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Posts Tagged ‘Rose ‘Paul’s Himalayan Musk’

Tuesday, 19 June 2018

Ilwaco post office with Asiatic lilies and Stipa gigantea

Mike’s garden

My plan for today had been just to water the port curbside gardens.  However, I had seen on the Plant Idents Facebook group that the little geranium which had recently started running rampant in Mike’s garden is on the noxious weed list, common name Shiny Geranium.  So I pulled a bag of it while Allan worked some more on Mike’s back garden.

The red is Geranium lucidum.

suddenly all over the narrow north side of the garden

later

The geranium went into a tied shut garbage bag.

The north side of the house is a dry and drab area that is mostly used as a path.    I have not tried to do much of anything to make it better.

Today, however, I realized that the buried path (because of some construction) was not going to reappear by itself.

We moved an entry area sideways to get away from a big Escallonia iveyi…

Allan’s before…

and after

And Allan brought the rest of the path back after I moved an H block and found the pavers (and moved some of them sideways for an easier route).

during

after

We both worked on making dirt paths reappear in the woodsy back yard.

Allan’s before…

and after

A path circles the tree again.

Port of Ilwaco

We watered from one end to the other, randomly because the Pavilion was being pressure washed, which threw us off our proper order.

I must remember to be on the lookout for some good semi shade plants to re-do these pots at OleBob’s Café.  The pampas grass, mostly dead, was not a wise choice.

We did not do it!

Another vandalized Eryngium at the Riverszen garden:

Allan’s photos

trashed for no reason other than the will to damage beauty

an undamaged Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ (Allan’s photo)

At the west end, the oxeye daisies in the driest spot are starting to die off, so time was spent clipping them back.  (Often I just pull them.)

I applied fish fertilizer to the Time Enough Books garden, which does worst of all even though we have done it longest and with much love.  It was terrible soil under river rock.  We removed a lot of rock, added mulch, and yet…it struggles.  It probably gets the most water, too, because sometimes bookstore owner Karla waters it.

We weeded the curbside garden at the former Shorebank, which is going to be a hotel called At the Helm (with a pub!).

Allan went on to water the east end, while I went home to try to get ready for our trip.

east end garden (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

at home

I was home soon enough to garden for a short while.

back garden looking south

Sunday I got seven or eight barrows of compost from compost bin one.  Today, this was all I got by getting to the bottom of bin two.

It was almost all dried up ornamental grass stalks.  I had not been able to properly mix green and brown, due to a shortage of green in early spring.

I noticed that the leaves of the golden hypericum that I pruned radically not long ago have turned splotchy and ugly.

I had to cut it down again, and in the process snapped off a new lily.

Call the WAHmbulance over the poor lily.

Now I wish ever so much I had just left that golden shrub alone in the first place.

Once you cut it, you can’t put it back.

There were consolations.

Mermaid rose on the arbour

Paul’s Himalayan Musk rose

pink and yellow rose whose name I have forgotten

The rose that was here when we bought the place.

close up; it is fragrant and once blooming

with Clematis ‘Etoile Violette’

I do not want to leave my garden even for a trip to see other splendid gardens.

 

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Sunday, 17 June 2018

at home

Rose ‘Paul’s Himalayan Musk’ and bright blue skies

Midmorning, I started sifting compost from bin two.  My goal was to mulch the edges of the center bed as far as possible.

sifting

at least a foot of good compost at the bottom of the bin

I did not get even one barrow full before I gave up and went inside.  It was too hot…in the low 80s.  I worked on billing and blog posts instead, waiting for the day to cool down.

I did not get back outside again till five.

my view while sifting compost

all the way to the bottom of bin two

Bin two was turned into bin one. Bin three will be turned into bin two.

I was able to mulch all down the east side and the front of the center bed.

my audience

And I got my small batch of ladies in waiting planted.

In the evening, because of the extra hot day and because Sunday is the quiet day there, Allan watered at the

Ilwaco Community Building.

fern at the entrance to the library

same fern after cutting off the last year’s fronds

another fern that Allan trimmed up today

reading

Earlier this weekend, I finished the fourth in Virginia Ironside’s Marie Sharp series.  I do hope there will be a fifth one, seeing Marie into her 70s.

I knew exactly which documentary she refers to in this passage:

…The first of the Paradise Lost trilogy.  I have watched them all, the earlier ones twice, and it is a strange thing to find such a documentary enjoyable to watch.

When Marie goes to buy an iPhone:

I am a fan of Piet Oudolf, so i was terribly amused at this passage about a garden made by Marie’s friend James.

Marie follows David’s example and goes on to say, “It’s not like a normal garden, true…

I discovered Virginia Ironside by reading (three times in all) her book about pet loss, Goodbye Dear Friend.  So of course, the passage about Marie burying her cat is perfect.

You might not want to read it; it had me in tears.  It is at the end of this blog post so you won’t miss anything if you stop right here.

I still miss my heart cat Smoky and my good feline friend Calvin and can’t even bear to put their ashes in the ground yet.

 

 

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Friday, 8 June 2018

at home

The rain started last night around midnight and kept on and on.

breakfast time and no room for my food

In the midmorning, I went out into it to fill from the rain barrels all my little buckets and (with some help from Allan) all the green jugs.  The barrels had been completely empty and by end of day they were full even after all the dipping out.  I found this little guy floating in one as it filled.  He must have been on the bottom—glad I rescued him in time.

I do so enjoy dipping cool water from a barrel.

Skooter observes

buckets and jugs

I walked around the garden to enjoy its happiness.

the new ladies in waiting

back garden, east bed

Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’

more east bed

Mom’s copper rose

a new lily

Stipa gigantea and Rosa moyesii

cutleaf elderberry, Fuchsia magellanica, Rose ‘Radway Sunrise’

rain gauge as of half past noon

a bogsy wood clearing that needs clipping before it disappears

bogsy wood path that need weeding or mowing

The garden that was battered after last week’s weeding is all fresh again.

unweeded west side border

The white rambling rose below was grown from a cutting from Maxine’s garden…just laid into the soil in autumn till it sprouted…and then from another cutting when we moved from our old garden to here.

In the garden boat, snails ate my smaller cosmos.  And they keep attacking the dahlias so I have these thingies over some of the dahlias so I can put the bad slug bait inside without the cats stepping in it.

Rose ‘Paul’s Himalayan Musk’

from outside the garden

If I were walking by and looked down the Nora House driveway, I would be intrigued and excited.

Frosty watches me reenter the house.

