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Posts Tagged ‘Rose ‘Jude the Obscure’’

Wednesday, 6 June 2018

We had an easy day planned, with a garden tour and a garden visit after work.

The Red Barn Arena

bees on California poppies (Allan’s photo)

I dug out some more wilted Helianthus, determined to grow only plants here that will look good without much watering.

This little patch of helianthus might get enough spill over water from the barrel, which gets watered more often than the garden does.

doesn’t make me happy to dig these out

in the barn (Allan’s photo)

horses going to pasture

Two coreopsis in a barrel also came out.  They have been wilted the last two times so they cannot live here anymore.

out they came

I need plants here that will thrive only on our once a week watering.  It is a windy area, which makes it even harder.

By the front gate, drought tolerance is even more necessary as water has to be schlepped out there.

Delosperma ‘Fire Spinner’ (not invasive here)

Diane’s garden

We weeded and did not need to water.

allium going to seed (Allan’s photo)

our good friend Misty (Allan’s photo)

Diane’s roadside garden

The Planter Box

I found a few succulents for the planter we had taken the coreopsis out of.

dazzling pelargoniums at the Planter Box (did not buy these for the barrel)

Klipsan Beach Cottages

We weeded and tidied for an hour, and took photos for the KBC Facebook page.

a bud on Salvia ‘Black and Bloom’, an improvement on ‘Black and Blue’

This will be our last summer in this garden because managers/owners Denny and Mary are retiring.  It feels odd.  Can’t do planting for the future here.

Thalictrum ‘Elin’ and rugosa rose

Fuchsia

fern by the clam shed (Allan’s photo)

the pond (Allan’s photo)

Bella

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

Rose ‘Jude the Obscure’

Now that KBC is the only job we have north of Long Beach, we try to sometimes add a fun north end garden tour or some such thing to make the round trip (about forty minutes driving) worthwhile.  (Next year, not having KBC will probably give us an extra day off on some of the summer weeks.) This time, we visited the Oysterville garden (which will be tomorrow’s post).

This was at the Oysterville Church afterward.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

behind the church

If you are ever taking a walking tour of Oysterville (a map is available inside the church), it is useful to know that there is a sani-can behind the church.

On the way back south, we stopped briefly in Ocean Park at

Mark and Brian’s garden.

You may remember our tour of their garden last summer.  Today, we were just picking up some Japanese anemone that they had potted up for us (to go in the bogsy wood).  Of course, we did have a good walk around the garden.

calendulas and marigolds

the front garden

The air immediately becomes cooler and fresher when one enters the back garden with its two waterfall pond.

Allan’s photo

a garden expansion in front of the pond

rock dragonfly

fancy pelargonium

succulent pot

hellebore foliage

Rhododendron ‘Pink Walloper’

Rhododendron ‘Pink Walloper’

Brian with maples from seedlings found in a parking lot planting

the deckside garden (The deck has an enviable view of the pond.)

a gift of Japanese anemones. I gave them a six pack of Cosmos ‘Cupcake’.

a bit more work

On the way home, we swung by the Red Barn again and bunged some succulents and gaillardia into the barrel.  I also put in a small, perhaps too small, sign that says “Water me!”  The poor erysimum got awfully dried up, but I left it in there for now because it is blooming so well.  The bulb foliage (in an awkward place) is tigridia.

Allan’s photos

After we got home, Allan watered at the J’s….

and the Norwoods….

The forecast still calls for rain on the weekend.  We hope so…as long as it does not fall on the Pride parade in Astoria.

 

 

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Wednesday, 13 September 2017

The work board has sprouted a list for fall.

The top “later” project at Diane’s, restoring the roadside garden, has to wait for a new fence.

While I struggled to get going, Allan hauled my clipped salmonberries from the bogsy woods and loaded them into the trailer.

It’s about a 200 foot drag. (Allan’s photo)

J’s garden

We began across the street. While painters are working on the house and garage, we had let the blackberries come through from the yard next door.  How did that happen so fast?

before

Allan’s photo

after

This load went to the dump.

The Depot Restaurant

The soil was damp enough so that we did not have to water.

north side of dining deck

autumnal Solidago ‘Fireworks’

Agastache ‘Mexican Giant’

Basket Case window box and planter

and another Basket Case window box and planter

We had time to do a good clipping of the escallonia that always wants to block the railway history sign.  (No photos of that project.  I was having a very hard time getting myself in gear for today.)

The Red Barn

While Allan got started on weeding and watering, I had a look at a horse.

tail brushing

“One Last Cruise”, nickname Cruise, named because he was the last foal of his breeder.

That was Mr. Amy with Cruise, and here comes Amy her ownself.

Allan’s photo

Diane’s garden

I then walked across the field to Diane’s garden.

My good friend Misty awaits her belly rub.

Oh, look, fence posts!  Looks like the fence is going to go up sooner than I thought.  I hope we can remove the strip of sod that will be outside the fence; that would be very hard to maintain.  Of course, it will be harder to remove the sod edge once the fence is in.

