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Posts Tagged ‘rain’

Monday, 13 March 2017

As I write the first part of this in the mid afternoon, the rain is not as fierce as it was this morning.  In my youth…maybe five years ago…I would have leapt out to do some work.  Now, I feel less like working in the drizzle.  I added last week’s one day of work to the time sheet and was shocked to see we’ve eight rain and windy bitter cold and even snow days off.  Meanwhile, I’m embarrassed to report that Dave and Melissa bundled up in rain gear and worked through almost ALL the weather.

My excuse today: The soil is boggy and the plants are all drenched.  What a wimp!

I did take a walk in the soft rain throughout the garden.

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Skooter looked startled that I opened the front door.


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hyacinth basket


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looking south


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soggy footing


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lots of crocuses


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Harry Lauder’s Walking Stick (contorted filbert)


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way too much fried egg plant reseeded in the bogsy wood


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narcissi, and monster shotweed


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Slippery ground prevented the shotweed pulling and fern clipping from starting up.

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pulmonaria (spotted dog)


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hard to even imagine when we’ll be able to have a campfire


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The swale path is a pond.


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Looking north.  Water on the center path is over the top of my boots.


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south gate

The top of the south gate represents a Chinook tribal canoe, the sort that used to ply the river when this very spot was river front, before the port parking lots and building sites were built on fill, in the early 1950s.

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I do wish this water stood all year long.

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coming round the west side


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more pulmonaria


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corydalis foliage


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crocuses

As you can see, the chop and drop method looks pretty messy.  I look forward to the future three compost bins which will be made as soon as we get six more free pallets…from somewhere.  I have decided the bins will tuck in nicely next to the greenhouse.

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They will replace the wonky tadpole pond set up…


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I love my new stop the eye fence.


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Euonymus ‘Wolong Ghost’ is seriously climbing the front of the house, which is vinyl clad.

As I had walked all around the garden, I had collected one flower from every hellebore.  I’m sorry to report that many had minuscule snails hiding inside, putting paid to the idea that a cold winter would mean fewer snails.

Here is the full collection of hellebore blossoms.

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Skooter appeared.

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The center one is last year’s birthday present from Our Kathleen.

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Because my camera has been finding it hard to capture the glory of the corylopsis in bloom, I asked Allan to photograph it.

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Corylopsis and crocus, my photo

He returned with these:

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Corylopsis pauciflora

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with some fill in flash

Smokey snoozed through all of it.

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I’d like to read for the rest of the day in this most wonderful book:

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I can already tell you I am going to be rating this book at 20 stars.  As a former housecleaner for 18 years, I find deep familiarity in the stories of doing housework for richer folk.  And as the protagonist, Mildred, talks with her best friend about race, I keep marveling in a furious way that 70 years after it was written, how very much about racism is still the same.  Read it; it is wonderful and it’s funny despite its serious topics.  Read about it here.

My reading hours are curtailed because tonight is the local Democrats meeting.  I know Mildred would want me to go.  Here are her thoughts on a meeting:

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Monday, 22 February 2016

Last night at 2 AM, I finished a novel that I’d been pecking away at for several bedtimes.

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I especially liked this description of what it feels like when rain comes after a long drought.

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That is very much how it was when rain finally came here after last summer’s drought.

Port of Ilwaco

We had time from midmorning till very early afternoon to weed a few more curbside beds at the port.

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Time Enough Books/Purly Shell curbside, before

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after clipping santolinas, grass combing, weeding

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Tulips and Narcissi foliage in the garden boat

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a big old santolina, before

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and after; could have been cut even harder

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Port Office garden, after some clipping and weeding

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Port Office, south side, before

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after clipping santolinas

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Narcissi, Lavender, and Lambs Ears

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across the lawn from the port office

Meanwhile, Allan weeded and clipped the Salt Hotel curbside garden.

Then off we went along the Columbia River and through the woods to see Dr Gwen at the Naselle Clinic.  I was pleased and surprised when all my blood tests came back good…good cholesterol, liver and kidney function, and no diabetes.  Perfect glucose.  I was surprised and pleased to learn that I don’t have to give up Pink Poppy Bakery cupcakes.  The astonishing thing was that I was quite low in Vitamin D.   How can this be for someone who is outside all day?  Our sunshine here is weak.  Dr Gwen says I will feel much better when I have boosted my D.