Now for a reading and Gardeners’ World day.

while trying to read

I finished the book I’d been reading all week at bedtime.

third in an excellent series

In the book, Marie has a health scare.  I am sure most people who have had something that might be, or is, cancer, can identify with this:

I love Marie!  I read on anxiously to find out how she fared.  I was worried about a friend with a similar problem—that turned out to be a hernia, for which we were all oddly grateful.

Marie’s intake for an MRI amused me…

And I enjoyed her enjoyment of the MRI, since I found it most interesting and peculiarly pleasant when I had mine.

This is a rare occurence:

Marie, in her mid 60s,  writes, “I think of…

I think of my grandmother every day also, and am surrounded by her things (furniture, dishes, pictures).

Gene is her grandson, and Jack her son, in this passage that expresses how I feel about my house.

Marie joins Facebook in this group, and I must admit I share her cynicism about happy-all-the-time memes.

I can’t recommend these books highly enough.  As I write this, I have finished the fourth one and I hope there will be a fifth one.

I went on to have a wonderful time watching three episodes of Gardeners’ World.

I happened on an old one that was labeled 2017 but must have been from before Monty Don hosted the show from his own garden, and therefore must have been before he had a stroke and took a few years off from the show.  The setting was different.

My notes:

Rose ‘Souvenir du Dr. Jaimon’ likes some shade.

Stipa gigantea’s common name is ‘Golden Oats’.

Monty says, “You don’t get as many seeds to the packet as you used to.  But maybe that’s a truism about life.”

Thinning carrots attracts carrot fly.

In the evening, Allan and I agreed that we both would rather stay home than go to the Pride parade tomorrow, as we both feel we have so much to do here.  However, we WILL go…unless, as some forecasts predict, it is pouring rain and windy.

By the end of the day, we had had a wonderful 1.08 inches of rain, which will enable us to take Monday off instead of watering planters. Thanks to our having watered planters yesterday, the soil will stay damp even in the thickest of plantings.  The water barrels all were full again.

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Sunday, 29 May 2016

Oh how I wanted to finish my book…but first I was still figuring out how to write about what happened Wednesday regarding that thing that I am probably done writing about.  It worried me how to say it best, and took part of the morning and some advice from friends including my dear old copy editor friend, Montana Mary, to refine it.  As soon as it was done, I felt free and went out into the garden with a deep sense of joy and of having TIME.  The book would have to wait till after dark.

First thing I saw:  The old tree that has never had fruit since we moved in here in 2010 has fruit this year.

The tree to the left...

The tree to the left…

...has fruit on some branches.

…has fruit on some branches.

water box frog (one of several)

water box frog (one of several)

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Allan decided to make a landing spot for the fledgings when they emerge from the Motherboard Birdhouse.

before

before

after

after

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He got the itch to prune Paul’s Himalayan Musk:

before

before

after

after

I got a considerable amount of enjoyable weeding done while Allan went to Ilwaco Community Building to work for a couple of hours on his own job.  I am helping there more but he likes to have that job be his own, I think.

Community Building garden

Community Building garden

a fern and the dreaded salal

a fern and the dreaded salal

He had a snack while sitting by Black Lake.

He had a snack while sitting by Black Lake.

Black Lake memorial plaque

Black Lake memorial plaque

Memorial Day fishing

Memorial Day weekend fishing

and a catch

and a catch

When he returned, we had a campfire that made a perfect end to the gardening day.

DSC09396

overhead: blue evening sky

overhead: blue evening sky

evening light

evening light

DSC09394

DSC09395

DSC09405

DSC09407

perfect corn roasted in foil with butter, salt and pepper

after sausages and buns: perfect corn roasted in foil with butter, salt and pepper

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DSC04576

my beloved Smokey

my beloved Smokey

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Stipa gigantea (Allan's photo)

Stipa gigantea (Allan’s photo)

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the remainder of last winter's windfall wood

the remainder of last winter’s windfall wood

An episode of Luther and finishing my book made for a good day’s end.  I loved Casting Off (book four of the Cazalet Chronicle…one more to go) so much that I sat and hugged the book for awhile when I was done with it.

Monday, May 30 2016

Allan had a plan to go boating.  As happens with long weekends, he had to water the Ilwaco planters first.  Unfortunately.  He does not get the good stretch of time off that I do.  In fact, I have to admit that while he was watering, I was sleeping.  I had started a new book at 1 AM and found it most absorbing.

Allan’s watering Ilwaco photos:

bindweed and a daisy at the boatyard faucet where he fills up.

bindweed and a daisy at the boatyard faucet where he fills up.

California poppies

California poppies

at the boatyard

at the boatyard

Harvey-O

Harvey-O

across from the post office

across from the post office

This is adorable. Thanks to whoever did this!

This is adorable. Thanks to whoever did this!

By the Griffin Gallery. Plant protectors.

By the Griffin Gallery. Plant protectors.

Ilwaco City Hall planters

Ilwaco City Hall planters

He returned home, loaded the MaryBeth boat and headed down to Seaside for an adventure.  I began my pleasant day of weeding, staying out from under the big trees because of a strong 20 mph not too cold wind.

front garden before...

front garden before…

after

after

next door at Nora's

next door at Nora’s

He let me get this close.

He let me get this close.

DSC09420

Last night as we sat round the campfire, Allan had a brilliant idea: that we should name the four lanes of grass that run north-south in the back garden.  I immediately came up with four good names, although I am wavering between ideas on one of them.  Here they are:

the west path: Fuchsia Lane

the west path: Fuchsia Lane

Fuchsia lane has some nice hardy fuchsias.

on Fuchsia Lane

on Fuchsia Lane

DSC09425

on Fuchsia Lane

on Fuchsia Lane

the right center path: Black Cat Lane

the right center path: Black Cat Lane

because of the kitty bench

because of the kitty bench

left center path: Pippin Lane

left center path: Pippin Lane

because of the Cox's Orange Pippin apple tree.

because of the Cox’s Orange Pippin apple tree.

Although I did think of calling it Radway Lane because of the Radway Sunrise rose.

Although I did think of calling it Radway Lane because of the Radway Sunrise rose.

the east path: Nearly Wild Lane

the east path: Nearly Wild Lane

because it is the narrowest lane and starts with the Nearly Wild rose.

because it is the narrowest lane and starts with the Nearly Wild rose.

I first thought of calling the east lane Blueberry Lane because it ends at a patch of blueberries.  Which do you like best, Blueberry Lane or Nearly Wild Lane?

Allan even spoke of making signs.  I wonder if he will?

looking southeast from the double door gate

looking southeast from the double door gate

All the lanes converge on Campfire Cove and beyond that is Salmonberry Loop through the bogsy wood.

I am very satisfied with all of this.

Tomorrow: Allan’s day on the good ship MaryBeth.