Holly peeking out from the porch. Soon she will have a big place to play.

Basket Case Greenhouse

I was on a quest for Lavender ‘Hidcote Blue’, but I had bought them all last time.  I will check at The Planter Box next week.  It was still pleasant to visit with Darrell and Roxanne..

Basket Case

The Dodge truck display that Basket Case put together for Rod Run.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

schmoozing with owner Darrel

Klipsan Beach Cottages

We did a lot of deadheading and cutting back of rose canes.  I made it so this hydrangea shows again:

A before and after would have been dramatic. Rugosa rose with a rambling red rose threaded through it.

Allan pulled Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ to make a better view through the deer fence.

before

after

I’m going to ask if I can do a severe pruning of that big rugosa rose later on.  (Mary was away for the week, and I did not have time today, anyway.)

the east gate

gate detail; the glass ball was my idea!

It is sad that my former partner, Robert, got post polio syndrome and could no longer do heavy work like welding.  He was so talented at it.

east gate

He called this one the Fish Gate.

south gate

sit spot with Tetrapanax ‘Steroidal Giant’…and a sprout, in the foreground.

seeds of tree peony

The leaves of the peony always get crispy and ugly in the late summer, so I pick more off every week.

ugly tree peony leaves (Allan’s photo); I wonder if this is normal or if they are diseased?

Allan found that the fairy door had gone missing!

home regained

Billardia longiflora

Clematis ‘Rooguchi’

Rose ‘Jude the Obscure’

Rose ‘Jude the Obscure’ (Allan’s photo)

cottages on the ridge

Long Beach

We decided that we had time to get a head start on Long Beach tasks by tidying Veterans Field.  On the way, we saw a new garden at a cottage that I always admire.

“Kite Flyers Only” Cottage

The Long Beach Peninsula could have an amazing cottage tour of its own if enough people could be found to open their cottages to strangers.

Veterans Field flag pavilion garden

Vet Field corner garden, cosmos (Allan’s photos)

cosmos and eryngium

home

While Allan mowed the tiny lawn in the J’s back garden, I somehow got a burst of energy after watering the tomatoes in the greenhouse and decided to rescue a container of bamboo from being overrun with hops and honeysuckle.

Allan’s shed repair photo from two days ago shows the before.

tonight: rescued bamboo

this much debris! J9 wants some hops for decorating.

Skooter

 

 

 

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Note to other WordPress bloggers:  I think I found out how to get to the old editor without fail.  Go to comments, then to Posts (on the left nav bar) and jump straight to “all posts”, and the old editor, which I much prefer, opens instead of the more streamlined and spacious new one.  Joy.

Wednesday, 11 May 2016

Ilwaco

watering Time Enough Books curbside garden (Allan's photo)

watering Time Enough Books curbside garden (Allan’s photo)

Armeria maritima at Time Enough Books

Armeria maritima at Time Enough Books (Allan’s photo)

On our way to planting up the garden boat at Time Enough Books, I saw how great the boatyard garden looks today. On the way out of Ilwaco, we photographed it.

boatyard poppies

boatyard poppies

clamshell railroad sign

clamshell railroad sign

boatyard

boatyard looking south from gate

Allan found a weed.

Allan found a weed photobombing the poppies.

poppies, Allan's photo

poppies, without dandelion, Allan’s photo

poppies and lupines, Allan's photo

poppies and lupines, Allan’s photo

boatyard gate

boatyard gate

looking north

looking north

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Stipa gigantea, my favourite ornamental grass

Stipa gigantea, my favourite ornamental grass

looking north

looking north

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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inspirational boat name

inspirational boat name

interlude

Because I’d had a poor night’s sleep because of thinking of the recent job debacle, I needed coffee from the Great Escape drive through.  I had resolved to call the problematical place of work before going in today, to talk to the manager about how the temporary manager had disliked our garden and tried to take it away from us.  I had time to call as we drove between the Ilwaco work and the next job. Much to my shock, even though the real manager, who has always been a supporter of the garden, was back, she said the prospect did not look good for us, and implied “corporate” had had their attention drawn to the garden by the person who disliked it, and that while she would fight for us, she could not guarantee we still had the gardening job.

I reminded her (not that she needed reminding) that we had created the garden from four weedy scrubby unmowed almost grassless (all weeds) lawn areas, and had done it for a year as volunteers, that we and my mother (before she died) had provided most of the plants for free and that we had charged “grandma rates” for five years since being offered the job after my mom died.

She said just that just last year, someone from high up had come to tour the facility and had said, upon entering the courtyard, “My God, look at this garden!  This is the best looking courtyard of any of our places!”