From the waiting room of the clinic, we saw this fellow getting into a vehicle:

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I am in love.  (Allan’s photo)

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All the good news was tempered with the unsolved mystery of problems not explained by perfect blood tests, thus the neurologist still looms in the near future.  As does a knee doctor, as the interpretation of my knee X rays says that my left knee has “mild degenerative changes” but my right knee has “severe degenerative changes…with complete loss of the normal joint space.”  Well, ow.  I share this not that the world should give a hoot about my knee, but because it is an interesting plot twist in a gardening blog.  By the way, I don’t kneel to garden…The way I bend over while working puts more weight on my left knee than my right, so it is mystifying to me that the right one went kaflooey first.

I used to run.  A lot.  For years. On concrete in the city.  I blame this for some of my knee problems, as the pain started back then and I “pushed through it”.  I think if I had not been obsessed with weightlifting, running, and aerobics for ten years, I would be a stronger gardener now.

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me, 1987, age 32, running around Green Lake (about 3 miles), photo by Allan, who used to run with me on occasion. I was slow but determined.  Exercise addiction is not always good for the body, no matter how much praise one gets for the results.

To celebrate today’s good blood tests, we dined at…

The Depot Restaurant

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Depot Restaurant (Allan’s photo)

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wilted spinach salad and clam chowder (Allan’s photo)

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won the best chowder award at the 2015 Razor Clam Festival (Allan’s photo)

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char grilled Ling Cod with Tuscan bean and tomato stew and garlic parsley butter

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Allan’s photo

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chocolate espresso pot de creme to celebrate a good glucose test!

I am also celebrating that I have two weeks to catch up on all the spring clean up before more appointments.  I had been so afraid that something medical and scary and sudden would happen today that would interfere with the rest of the work week.  It was a nonsensical fear, but a strong one.

Ginger’s Garden Diaries

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from my mother’s garden diaries of two decades ago:

1995 (age 70):

Feb 22:  Planted new Stark raspberries (10).  Heeled in new Stark strawberries (75) and put in greenhouse under lights.  Then I started sieving compost box.  I’m throwing all stuff not decomposed on garden area to be tilled in later.  A good day’s work!!

1997: age 72

Feb 22:  Worked about 1 1/2 hours bringing firewood up to porch.  Finished all wood from west side of shop.  I put the wet ones on pallet boards behind shop and covered them with the tarps.  Also covered were the huge pieces of that tree Mac sliced in half.

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Thursday, 21 January 2016

How lucky my visitors and I had been yesterday to tour gardens in a brisk wind and no rain.  On Thursday, the Long Beach Peninsula had one of the rainiest days ever.  I put on my boots and took a garden walk.

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an exceptional amount of standing water

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looking east

 

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west side path

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fire circle

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bogsy woods lawn

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Jared and Jessika’s back yard to our east

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on my way back inside

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Fortunately, a Piet Oudolf book had arrived for me from the library.

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inspiration

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The thoughts on public gardens are so useful to me.

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one or two gardeners! 😉

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perfect winter days

Ah, “You can just sit…reading gardening books…next to your cat…”

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I appreciate the non-murderous philosophy here.

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food and kindness toward all

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Piet Oudolf…my favourite gardener

And just after midnight, here were the rain totals for today.

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The next day, Ilwaco City Hall looked like this:

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Allan’s photo

And there was standing water on roads all around the Peninsula.  The rain did stop after another quarter inch overnight, and we had a few days to dry out.

Over the course of garden book reading in the last couple of weeks, I added this many plants to my list (typed with one finger on my phone notes while holding a big book). Some I’ve wanted for a long time (Helianthus salicifolius) and others are of interest for one reason or another:

Piet Oudolf:

Selinum wallichianum

Isatis tinctoria.  (woad)

Helianthus salicifolius

Kirengeshomo palmata

Lindefolia anchusoides

Persicaria polymorpha

Persicaria amplexicaulis alba

Origanum ‘Rossenkupel’

Thalictrum ‘Hewitt’s  Double’ (used to have this)

Solidago ‘Golden Rain’

Veronicastrum

Salvia glutinosa (shade)

Molina caerulea ‘Poul Peterson’

Vernonia ‘Iron Butterfly’

Helenium ‘Rubinswerg’

Solidago ‘Golden Rain’

Agastache nepetoides. Must have.

Veronicastrum virginicum ‘Apollo’

Salvia ‘Madeline’

Sanguisorba menziessi ‘Wake Up’

Actaea ‘Queen of Sheba’

Pennisetum  viridescens

From The New Shade Garden by Ken Druse:

Stilophorum diphyllum. Yellow wood poppy

Dicentra spectabilis is now lamprocapnos (must remember this)

Cornus kousa ‘Wolf Eyes’. Small tree

Bux us microphylla ‘Wanford Page’. It is Chartreuse.