For those who like old pictures: I have added a couple more posts to The Grandma Scrapbooks.


Ginger’s Garden Diaries

gdiaries

from my mother’s garden diaries of two decades ago

1998 (age 74):

May 29: cool  12:30-4:30  It tried to rain but only a few drops so I stayed out.  I planted sweet peas near a rose trellis.  Planted some begonias in wooden tubs.  These are the ’96 bulbs that I didn’t label so I don’t know if they are upright or cascade.  I planted some of the “little” bulbs in bowls.  I quit early because I was tired and I wanted to eat before basketball game.

May 30:  I planted more seeds in house.  I didn’t feel like going outside.

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Saturday, 21 May 2016

I had the day to myself because Allan had gone boating.  The unusual state of complete solitude inspired me to skip the Saturday market.

 As usual, it tok me ages to get started on a day off.  J9 stopped by unexpectedly just before I got outside, and we had a good natter for half an hour and then I began to plant my own painted sage.

What I most wanted was to be done with annuals planting time.  Otherwise, I would have rejoiced in the rain that stopped me halfway through the planting, and would have settled in with volume 4 of the Cazalet Chronicle.  I felt sorry for the vendors down at the Saturday Market; the rain was torrential.  I might have kept planting in the privacy of the back yard, but in the more public front yard I did not feel like exhibiting drowned rattiness.

rain from the east window

rain from the east window

from the porch

from the porch

pelting

pelting

topping up the rain barrels

topping up the rain barrels

As soon as it slowed, I was back out finishing the planting.

Frosty preferred to stay in.

Frosty preferred to stay in.

I reassembled my mom’s sedum table display next to the water boxes.  It has gone from her own garden to Golden Sands, lived there under a courtyard tree for six years, and has now come home.

mom's little wooden table, still sturdy.

mom’s little wooden table, still sturdy.  Edged with brick, piled with soil, planted with succulents that were brought home in a bucket.

potatoes growing on the debris pile

potatoes growing on the debris pile

Paul's Himalayan Musk rose overhead

Paul’s Himalayan Musk rose overhead

Rose 'Gloire de Dijon'; if I were retired, I'd pick off every blackspotty leaf.

Rose ‘Gloire de Dijon’; if I were retired, I’d pick off every blackspotty leaf.

Egyptian Walking Onion outside the deer fence.

Egyptian Walking Onion outside the deer fence.

strawberries outside the deer fence; before I put this mesh up, Devery caught the deer browsing them.

strawberries outside the deer fence; before I put this mesh up, Devery caught the deer browsing them.

almost ready!

almost ready!

a rose across the driveway at Nora's old house (now her granddaughter Alicia's)

a rose across the driveway at Nora’s old house (now her granddaughter Alicia’s)

Calvin was the one who followed me around outside today.

Calvin was the one who followed me around outside today.

looking south east from the gate

looking south east from the back gate

the one rose that came with the house...a prolific once-bloomer

the one rose that came with the house…a prolific once-bloomer

(weedy) patio with no plants to plant!

(weedy) patio with no plants to plant!

Onyx from next door came to visit.

Onyx from next door came to visit.

Onyx and Frosty

Onyx and Frosty

front path with painted sage planted along the edge

front path looking west with painted sage planted along the edge

Chickadees have made a next in the circuit board bird house.

Chickadees have made a next in the circuit board bird house.

purchased once upon a time at Saturday market

purchased once upon a time at Saturday market

If I had the patience of Mr Tootlepedal, I would get a photo of the chickadees going in and out.

I was chided from a nearby perch.

I was chided from a nearby perch.

front path looking east

front path looking east, not raked up yet

Clematis durandii on new arbour (where wire mesh will be inserted for it to climb on).

Clematis durandii on new arbour (where wire mesh will be inserted for it to climb on).

more small painted sage plants along more edges. I had to pull some red poppies to make room, felt it was a shame but did it anyway.

more small painted sage plants along more edges. I had to pull some red poppies to make room, felt it was a shame but did it anyway.

I used up all my six packs of sage with not a one left to squeeze into the boatyard garden.  At last, with all the plants in the ground, I had time to begin the sort of tasks that I like best in the garden.

clipping hellebore: before...

clipping hellebore: before…

and after. I had been looking forward to that.

and after. I had been looking forward to that.

With all the plants planted, I can now turn my attention at work to projects, the sort of work I much prefer to planting.

DSC09228

 

Now, if I just stop buying plants, I won’t have any more planting to do till next year, will I?

Allan got home just after dark.  Tomorrow’s post will be about his adventures in Portland.

Ginger’s Garden Diaries

gdiaries

from my mother’s garden diaries of two decades ago

1997 (age 73):

May 21:  10:30-5:00  Don and I worked about 3 hours in the garage going through the NW corner sorting stuff for garage sale.  When he left, I worked in front weeding out the sweet woodruff, etc.  I think I have about 4 or 5 wheelbarrows to add to the compost pile.

1998 (age 74):

May 21:  I brought out all the baskets that are growing good.  I managed to hang several of the baskets with rigid hangers.  I worked again potting tomatoes.

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Sunday, 21 June 2015

at home

Smokey

Smokey

I find it so sweet that Smokey now sits on the chair closest to my new table while I have breakfast; he sat next to the other table when I would dine there.

I could not get going outside today despite big plans. I had so little energy for gardening that I wrote two blog posts instead, feeling a nagging guilt the whole time because the weather was warm and not terribly windy.  I attribute some of the lack of energy to having heard this morning that Long Beach won’t hire an intern to weed the beach approach. I don’t get it as they have to pay someone to do it, right? So it seems like the remaining ten sections are again hanging over my head like the axe of doom. Or…it just won’t get done. Other than that, I suppose we all need a rest sometimes and I had to take one.  Fortunately, it was the longest day of the year and so even though I did not begin to garden till 4:30, I still had time to put in a good four plus hours.

I ate the Pink Poppy Bakery Swedish Traveling Cake, which I'd forgotten about yesterday, for energy.

I ate the Pink Poppy Bakery Swedish Traveling Cake, which I’d forgotten about yesterday, for energy.

Allan had already helped me enormously by setting up a sprinkler to water the front garden.

front garden lilies

front garden lilies

lilies2

pale yellow lilies in bud

pale yellow lilies in bud

Scrophularia variegata (figwort) and a variegated Hellebore

Scrophularia variegata (figwort) and a variegated Hellebore

Lily 'Landini'

Lily ‘Landini’

Lily 'Landini'

Lily ‘Landini’

I had been excited after a rain shower late last week to find the new water bin full…until Allan pointed out it also collected roof water from when we run the oscillating sprinkler.  (Our house is short).