I did not expect it to play out that the job was still so very much at risk and was taken by surprise.  My concern had simply been what if the temporary manager had been called on to be there again at some time.  By this point in the phone conversation, Allan and I were at the coffee drive through.  I said, “If we don’t have the job, I need to know that I can come get my mom’s….” and I started to cry so hard that I could not say the word “birdbath.”  I started over and tried the sentence again…and could say it…until I got to the word “birdbath” and again I suddenly started crying so hard that I could not say the word.  Three times this happened, and finally she said “You’re trying to say birdbath.”  I replied, “Yes, sorry, I can’t say the word for some reason.”  She assured me I would be able to get it, but that I should wait, because she was going to try more reasoning with the powers on high, and she would call me and let me know on Friday.

I had not even gotten into how two rosebushes there are from my mom’s garden, as is a small yellow rhododendron, all beloved by her, all given supplemental water by me to keep them happy, and this is the wrong time of year to even try to move them to my own garden.  (The rhodo might survive.)  I don’t know the names of the roses(one velvet red, one copper coloured) so I cannot just buy new ones .

We had planned to plant cosmos there today; now I did not know if we were going to plant cosmos or anything else there ever again.

Still reeling mentally, we went on to our next job.  I was halfway through planting there before I even noticed that I had an iced mocha in my cup holder.

The Anchorage Cottages

Mitzu's greeting

Mitzu’s greeting

We planted cosmos in the gardens and annuals in the window boxes and containers.

plants set up for Allan (his photo)

plants set up for Allan (his photo)

plants planted (Allan's photo)

plants planted (Allan’s photo)

center courtyard

center courtyard

by the office

by the office

one of the window boxes

one of the window boxes

The Planter Box

We made a stop for the cosmos we would need for the rest of today and some for tomorrow.

I've had no time to go through the roses to see if perhaps 'Berries and Cream' is in here.

I’ve had no time to go through the roses to see if perhaps ‘Berries and Cream’ is in here.

annuals in the front greenhouse

annuals in the front greenhouse

Both the Planter Box and Basket Case have donated extra plants for that garden that is now perhaps no longer “mine”.

We drove on past the Job in Jeopardy; that garden would get no cosmos today nor would it be weeded or the little lawn strimmed this week.  Perhaps someone else would mow the wee lawn and undo our years of encouraging flowers to grow in it.

Klipsan Beach Cottages

All we had to do here is plant cosmos.  The garden had been carefully mulched with Gardener and Bloome Soil Conditioner by Josephina, her dad and sister, all part of the KBC working crew.  As I get older, and as the Long Beach job has gotten bigger, I appreciate not having to do all the garden tasks here. Although it might be a bit late to mulch, and hard to work around big plants, Mary and Denny were inspired to do so by how dry and hot the weather has been.

While I did the planting, Allan pruned the honeysuckle and rose over the east gate.

during (Allan's photo)

during (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo, during

Allan’s photo, during

after (Allan's photo)

after (Allan’s photo)

sit spot in the fenced garden

sit spot in the fenced garden

behind the bench: Tetrapanax papyrifer 'Steroidal Giant'

behind the bench: Tetrapanax papyrifer ‘Steroidal Giant’

new buds of Steroidal Giant

new buds of Steroidal Giant

'Polka' Rose

‘Polka’ Rose

view from the sit spot

view from the sit spot

Dutch iris and rose

Dutch iris and rose

I wish I knew this rose's name.

I wish I knew this rose’s name.

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early evening light

early evening light

Rose 'Jude the Obscure'

Rose ‘Jude the Obscure’

late afternoon sun

late afternoon sun

Marilyn’s Garden

We did not get to Marilyn’s till after five.  If we had been able to do the Job in Jeopardy, we would not have arrived there till at least six.  As it happened, Marilyn’s daughter was there and told us the neigbour’s husband had just moved into the facility of the Job in Jeopardy, and she had been wheeling his chair through the courtyard and they had been loving the garden; his room has a view of the garden.  I said I did not even know if we still HAD that garden in our care, although I did hope that the situation would resolve in our favour soon and that I would know by Friday.  Shock and sympathy were forthcoming.  A lot of people around here are familiar with that garden.

We added cosmos to Marilyn’s garden and weeded.

view from the street

view from the street

looking south

looking south

looking west from the back steps

looking west from the back steps

looking north; I learned from Ann Lovejoy to always leave a space between garden and house for maintenance and air circulation.

looking north; I learned from Ann Lovejoy to always leave a space between garden and house for maintenance and air circulation.

Ilwaco and home

We were back at home over an hour before dusk.  If we had done the Job in Jeopardy as well as all the others, as planned, we would have been leaving Marilyn’s at dusk.  I had time to sort plants for tomorrow and even to admire my own garden (and fret a bit over the weeds).  Allan had time to water the curbside garden at the east end of the port AND the Ilwaco Community Building Garden.  You have probably noticed how many of our gardens require hose watering.

east end curbside, Howerton Avenue (Allan's photo)

east end curbside, Howerton Avenue (Allan’s photo)

east end curbside garden (Allan's photo)

east end curbside garden (Allan’s photo)

community building garden (Allan's photo)

community building garden (Allan’s photo)

Community Building garden, watered (Allan's photo)

Community Building garden, watered (Allan’s photo)

The planting load is getting smaller.

