Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘roses’

Saturday, 18 June 2015

Music in the Gardens Tour, Long Beach Peninsula

a benefit for the Water Music Festival and music programs in local schools

ticket tour map

ticket tour map

Garden 1: Lily and Rose Garden

The lush green entry gives you but a small clue to what is beyond. Kristine’s secret garden slopes down from a deck filled with bountiful containers of flowers and a small kitchen garden. This gentle change in elevation provides a vista of the perennials and roses she grows for bouquets. This is a classic cutting garden and bird watchers’ paradise. Continuing through a second gate to the west, you’ll discover an artistic deer fence enclosing flowers and vegetables. Granddaughter Lily’s delightful playhouse, The Lily Pad, has been the site of many tea parties.

Garden Tour Nancy and I previewed this garden on July 3rd; those photos are included in this post.

On tour day, look for the pink and red balloons.

On tour day, look for the pink and red balloons.

Kristine made all the beautiful signs for parking, guest book, and refreshments.

Kristine, an avid photographer, made all the beautiful signs for parking, guest book, and refreshments.

The day was already hot, so the greenery and shade of the front garden was restful to the eyes.

The day was already hot, so the greenery and shade of the front garden was restful to the eyes.

The garden is close to the  dunes. (Allan's photo)

The garden is close to the dunes. (Allan’s photo)

front garden

front garden

up the front door (but we are not going that way)

up the front door (but we are not going that way); note the well trimmed sword fern

front

the gate to the secret garden, with our friend Gene emerging

the gate to the secret garden, with our friend Gene emerging

(Gene’s garden was on the 2013 tour, and we have some new photos of his garden to show you in an upcoming post.)

through the gate (Allan's photo)

through the gate (Allan’s photo)

tour guests entering

tour guests entering

another of Kristine's photo signs on the entry table

another of Kristine’s photo signs on the entry table

welcome

guest book and bouquet inside the front gate

guest book and bouquet inside the front gate

The Mozart Chicks were playing under a tent in the front corner of the garden, to the right as we entered the gate.  Hot bright sun made photos difficult today.

The Mozart Chicks

The Mozart Chicks

Mozart Chicks

mozartchicks

the Mozart Chicks, tootling

chicks

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Kristine her ownself

Kristine her ownself

path curving around the house

path curving around the house

south wall of house

south wall of house

from a pre-tour visit on July 3

from a pre-tour visit on July 3

rose on pre-tour visit, July 3

rose on pre-tour visit, July 3

pink

I want this pale pink fringed sidalcea or whatever it is; Kristine says I can have seeds.

I want this pale pink fringed sidalcea or whatever it is; Kristine says I can have seeds.

Kristine doesn't spray anything toxic for blackspot on roses; she told us she picks off any bad leaves.

Kristine doesn’t spray anything toxic for blackspot on roses; she told us she picks off any bad leaves.

rose2

Allan's photo, looking through flowers to the deck

Allan’s photo, looking through flowers to the deck

looking up at the back deck, pre-touring on July 3

looking up at the back deck, pre-touring on July 3

July 3

July 3

July 3

July 3

tour day

tour day

guests

pre-tour visit, July 3rd

pre-tour visit, July 3rd

poppies

treats

bouquet, Kristine's cards, and treats

bouquet, Kristine’s cards, and treats

choc

 

pecan

Cool liquid refreshment was so refreshing on such a hot day.

Cool liquid refreshment was so refreshing on such a hot day.  It was a scorcher by beach standards, possibly up into the 90s.

containers on the deck

containers on the deck

Brodiaea in deck container

Brodiaea in deck container

flowers

view from the deck

view from the deck

from the deck, Allan (right) taking a photo

from the deck, Allan (right) taking a photo

This is the photo Allan was taking.

This is the photo Allan was taking.

roses

pinks

deckrose

view looking west from next to the deck

view looking west from next to the deck

looking southwest from the deck (telephoto)

looking southwest from the deck (telephoto)

I never find time to just sit on these garden tours, especially the Peninsula tour which always has at least eight gardens.  I know that some folks here just skip and garden or two, but as the administrator of the Facebook page, I need our photos of each one, and also I just cannot bring myself to skip a garden.

southeast corner of the garden at the top of the grassy slope, next to the deck

southeast corner of the garden at the top of the grassy slope, next to the deck

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

ferns

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Halfway down the garden from the deck, on the south side, is Kristine’s cutting garden.

cutting garden

cutting garden

pre-tour visit, July 3rd

pre-tour visit, July 3rd

cutting2

Kristine said she wished there had been more lilies in bloom.

