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Posts Tagged ‘Rosa pteracantha’

During the last part of January, I was obsessed with the 1975 UK flashback blog and worked on it for hours every day till it was done—except for one nice weather day, when I had to garden at home.

Thursday, 25 January 2018

I made it out to the greenhouse to water.  Otherwise, I was completely preoccupied in writing my UK trip blog.

snowdrops in one of the new windowboxes on the shed

Friday, 26 January 2018

One day of fine weather let me get out into the garden.  Allan took some photos.

I had intended only to mess about with my compost bins for a bit, and then realized I had five shrubs to plant and replant.  First, out came a Rosa ‘Mutabilis’ which went from the front garden to the back.  Into its place went a Grevillea ‘Victoria’ that Steve of the Bayside Garden had kindly procured for me.  Allan planted the new shrub while I started to dig up my Rosa pteracantha.  Then he helped with that! The second rose also went into the back garden, and (again with Allan’s help) a Pittosporum ‘Tasman Ruffles’ went where the rose had been.  Poor Tasman had very little root ball because this is its third move.  Now it is in the perfect place to help block some bright security lights, and I do hope it survives.  Finally, the gift from Steve of a Grevillea rosmarinifolia went over by the driveway.  I think the spot I found for it is not perfect; I hope it will not end up being moved around three times.

trying to get Rosa pteracantha out  (Allan helped)

Grevillea ‘Victoria’ in

Tasman Ruffles in

Allan helped me move some Geranium ‘Rozanne’ around to make room for the rose.

Skooter helps me make a new spot for the rose.

Rosa pteracantha in

Later, I will prune this rose because it is on the new growth that the thorns glow the most red.  It will be superbly back lit in this spot.

I decided I must also cut down the Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’.  Allan helped again.

Skooter helps, but not as helpfully as Allan.

Ooops. Stuck again.

clipped Autumn Joy

Finally, I got to the original plan, some compost sifting.

Saturday, 27 January 2018

snoozy times for the cats while I blogged about the UK

Skooter helped me blog.

Wednesday, 31 January 2018

A dear friend, Shaz, who I have not seen in person for years dropped by, with her new spouse (they live near Portland).  She brought me flowers.

Shaz meets Skooter

They were only able to visit for an hour, having driven up from Cannon Beach mainly to track me down. (They were staying at a place where I’ve stayed in Cannon Beach, the Sea Sprite, in the same unit that Carol and I once stayed in.)

Years ago, I had a wonderful time creating a garden with Shaz, back when she lived on the bay.

Shaz’ garden way back when

Sharon’s beautiful bird bath.

In 1998, Robert and Sharon and I created this garden around Sharon’s house where once had been just three scraggly rosebushes.

..and we made a rock wall garden along the bayside of her lot.

Wonderful memories were relived in our conversation today.

I had finished the UK blogs, which were set to publish daily for another 12 days.  Finally, I was able to devote my day to a book.  I had heard of it from author Leslie Buck, who wrote the brilliant gardening memoir Cutting Back.

I had not heard before of Mary Delaney, who as an old woman began to make glorious flower collage art out of bits of paper. Her flowers will amaze you.  Have a look here. And I do think some of you will want to read The Paper Garden. Poet and biographer Molly Peacock weaves her own story in with the life of Mary Delaney.  I treasure this part about grandma art:

On whether to keep or discard those sentimental things:

On looking for role models, I agree that I have found several who are already gone…

When Mrs. Delaney remarried happily in midlife, she created with her husband a garden in Ireland.

I agree with Mrs. Delaney on gardening being the best thing to spend money on.  We had something else in common:

“She stayed up late and got up late. ‘We live magnificently, and at the same time without ceremony.  Our hours for eating are ten, three, and ten again.'”  That is an ideal schedule for me.  The first meal might be too early for staycation, though, when I find myself awake at four AM and having breakfast at noon.  It will be hard to readjust to work time, which IS ten, three, and ten for meals.

Molly Peacock writes of seeing art in the everyday.  I would like to emulate this man:

It is more likely that Allan would create the quotidian art on the grocery store belt, whereas I would make the jumble.

In a Dublin pub, Molly Peacock is advised, “Don’t take another picture of people!…Photograph the dishes on this table! It’s pictures of people’s everyday lives that we need!”