The planting load is getting smaller.

back garden

back garden

Rose 'Radway Sunrise' and Aquilegia 'Clementine White'

Rose ‘Radway Sunrise’ and Aquilegia ‘Clementine White’

Siberian iris

Siberian iris

horsetail, roses, and rue

horsetail, roses, and rue

looking west

looking west

It was so grand to be back to Ilwaco early enough to do some much needed watering and plant sorting that I recalled I had been wishing for just one less job.  I just never thought it would be one that we had given so much love and attention to and one that was so closely connected to my mother.

ginger

1995 (age 71):

May 11: Store day.

1998 (age 74):

May 11:  I just goofed around after sleeping late.  The weather is cold, which would be good to plant but I didn’t feel like it.

 

 

 

 

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Monday, 28 March 2016

I awoke early (for me) and could not go back to sleep till I had called the neurologist’s office in Aberdeen.  His office person put him on the phone within thirty seconds; my timing had been perfect, and he had wonderful news: The MRI and ultrasound showed no tumor, no strokes, nothing at all bad in the old brain, and my carotid arteries are in perfect tune.  My happiness was not even slightly tempered by my chronic “dizziness” (lightheadedness, not the spinning of vertigo)  being still a mystery.  I still have the occasional very weird feeling of my right side head and right side foot BOTH feeling whirly inside at the same time.  I thought I’d mention that in case a reader says “Oh, I have that, too, and it’s _____”.

Next week brings another scary medical test (I fear not the test itself but the potential for bad results) but for now, I am free this week to get lots of work done without having to make another trip to the wise and highly rated doc two hours away in Aberdeen.

My plan today had been to weed the Ilwaco boatyard garden.  Perhaps my burst of happy energy changed my mind and sent us to the beach approach garden instead.  My conscious thought was that it is better to do beach approach day, boatyard day, then back to beach approach because the approach garden is SO tedious that it’s better to not do it two days in a row.

At the post office, we got a great big box from Heirloom Old Garden Roses, too big to haul around all day so we went back home to unpack it.

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Allan’s photo: boxes inside boxes


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Allan’s photo: Jude the Obscure, Westmoreland, Mme Alfred Carriere

Inside were three excellent roses, including Jude the Obscure which I’ve long admired at Klipsan Beach Cottages…but not Mary Rose, the one I had especially meant to order for Kitty Mary’s grave.  I think I got distracted by climbers and forgot to tick the correct box.  Good thing I know nothing is wrong in my brain or I would wonder.  I called them up and ordered Mary Rose to come all on her own.  Heirloom Roses used to sell the tiniest of roses, all of which grew and did well for me. Over the years, something has changed and now they offer gallon size, as you can see.  They sell ONLY own root roses, about which they say:

Heirloom Roses does no budding or grafting at our nursery.  Unlike the majority of rose growers in the US. we sell only own-root, virus-free roses. Our roses are first-year cuttings that are grown from a leaf cutting taken from a “mother” or “stock” plant. Own-root roses may be smaller when purchased, but quickly catch up to grafted roses (which are usually sold as two-year-old plants).

  • Own-root roses are hardier than grafted roses because their crown has not been weakened.  The bud union of a grafted rose is vulnerable to cold and can be easily damaged during a hard winter.
  • Own-root roses come back true to variety if frozen to the ground, because they have their own root system. Winter kill is less likely.
  • Own-root roses are shaplier because they send up shoots from their own roots. This creates a fuller plant over time, which adds to increased vigor, bloom, and life expectancy.
  • Own-root roses have no rootstock suckers, meaning more energy is sent to the main plant.

Rose 'Jude the Obscure'

I look forward to having Jude the Obscure in my own garden and, by next week, Mary Rose. I was, in fact, with Mary Caldwell of Klipsan Beach the day she bought her Jude the Obscure in person at Heirloom Roses.

onyx.JPG

Onyx watching the unpacking of roses


onyxacanthus

Onyx’s eyes are similar in hue to Acanthus Hollard’s Gold.

Long Beach

We picked up one of my grandma’s scrapbooks which had been on loan to our friend Wendy at Beach Dog.

gunneras

Beach Dog’s impressive pair of gunneras.

Then, to work, first with some deadheading at City Hall….

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city hall north side


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Just west of city hall: Starvation Alley organic cranberry juice tasting room

…and then  out to the Bolstad beach approach garden to weed one more of the thirteen sections..

bolstad

the long narrow Bolstad garden


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before: 12:15 PM


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before (Allan’s photo)


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before (Allan’s photo)


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Allan’s photo


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Someone had left these, perhaps in excitement at approaching the beach. (Allan’s photo)


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almost done, with a big mess to clean up (Allan’s photo)


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a difficult and thorny job (Allan’s photo)


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cleaning up (Allan’s photo)


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after, 5:45 PM, weeds out, roses beaten back from the edges


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sweeping up

Today the job still took ages, 5.5 hours (11 total) and yet felt less daunting, perhaps because of the good news I had had in the morning.