Kristine said she wished there had been more lilies in bloom.

flowers2

pre-tour visit, July 3rd

pre-tour visit, July 3rd

Allan's photo, the Mozart Chicks viewed from the cutting garden

Allan’s photo, the Mozart Chicks viewed from the cutting garden

Allan told me he found out halfway through this garden that his camera was on a “night” setting so he did not get many photos here.

gladiola

gladiola

cutting garden path

cutting garden path

clematis in the cutting garden

clematis in the cutting garden

pre-tour visit, July 3rd

pre-tour visit, July 3rd

cutting

pre-tour visit, July 3rd

pre-tour visit, July 3rd

pre-tour visit, July 3, 2015; a second garden area is on the other (west) side of this fence.

pre-tour visit, July 3, 2015; a second garden area is on the other (west) side of this fence.

Beside the conical tree, one enters the second (west) garden area.

Beside the conical tree, one enters the second (west) garden area.

astilbe inside the gate

astilbe inside the gate

deer fenced garden in second area

deer fenced garden in second area (pre tour visit, July 3rd)

rose climbing on deer fence, July 3rd

rose climbing on deer fence, July 3rd

looking through the deer fence

looking through the deer fence

with my camera lens poked through the fence

with my camera lens poked through the fence

a picotee gladiola

a picotee gladiola

rose

that flower that I want

that flower that I want

Outside the fence, lavender is unbothered by deer.

Outside the fence, lavender is unbothered by deer.

July 3rd

July 3rd

tours

looking through the veg patch into the playhouse patio

looking through the veg patch into the playhouse patio

and from the playhouse path looking north

and from the playhouse path looking north

veg patch, July 3rd

veg patch, July 3rd

The Lily Pad

The Lily Pad

Kristine’s grand daughter, Lily, is three, and could not come visit from the east coast this summer because Lily’s mom is expecting a baby soon.  As you can imagine, this has been sad for grandma Kristine.  Thanks to Skype, grandma and granddaughter can communicate daily.  This tea party was set up to Skype to Lily for her birthday.

The Lily Pad

The Lily Pad

tea

kitty2

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

a message to Lily

a message to Lily

Oh, how I do wish I had a granddaughter named Lily (or Rose, Iris, Violet, Jasmine, Poppy, Willow, Fern…)

The Lily Pad

The Lily Pad

view west from the Lily Pad

view west from the Lily Pad

monkey puzzle tree to the west of the Lily Pad

monkey puzzle tree to the west of the Lily Pad

a simple border along the north fence

a simple border along the north fence

looking along the north fence toward the house

looking along the north fence toward the house

Kristine’s was a contender for my favourite tour garden because of the driftwood gate on the deer fence and the assortment of colourful plants, especially the lilies.

Next: an inspirational one year old garden.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Sunday, 28 June 2015

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend

study

Barrager garden

Just up the street from Barbara Ashmun’s garden, her nearby neighbour Doug Barrager’s garden was also on tour.  I do love when tour gardens are walking distance from each other.

DSC05230

from the street

from the street

sideslope

lilies

lilies

lily and dogwood

lily and dogwood

rose borders

side garden rose borders

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo, back garden

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

into the shade

into the shade

shadegarden

more shade beds: Allan's photo

more shade beds: Allan’s photo

hydrangeas

hydrangeas

I want this hydrangea.

I want this lace cap hydrangea.

I like the precisely cut flowers.

I like the precisely cut flowers.  Allan overheard some tour guests saying this is an unusual cultivar.

Jeanne and I marveled at the perfection of the hostas.

Jeanne and I marveled at the perfection of the hostas.

hostas2

more perfect hostas

work area around the side of the house

work area around the other side of the house

the sunny side of the house

the sunny side of the house

variegated dogwood at the corner

variegated dogwood at the corner

roses along the front street

roses along the front street

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

another starry dahlia

another starry dahlia

bonus garden

We enjoyed the view over the picket fence of a garden across the street.

DSC05331

another gardening neighbour

Next: We return to Floramagoria, one of our favourite Portland gardens.

Read Full Post »

Wednesday, 22 April 2015

Klipsan Beach Cottages

We began our day by zooming up Sandridge Road to Klipsan Beach Cottages.  I needed to meet Garden Tour Nancy there to do a walkaround of the gardens and work on the description for the Rhodie Tour tickets.   So it seemed like a good idea to make it a workday there and get one big weeding project done.

It was a bright day, not the best for photos.

Nancy arrived right on time and we began our walking and talking (while she took notes).

sword fern foliage unfurling

sword fern foliage unfurling

Mary has already planted diascia and calibrachoa in the clam shed picnic area.