I should have dipped water out before today's sprinkler session.

I should have dipped water out before today’s sprinkler session.

In the back garden, I found two frogs, not Pacific tree frogs but a larger kind (leopard frogs?) hanging out under a piece of driftwood in one of the water boxes.

frogs

frogs2

I could also see some small tadpoles swimming around, the ones Allan had rescued last weekend.  They are elusive and dive down when observed.

Allan had mowed the lawn earlier in the day.  I watered with the four back garden sprinklers, weeded the former Danger Tree bed and added whatever mulch I had around (not enough!), and then I partially trimmed out the sides of the salmonberry tunnel back in the bogsy woods…

before...forgot to take an after.  And the results were just middling because of lack of energy.

before…forgot to take an after. And the results were just middling because of lack of energy.

Japanese iris by the woodpile at the tunnel entrance

Japanese iris by the woodpile at the tunnel entrance

iris2

I had company in the garden.

I had company in the garden.

Allan went to water the Ilwaco Community Building.  I observed that he does not mind going to work for a bit on a day off, whereas to me, having to work even a bit makes it completely not count as a day off.

Allan's photo: flooding the sad horsetail-y soil at the community building.

Allan’s photo: flooding the sad horsetail-y soil at the community building.

Allan's photo: Brodiaea at the community building.

Allan’s photo: Brodiaea at the community building.

When he returned, he built a campfire.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

allanfire

Later in the evening, I got the impulse to completely get rid of that old tricycle piece at the lower right, above; it has slowly disintegrated, and makes it impossible to expand the garden into that area.  It’s gone now.

Near the fire circle:  two beloved plants, Sambucus laciniata from Joy Creek Nursery and Rose 'Radway Sunrise' from Cistus.

Near the fire circle: two beloved plants, Sambucus laciniata from Joy Creek Nursery and Rose ‘Radway Sunrise’ from Cistus.

Walking to and from the house to collect campfire food and drink, I noticed that the vine that Nancy gave me, from Annie’s Annuals, is blooming.  I have completely forgotten its name even though it is a vine I have wanted to grow, so I hope someone can help me ID it.

exciting!

exciting!  Sorry did not get a long shot of the plant.

Paul's Himalayan Musk rose is still blooming over the big west arbour.

Paul’s Himalayan Musk rose is still blooming over the big west arbour.

Then, we settled in for our campfire.

view of the Danger Tree bed I had weeded earlier today.  I want to build the bed up higher now that the tree is just a snag.

view of the Danger Tree bed I had weeded earlier today. I want to build the bed up higher now that the tree is just a snag.

to my left: the bed that I expanded recently.  Quite satisfying to see those ladies in waiting planted.

to my left: the bed that I expanded recently. Quite satisfying to see those ladies in waiting planted.

fire

At last, a fire, and no wind.  We had hoped for this last night when Kathleen was available to join us.  It has been a couple of windy weeks waiting for a campfire evening.  Tonight was summer solstice, and even though I knew it was the longest light evening of the year, I totally forgot that we should howl and …recite poetry… and other solstice rituals.  We just quietly sat and toasted sausages and had a hard apple cider with lime each.

fire2

lots of wood waiting for future campfires

lots of wood waiting for future campfires

above: trees with no roaring wind; what a delight

above: trees with no roaring wind; what a delight

Monday, 22 June 2015

My plan was to title this post “A lazy day and a busy one” or something like that, as I had expected to do a lot of weeding and pruning at home on Monday (while waiting for the plumber).  And then….because the next six days will be tremendously busy…I completely skived off and read the brand new book in a series that I love: The Seaside Knitters.  How could I resist?  It had come from the library, and if I did not read it today I would only have time for small bits of reading later in the week.  That is no way to read a mystery.

ahhhhh.....

ahhhhh…..

Mary immediately saw that it was going to be a good day for her, as well.

Mary immediately saw that it was going to be a good day for her, as well.

She made a good book rest.

She made a good book rest.

I love this series so much that I wrote a special blog post about it, and when I have time I have some new descriptive details about the fictional town of Sea Harbor to add to that post.  Despite an unusual number of murders, the town is idyllic, and even more so is the friendship among the women who comprise the core characters.  It is possible to find friends like that, and rare, and they should be treasured.  (I can guarantee that none of them would tolerate mean girl shenanigans any more than they tolerate unsolved murders.)

During that time, the plumber came and Allan dealt with the whole interlude so that I got to just keep reading.  He was being much more productive than me and had painted some posts and an old door for an upcoming project.

Allan's photo: He also scraped and repainted an old door that is one of the deer fence gates.

Allan’s photo: He also scraped and repainted an old door that is one of the deer fence gates.

I did not rush through my book despite my usual feelings of garden guilt, so I was not outside until after five.  (A sunny but not too hot day reading indoors is not as purely pleasurable as a winter day….)  In the following three hours, I managed to accomplish some weeding, some watering (including watering can applications from the full rain barrel), picked some strawberries and blueberries, and tied about twenty more tall bamboo stakes to the fence wherever I thought the deer might be jumping over.

bamboo stakes ready to go

bamboo stakes ready to go

evening light

evening light

reseeded Nigella (love in a mist)

under the rose arbor

deep blue nigella

deep blue nigella (love in a mist) reseeded from last year

looking south over the water boxes

looking south over the water boxes

a pretty annual given to me by Teresa from The Planter Box

a pretty yellow annual given to me by Teresa from The Planter Box

tall bamboo stakes in place

more tall bamboo stakes in place

looking south

looking south

looking southwest

looking southwest

Cosmos 'Antiquity'

Cosmos ‘Antiquity’

This daylily is a keeper.

This daylily is a keeper.

This evening I pulled a lot of bindweed off the backside of this area: East side of bogsy woods.

This evening I pulled a lot of bindweed off the backside of this area: East side of bogsy woods.

Salvia 'Hot Lips' came back from last year.

Salvia ‘Hot Lips’ came back from last year.

Cyperus in the water boxes

Cyperus ‘King Tut’ in the water boxes

While I had a couple of productive hours in the garden, Allan went out to water the Ilwaco planters and street trees, so again it was not a true day off for him.  I find that a shame.  I think it bothers me more than it bothers him to see him have to go to work instead of having a real two day weekend.

We finished the day with the Johnny Cash biopic, Walk the Line.  In one scene, June Carter uses the phrase “a hitch in your giddyup”, which is sort of cosmic because I just heard and adopted “hitch in your getalong” last week.

Tomorrow:  the north end jobs come early this week.  I am hoping, oh so fervently hoping, that the Long Beach planters will hold out till Wednesday and will not need watering tomorrow.