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after

After dumping the debris at city works, we planted three plants at Fifth Street Park, and a start of a white geranium macrorrhizum at the mortuary garden.

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Fifth Street: One variegated symphytum, welcome to run all around this corner (Allan’s photo)


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lavenders into planters


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Lavender ‘Madrid Blue’ which I pray does not get stolen (with Viola ‘Etain’, Allan’s photo

The air had become chilly, changing my mind about planting some seeds at the Ilwaco Community Building.

The Depot Restaurant

was an appealing place to warm up with a good meal.

gavota.JPG

Tulip ‘Gavota’ looks good against brick and against red paint.


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Depot garden (Allan’s photo)


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Depot garden (Allan’s photo)


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in the Depot, at the end of the bar


depottrain

Depot Restaurant wilted spinach salads

 

depot2

halibut on sausage gumbo with basmati rice


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sunsetting at the end of the Seaview approach road, past the Sou’wester (left)


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Allan deadheaded a window box on his way out.

Ilwaco

We paused in the big port parking lot to admire the southeastern sky over the port buildings.

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Allan’s photo


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Allan’s photo


  A guest photo:  

Our friend Michelle drove across the four mile long Astoria-Megler Bridge today and posted this photo of how the clouds were so low that vehicles were above the clouds on the Columbia River.  Re the bridge, she writes: “I’ve grown used to it. 8 years ago, I held my breath all the way over.”

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photo by Michelle Zinkevicz

Ginger’s Garden Diaries

gdiaries

from my mother’s garden diaries of two decades ago

1995 (age 70):

March 28:  Planted all begonias in pots and in trays etc.  I have to figure out a new way to label bulbs in color etc.  The ones I marked last fall are all mixed up.  Next job will be to check over dahlia bulbs to see which ones made it through the winter.

1998 (age 73):

March 28:  2:00-5:00  It was cold today so I stayed in until 2:00.  Then the sun came out.  I went out planning to weed in front but worked in strawberries instead.  Last week I decided it will be easier just to dig the berry plants because most need to be divided so I dug plants out of one row.  I can’t decide if I should leave area empty until Ron comes to till or whether to replant berry rows as soon as I can.

 

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Wednesday, 10 June 2015

I had a hard time getting going this morning.  Devery stopped by while doing her daily check up on Nora’s house and picked some strawberries from our garden;  I have asked her to do so as I am too busy to keep up with them.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo; Devery is there!


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Allan’s photo


strawberry pickers

strawberry pickers


Allan's photo: Tadpole check!

Allan’s photo: tadpoles in the water boxes


by our driveway: poppy flowers in the Eleagnus

by our driveway: poppy flowers in the Eleagnus


Ilwaco post office garden

Ilwaco post office garden


Post Office garden....I assess it can wait till tomorrow to be watered.

Post Office garden….I assess it can wait till tomorrow to be watered.

First job of the day:

the staking of a windblown Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue' by Azure Salon

the staking of a windblown Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ by Azure Salon

Basket Case Greenhouse

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Our stop at the Basket Case was simply to pick up five plants for Long Beach planters, to replace plants stolen recently by thieving varmints.  While there, I was delighted to see Ed and my nephew, Jackson Strange.

Ed, Nancy, and Walter and Shadow

Ed, Nancy, and Walter and Shadow


me and Jackson

me and Jackson


most darling!

most darling!


still some left of one of my favourite perennials: Agastaches (hyssops)

still some left of one of my favourite perennials: Agastaches (hyssops)

As we departed, a cedar waxwing had gotten into the main greenhouse and was having a hard time figuring out how to get out.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Marilyn’s Garden

We began at our furthest north garden, in Surfside.

My good friend Goldie came to greet me.

My good friend Goldie came to greet me.


Goldie

Goldie

goldie2

my very good friend

my very good friend


looking north from the back steps

looking north from the back steps

I was mad at myself because I forgot to bring some painted sage to plant here.  Next time!

Alliums

Alliums


Allium albopilosum

Allium albopilosum

interlude

On the way south to our next job, we bought an oscillating sprinkler at Jack’s Country Store, which resulted in driving down Ridge, one block over from the highway.  There I admired two pocket gardens which I do think might be asked to be on the garden tour next year or the year after that!  (I believe Nancy has enough gardens this year.)

garden one, a sweet cottage garden...

garden one, a sweet cottage garden…


with river rock walls...

with river rock walls…

one

and a driftwood fence.

and a driftwood fence.


a few blocks south, a handsome fence and patio

a few blocks south, a handsome fence and patio

Klipsan Beach Cottages

While I groomed the fenced garden, Allan did some weeding along the woodland swale:

before

before


after

after

He got a whole heaping wheelbarrow of weeds removed.