Mary has already planted diascia and calibrachoa in the clam shed picnic area.

I've been watching them to see if they are doing well despite cold nights...and they are.

I’ve been watching them to see if they are doing well despite cold nights…and they are.

We walked by Mary, Bella, and Allan.  She was pointed at the handsome leaf of a podphyllum.

We walked by Mary, Bella, and Allan. She was pointed at the handsome leaf of a podophyllum.

The pond garden has several rhododendrons large and small.

The pond garden has several rhododendrons large and small.

A deer slowly eluded us at the A Frame garden.

A deer slowly eluded us at the A Frame garden.

With my mind more on descriptive words than photos, Nancy and I walked all around the gardens, and to the next door garden (Joanie’s cottage), and out to the dunes and then back to the KBC cottages on the beach trail.

looking east from the dunes

looking east from the dunes

Then we sat on a bench and talked some more.  Somehow, exactly one hour went by.  (And she gave us some eggs from her chickens!)

Timmy joined our conversation for while.

Timmy joined our conversation for while.

Nancy and I, as I skive off work

Nancy and I, as I skive off work

DSC00101

Nancy departed and I got to work.  Allan had already started our main project of the day: to weed massive amounts of wild violet and other reseeded plants from the lawn border, to give it a neater look.

today's project, before

today’s project, before

The podophyllum that was being admired is to the left in that photo…big leaf.  They come in all kinds of exotic patterns, as you can see if you google podophyllum images.

after

after

before, Allan's photo

before, Allan’s photo

after, Allan's photo

after, Allan’s photo

before and after (Allan's photos)

before and after (Allan’s photos)

The pieris at the end of that border has been blooming for weeks.

The pieris at the end of that border has been blooming for weeks.

I’m not deluding myself that the violets won’t come back.  I hope we can find time to keep them controlled.  I’ve planted hellebores all along here, and by next spring when they have filled out (this was their first year) they should be spectacular.

Euphorbia characias wulfenii outside the deer fence

Euphorbia characias wulfenii outside the deer fence

Meconopsis cambrica (Welsh poppy)

Meconopsis cambrica (Welsh poppy)

darling rosebud of...April

darling rosebud of…April

Geum 'Mango Lassi'

Geum ‘Mango Lassi’

The sweet peas came up by the garage so Allan made a string trellis.

The sweet peas came up by the garage so Allan made a string trellis.

He also picked a bouquet fit for a zombie bride (by deadheading narcissi all over the gardens)

He also picked a bouquet fit for a zombie bride (by deadheading narcissi all over the gardens)

Narcissi in the A Frame garden

Narcissi in the A Frame garden (Allan’s photo)

view of the week

view of the week

Anthriscus sylvestris 'Ravenswing'

Anthriscus sylvestris ‘Ravenswing’

Tulip 'Formosa'

Tulip ‘Formosa’

center plant with purplish foliage: Thalictrum 'Elin', which will get over 6 feet tall.

center plant with purplish foliage: Thalictrum ‘Elin’, which will get over 6 feet tall.

Mary's beachscape in the old (leaky, so now dry) fountain

Mary’s beachscape in the old (leaky, so now dry) fountain

Tiger Eyes sumac

Tiger Eyes sumac and red rhododendron

Last week, Allan had noticed some bare-rooted boxwoods languishing in the debris pile and asked me about them.  I said snag them next time, so he did. While I am not sure where I will put them, I am happy to try to rescue them.  They want to live!  There are a couple of deer -chewed arbovitae, too, which don’t thrill me but I can think of a place to use them.

rescue mission

rescue mission

Basket Case Greenhouse

We went to our next job via the Basket Case Greenhouse to pick up a blueberry for Andersen’s, some soil for the Jo’s new roses, and some diascia for the Ilwaco planters.

a wealth of violas

a wealth of violas

Geums red and orange; I got myself one of the orange, 'Starker's Magnificum'.

Geums red and orange; I got myself one of the orange, ‘Starker’s Magnificum’.

I could not resist getting a couple of Physocarpus 'Dart's Gold' at a very reasonable price of about $10 each!

I could not resist getting a couple of Physocarpus ‘Dart’s Gold’ at a very reasonable price of about $10 each!

Physocarpus 'Dart's Gold'

Physocarpus ‘Dart’s Gold’

on my cart!  (Allan's photo)

on my cart! (Allan’s photo)

the annuals house.  Fred agrees it is too cold at night to plant tender ones yet.

the annuals house. Fred agrees it is too cold at night to plant tender ones yet.

