractive rain barrel I had ever seen, imported from England:

Tour time was over and back we went to Sheila’s home and garden which deserves an entry of its own.

Read Full Post »