Inspiration: At age 59, Mrs. Delaney “thought of herself as old, although we now know she was just at the end of the second third of her life.”

Here is Mrs. Delaney as an old woman.  She looks so familiar to me.  I wept to finish the book on February 1st, because I did not want to let her go.

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real time reminder:

The day that this post publishes is Edible Tour day.  See you there?

coming up August 9th

coming up August 9th

Wednesday, 22 July 2015

Every year seems to have one day that drags on till dark and qualifies as the longest day, and today may have been it for 2015.

Copy editors:  I know I change tenses a lot.  I don’t mean to switch from past to present tense.  Sometimes, a work memory is so immediate that I switch to present tense as I relive it.

Ilwaco

Allan watered our volunteer garden at the Ilwaco Post Office garden while I watered my potted plants and ladies in waiting at home.

Allan's photo: someone is stripping the flowers off this lily at the post office, on a daily basis.

Allan’s photo: someone is stripping the flowers off this lily at the post office, on a daily basis.

Allan's photo: lily buds dropped on the ground.  The stripping is too thorough to be a deer.

Allan’s photo: lily buds dropped on the ground. The stripping is too thorough to be a deer.  You can see his  and the cameras shadow.

Allan's photo: It's grasshopper time

Allan’s photo: It’s grasshopper time.

post office

post office watering (Allan’s photo)

Nicotiana langsdorfii has been a champ in the garden this year, whether here in the drier front garden or in the more lush back garden.

at home: Nicotiana langsdorfii has been a champ in the garden this year, whether here in the drier front garden or in the more lush back garden.

Mary sees us off.

Mary sees us off.

I am sure she would rather I stay home, as she likes to be with me in the garden.

I am sure she would rather I stay home, as she likes to be with me in the garden.

I would rather like to have stayed home.

I would rather like to have stayed home.

on the way out of town: the planter by Queen La De Da's on Spruce Street.

on the way out of town: the planter by Queen La De Da’s on Spruce Street.

Jenna gives this one and the one across the street from her shop extra water, so it is thriving.  Too bad all the merchants don't do that for their adjacent planters...It would be so easy.  (The Portside Café does!)

Jenna gives this one and the one across the street from her shop extra water, so it is thriving. Too bad all the merchants don’t do that for their adjacent planters…It would be so easy.

A planter that gets watered daily does better than one that is watered every third day, which is what the city budget and our time allows.  Just sayin’….it’s not that hard to take a jug of water out to the planter by one’s business…or is that too much to wish for?  The Portside Café owners also give theirs extra care, and it shows.

The Planter Box

On the way north, we stopped at the Planter Box to get some new plants for the biggest Long Beach planter.  I was impressed with how lush the plants look; it is not easy at all to keep them all watered.

Planter Box: me and owner Theresa

Planter Box: me and co-owner Theresa; it’s a family business started by her dad and mom, who have almost retired.

DSC03188

roses

roses

shades of gold

shades of gold

Rudbeckia 'Irish Eyes' (I had to buy one for me)

Rudbeckia ‘Irish Eyes’ (I had to buy one for me)

blue agastache (hyssop)

blue agastache (hyssop)

Eryngium 'Blue Hobbit'

Eryngium ‘Blue Hobbit’

Celosia 'Forest Fire'

Celosia ‘Forest Fire’

Allan's photo: snapdragons

Allan’s photo: snapdragons

With some plants acquired, we went onward to our first job.

Golden Sands Assisted Living

I hope that our four flower quadrants in the courtyard at Golden Sands remind residents of cottage gardens they once knew.

from the south hallway window

from the south hallway window

garden2

SE quadrant

SE quadrant

NE quadrant

NE quadrant

dahlias

dahlias

oh, yay...have successfully grown sweet peas up my mom's Climbing Joseph's Coat roses.

oh, yay…have successfully grown sweet peas up my mom’s Climbing Joseph’s Coat roses.

dahlia

dahlia

NW quadrant

NW quadrant

SW quadrant

SW quadrant

just one third of the length of hallways that we traverse to the garden

just one third of the length of hallways that we traverse to the garden

This was actually a short day for the north end jobs, because we did not have Marilyn’s today; we do it every other week now. So we went straight from Golden Sands to…

Klipsan Beach Cottages

Photos taken after an hour of weeding and deadheading; Mary and Denny keep the gardens well watered.