Blue cohosh. Caulophyllum thalictroides

From The Art Of Gardening (Chanticleer)

Helianthus ‘Capenoch Star’

H ‘Gold Lace’

H ‘Santa Fe’

Angelica gigas

Rudbeckia ‘Henry Ellers’

Begonia grandis evansiana

Dahlia ‘Verrone’s Obsidian’

Rose ‘Westerland’.  Orange climber.

Cirsium rivulare atropurpureum

Symphytum ‘Axminster gold’

Thuja ‘Green Giant’

Salix sachalinensis ‘Golden Sunshine’

Disanthus cercidifolius

Euonymous Europeas or Americanus

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We were most decidedly rained out of work; on both day I took photos of the gratifying amount of water in the bogsy woods.

Friday, 13 November 2015

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We could get fancier chairs but these are honestly the most comfortable (when upright).  We’d had some wind.

I see through the east gate that the crab pots next door have been moved and are elsewhere now in readiness for the crab season.

I see through the east gate that the crab pots next door have been moved and are elsewhere now in readiness for the crab season.

The garden would look wilder if we brought the hoses in.

The garden would look wilder if we brought the hoses in.

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turning to look back (north) up the west side path

turning to look back (north) up the west side path

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south fence

splishy splashy walk

splishy splashy walk

I find this most pleasing.

I find this most pleasing.

outside the south fence

outside the south fence (looking due south)

looking north from the south gate

looking north from the south gate

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looking east

looking west

looking west

I like the look of the extra river rock that we put into the (sometimes dry) creekbed.

I like the look of the extra river rock that we put into the (sometimes dry) creek bed.

hardy fuchsias still blooming

hardy fuchsias still blooming

Fuchsia magellanica and some late roses (Radway Sunrise)

Fuchsia magellanica and some late roses (Radway Sunrise)

one of our water features

one of our water features

and another

and another

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I meant to read after my walk round the property, but having the place all to myself inspired me to putter at tidying the garage (since I could make all the decisions about where to put things).  I noticed Allan had had the clever idea of inserting a couple of bulb sorting milk crates into the shelves, and I expanded on the idea and got all our garden supplies sorted by type.

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The blue tin can to the left has all the COOL tags.

A few days back I had sorted out a big bucket of plant tags, throwing out all the duplicates and winnowing the last couple of years of tags down to two containers.  Today, I refined them into having one blue can containing all the most special tags from Cistus and Xera and Joy Creek.  Like these:

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The bottom tag tells me that I HAD bought a Heptacodium before Debbie Teashon brought me one this fall, but clearly it had died in its youth, as I have none in the garden other than the one she brought.

These were all from when Pam Fleming had the glorious and much missed Back Alley Gardens in Gearhart.

These were all from when Pam Fleming had the glorious and much missed Back Alley Gardens in Gearhart.  Oh, except for the Hymenanthera, which I got at 7 Dees Seaside (and had lost that tag for four years!)

I spent several years not knowing what the cool shrub in my front garden was.

I spent several years not knowing what the cool shrub in my front garden was.

Hymenanthera with white and grey berries.

Hymenanthera with white and grey berries, last month

ID for the lovely sedum I can see from my blogging window.

ID for the lovely sedum I can see from my blogging window.

and this Snowberry that is next to Allan's garden.

and this Snowberry that is next to Allan’s garden.

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In the last hour of daylight, the rain stopped. I had gotten my onw bulbs sorted into three boxes (front garden, back garden, and garden boat) and thought I might plant some…till I realized that Allan had taken all the bulb food away with him in the van!

three boxes of bulbs to plant here.

three boxes of bulbs to plant here.

So I had no choice but to finally finishing my book; thanks to a mention in the Susan Conant Dog Lover’s Mystery series, I had learned that a particular favourite author has two books I had not read:

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Just some bits I liked:

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And this amused me because I spend a great deal of time peering into my iPhone:

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and then this, as I am entering the third act:

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When I came emerged from the end of the book, I had a text from a friend telling me about the latest horrors in the real world, and when Allan arrived home he said he had been listening to the NPR newscast during all his driving time.  It cast much somberness over the evening as I contemplated the many such tragedies that take place around this world.