In the fenced garden:

looking in the east gate

looking in the east gate


view over the birdbath

view over the birdbath


Verbascum

Verbascum


one of Mary's roses

one of Mary’s roses


sit spot

sit spot


fuchsias and daylily well matched in colour

fuchsias and daylily well matched in colour


honeysuckle

honeysuckle


Rose 'Jude the Obscure'

Rose ‘Jude the Obscure’


Jude's petals on boxwood and Hebe 'Boughton Dome'

Jude’s petals on boxwood and Hebe ‘Boughton Dome’


Rose 'New Dawn' from outside the fence

Rose ‘New Dawn’ from outside the fence


outside: Euphorbia and fennel

outside: Euphorbia and fennel

Golden Sands Assisted Living

blue sky by our parking place...and hardly any wind!

blue sky by our parking place…and hardly any wind!

On the way through the hallways to the courtyard garden, I met a new friend named Susan.

Susan, very friendly and sweet! (Allan's photo)

Susan, very friendly and sweet! (Allan’s photo)

I had not even been sure we should take time to stop at Golden Sands, till I had remembered that the birdbaths surely needed filling, and indeed they did.

Each one had acquired a yellow duck.  (Allan's photo)

Each one had acquired a yellow duck. (Allan’s photo)


Allan's photo: These birdbaths seem to await our arrival to be filled.

Allan’s photo: These birdbaths seem to await our arrival to be filled.


The tiny Tiger Eyes sumac may finally decide to grow this year.  (Allan's photo)

The tiny Tiger Eyes sumac may finally decide to grow this year. (Allan’s photo)


brand new seating by the dining room doors

brand new seating by the dining room doors

The weekly overview of the four quadrants:

SW quadrant

SW quadrant


SW quadrant

SW quadrant


long view of NW quadrant

long view of NW quadrant


NW quadrant

NW quadrant


NE quadrant

NE quadrant


detail

detail


SE quadrant

long view of SE quadrant


SE quadrant

SE quadrant


SE quadrant

SE quadrant

As we left, I made another new friend named Ginger.

Guiding Ginger so she did not get under our vehicle.

Guiding Ginger so she did not get under our vehicle.


my new friend, with the same name as me mum

my new friend, with the same name as me mum

Andersen’s RV Park

Allan took on the project of weeding by the entry.

before

before


after

after, a subtle difference


before

before


after

after; an impressive difference—The rose is Rosa rugosa ‘Blanc Double de Coubert’

He also tidied up along the walkway by the restrooms and laundry room.

before

before


after

after

I weeded by the garden shed, the picket fence garden, and the Payson Hall boxes:

the garden shed garden

the garden shed garden


climbing rose on one of the two cottages

climbing rose on one of the two cottages


the picket fence garden

the picket fence garden


west side, the poppy field

west side, the poppy field


red poppies, many still to come

red poppies, many still to come


and California poppies mixed in

and California poppies mixed in

home

I had to do a good watering of the front garden with the new oscillating sprinkler, and on the back patio I found that the Hymenocallis (Peruvian daffodil) had begun its brief and amazing show:

Hymenocallis

Hymenocallis


AKA Peruvian daffodil

AKA Peruvian daffodil

Coolest thing today: Mary and Denny of Klipsan Beach Cottages gave us a blue gate leg table.  Wrestling it in and out of the trailer was hard (easier for Allan) and rearranging our comfy guest chair to make room for it was mentally hard, but it is now in a spot in our living room where I will be able to have breakfast while looking out the window instead of in the windowless corner (where the dining table naturally fits, due to a low hanging ceiling light fixture in the double wide floor scheme).

new table by the garden book nook

new table in the garden book corner

Next: two mostly Long Beach days during which I do hope we can manage some more beach approach weeding…

 

 

 

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I suspect that yesterday will have been the longest day of our work year, but maybe not, as garden tour month approaches and three of the gardens we have a hand in will be on the tour (on July 20th).

We had much to do yesterday, and our main goal was to get many jobs done and get to Andersen’s RV Park by five to do a lot more weeding before the Sisters on the Fly group starts to arrive this weekend.

Larry and Robert’s garden

We began just down the street at Larry and Robert’s garden with the continuation of changes to their back yard.  

before and after

before and after

We added an Azara microphylla (an excellent small tree with fragrant winter blooms) and some pea gravel and river rock and some edging from materials that were on the property.  I have in the past had an aversion to scalloped edging.  Now I cannot remember why, because I think it looks just grand here.  Now we need some more river rock for against the house and some sort of plant to fill in the narrow border there that is somewhat resistant to three small dogs (nothing too delicate).

Ilwaco intermission

We then planted an Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ in our volunteer garden at the Ilwaco Post Office.