Geranium 'Ann Folkard' drifting around

Geranium ‘Ann Folkard’ drifting around

Dierama (Angel's Fishing Rod)

Dierama (Angel’s Fishing Rod)

the straight path (made for easy wheelbarrow access) in the fenced garden

the straight path (made for easy wheelbarrow access) in the fenced garden

the weekly view SW across the birdbath

the weekly view SW across the birdbath

I wish I knew the names of Mary's roses.

I wish I knew the names of Mary’s roses.

Agapanthus

Agapanthus

Agapanthus (lily of the Nile)

Agapanthus (lily of the Nile)

Strobilanthes atropupurea...very hardy here, blooms late

Strobilanthes atropupurea…very hardy here, blooms later than this usually

Nicotiana langsdorfii

Nicotiana langsdorfii in front of lilies and Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’

lily

lily

Salvia viridis (painted sage)

Salvia viridis (painted sage)

We planted the Clematis 'Rooguchi' that we acquired at the Basket Case end of season sale.

We planted the Clematis ‘Rooguchi’ that we acquired at the Basket Case end of season sale.

daisies in the lawn border (outside the deer fence)

daisies in the lawn border (outside the deer fence)

It was a hot day.  The refreshing splash of the pond waterfalls helped.

It was a hot day. The refreshing splash of the pond waterfalls helped.  That’s a plastic fern hiding the pipes…good idea.

The A Frame deck: I often think it would be nice to be a guest here, sipping a glass of cold white wine and just chillaxin'.

The A Frame deck: I often think it would be nice to be a guest here, sipping a glass of cold white wine and just chillaxin’.

Long Beach

First, we went to the city works yard and got several buckets of Soil Energy mulch from my pile.  Allan took some to Fish Alley to top off the four barrels there.

Fish Alley, Allan's photo

Fish Alley, Allan’s photo

santolina and diascia, Fish Alley, Allan's photo

diascia and santolina, Fish Alley, Allan’s photo

At last, we took the crapulous old Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ out of the Lewis and Clark Square planter.

old and tired Erysimum

old and tired Erysimum

before

before

after; we had picked up some soil at LB city works to fill in.

after; we had picked up some soil at LB city works to fill in.  The white is sluggo, because we found lots of snails.

It did not look as great as I had pictured to I added two zinnias that I had bought for me.

It did not look as great as I had pictured so I added two zinnias that I had bought for me.

Because it did not end up looking as full and wonderful as I had imagined,  I wished I had brought more plants.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Next, we went to Oman Builders Supply to get some lumber for a home project which you will be reading about soon-ish.  It’s for an idea proposed by Pam of Seaside.  $200 plus of lumber later…  A worker there had brought her new puppy!

puppy was getting belly rubs

puppy was getting belly rubs

Ilwaco

A brief stop at home to unload lumber and pick up the water trailer battery and some hoses….

In the front garden, my Rose pteracantha was giving just the effect I wanted...

In the front garden, my Rose pteracantha was giving just the effect I wanted…

sunshine glowing through the thorns

sunshine glowing through the thorns

Even thought the foliage does not look impressive, I was thrilled to see a flower on one of my pineapple lilies.

Even thought the foliage does not look impressive, I was thrilled to see a flower on one of my pineapple lilies.

Mary probably thinks we are home for the evening.  (Allan's photo)

Mary probably thinks we are home for the evening. (Allan’s photo)

leaving home again...phooey

leaving home again…phooey

Allan did his usual hour and a half watering session of the Ilwaco trees and planters while I watered the boatyard garden.

watering from behind the fence (Allan's photo)

watering from behind the fence (Allan’s photo)

We have had no rain to speak of.  Across the street, birds were pecking at ice from one of the fish trucks.

We have had no rain to speak of. Across the street, birds were pecking at ice from one of the fish trucks.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo of a local fellow heading to the water.  (I bet Allan wished to be boating instead of watering.)