Allan’s day

a trip to Astoria and Warrenton for an oil change and shopping...

a trip to Astoria and Warrenton for an oil change and shopping…here on the Washington side along the Columbia River

waves splashing up over the breakwater

waves splashing up over the breakwater by a Lewis and Clark interpretive sign

an adorable Tillamook cheese van is a cheerful note to end on

an adorable Tillamook cheese van is a more cheerful note to end on

Saturday, 14 November 2014

  As for the day time, I took another walk in the late afternoon back to the bogsy wood to see how deep the water was (deeper than Friday), tried to read a book, could not concentrate, read a lot of news reports.

takes a lot of rain to have standing water here

takes a lot of rain to have standing water here

splashier than yesterday

splashier than yesterday

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Allan wonders when he will be able to mow.

Allan wonders when he will be able to mow and how far will the mower spray water if he did it now.

I'm glad I got these areas pretty much weeded.

I’m glad I got these areas pretty much weeded.

Today I wore boots so I could walk through here; the water came up to the tops of calf-height rain boots.

Today I wore boots so I could walk through here; the water came up to the tops of calf-height rain boots.

The big event of the evening will be another post on our other blog, which I will re-blog over to here by tomorrow morning.

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Friday, 7 August 2015

Because of another bout of strong wind, I stayed indoors working on this blog, and with this post I finally have caught up after all the June and July garden touring.  It won’t last long, as the edible tour is on Sunday, and it won’t make the posts publish in real time, as I’m still about ten days behind.

I didn’t even have to water the ladies in waiting today, as Allan had done so while watering his own garden.  Since I didn’t have room to share these photos during the work blog, here are a few of our garden taken four days before:

second wave of lilies coming on

second wave of lilies coming on, looking southeast

lilies and cosmos

lilies and cosmos

Miscanthus and lilies

Miscanthus sinensis ‘Variegatus’ and lilies

hips of Rosa moyesii with Stipa gigantea

hips of Rosa moyesii with Stipa gigantea

looking west

looking west

the west bed, with the last wave of lilies

the west bed, with the last wave of lilies

It’s not all beauty: I must remember to move the poor astilbe, below, which I also told myself to move last summer when the same thing happened.

It is not getting watered and needs a new location, poor thing.

It is not getting watered and needs a new location, poor thing.

Echinops sphaerocephalus 'Arctic Glow'

Echinops sphaerocephalus ‘Arctic Glow’

center bed: river of Geranium 'Rozanne'

center bed: river of Geranium ‘Rozanne’

I take this quiet day as a chance to recommend the book I finished last week:  It’s informative and also personal in perfect combination:

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Cabin Lessons by Spike Carlsen

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from the book

from the book

That reminds me of the work triangle, which says you can get two out of these three qualities: fast, cheap, and good…but never all at once.

The workers that are fast, good AND cheap are probably going to struggle financially.  I speak from experience.

Allan worked on his project, and watered the Ilwaco planters.

He saw a moth on a daisy...

He saw a moth on a daisy…

a new boat in the boatyard...

…a new boat in the boatyard…

and watered a stray poppy...

…and watered a stray poppy…

admired some good nasturtiums in a planter...

…and admired some good nasturtiums in a planter…

and talked with the owner of this boat, in town for the Tuna Classic.

and talked with the owner of this boat, in town for the Tuna Classic.

 Saturday, 8 August 2015

Allan's photo: Our neighbour, Onyx, comes for a drink.

Allan’s photo: Our neighbour, Onyx, comes for a drink.

At one-ish, I walked down to the Saturday Market.  Allan had already started working on his project.

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Ilwaco Saturday Market

I had a feeling I had better get to the market before it was closed down by heavy 25 mph wind aimed right at the market tents.

looking west down Waterfront Way

looking west down Waterfront Way

Northwest Natural

Northwest Natural

Northwest Natural leaf molds

Northwest Natural leaf molds

bought some Ginger Gold apples from De Asis Farm

bought some Ginger Gold apples from De Asis Farm

Meanwhile, the Oregon Tuna Classic was taking place in the stormy weather; the marina is full of tuna sport fishing boats for this annual event.  Much tuna will be donated to local food banks.

Oregon Tuna Classic

Oregon Tuna Classic

a heavy load of tuna

a heavy load of tuna

tuna catch

tuna catch

icing down the fish

icing down the fish

more fresh produce at the market

more fresh produce at the market

Ankeny Street

Ankeny Street

(We toured a garden on Ankeny Street in June.)

Every week at the market, I see folks admiring the Basket Case Greenhouse’s hanging baskets.