Jo’s garden

Early in the day, I’d gotten a message from Basket Case Nancy asking us to join them at the Depot for burger night.  When they could not get a reservation till 6:30 PM, I thought, “Great, we’ll have plenty of time to plant Jo’s roses and some perennials and do some weeding and…easy peasy.”  It did not turn out that way and was the usual somewhat stressful rush at the end.

entering the garden

entering the garden

Jo's garden from her deck

Jo’s garden from her deck

Yesterday, Allan had dug some old roses out of these driveway beds.

Yesterday, Allan had dug some old roses out of these driveway beds.

Today, he planted some new bare root 'Flower Carpet' roses, which she hopes will be more vigorous.

Today, he planted some new bare root ‘Flower Carpet’ roses, which she hopes will be more vigorous.

He added plenty of new bagged soil to try to avoid the dreaded “rose replant disease’.

Jo gave me a bonus rose that came with the order.  I planted it as soon as I got home, and immediately misplaced the tag somewhere in the house so I can’t look up what colour it is!  (Update:  I found the tag; it’s a luscious deep red one called Always and Forever.)

the center courtyard

the center courtyard

the west garden

the west garden

What threw the day into a tizzy was when I discovered that a lot of the phlox, if not all of it, in the west bed, has some kind of nasty disease and had to be hoiked out.  I have run across this with phlox before.  Allan hacked a lot of it out while I weeded and planted some Agastaches and Nicotiana langsdorfii in the east garden.

yucky phlox

yucky phlox

yucky phlox, before (Allan's photo)

yucky phlox, before (Allan’s photo)

after (Allan's photo)

after (Allan’s photo)

On closer look, these phlox also look yucky at the base, and may have to be removed next time.  I have no patience for chronically diseased plants.

On closer look, these phlox (against the fence) also look yucky at the base, and may have to be removed next time. I have no patience for chronically diseased plants.

I got this area weeded and somewhat planted.  Cosmos and more will come later.

I got this area weeded and somewhat planted. Cosmos and more will come later.

Depot Restaurant

We left Jo’s two minutes before our dinner date; fortunately, the Depot is only a five minute drive.

Nancy and Fred, ready for burger night

Nancy and Fred, ready for burger night

We had a jolly old time talking about plants, work, overwork, dreams of retirement, dogs, and more, and ended with delectable desserts:

vanilla bean flan

vanilla bean flan

sorbet duo

sorbet duo

chocolate pot du creme

chocolate pot du creme

Tomorrow: adding some diascia to Ilwaco planters, and deadheading Long Beach town as I noticed an awful lot of “done” tulips and narcissi when driving through town this evening.

Read Full Post »

Saturday, 12 July 2014

Garden Bloggers Fling

day 2: a shorter day

day 2

International Rose Test Garden

rose

I looked at the stairs and the long gentle wheelchair ramp and realized there was no way I could down into the garden. Because it was a public garden that I could see some other time, I did not mind too much, so I found a place to sit in semi shade. (It was very hot, something in the 90s F.)

My view was through this very fragrant climbing yellow rose.

My view was through this very fragrant climbing pale yellow rose.

overhead

overhead

Allan brought me my sandwich. The fling lunches were from Elephant’s Delicatessan and they were just delicious.

My mouth waters looking at this photo.

My mouth waters looking at this photo.

Each lunch also had chips and a chocolate chip cookie and a shortbread cookie shaped like an elephant.

After my lunch, I walked over to the top of the wheelchair ramp and looked down. Could I do it? Nope. Too much knee pain walking (although ironically my other leg now seemed to be more or less improved).

ramp

Allan had found out he could get me a wheelchair; I declined because I know how hard it is to push a wheelchair over a lawn.

“Just take pictures for the blog,” I told him, and off he went.

Meanwhile, I took some photos from up above before going to sit down again.

An exceptionally cute sightseeing bus went by.

An exceptionally cute sightseeing bus went by.

looking down into the rose garden

looking down into the rose garden

roses

roses3

roses4

rose5

rose7

rose8

telephoto from above

telephoto from above

another event going on

another event going on

Allan’s photos

The garden is divided into several sections, which you can find on the map if you are so inclined, as we follow him through the garden in our minds:

map

Antiquity Rose Garden:

P1090995

Garden Sun (climber)

Garden Sun (climber)

along the ramp

along the ramp

I have no clue what this is.

I have no clue what this is.

astilbe and rose

astilbe and rose

P1100007

Royal Rosarian Garden

“By Mayoral Declaration, the Royal Rosarians serve as the Official Greeters and Ambassadors

of Goodwill for the City of Portland. We are dedicated to community service through the

charitable activities of our Royal Rosarian Foundation. We honor our legacy of tradition with

rich pageantry and ceremonies from the mythical Realm of Rosaria.”