Allan’s photo of a local fellow heading back from paddling out in the Port of Ilwaco. (I bet Allan wished to be boating instead of watering.)

the usual obstacle course for boatyard watering

the usual obstacle course for boatyard watering

as always, interesting boats

as always, interesting boats

boatyard garden, looking north from the gate

boatyard garden, looking north from the gate

the south stretch of boatyard garden as I leave for further watering rounds

looking north at the whole length of boatyard garden as I leave for further watering rounds

looking east along Howerton

looking east along Howerton

looking northwest back at the boatyard

looking northwest back at the boatyard

My mission now was to water all of the Howerton Avenue gardens at which I have hose access: Time Enough Books, the port office and Nisbett Gallery gardens, and the Bruce Peterson gallery garden.

As i walk east, I ponder this scruffy little spot.  I decide to imperialize it by throwing a bunch of poppy seeds in here this fall.  If we get some rain...could be good next spring into early summer.

As I walk east, I ponder this scruffy little spot. I decide to imperialize it by throwing a bunch of poppy seeds in here this fall. If we get some rain…could be good next spring into early summer.

West end garden...too dry.

West end garden…suffering in the drought.  The most difficult one to water.

a soothing view while I unhook the port office hose to hook it up to a faucet closer to the Howerton gardens.

a soothing view while I unhook the port office hose to hook it up to a faucet closer to the Howerton gardens.

view2

As I water the gardens by the Nisbett Gallery, Don comes out to chat and tells me he has been watering them also, and he means absolutely drenching them.  He unhooks the hose for me and hooks it back up at the port office, bless his heart.

thriving gardens by Nisbett Gallery and Port office, thanks to Don's extra watering.

thriving gardens by Nisbett Gallery and Port office, thanks to Don’s extra watering.

looking west along the Time Enough Books garden

looking west along the Time Enough Books garden, which has extra cool plants because we’ve been doing this one for years.  Sometimes bookstore owner Karla adds some extra water, too.

I show Don where someone snipped themselves a bouquet of lavender.  Do they think I won't notice?  I notice everything.  If everyone did that, there would be NO flowers left.

I show Don where someone snipped themselves a bouquet of lavender. Do they think I won’t notice? I notice everything. If everyone did that, there would be NO flowers left.

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue' starting to fade

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ starting to fade

I love that I can flood these small beds with water and let them soak in.  Happy plants.

I love that I can flood these small beds with water and let them soak in. Happy plants.

Gaura lindheimeri 'Whirling Butterflies'

Gaura lindheimeri ‘Whirling Butterflies’

Allan, having finished the Ilwaco planter watering, is coming along after me.  His plan is to use a long series of hoses to water the gardens at the west end, and to also use it to water Salt Hotel’s curbside garden to pay them back for their water generosity.  They’ve been letting us use their hose and water to water two businesses other than their own.

Allan will water this one also.

Allan will water this one also.

I do a bit of trimming and weeding the garden above but I give it up and move on when a drunk guy who has hunkered down between two buildings starts yelling at me.  Not a pleasant working environment.

By now, I have realized Allan is having trouble because he is so far behind me.  I call him and he tells me what is going on:  Because the owners of the business close to the garden will not let us use their water, Allan is hooking up to a faucet at the docks, but wrestling with three hoses takes time.  Then he found that even three hoses was not long enough to reach, so he borrowed the Salt Hotel hose.  The Salt hose sprung a leak and he said he felt responsible because he has been using it to water for the last few weeks.  But the leak looked like the hose had been burned…but did he have to get them a new hose?  I said Oh my gawd I am too tired to even think about that, but if it looked burned, it was not our fault.  (He talked to Salt owner Laila and she agreed, but he still felt bad.)

Allan manages to get the hose all the way to the Salt garden.

Allan manages to get the hose all the way to the Salt garden.

Here’s how he did it:

route
I leave him to his struggles and walk several storefronts to water the Peterson Gallery.  Then, even though I am so tired, I unhook the Peterson hose and haul it several storefront west to the bank, where I have found a faucet that I can use just to get enough water for their street trees, so they won’t die in this drought.  This will save Allan some time and I know he must be exhausted.

When he gets to the Pavilion, I water the garden there with his hoses while he takes the Peterson hose back to hook up to THEIR faucet.  I lack manual dexterity and am lousy at threading and unthreading hoses to faucets. I imagine how good the gardens could be if I could devote the time we now spend hose watering to garden design and care instead.