 

 

 

 

 

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Sunday, 14 June 2015

More intense wind than yesterday meant I could not weed back by the bogsy wood, so I focused on the front garden.  But first, I had woken up with a brainstorm that I shared with Allan, hoping he would implement it, and he did.  We have an old plastic pond form passed on to us (thanks, Betsy!), that I had not figured out where to put till this morning.  It could be a tadpole haven, I thought, and would fit perfectly in an empty spot in the raspberry patch.  The pond did fit, and the only sad thing was learning that the last tadpole puddle has dried up along the meander line ditch.  At least I was able to shift a few tadpoles from a crowded water box into this new home.

Allan's photo: the dry ditch, not a puddle left

Allan’s photo: the dry ditch, not a puddle left

the good news: lots of tiny tree frogs had managed to grow legs in time.

the good news: lots of tiny tree frogs had managed to grow legs in time.

IMG_2205IMG_2221

Allan took a sequence of photos of filling the plastic pond.  Such things are deeply fascinating to us.

before

before

during

during

siphoning water from a rain barrel

siphoning water from a rain barrel

all the way around the corner

all the way around the corner

One of 8 barrels that collect water from gutters on shed and house

One of 8 barrels that collect water from gutters on shed and house

A couple of them even have proper faucets (inset by Allan)

A couple of them even have proper faucets (inset by Allan)

after

after

The pond form is actually made to sink into the ground.  I like it raised up high where I can see it better.  We used up all the barrel water on the not quite full new pond and some watering of planters and the burbling yesterday of all the ladies in waiting.

During my first rest break, I was about to share a local cross-post to Discover Ilwaco to help promote an Ilwaco business, and I saw a little motion on the corner of my iPhone.

checking out a selection of the pages I administrate or help administrate

checking out a selection of the pages I administrate or help administrate

I do think snails are cute.

I do think snails are cute.

I think snails are so cute that I can’t kill them.  My latest solution is I put them in a pot, and gently insert another pot to hold them in, and at the end of the day I take them to the other side of the meander line and dump them in the long grass and hope they find something to eat there and that they do not breed and march all the way back into my garden again.  I do put out Sluggo, which counts as killing, except that snails don’t seem to consume it.  Slugs do, although not voraciously enough.  I do not thinks slugs are cute at all because they don’t have little houses by which I can pick them up.

my little friend

my little friend

Back outdoors, I realized that a hardy fuchsia had gotten so big it was swamping other choice plants.  It’s the pale pink magellanica and it is now back (planted at risk of the wind, but it had to be done) under one of the alder trees.  I cut it back hard and hoped for the best.  It is not the only pale pink magellanica I have so it was worth the risk.

before

before

after: Now I really need a deer fence here!  (We stuck in a temporary fence section for now.)

after: Now I really need a deer fence here! (We stuck in a temporary fence section for now.)

Allan's garden looked lovely; he had just weeded and watered.

Allan’s garden looked lovely; he had just weeded and watered.

arch to the back garden: Clematis 'Etoile Violette' is not as prolific as last year.

arch to the back garden: Clematis ‘Etoile Violette’ is not as prolific as last year.

She is magnifique from every angle.

In 2013: She was magnifique from every angle.

Paul's Himalayan Musk rose on the west arbor

Paul’s Himalayan Musk rose on the west arbor

Allan went to work for a bit watering the Ilwaco Community Building Garden.

He brought back this proof that a few of the California poppy seeds I sowed have come up.

He brought back this proof that a few of the California poppy seeds I sowed have come up.

We rewarded ourselves for a productive weekend with dinner at the Depot for their once yearly Paella special.

We sat at the counter at 8 PM.

We sat at the counter at 8 PM.

some wine: Pinot Noir for me...

some wine: Pinot Noir for me…

Chef Michael's delicious paella

Chef Michael’s delicious paella

When we got back home, I noticed in the long evening light that the volunteer poppy in a garage planter looked especially fine.

a self sown volunteer

a self sown volunteer

Allan had clipped it to make it stand up.

Allan had clipped it to make it stand up.

Monday, 15 June 2015

The cold 20 plus mile an hour north wind was horrid for me gardening at home; Allan took off on a boating trip to South Bend where the wind was an advantage and the temperature not as cold.  (Next post!)

looking south to the bogsy woods

looking south to the bogsy woods

Imagine the roar of wintry-feeling wind in the trees!  I forced myself to stay outside and do a few projects closer to the house.

before, between the greenhouse and the shed, untouched so far this year

before, between the greenhouse and the shed, untouched so far this year

after....

after….

I had big plans for putting some driftwood in front of the pond form…and did not get far.

found one little thing to help camouflage the front of the plastic pond

found one little thing to help camouflage the front of the plastic pond

After weeding by the garden boat and cutting some willow limbs that were leaning over the west edge of the garden, I had had enough of the horrid weather.  I’m surprised I lasted the several hours that I did.  I forced myself to pick some strawberries; I’ve been letting our friend Devery have them all so far.

40 strawberries with many more ripening

40 strawberries with many more ripening

During the weeding sessions, I have been noticing more deer damage inside the deer fence.  Is it from when they got in last week, or is it new damage, implying they are jumping the fence???!  Although the wind prevented me from making a circuit of the whole fence, and our workweek begins tomorrow, next weekend might find me tying tall bamboo poles all along the fence to turn it into a taller stockade.  Seven feet is supposedly not tall enough.

just a lovely sanguisorba

just a lovely sanguisorba

and no more ladies in waiting except for four plants that are for Steve and John

and no more ladies in waiting except for four plants that are for Steve and John

Well before dark, I took refuge in the house and finished my book, which is what I had been longing to do all along.

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Monday, 8 June 2015

I woke to the roaring of wind and went on strike.  There was no way we were going to weed a section of the beach approach in 25 mph miserable cold icy north wind.  Ok, not icy.  But a local outdoorsy fellow commented that he voted Monday “the coldest day of the year so far”.  I did not set one foot out the door until a dinner engagement, and spent the day catching up on writing this blog.  Every time I thought of going outside, another blast of wind would batter the house.  It felt more like a winter than a late spring storm; I wish it had at least brought some rain.

Allan, however, did go on an errand to the port, and photographed the sideways motion in one of the gardens there.

windblown

windblown

On the way back,  he did a tadpole rescue mission and brought back a colander of tadpoles from the meander line ditch, which is rapidly drying up in places.  He said one pool had had a tractor tire tracks at the edge and oil on the water.

lots of grass mown into the pond

lots of grass mown next the pond


the last pool of water getting crowded

the last pool of water getting crowded


an almost frog in the last pond

an almost frog in the last pond


rescue underway

rescue underway


a colander of tadpoles

a colander of tadpoles


some with legs!

some with legs!