P1100011

P1100012

P1100013

P1100014

P1100015

P1100016

P1100017

 

rose markers set in brick

markers set in brick

P1100025

P1100026

P1100027

Section E (promenade down the middle of the upper level)

P1100032

P1100034

From E to the Stage

P1100035

I imagine that is the concrete structure in the middle where folks were taking pictures of each other.

P1100036

P1100037

Allan was especially smitten with this multicolored rose.

Allan was especially smitten with this multicolored rose.

P1100040

At the stage, a representative one of the tour sponsors, Corona Tools, was giving a clipping demonstration to prove their loppers were stronger than brand X.

At the stage, a representative one of the tour sponsors, Corona Tools, was giving a clipping demonstration to prove their loppers were stronger than brand X.

A blogger gives the loppers a try.

A blogger gives the loppers a try.

I’m a big believer in using bypass instead of anvil loppers, per Ann Lovejoy, who said that anvils crush the stem while bypass cuts cleanly. What do you think?

Leaving the Stage for the Queen’s Walk

P1100046

P1100048

P1100054

P1100056

P1100057

pretty amazing lack of blackspot

pretty amazing lack of blackspot

P1100059

P1100060

Queen’s Walk to Shakespeare Garden

'Day Breaker'

‘Day Breaker’

Melody Parfumee

Melody Parfumee

P1100066

P1100067

P1100068

P1100069

P1100071

P1100070

Looks like a couple of folks on the side have swooned from the blazing sun!

P1100074

P1100075

P1100077

Gold Medal Rose Garden

P1100078

'Sally Holmes'

‘Sally Holmes’

P1100081

Allan says the rose garden was so big that he did not even get all the way through it. During their time in the garden, the bloggers posed for their group photo, so you can at last see how many there were (minus me, Allan who was probably getting me my lunch at the time, and one other blogger who had gone off seeking a restroom!)

group

group photo

Thanks to Allan’s carefully organized photos, I feel like I did have a stroll through the rose garden.

Next, one more public garden and then on to more thrilling private gardens, only two of which I had seen before.

Read Full Post »

Bob and Helen Bohnke Garden

from the program: Eclectic English Garden: 11th Street is a happier place for the Boenkes’ splendidly restored home and well-loved garden. This 1895 Italianate, formerly known as ‘the ugly sister’, was built by David Warren of Warrenton fame as one of three identical professional rentals. Snug around the house, beds overflow their borders with lush abundance as diverse grasses and ferns complement roses, daisies, lilies, carnations, African iris and heather, as well as coastal favourites such a hostas, hydrangeas, rosemary and lavender. You’ll find carefully transplanted forest floor plants and delightful pots full of dahlias, geraniums, lobelia, begonias, and fuchsias, all interspersed with driftwood, found objects and sculptures galore. With a ‘live and let live’ credo, the red Japanese maple thriving within the front walking path demands careful skirting. Until recently there was no rear garden and now flora charmingly buffers the driveway. Don’t miss the whimsical flowerbox fence lining the shady south side.

I got breathless with joy as soon as I saw the colourful house.

Bohnke house

Bohnke house

the colour!

the colour!

Crocosmia 'Lucifer'

Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’

wow! zip! pow!

wow! zip! pow!

colour coordinated mailbox!

colour coordinated mailbox!

looking up from the sidewalk

looking up from the sidewalk

a beautiful tour sign

a beautiful tour sign

sign

I was backing and forthing down on the sidewalk and had to explain to the owner of the garden that I was just so gobsmacked I had not got around to climbing the steps yet.

owner Bob Bohnke

owner Bob Bohnke

Bob Bohnke was the cover guy on the garden tour issue of the Daily Astorian!

cover guy!

cover guy!

from the e-edition

from the e-edition

I finally went up the steps and started around the north (downhill) side of the house. You would think from the garden description that it might be a larger garden than it is, but no…it is a narrow city lot, densely planted. My house in Seattle had equally narrow sides (and my grandmother had had them equally densely planted). I felt right at home.

front porch

front porch

historic register

historic register

side of front porch

side of front porch
Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

a porch photo by Allan

a porch photo by Allan

north side path

north side path
driftwood planter along the path

driftwood planter along the path

along the path

along the path

ogre

Canna leaf

Canna leaf

duck

duck

Allan's view

Allan’s view

Around the corner, we came to the back porch.

so colourful

so colourful

At the back corner of the house, just before turning to the south side: cookies and lemonade served by Helen Bohnke.

treats

treats

pouring us some delicious lemonade

Helen pouring me some delicious lemonade

I went down the south side chomping my cookie because the cunning planter top to the fence (or is it a retaining wall?) so captured my attention.

looking back toward the cookie tray

looking back toward the cookie tray

Here, I look toward the front of the house along the south side. I so love this fence.

planter topped fence on south (uphill) side of house

planter topped fence on south (uphill) side of house

looking back again as I admire the planters

looking back again as I admire the planters and Allan gets some lemonade

compost pile!

compost pile!