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I found Maddy of Pink Poppy Bakery dismantling her tent because of the wind and managed to buy some lemon cupcakes at the last minute, then went into Time Enough Books to give owner Karla a gardening invoice.

shop dog Scout and a friend

shop dog Scout and a friend

When I departed after a good long chat with Karla, I found actual rainfall outside.

When I departed after a good long chat with Karla, I found actual rainfall outside.

At home, I excitedly checked all the rain barrels.

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Yay!

Yay!

rainbarrel

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This one had a head start with osciillating sprinkler run off from our low roof.

This one had a head start with osciillating sprinkler run off from our low roof.

Frosty and Smokey observing the weather.

Frosty and Smokey observing the weather.

Much as I would love to see several days of heavy rain, I must request a break from rain from noon to five tomorrow (August 9th) for the edible garden tour.

Now I am at last going to catch up on posts I’ve missed (due to garden touring and blogging about garden tours) in the Tootlepedal blog.

I also plant to finish an excellent gardening memoir:

apprentice

 

 

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Saturday, September 28, 2013

gale warning

gale warning

In the late morning, I wanted to get a telephoto of how the two flags at the port office (signifying a gale warning, 39-54 mph winds) had slipped halfway down the flagpole.  It came out rather blurry, but there it is.  The wind, while strong (I later learned it had been 61 mph at Cape Disappointment, the backside of which I can see from my window) was not a cold wind.  So during a lull in the rain, I went out to take a video of the windy bogsy wood with my phone.  You may be able to view it here.

I became thoroughly occupied with a new Facebook page that will be a repository for my non-Ilwaco photos of the Long Beach Peninsula.  I had no intention of going to Olde Towne in the bad weather…until I get a message from Luanne who sounded kind of lonely!  So we went, and I was glad we did as our friend Kelly was there and, with no other customers except for her niece, Luanne was able to sit and visit with us.

almost empty on a stormy day

almost empty on a stormy day

I was also glad that I had not walked there as the rain was absolutely sheeting down beyond any amount I have seen so far this year.  (I later learned that Astoria had something like three inches of rain.)

In case of a power outage, Olde Towne has a good stock of oil lamps for sale.

In case of a power outage, Olde Towne has a good stock of oil lamps for sale.

Amazingly the rain stopped for awhile after we returned home.  The Danger Tree was still standing and had not lost a limb.

stubborn old thing

stubborn old thing

In a lull with no wind, I took a walk through the bogsy wood.  It had been completely devoid of any standing water the evening before.

The bogsy wood is bogsy now.

The bogsy wood is bogsy now.

Path next to the Danger Tree:  The water came almost over my shoes.

Path next to the Danger Tree: The water came almost over my shoes.

It’s rare to see the water standing this deep on the lawn to the north of the bogsy wood.

between danger tree and bogsy wood

between danger tree and bogsy wood

the swale by the bridge

The swale under the bridge was overflowing.

deep

I’ve never seen the bridge swale this deep this early in the year.

I would love it if this were full of water all year.

I would love it if this were full of water all year.

more standing water beyond the deer fence

from the bridge:  more standing water beyond the deer fence

next to the bridge

next to the bridge

the big swale in the middle of the bogsy wood

the big swale in the middle of the bogsy wood

looking north to the house

looking north to the house

Sad though it is, I think I must admit that the cosmos in the garden boat are goners.  Some years they bloom into bulb planting time.

maybe if I cut them halfway back....

maybe if I cut them halfway back….

I’m not much for going out in the evening (except for dinner) anymore.  Something certainly changed in me along the way because in my twenties and thirties I was out clubbing two or more nights a week.  (Some of those evenings turned out so boring that I would have been better off staying  in and reading a book, although many excellent bands were seen back in the day.)  However, after our recent daytime visit to The Sou’wester, where I lived for a year in 1993, I resolved to go out to more of their musical events…for old times’ sake.  It was an effort to leave home comforts to go out the door at almost 8 PM to hear a concert opening their Artist Residency program!

Once we were there, the living room felt so familiar.

At the Sou'wester

At the Sou’wester

We talked with a teacher and mechanic couple who were visiting from Portland.  She had fallen in love with the Sou’wester much as I had in 1991.  I warned her how I had come on vacation in fall of ’92, a vacation that got longer and longer until I suddenly upped stakes and moved here.  She loves her job in Portland, but don’t underestimate the lure of Seaview.  While we talked, I absorbed the familiar details of the room.

the glow of light on the beamed ceiling

the glow of light on the beamed ceiling

The sound of guests in the four upstairs suites going up and down the stairs took me back twenty years.

before the performance...looking to the south windows of the lodge

before the performance…looking to the south windows of the lodge living room

Many an hour I had spent in the office just to the left in the above photo.