They went into our water boxes.

with twigs to provide escape if desired later

with twigs to provide escape if desired later

At 6, with the wind still roaring, we took J9 out to the Depot for a belated birthday dinner.

I tried a new dish of polenta cake, hummus and chickpea salad.  Tasty!

I tried a new dish of polenta cake, hummus and chickpea salad. Tasty!


J9's brownie dessert

J9’s brownie dessert


strawberry cobbler

strawberry cobbler


happy trio

happy trio

Tuesday, 9 June 2015

I woke up later than usual and when I asked Allan why he’d let me sleep so late, he said because the wind had kept on roaring.  By the time we were ready to go, the sun had warmed the air and the wind did not seem as bad as it has the last five days, and especially not as bad as yesterday.

With all the bluster that’s been going on, I knew both the Long Beach and Ilwaco planters would need watering.

Smokey and Mary had no intention of going out.

Smokey and Mary had no intention of going out.

Long Beach

windy!

windy!

I replaced the Agastache that had been stolen last week and made note of a few other gaps that need filling in that particular planter.  I suspect more theft as I am sure I planted more trailies along the edge.  I hope whoever took the trailies and agastache was just passing through.  The hanging baskets looked undaunted by all the wind.

reseeded California poppies

reseeded California poppies

Just south of Streetside Taco I found an odd thing: a cosmos pulled up and resting in the water faucet cover which was upturned.

What the heck???

What the heck???

Maybe someone found it pulled up and tried to give it a drink of water?  Just as I had replanted it and was back to watering with the sprayer of Blue Stuff (fertilizer), I heard a voice chiding me for using such a non organic product.  There was Todd, who of course had read of my struggles trying to go to organic fertilizer in the LB planters.

Allan's photo:  Busted using The Blue Stuff!

Allan’s photo: Busted using The Blue Stuff!

I pointed out the sad cosmos and Todd said “Oh, I try to make sure to take all the ones I pull up to replant in the Wiegardt Gallery garden.”  I replied that these were short ones that would be a total disappointment to Eric!  This is an old joke about how Todd’s brother, artist Eric Wiegardt, always used to reminisce about a summer when the cosmos at the gallery were so tall…an effect I had never been able to recreate.  Cheered up by the joshing around (even after Allan joined us carrying another cosmos he had found pulled out in a planter just to the north), I noticed that the intensity of wind had died down.

Todd went on his way and we got back to watering.

I love this white diascia; too bad I only found about four of them for sale this year.

I love this white diascia; too bad I only found about four of them for sale this year.


DSC01365

Allan’s photo: Fifth Street Park


Allan's photo:  roses in Fifth Street Park

Allan’s photo: roses in planter


Allan's photo: dog water and people water in Fifth Street Park

Allan’s photo: dog water and people water in Fifth Street Park


Allan's photo: Hot Lips Salvia

Allan’s photo: Hot Lips Salvia and a perennial veronica

Allan saw someone from Benson’s By The Beach Restaurant beautifying their deck…

unloading some plants

unloading some plants


deck all planted up

deck all planted up


Gulls by outdoor seating between two cafés, hoping for a snack.

Gulls by outdoor seating between two cafés, hoping for a snack.


I am pleased with the big pop out.

I am pleased with the big pop out poppies.

Long Beach watering had proved to be a snap with only minor annoyances, decreasing wind, and a bit of fun banter, and we had plenty of time left to do the Ilwaco watering.

 Ilwaco

We began by weeding a couple of sections midway along the port.

Allan's photo: much vetch to weed out of the river rock bed on the curbside by the old Portside Café

Allan’s photo: much vetch to weed out of the river rock bed on the curbside by the old Portside Café

Vetch is actually beautiful and if it weren’t so rampant, I am sure we would all grow it as an ornamental.

looking west across my favourite section

looking west across my favourite section by Ilwaco pavilion


Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue' and santolina and a ladybug

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ and santolina and a ladybug


cropped

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

While we were weeding, a friend came out of a business after work.  I won’t say who as he may not want to be quoted.  We were talking about how excited we all are about the renovation of the Salt Hotel (formerly the Harbor Lights) and I said, “Ilwaco is going to become a hipster town!”  He scoffed and I said,”No, really, my Portland friends say THEY’RE COMING; they are already in Astoria, and they’re already coming here to the Sou’wester and Adrift.  The Salt is going to be a hipster hotel, you watch!”  He replied, “Hipsters are gonna come to Ilwaco when purple monkeys fly out of my butt.”  We’ll see who’s right; I still predict (and welcome) an influx of Portland area hipsters.  Any of them who are gardeners will be, I think, impressed with our selection of cool plants along the port.

Allan departed to water the street trees and planters with the water trailer while I kept weeding.

Allan's photo on the way to get the water trailer

Allan’s photo on the way to get the water trailer


Allan's photo: in the boatyard

Allan’s photo: in the boatyard


before, with lots of single stemmed weed grasses

before, with lots of single stemmed weed grasses


after

after


lavender

lavender

Because one of the merchants all of a sudden did not want us to use their water, I had to call Allan to refill the water truck to bring to water one of the port gardens, and since he had to do that, he did the east end (which is by a parking lot with no hose pipe) as well.  This surprising and I hope temporary development added half an hour to our day so we did not get done til near sunset.  I think what a lot of folks might not understand is that right now time is more valuable to us than money, so it does not make us happy to add extra work to the day.  It is a fortunate (and I hope not temporary) state of affairs to have the luxury to seek more free time and is only possible after years of frugality.  I do not welcome the job taking longer because of having to haul more water.

Allan's photo: east end garden

Allan’s photo: east end garden


Allan's photo: lavender

Allan’s photo: lavender


Allan's photo, bachelor buttons at the east end

Allan’s photo, bachelor buttons at the east end


Allan's photo: Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

Allan’s photo: Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’


Allan's photo: Stipa tenuissima

Allan’s photo: Stipa tenuissima shaped by the wind

At home, I had a bit of container watering to do.

Paul's Himalayan Musk rose in evening light

Paul’s Himalayan Musk rose in evening light

The wind had almost completey stopped and I was able to safely walk back into the bosgy woods for the first time in days.

found another big branch down

found another big branch down


where I left off during the wind

where I left off spreading new soil during the wind


bogsy wood bridge

bogsy wood bridge


looking north

looking north


salmonberry tunnel needs re-cutting

salmonberry tunnel needs re-cutting


lemony combination

lemony combination

Allan went on another tadpole rescue mission and returned with tadpoles and these photos:

Calla lilies at the end of Nora's back yard

Calla lilies at the end of Nora’s back yard


a goopy oily pool at the meander line

a goopy oily pool at the meander line, with no living tadpoles.  Who messed with this pool??


tadpoles in the last healthy pool

tadpoles in the last healthy pool


and lots of them

and lots of them

With no rain in sight to refresh the water in the rapidly drying pool, Allan rescued another batch.