I loved the tiny little compost pile. Bob Bohnke told us it had been much bigger before the tour.

Coming around the corner and back into the blazing sun…

return to the front garden

return to the front garden

the precariously situated little maple

the precariously situated little maple

front porch again

front porch again

by front steps

by front steps

further ogling of the front porch

further ogling of the front porch

I turned back to return to the back yard, figuring I could find a more dignified exit than inching my way down the steep steps to the sidewalk. I carefully stepped around the little maple; owner Bob had expressed concern that its one sideways branch would survive the tour.

the maple in question

the maple in question

I hope it did!

another detail

another detail

enjoying the south side path again

enjoying the south side path again

We skirted past Helen’s lemonade area to get to the parking lot behind the house where we could get a good view of the back.

east side of house

east side of house

back garden

back garden

The back garden, said to be new, looks well established.

back garden detail

back garden detail

looking up to the back porch

looking up to the back porch

To the south and below the garden is a lawn where we were able to walk back to the sidewalk.

south side of house

south side of house

perfect roses

perfect roses

Allan remarked that the roses had no blackspot!

rose

front porch from south lawn

front porch from south lawn

porch

side garden at eye level from below

side garden at eye level from below

eye to eye with the gnome

eye to eye with the gnome

I hope you enjoy looking at the porch as much as I did.

I hope you enjoy looking at the porch as much as I did.

I crossed the street to get a photo of the front of the whole place. I could easily have walked round again, especially the south side with the planter wall.

the whole shebang

the whole shebang

I have tried to analyze why of all the lovely gardens this was my favourite, and in posting these photos I have figured out that it is because I adore brightly painted houses. Painted Ladies, Daughters of Painted Ladies, and A Gift to the Street are books that I own and treasure about painted Victorian houses. I also realize now that the narrow side gardens remind me of my beloved Gram’s garden on its small Seattle city lot (although her front and back yards were bigger than this).

Brief Intermission

One of the Lower Columbia Preservation Society volunteers at this garden told us that she, too, has a purple house. Allan must have commented to her about the big one up the street from this garden. She kindly gave us the address so that we could go see it and it was well worth the side trip into a different neighbourhood.

a cottage of purpleness

a cottage of purpleness

I love it! Next: a garden full of something I love: quotations in the garden.

Read Full Post »

Wednesday, we added a Brunnera ‘Looking Glass’ to fill in a space in Mayor Mike’s garden…

much better!

much better!

admired this combo at our Ilwaco Post Office volunteer garden:

Asiatic lily and Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

Asiatic lily and Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

Note:  Mike’s garden, which we just started doing this year, needs some white lilies.

We stopped at The Basket Case Nursery, where Walter greeted us.

Walter, one of three poodles

Walter, one of three poodles

Next, we stopped at The Planter Box for more Dr. Earth organic caterpillar spray and to confirm the date (July 18th!) when they will be “cash mobbed”.  (Later in the week, we got back to “the caterpillar job” and decided not to spray again.  There were just a few left and we did not want to hurt the busy bees.)

at The Planter Box

at The Planter Box

Next, on to Andersen’s RV Park.  From here on, it would be a “north end day”.  I like a north end day because the gardens are all favourites of ours and it is easier to do two hours here and two there with a car ride in between than a steady slog at one garden all day.

Andersen's west garden

Andersen’s west garden

Baptisia australis backed with Stipa gigantea

Baptisia australis backed with Stipa gigantea

west side garden with Eryngium 'Jade Frost'

west side garden with Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’

west side

west side

Staffer Rob Rosett had taken some wonderful photos of the Sisters on the Fly gathering.  Here he is in the office with two of them.

Rob Rosett

Rob Rosett

Stunning photos, eh?

On our way north to our next job, we stopped at our friend Sarah Sloane‘s home to drop off a couple of roses for her garden.  I was smitten with the Dianthus in her neighbour’s window box.  The apartment complex has sweet garden beds.  I was distracted by conversation and forgot to take more photos.

at South Wind Apartments

at South Wind Apartments

Klipsan Beach Cottages came next.

at KBC

at KBC

fenced garden

fenced garden

roses

roses

lilies

lilies

Lily 'Landini'

Lily ‘Landini’

Allium schubertii

Allium schubertii

The week of rain had been hard on some of the roses.

unopened buds

unopened buds

That rose looked fine once we pruned it.  (Down to the next junction with five leaves.)

all better

all better

This rose was just fine despite rain.