Ilwaco Post Office

Ilwaco Post Office

As we headed out of Ilwaco, the man who sells firewood on 2nd SW waved us down and gave us two hollow rounds of wood that could be used as planters, he said in appreciation of our volunteer work in town.  I told him we do get paid to care for the planters and the boatyard (although the latter did start out as a volunteer project years ago) and that the post office is our only volunteer garden now.  He still insisted we should have the planters.  (He has them for sale sometimes over at 2nd SW and Eagle.)

a garden gift

a garden gift

Might I add, those things are very heavy!

Diane’s garden

Next, we stopped at Diane’s garden and The Red Barn Arena (next door to each other): Allan fertilized the whiskey barrel planters at the barn and Diane’s containers while I deadheaded and weeded along the road.

at Diane's

at Diane’s

That roadside garden clearly needs more plants.  I’ll add some of the inexpensive Dianthus from the Basket Case next time we go there.

Anchorage Cottages

After Diane’s, we went to The Anchorage Cottages where we were requested to prune a branch off of the Ceanothus so that the parking sign for cottage one would show.  The shrub was thick with bees.

Ceanothus

Ceanothus (California Lilac)

Ceanothus (California Lilac)

Even though the bees were gentle, they got pretty agitated when I tried to lop a large branch, so I settled for quickly cutting one small piece and then scampering well back while they swarmed toward me…then…whew!!…resettled on the flowers.

The number one just barely showing.

The number one just barely showing.

Plant emergency of the morning:  thrips on a lily!  Doused it with a cup of mild dish soap well diluted with water.  Fingers crossed.

cured, I hope

cured, I hope

I was reminded of this New Yorker cartoon, long a favourite of mine.

 

george-booth-aphids-on-the-heliotrope-new-yorker-cartoon

Anchorage center courtyard

Anchorage center courtyard

New Dawn rose

New Dawn rose

We did not spend as long there as I would have liked because our mission remained to get to Andersen’s by five.  Our next stop was The Basket Case to pick up some plants for Andersen’s garden shed border which I felt had looked a little bare after the previous evening’s weeding there.  I also got two Lobelia tupa for Sheila as she and Harold are coming to visit us soon!

at the Basket Case, what a deal!

at the Basket Case, what a deal!

Wiegardt Studio Gallery

Next we went all the way up to Nahcotta/Ocean Park to the Wiegardt Gallery where again we went round the garden in haste but I hope effectively.

at Wiegardt Gallery with manager Christl

at Wiegardt Gallery with manager Christl

Allium schubertii

Allium schubertii and albopilosum

Wiegardt

Alliums white and purple

Alliums white and purple

Allium albopilosum and Allium moly 'Jeannine'

Allium albopilosum and Allium moly ‘Jeannine’

front walkway

front walkway

west side of gallery

west side of gallery

It occurs to me that next time we are there, I will take you inside!  Eric Wiegardt is a renowned artist and the gallery is beautiful.

Ocean Park intermission

We were doing well as it was only three o clock, so we had time to stop at Jack’s Country Store for what we call “Jack’s snacks”.   Of such tiny luxuries are happy moments made.

Bliss:  The Jack's Snacks Cooler and my potato salad in the car

Bliss: The Jack’s Snacks deli cooler and my potato salad in the car

I think this is the first time since the beginning of May that we have had time, when at the north end, to stop for a treat.

Next up:  the small entry garden at Oman Builders Supply.  But first, we did a U Turn to get a better look at a garden near Jack’s that is looking fine.  Garden tour next year?

an Ocean Park garden

an Ocean Park garden

driftwood and toadflax

driftwood and toadflax

lupines

lupines and foxgloves

a work in progress

a work in progress

Doing another U turn to get back to OBS, we saw that the poppy garden behind Jack’s is still there.  Jack himself started it, or his wife perhaps, and it is being carried on.

east wall of Jack's

east wall of Jack’s

Oman Builders Supply

After those distractions we got to Oman Builders Supply garden.

OBS garden

OBS garden

Mainly I wanted to make sure that the Eryngiums ‘Jade Frost’ and Lobelia tupa that we had planted last week had no transplant shock.  They were fine.  We could have spent quite awhile deadheading the Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ but more work called to us to keep moving.

The remaining deadheads can wait till next week.

The remaining deadheads can wait till next week.

hebe flowering at OBS

hebe flowering at OBS

Klipsan Beach Cottages

We pulled into our parking area at Klipsan Beach Cottages at a quarter to four.  Still on track for our day’s plan.  I knew the garden would be in good shape and that we could get it done in an hour.

Klipsan Beach Cottages

Klipsan Beach Cottages fenced garden

Allium albopilosum (Star of Persia)

Allium albopilosum (Star of Persia)

Allium schubertii

Allium schubertii

Rose 'Jude the Obscure'

Rose ‘Jude the Obscure’

The names of some of the roses are lost to us!

The names of some of the roses are lost to us!

rose

Last year this one did not open well but this year it looks fine.

Last year this one did not open well but this year it looks fine.