DSC01395

We have two water tubs (one an old bathtub) on the patio, so he put some in each tub.  The ones that went into the water boxes a day ago seem to be thriving.

 

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Saturday, 30 May 2015

I’ll tell you a secret: On a day off, I would rather not even leave my property, so sometimes going to the Saturday market on a Saturday off is a self imposed chore.  I do reward myself for taking photos for Discover Ilwaco by buying myself a Pink Poppy Bakery treat.

at home

Frosty all set for a day at home...

Frosty all set for a day at home…


So is Mary, by the gardening tools I had set out for later.

So is Mary, by the gardening tools I had set out for later.

I had much that I wanted to do in the garden.  Before the market jaunt, I indulged in some garden admiration.

My new Penstemon davidsonii in my mini-scree garden

My new Penstemon davidsonii in my mini-scree garden


another happy little scree plant

another happy little scree plant


one from Todd

one from Todd


and another from Todd

and another from Todd


and a scrim of picture perfect horsetail over all

and a scrim of picture perfect horsetail over all (to be attended to soon)


Paul's Himalayan Musk rose

Paul’s Himalayan Musk rose


Rosa moyesii and Stipa gigantea

Rosa moyesii and Stipa gigantea


Rosa moyesii from Joy Creek Nursery

Rosa moyesii from Joy Creek Nursery


Rosa moyesii 'Geranium';  Reader, I bought one.

Rosa moyesii ‘Geranium’ at Joy Creek Nursery


a yellow rose which I could identify if I spent some time with the Heirloom Roses catalog.

a pinky yellow rose which I could identify if I spent some time with the Heirloom Roses catalog.


The Geranium 'Rozanne River' has gotten ridiculously tall.

The Geranium ‘Rozanne River’ has gotten ridiculously tall.


In Allan's garden...what is it?

In Allan’s garden…what is it?


Love this mystery flower.

Love this mystery flower on a long stem….


The three year old Bartlett pear tree in Allan's garden has ONE pear.  That might mean there IS another pear tree in the neighbourhood.

The three year old Bartlett pear tree in Allan’s garden has ONE pear. That might mean there IS another pear tree in the neighbourhood.

to market

As I walked the two blocks to the market, I saw the tall ship looming behind the Ilwaco pavilion building.

Lady Washington

Lady Washington

I walked from one end of the market to the other, taking photos.

flower pots at the Willapa Crafts booth

flower pots at the Willapa Crafts booth


Willapa Crafts

Willapa Crafts


De Asis produce

De Asis produce


roses at a plant booth

roses at a plant booth


Adorable dogs made the trip worthwhile.

Adorable dogs made the trip worthwhile.


I fell in love with this little one.

I fell in love with this little one.


I wish I had captured the perfect brown spot on the top of this sweet long haired dachsund's head.

I wish I had captured the perfect brown spot on the top of this sweet long haired dachsund’s head.

Some passersby admired the alliums at the Port Office garden and wanted to know what they are.  I told them about some good bulb catalogs.  They insisted that Michigan Bulb Co or Brecks were best because they replace anything that doesn’t grow.

Alliums in the Port Garden

Alliums in the Port Garden

I am not there to argue, so I let it go, but trust me, you will get bigger bulbs from Van Engelen or John Scheepers and Todd recommends Brent and Becky’s Bulbs as having excellent bulbs.

Here was my reward from Pink Poppy Bakery

Here was my reward from Pink Poppy Bakery


a beautiful Pink Poppy pie

a beautiful Pink Poppy pie


Salt Hotel remodel is coming along well, due to open at the beginning of July.

Salt Hotel remodel is coming along well, due to open at the beginning of July.

Just as I got to the end of the market and was about to go home, I heard someone yelling at me, “Delete that photo!”  I turned to see a new vendor, who had chased me two storefronts down saying I was stealing his art.  I am not going to pinpoint him by sharing the photo I took, but trust me, it shows his whole booth and is not in the least way a close up of his wares.  I think he got more than he bargained for, as I in turn gave him, in a calm tone (really!), my opinion that people take photos nowadays for blogs and Trip Advisor and Instagram and that anyone vending in a public market has to expect photos to be taken and that vendors simply must be kind to the tourists (which, for all he knew, I was).  I told him that he could ruin the day of a tourist who was happily taking photos to remember and share a good day, or perhaps to blog about the delights of the market.  I explained to him about the Discover Ilwaco Facebook page’s Saturday Market albums, and may have even said I would rather have stayed home today but that I am dedicated to promoting the market on social media. When he continued to loudly insist I delete the photo, I did not (of course).  I wonder if a tourist would have meekly complied, and I also wonder if he would have chased down a man his own size.  Feeling by then quite upset and shaken by his loudness, I walked all the way back to the other end where the market manager was, showed him the photo, and got his support and action on the matter.  It all sucked up another half hour of my precious gardening time, and later I wished I had just kept walking when the guy accosted me, and yet I wonder if he then would have grabbed my arm or something even more disconcerting than angry accusatory words.  I completely forgot my plan to take some photos of the tall ship Lady Washington; I went home and took awhile to recover, with a long written conversation back and forth with our Kathleen, who happened to be online and was most helpful.  I scarfed down the lemon treats from Pink Poppy without even savoring them as they should have been savored; at least I had the willpower to save the brownies to share with Allan after dinner.  My new resolve is I will continue to be the bellwether for how tourists are treated; for the most part, the market is a friendly and happy place and I intend to do my part to keep it that way by not being intimidated by one angry man.  (It would have been easy to use the incident as an excuse to just stay home on Saturdays from now on…since that is what I crave to do anyway.)  It’s not the first time that photography has been met with suspicion there, and I do understand how infuriating it is for vendors to feel someone might be taking a photo “because I could make that myself”.  However, next time there is any problem I am going to simply refer the concerned vendor to the market manager.

at home, at peace

When I finally got me arse back in gear after all that, I spent the afternoon into evening productively weeding out much dwarf fireweed and scrimmy horsetail.  Some gardening stream of consciousness:

At last, I can see the shapes of the plants unblurred by weeds.  Miscanthus variegatus is fantastic.

At last, I can see the shapes of the plants unblurred by weeds. Miscanthus variegatus is fantastic.