This rose was just fine despite rain.

I decided a tree in the lower fenced garden (where the fence protects raspberries, a fig tree, apple trees and more roses) should be limbed up for the sake of the plants underneath. “No sooner said than done” Allan had already cut one branch by the time I took the before photo.

(sort of) before and after

(sort of) before and after

By the drive up the the cottages, the foxgloves were still going strong although the unseasonable strong winds of the last week pushed them sideways.

entry sign

entry sign

To the south of that sign, I have a river of Geranium ‘Rozanne’ (plant of the century!)

Rozanne blooming in shade

Rozanne blooming in shade

Because I love fuchsias, there are several, including one of my favourites:

Fuchsia 'Hawkshead', white with green tips

Fuchsia ‘Hawkshead’, white with green tips

Hawkshead is a tall one.

Hawkshead is a tall one.

Behind it, a Callistemon still blooms.

bottlebrush

bottlebrush

Next, we stopped to deadhead Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ (three big ones!) at Oman Builders Supply in Ocean Park.

OBS garden

OBS garden

And we concluded our workday at The Weigardt Gallery (which had closed by the time we got there).

Wiegardt Gallery

Wiegardt Gallery

the north side, showing Eric's upstairs studio

the north side, showing Eric’s upstairs studio

By the time we left there, it was 6:30 PM.  Since I’d been to Marilyn’s garden with Nancy on Sunday on our pre-tour look at the tour gardens, and since rain had been falling on us off and on all day, we knew it would not need watering.  We were both rather damp and tired so we ended the workday early and headed home.

Read Full Post »

Just some plants and vignettes from our garden over the weekend.

new hanging basket from The Basket Case

new hanging basket from The Basket Case

the bees love it!

the bees love it!

an anemone, I think

an anemone, I think

Brodiaea 'Pink Diamond'

Brodiaea ‘Pink Diamond’

an old rose

an old rose

I used to know the names of all my roses, and now I have lost track.  I hope to get this sorted out again someday!

newest bed

newest bed

The new garden bed is by Nora’s driveway and was planned to be full of beautiful flowers for her to see from her wheelchair.  When I found she was dying and would not see midsummer, I lost heart, and have not quite figured out a new plan for it.  Recently, I put in a couple of shrubs in case we ever get neighbours from whom we want some privacy.  If we ever really need privacy, we might fit in a small garden shed here.  This bed makes me sad these days.  I miss Nora.

white monkshood, and Allan with the new mower

white monkshood, and Allan with the new mower

One of the new roses I got last year from Heirloom Roses.

One of the new roses I got last year from Heirloom Roses.

It has different colours on the same bush...

It has different colours on the same bush…

lovely!

lovely!  It is not Rosa mutabilis.  The flowers are bigger.

another old rose

another old rose

I have had the above old rose for years.  I brought it from my other garden.  It is a very fragrant old rose, and I have forgotten its name which I used to know so well.  (Am I scared by this memory glitch? No, I can remember other plant names still….so far…)  This winter I will have to re-read my rose books to remember the names, I think.  Google will not help; there are too many old roses.  I like the little green dot in the center.

white rambler

white rambler

I’ve never known the name of the rambler above, and just call it Maxine’s rose because I grew it from a cutting from her garden.  It is also in her daughter Jo’s garden by the same method.

I know this one:  Radway Sunrise!  Got it at Cistus Nursery.

I know this one: Radway Sunrise! Got it at Cistus Nursery.

Radway Sunrise came with me from my old garden.

cutleaf elderberry from Joy Creek

cutleaf elderberry from Joy Creek (Sambucus lanciniata)

three tier sedum table

three tier sedum table

The cute blue and yellow vase in the greenhouse window was a present from Nancy Aust and ones like it are available at The Basket Case Greenhouse.

Here’s one for Mr. Tootlepedal:

a BLACK perennial bachelor button (cornflower)

a BLACK perennial bachelor button (cornflower), Centaurea Montana

Got it at a Hardy Plant study weekend.  Might be ‘Black Sprite’.

Apparently I was crazy enough to plant ‘Paul’s Himalayan Musk’ rose again, even though in five years time it swallowed an old trailer at our old house.

Paul again, second year

Paul again, second year

It is now swallowing another new rose I should not have planted next to it and will move in the fall.