Last year Mary brought back some choice shrubs, and the one below is still in a pot because we have not found the perfect spot for it.  I think it is some kind of callistemon but if I am wrong, perhaps someone will enlighten me.

a recent acquisition

a recent acquisition

One of the two cats put on a charming show for me in the garden.

Sarah, who did get a belly rub

Sarah, who did get a belly rub

The foxgloves are restricting the view of one of the entry signs.

No one can bear to cut them down.

No one can bear to cut them down.

We would have left, as I had planned, by 4:45, but owner/manager Mary and I got into a conversation about Nora’s funeral, and life, and death, and afterlife or not, and walked up to the cottages and back, and so Allan and I did not leave till a little after five.

Corokia cotoneaster

Corokia cotoneaster in late afternoon light

Andersen’s RV Park

At last, we got to Andersen’s at five fifteen.  While Allan planted the new perennials in the garden shed garden, I weaseled out of my least favourite garden task (planting) to discuss with the staff what to do with one of those free planters we had been given in Ilwaco earlier in the day.  Jan came up with a good spot for it, and we waited for Al to return from walking his dog in order to suggest it, because it involved an area for which he had been seeking a design solution.

Al and Chewie return from the beach

Al and Chewie return from the beach

He liked the idea but since his shift was over, another staffer and Allan ended up doing it.   I hope Al was not disappointed the next morning to find it done, because he does like to have a project.  Jan’s idea was so good that it couldn’t wait till morning!

the round hollow wood

the round hollow wood

I snagged three gazania out of planters on the east side of the house where they closed up in the afternoon for lack of sun.

Till eight thirty, Allan and I weeded like mad in the beds behind the office, where the pernicious quack grass had returned; I walked the other beds and planters removing dead bulb foliage.  The results were satisfactory and now, on Monday, all we have to do is a light weeding from one end of the gardens to the other and all will be perfect…at the same time!  This is rare, because as you can probably tell, we have too many jobs to reach that state of glory very often on our larger garden jobs.

behind the office

behind the office

Having time to deadleaf as well as deadhead really makes a garden look perfect.

Buddliea 'Black Night' before...

Buddliea ‘Black Night’ before…

and after picking off yellowed leaves

and after picking off yellowed leaves

If an RVer who is also a gardener camps here, s/he must be pretty impressed with the beauty of the gardens at this time of year in evening light.  Tired though we were, we lingered to take some pictures in the late evening.

poppies and Payson Hall

poppies and Payson Hall

Baptisia (false indigo)

Baptisia (false indigo)

Stipa gigantea, my favourite ornamental grass

Stipa gigantea, my favourite ornamental grass

Stipa and Payson Hall

Stipa and Payson Hall

gold spangles

gold spangles

sunset light

sunset light

On the way out, we swung by the garden shed so I could see the new plants in.  It does look more filled out with the addition of a couple of Gaura ‘So White’, a Cistus, a Phygelius ‘African Queen’ and…something else…I forget what!

garden shed garden

garden shed garden

Al had, earlier in the day, made the gravel path at the very far end look spiffing but it does not show in this photo.

An emergency

Finally we could go home!  As we drove south through Long Beach, I checked my messages on Facebook to get an update from my gardening neighbour (four doors down), Judy.  As I read her fairly reassuring message about her visit to the cardiologist, another message popped up from a client at a commercial establishment.  There were caterpillars all over a shrub, having stripped the leaves, and looking horribly unsightly right next to a venue for an event on Saturday.  Could we come tomorrow (Saturday morning) and cut it down?  I won’t name the business because no one wants to think about horrid caterpillars.  It was on our way home, and Saturday morning was fully booked with events (Saturday market, visiting friends, cash mob) so we had to make an emergency detour with loppers and a chainsaw and cut the shrub (a Leycesteria formosa) to the ground at dusk-thirty.  I felt terrible because a hummingbird was feeding on the flowers; every leaf was gone, but the flowers remained.  One on the other side of the building (away from the next day’s event) was still leafed out, although a bit chewed, and I think the hummer could find it.

In my own garden I would have left the shrub alone to leaf out again, but at a business such ugliness cannot stand, especially if caterpillars are dropping onto customers!

We could not haul the debris.  Nay, would not.  No caterpillars allowed in our work trailer or at the site where we dump.  Fortunately there was a place we could stash the branches till the infestation is gone.

By then it was far too late to blog about such a long day so I made a placeholder entry via my iPhone on the way home…where we collapsed in front of the telly and had a comforting dinner quickly whipped up by Allan and watched Master Chef.  Just before that, as I did the evening spreadsheet on my computer, Allan came in to my office to show me this riding on his shirt.  If anyone knows caterpillars,  perhaps they can tell me what this horrid creature will become.  Nothing nice, I bet.  I shudder to think how many hitched a ride on our clothes.

a garden pest

a garden pest

I am hoping for no more days this long unless they are that long…in my own garden.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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