I am so tired, I can only imagine how tired Allan must be.  Fighting with four hoses is like being stuck in a nest of (nonvenomous) snakes.  I can’t help him water the east end garden, so I leave to walk three blocks to home.  (Using the water trailer would take him twice as long, because he has to wait for the tank to fill, and then wait for the water to pump back out of the tank onto a garden.)

Allan hauling hose back to the trailer, to drive down to the east end garden.

Allan hauling hose back to the trailer, to drive down to the east end garden.

By hooking up to the newly discovered (by us) dock faucet, Allan is able to give the east end garden a proper soaking for the first time this summer.  He had been hauling 20 or more five gallon buckets there once a week and tipping them out onto the garden.  (Picture also having to lift 20 heavy buckets of water out of the trailer.)

I walk home past “the lost garden”, thinking about how it once was carefully bordered with rocks, that now show because it has been strimmed.  The woman who created it is long dead, and the garden is gone.

the lost garden

the lost garden

home just before sunset.  Mary comes to greet me.

home just before sunset. Mary comes to greet me.

So does Smokey.

So does Smokey.

Allan gets home after dark.  Next time he will take another length of our hose and he’ll know his routes and the lengths he needs, so it should go faster. Thus ends what I hope will be the longest workday…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tuesday, 2 September, part two

I woke up at eight, early for me (way early), all excited about going to see Steve and John’s garden. Unable to fall back asleep, I decided to get up to make sure I had time to pick a really good bouquet for them. I took my camera out into the garden because I usually do not see it in morning light.

The mermaids were chatting.

The mermaids were chatting.

Roscoea purpurea 'Spice Island'

Roscoea purpurea ‘Spice Island’ (a hardy ginger, came back this year)

view to the southwest

view to the southwest

the west bed, back garden

the west bed, back garden

I swear that since we cut a limb on Nora’s tree, we can now see the house on the hill better. I don’t want to see it from my garden. That’ll teach us to mess with someone else’s tree (although it was a limb hanging way over on our side and one that was crossing another and made the tree look lopsided).

Leycesteria 'Golden Lanterns' from Joy Creek Nursery

Leycesteria ‘Golden Lanterns’ from Joy Creek Nursery

Agastache 'Blue Boa' or maybe 'Blue Fortune' from The Basket Case

Agastache ‘Blue Boa’ or maybe ‘Blue Fortune’ from The Basket Case (via Blooming)

sedum flower, a variegated one

sedum flower, a variegated one

I have every intention of sorting through all my tags this winter and making a master list of plants like John has done for the bayside garden. I really mean it this time.

a golden heather Allan brought back from Seattle; he brought three so I ended up with two in my garden.  Excuse the dratted creeping sorrel mixed in, such a bad weed.

a golden heather Allan brought back from Seattle; he brought three so I ended up with two in my garden. Excuse the dratted creeping sorrel mixed in, such a bad weed (but edible and deliciously lemony)

Some chelone (pink turtlehead) ended up in the bouquet.

Some chelone (pink turtlehead) ended up in the bouquet.

The pink turtlehead was in the front garden, where it was too dry. I moved it to the back garden last fall, where the water table is high. Some popped back up in the front garden and will get moved to Golden Sands Assisted Living and to Jo’s garden.

Physocarpus (probably 'Dart's Gold') and an astilbe

Physocarpus (probably ‘Dart’s Gold’) and an astilbe

In the front garden, Tetrapanax papyrifer 'Steroidal Giant' with the great Allium 'Forelock'

In the front garden, Tetrapanax papyrifer ‘Steroidal Giant’ with the great Allium ‘Forelock’ (expensive, thus only two, getting more this year)

white lilies and Rubus lineatus

white lilies and Rubus lineatus

At the post office, I was excited to get a book in the mail. Allan had ordered me a copy of Linnets and Valerians by Elizabeth Goudge, after I was reminded of her by seeing a book at Olde Towne Café. Oh, my! Was this a sequel to Linnets and Valerians?

The Runaways

The Runaways

Later in the day, I was sorry to learn that this book was Linnets and Valerians under a boring title. I guess the publishers thought Americans would not by a book with the original title, which is so so so much better. Now I am trying (or Allan is trying for me as he is better at online shopping) to find a copy with the proper title.