Japanese iris stunning, even in bud

Japanese iris stunning, even in bud


Why do I have so many daylilies?  This one is pretty good...

Why do I have so many daylilies? This one is pretty good…

daylily

but this one had better have a darned good flower or out it goes.

but this one had better have a darned good flower or out it goes.


I like the simple old fashioned yellow narrow buds on this one.

I like the simple old fashioned yellow narrow buds on this one.


I do think I have gone off this daylily, which I believe is 'Pardon Me'.

I do think I have gone off this daylily, which I believe is ‘Pardon Me’.

I need some of the fabulous new fringed and fancy daylily cultivars like I saw last summer at Floramagoria.

gold daylily and yarrow at Floramagoria last summer

gold daylily and yarrow at Floramagoria last summer


Dortmund rose, almost lost in honeysuckle, with snails

Dortmund rose, almost lost in honeysuckle, with snails


The pink rose that came with the house.

The pink rose that came with the house.


Under it is the perfect spot for some self-seeded Valerian.

Under it is the perfect spot for some self-seeded Valerian.


Still more Sedum 'Autumn Joy' had to go.

Still more Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ had to go.


Solanum crispum 'Glasnevin' (blue potato vine)

Solanum crispum ‘Glasnevin’ (blue potato vine)


outside the gate....A day of stress redeemed by gardening.

outside the gate….A day of stress redeemed by gardening.

 

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Sunday, 20 October, 2013

A day off at last.  We worked 19 days in a row, one of the 19 being at least a very short day…one a medium day…the others days the usual or extra hard work.  I honestly thought I did not have it in me anymore.  But we managed to soldier through all the work.  So… much sleeping occurred this morning, and then some dear friends dropped by.  We stayed indoors as the morning weather was deliciously cold.  Allan served brownies and oranges.  As they left, our friends apologized for keeping us from our day off.  I assured them that they had made the day MORE restful by inspiring us to sit indoors till after noon.

I had only one clear mission for the day:  to clean out the greenhouse of the tomato and pepper plants so that it is ready to take in the tender perennials when frost arrives.

before

before

I found an Eryngium coming up in one of the tomato pots….can’t imagine how it got there, but I was glad to see it.

a volunteer

a welcome volunteer, now planted in the garden

I was able to save three garbage cans full of potting soil, another welcome surprise.  I thought the roots would have solidified in each pot, but not so.  I will reuse it as base soil if I follow through with my plan to get a couple of really big horse troughs for a kitchen garden planting next year.

found this critter in one of the empty garbage cans

found this critter in one of the empty garbage cans

autumn light

autumn light

At last the pseudo summer seems to have broken into a cool autumn day, weather that I so much prefer to blazing warm sun.  Note, I said warm, not hot, because I do get made fun of when I complain about being hot at 61 degrees!

The garden still has lots of colour.  I took one tour around while dumping debris in the far back corner.

red salvia

red salvia (Uh oh, the kitty chair slipped a piece!)

Geranium 'Rozanne' still somewhat blue

Geranium ‘Rozanne’ still somewhat blue

I could trim all the brown areas from the river of blue and make it look better...or not...

I could trim all the brown areas from the river of blue and make it look better…or not…

When the sun came out, it showed me some maple seedling from the tree in Ann's garden.

When the sun came out, it showed me some maple seedling from the tree in Ann’s garden.

Where in the world (of my garden) can I plant a beautiful but rather large maple?  Oh!!  If I can get Danger Tree cut down, it could go next to the trunk…

hardy ginger in decline....

hardy ginger in decline….

a pale Pulmonaria in Allan's garden

a pale Pulmonaria in Allan’s garden

lost the tag from this plant from Back Alley Gardens...blooming with small blue flowers.  What are you?

lost the tag from this plant from Back Alley Gardens…blooming with small blue flowers. What are you?  And where the heck am I going to put you (and all your unplanted friends)?

hops aglow in late afternoon sun

hops aglow in late afternoon sun

Golden Delicious pineapple sage and Dahlia

Golden Delicious pineapple sage and Dahlia

Near the debris pile, I took a moment to spread out the sequoia needles that I brought home from the hydrangea job.

Near the debris pile, I took a moment to spread the sequoia needles that I brought home from the hydrangea job.

I planted lots of sweet peas along the mesh fence near Nora’s garages/parking area, and as if they knew she was going to be gone, only a few came up.  Now one lonely one is still blooming.

sweet pea

sweet pea

Allan got on a ladder to train the canes of Paul’s Himalayan Musk rose over the top of that same arbour (as if that rose could ever be trained).

arbour work

arbour work

You can see why I think of Nora every time I am in the garden, with her house right there and the fence built transparently to give her a view of the garden.  With her gone, I do wonder every at-home day about the future of that house and what sort of neighbour we might get; I have plans for enclosure on that side of the garden if I ever feel the need for it.  And yet we might someday get an ideal neighbour there.  Time will tell.  I’m a worrier.

In the greenhouse, I found two more frogs, this one:

Pacific tree frog

Pacific tree frog

frog

frogs

and this one:

a little brown frog

a little brown frog

Finally, the greenhouse had returned to almost emptiness with shelves reinstalled.

I had removed the shelving so the tomatoes had more headroom.

I had removed the shelving so the tomatoes had more headroom.

Plenty of room now for scented geraniums and a few other tenders to winter over.

The last of the harvest:

harvest pot

harvest pot

Judy had tomato farmed two days before and got enough for a salad.

tomatoes and tomatillos

tomatoes and tomatillos

I don’t really like dealing with tomatillos and wish I knew someone nearby who wanted some.   Many of the tiny tomatoes had gone soft; I just could not keep up with them.

peppers:  bell, Chocolate Beauty, Cowhorn Cayenne, Golden Cayenne, Serrano

peppers: bell, Chocolate Beauty, Cowhorn Cayenne, Golden Cayenne, Serrano

I spent some time today thinking about the results of taking on really big “extra” jobs.  I wonder how wise it is if it takes us three days to recover and the other jobs get behind.  This is certainly the only time of year (other than midwinter) when we have time for big extra jobs, and every year, without us even seeking one, something comes along for a week in October…

Tomorrow we hope to muster the energy to mulch the garden at Golden Sands…always a problem because we have to wheelbarrow down that long carpeted hallway so it is a job that seems to require so much advance planning that I dread it.  Last time it was not as bad as I thought, and good weather is certainly necessary; a muddy wheelbarrow and carpeted hallways do not mix.  It all depends on being able to connect with The Planter Box folks to get the cow fiber loaded into our trailer at the right time of day…

Then we must get back to Erin’s garden after promises we made about three weeks ago and have neglected to fulfill in any way!

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