New owner Thandi has a staff of friends to help her run the place.  Back in our time, Robert and I were the only staff to do all the cleaning, repairs, office work, lawn mowing to help the previous owners who were in their mid 60s at the time.  With the staff who were there that evening, and a few guests who attended the performance, listening to songwriter Nick Jaina was a quiet and personal experience.

Allan took this photo just as the show started.

Nick Jaina at the Sou'wester

Nick Jaina at the Sou’wester

I wanted to get a photo that captured how I felt being surrounded by Sou’westerness again and listening to the songs at the same time.

I think I got it.

I think I got it.

He told us the story of having stayed in one of the vintage trailers to write twenty songs in one day.  In his article about that experience is a photo of the exact trailer (I think) that Robert and I lived in for several months in ’93 (unless the resort has acquired another Spartan RV with curved front windows like that).

I remembered so many things while sitting in the living room listening to Nick’s excellent songs.  How I knew that the previous owners had bought the Sou’wester (in a state of great disrepair) when they were fifty.  I moved there when I was thirty seven, and ever since I have thought that age 50 was the benchmark for starting a big new thing and after age 50 it would be too late.  Now I am 58 and that is a disturbing thought.

Then I thought about age for quite a few minutes.  A lot of the people at the Sou’wester now look to be in their 20s and 30s.  I thought, Do they realize we are pretty much the same?  I know I did not realize that about “older people” until I became an older person.

Nick closed with the most amazing song…something like “I’m in the middle of a story that is breaking my heart; I won’t be with you when our plans finally come apart.”  It certainly brought back memories of assorted heartbreaks.  As I said, I have not been to a concert of this sort for a very very long time.  I bought Nick’s CD.  The song is called  “I’ll Become Everything.”   Give it a listen for some angsty memories.

Upon departing, the sight of the lodge with its windows aglow reminded me of evenings walking back from the beach at dusk and seeing these lights, and then the light in the window of the old Spartan Manor trailer that I stayed in.

Sou'wester by night from K Place

Sou’wester by night from K Place

Sunday, September 29, 2013

Rain.  Wind.  Blogging.  Did not set one toe outside.  Deleted over 2000 extra photos from iPhoto and got the “Our Long Beach Peninsula’ page well stocked with photos.  I want to leave some history behind, but it is all based on the hope that WordPress and Facebook will linger on long after me.

Allan pointed out that our dinner was 75% food from the garden:  three different kinds of peppers and garlic sauteed with baby red potatoes, and tomatoes, and Cox’s Orange Pippin apples all next to some fish.

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After the Cannon Beach Cottage Tour, we stopped on our way home at Back Alley Gardens and The Natural Nook.  Although it was past closing time, we got to peruse the new plant purchases and autumn displays in this delightful collectors nursery located in Gearhart, Oregon.

It must be (almost) autumn!

It must be (almost) autumn!

plant tables

plant tables

pretty little faces of autumn

pretty little faces of autumn

more cool plants from Xera

more cool plants from Xera

It definitely saved me money that the cash register was closed out because…just look at that little hot pink flower!   They also had some Salvia clevelandii ‘Aromas’…at least that is what I called it back when I had a late blooming sage with intensely fragrant leaves.

a planted potbelly stove

a planted potbelly stove

love the way these have decided to grow on the edge of the plant display table

love the way these have decided to grow on the edge of the plant display table

garden art

garden art

We had a pleasant visit and some good plant talk and stories of public gardening and then Allan and I were on our way.  Crossing the Astoria Megler bridge, a construction stop let us get a great view of the ships.

looking east from the bridge

looking east from the bridge

ship and Astoria

ship and Astoria

stairs at the highest part of the bridge!

stairs at the highest part of the bridge!

Looking northwest, we saw the Peninsula had become almost invisible because of a heavy bank of fog and clouds.  I hoped for a rainy Sunday so I could spend the day blogging about the cottage tour.

toward home

toward home

north on the four mile bridge

north on the four mile bridge

And the rainy day that I wanted is exactly what I got!

I took exactly one photo on Sunday the 15th of the rain out my south window.  I was able to write all day and avoid falling days behind again while posting about the cottage tour.

Sunday rain

Sunday rain; love the big pink cosmos in the garden boat

If I am lucky, Monday will be rainy as well and instead of blogging I just might catch up on paperwork.

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