We headed north on Sandridge Road with perfect timing to be at Steve and John’s on the dot of 11:30…till we got to the highway 101 crossing and I realized I had forgotten the book I wanted to show them, my hand gardening tools for later in the day, and the two plants I wanted to give them. So back we went, circling around Black Lake; getting the two plants was the most important thing.

The plants were part of the swag from the Bloggers Fling banquet and we had an extra of each one and figured Steve and John would enjoy trying out these 2015 introductions:

wiegela

disporum

Then we had our visit and tour of Steve and John’s bayside garden (see yesterday’s post). As we left their garden, rain had begun in earnest. I was hoping for a break so we could dump the weekend’s load of yard debris at Peninsula Landscape Supply and pick up a yard of Soil Energy mulch for our garden; the original plan had been to work for a couple of hours at Andersen’s RV Park between the mulch acquisition and home. I had already decided that was not going to happen, but I did want my mulch. (If I had woken up to rain, with the prospect of it lasting all day and nowhere to go, I would have been thrilled to just read.)

The weather got worse every moment. Allan pointed out how miserably drenched we would be if we followed the debris dumping and mulch plan.

We drove on past Peninsula Landscape Supply toward home.

We drove on past Peninsula Landscape Supply toward home.

I imagined an afternoon of reading, with rain outside. My desire for mulch was so strong that I couldn’t let it go and I said to Allan (gently, really) that if it were just me, I would unload the debris and get the mulch and get drenched….for the sake of fulfilling that desire. He took that as a challenge, he said, and turned around at the Red Barn Arena.

entering Peninsula Landscape Supply

entering Peninsula Landscape Supply

debris unloaded, getting a yard of steaming mulch

debris unloaded, getting a yard of steaming mulch

As we were getting loaded up, I sensed that the sky was lightening to the west.

I could feel the rain was about to cease.

I could feel the rain was about to cease. Light around the edges!

looking south, definitely light around the edges

looking south, definitely light around the edges

By the time we got home about fifteen minutes later, the sky was breaking into blue all around us.

looking south from front garden

looking south from front garden

looking west

looking west

and north, beautiful blue

and north, beautiful blue

Allan did most of the wheelbarrowing to fill in the new woods bed.

Allan did most of the wheelbarrowing to fill in the new woods bed.

I filled in some holes and low areas in the front garden where I had dug up a boring daylily, a clump of lady’s mantle, and other undesirables. (And, sadly, an Edgeworthia chrysantha that had died after being purchased and planted in glorious bloom in early spring of this year.)

I carried about nine five gallon buckets of mulch into the garage to save for later transplanting projects. Only for the last two did I get organized enough to use the wheelbarrow to make it easier. Then I stuck a shovel in the ground around a big Joe Pye weed to see how hard to would be to dig out.

It would be difficult.

It would be difficult.

Joe Pye wants to be in a damper spot (as do all the sanguisorbas in the front garden). Allan saw me poking at it and said he would not mind digging it up for me. Joy!

after

after

Of course, I had to haul most of my buckets of mulch back out of the garage to fill this in. My plan is to plant my new Rosa pteracantha there, as I have noticed that the area gets backlit by the sun and so its huge translucent red thorns should show up well.

Rosa pteracantha still in its pot.

Rosa pteracantha still in its pot.

The planting will have to wait as the mulch is still too hot to plant anything in it.

Cautionary tale: Whoever originally planted the Shorebank garden on Howerton Avenue at the port (not me!) put down steaming hot soil and planted immediately. Within days, all the shrubs they planted were dead and had to be replaced at great expense to the landscaper (who went out of business and shall not be named and shamed).

Sadly, another plant that went away was the contorted hawthorne from Joy Creek Nursery. Another cautionary tale: There was much argy bargy when Allan and I were planting the tree. “Don’t hold it by the trunk!” was the cry of dismay, and then there was an ominous cracking sound right where the trunk meets the root ball. For three or four years, the little tree put out some leaves (never any flowers) in spring and then went completely bare all summer, and it never grew an inch. I finally gave up.

contorted Paul's Scarlet Hawthorne...a goner

contorted Paul’s Scarlet Hawthorne…a goner

It’s back behind the house waiting for me to think of something to do with the branches. The root ball is the same size as when it was planted.

when I bought the poor thing, in 2011 at Joy Creek

when I bought the poor thing, in 2011 at Joy Creek

Moral: Plant trees carefully; they are not as tough as they look.

It’s going to be a challenge to get all the work done before the crowds for Rod Run weekend arrive by Friday afternoon. Even so, someone besides myself and Allan was pleased about our unexpected day off.

Smokey likes me to be at home.

Smokey (in his Birds Be Safe collar) likes me to be at home.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Saturday, 21 June 2014

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend

Lane-Allers garden

IMG_4806

Because I knew I would be taking many photos and using them for the blog, I had my resolution set rather low.  Perhaps you will be able to read this hand out that was available for tour goers:

with a magnifying glass?

with a magnifying glass?

At the streetside edge of the garden

At the streetside edge of the garden

I chose this path that led to my left away from the front driveway.

I chose this path that led to my left away from the front driveway.

I passed a mirror on a wall that reminded me of how we had used a mirror for that window-like effect on our old house.

I passed a mirror on a wall that reminded me of how we had used a mirror for that window-like effect on our old house.

deeply shadowed woodland path

deeply shadowed woodland path

The hand out said all of the rocks were brought in to the property.

The hand out said all of the rocks were brought in to the property.

little bits of whimsy along the path

little bits of whimsy along the path

emerging into sunshine

emerging into sunshine

a bog, with lawn of clipped creeping buttercup

a bog, with lawn of clipped creeping buttercup

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a bird by the bog

a bird by the bog

walking past the buttercup lawn

walking past the buttercup lawns

with the pond to our left

with the pond to our left

Allan's most excellent photo

Allan’s most excellent photo

a rustic sit spot

a rustic sit spot

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Turning left, we cross the bridge.

Turning left, we cross the bridge.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo: two garden guests pondering

Allan’s photo: two garden guests pondering

steps leading toward the house

steps leading toward the house

from the bridge

from the bridge

I've grown this primula, but it took another tour guest to show me that the flowers are sweetly fragrant.

I’ve grown this primula, but it took another tour guest to show me that the flowers are sweetly fragrant.

in bogland

in bogland

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Cercis 'Forest Pansy'!

Cercis ‘Forest Pansy’!  Note the glimpse of a folly just past the tree.

more of the big rocks

more of the big rocks

Someone thought this was the 20,000 lb one.

Someone thought this was the 20,000 pound one.

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Here is the folly that we saw just past the Forest Pansy tree.

Here is the folly that we saw just past the Forest Pansy tree.

For readers not from the Pacific Northwest, you may have noticed that several tour gardens have structures like this.  They were inspired by and often built by Little and Lewis.  I had the good fortune to tour their former garden once upon a time.

I would like one in my bogsy wood!

their beautiful book

their beautiful book

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The above view was taken from these steps:

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Now we will wend our way through the woods a bit more.

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a glimpse of the outside world

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

and of a sunlit lawn

and of a sunlit lawn

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out into the sunlight

out into the sunlight

a mirrored green wall

a mirrored green wall

more cunning mirror placement

more cunning mirror placement

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Near the mirrors, this path led right down to the street.

Near the mirrors, this path led right down to the street.

Imagine being able to have an unfenced garden without deer.  And what a surprise for anyone who wanders up that path into this amazing garden.

looking back to the sunny lawn and borders

looking back to the sunny lawn and borders

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Rosa pteracantha

Rosa pteracantha

and why I was so pleased to purchase a Rosa pteracantha to replace my diseased one.

and why I was so pleased to purchase a Rosa pteracantha to replace my diseased one.

That's what this rose is all about.

That’s what this rose is all about.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

a totem

a totem of leaves

another woodsy path

another woodsy path

steps

Let’s go up these steps.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

by the house

by the house

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

a patio for parties

a patio for parties

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by the patio

by the patio

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo of an area that I somehow completely missed.

Allan’s photo of an area that I somehow completely missed.

As we depart, a neighbour swings on a garden gate watching all the comings and goings.

As we depart, a neighbour swings on a garden gate watching all the comings and goings.

I wonder if we missed anything in this intriguing garden?  We must move on as we have three more gardens to see before the evening soirée (and I can tell you now, we did not make it to the final garden because of lack of time).

You can see more glorious photos of the Lane-Allers garden here on Alison’s Bonney Lassie blog.

 

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