¯

Both were from Heirloom roses

Both were from Heirloom roses

An acquisition from the Hardy Plant weekend in Portland:  Dicentra scandens, the bleeding heart vine.

Dicentra scandens

Dicentra scandens

yellow clematis...tanguitica type, maybe

yellow clematis…tangutica type, maybe

And a back garden view:

back garden

Read Full Post »

I suspect that yesterday will have been the longest day of our work year, but maybe not, as garden tour month approaches and three of the gardens we have a hand in will be on the tour (on July 20th).

We had much to do yesterday, and our main goal was to get many jobs done and get to Andersen’s RV Park by five to do a lot more weeding before the Sisters on the Fly group starts to arrive this weekend.

Larry and Robert’s garden

We began just down the street at Larry and Robert’s garden with the continuation of changes to their back yard.  

before and after

before and after

We added an Azara microphylla (an excellent small tree with fragrant winter blooms) and some pea gravel and river rock and some edging from materials that were on the property.  I have in the past had an aversion to scalloped edging.  Now I cannot remember why, because I think it looks just grand here.  Now we need some more river rock for against the house and some sort of plant to fill in the narrow border there that is somewhat resistant to three small dogs (nothing too delicate).

Ilwaco intermission

We then planted an Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ in our volunteer garden at the Ilwaco Post Office.

Ilwaco Post Office

Ilwaco Post Office

As we headed out of Ilwaco, the man who sells firewood on 2nd SW waved us down and gave us two hollow rounds of wood that could be used as planters, he said in appreciation of our volunteer work in town.  I told him we do get paid to care for the planters and the boatyard (although the latter did start out as a volunteer project years ago) and that the post office is our only volunteer garden now.  He still insisted we should have the planters.  (He has them for sale sometimes over at 2nd SW and Eagle.)

a garden gift

a garden gift

Might I add, those things are very heavy!

Diane’s garden

Next, we stopped at Diane’s garden and The Red Barn Arena (next door to each other): Allan fertilized the whiskey barrel planters at the barn and Diane’s containers while I deadheaded and weeded along the road.

at Diane's

at Diane’s

That roadside garden clearly needs more plants.  I’ll add some of the inexpensive Dianthus from the Basket Case next time we go there.

Anchorage Cottages

After Diane’s, we went to The Anchorage Cottages where we were requested to prune a branch off of the Ceanothus so that the parking sign for cottage one would show.  The shrub was thick with bees.

Ceanothus

Ceanothus (California Lilac)

Ceanothus (California Lilac)

Even though the bees were gentle, they got pretty agitated when I tried to lop a large branch, so I settled for quickly cutting one small piece and then scampering well back while they swarmed toward me…then…whew!!…resettled on the flowers.

The number one just barely showing.

The number one just barely showing.

Plant emergency of the morning:  thrips on a lily!  Doused it with a cup of mild dish soap well diluted with water.  Fingers crossed.

cured, I hope

cured, I hope

I was reminded of this New Yorker cartoon, long a favourite of mine.

 

george-booth-aphids-on-the-heliotrope-new-yorker-cartoon

Anchorage center courtyard

Anchorage center courtyard

New Dawn rose

New Dawn rose

We did not spend as long there as I would have liked because our mission remained to get to Andersen’s by five.  Our next stop was The Basket Case to pick up some plants for Andersen’s garden shed border which I felt had looked a little bare after the previous evening’s weeding there.  I also got two Lobelia tupa for Sheila as she and Harold are coming to visit us soon!

at the Basket Case, what a deal!

at the Basket Case, what a deal!

Wiegardt Studio Gallery

Next we went all the way up to Nahcotta/Ocean Park to the Wiegardt Gallery where again we went round the garden in haste but I hope effectively.

at Wiegardt Gallery with manager Christl

at Wiegardt Gallery with manager Christl

Allium schubertii

Allium schubertii and albopilosum

Wiegardt

Alliums white and purple

Alliums white and purple

Allium albopilosum and Allium moly 'Jeannine'

Allium albopilosum and Allium moly ‘Jeannine’

front walkway

front walkway

west side of gallery

west side of gallery

It occurs to me that next time we are there, I will take you inside!  Eric Wiegardt is a renowned artist and the gallery is beautiful.

Ocean Park intermission

We were doing well as it was only three o clock, so we had time to stop at Jack’s Country Store for what we call “Jack’s snacks”.   Of such tiny luxuries are happy moments made.

Bliss:  The Jack's Snacks Cooler and my potato salad in the car

Bliss: The Jack’s Snacks deli cooler and my potato salad in the car

I think this is the first time since the beginning of May that we have had time, when at the north end, to stop for a treat.

Next up:  the small entry garden at Oman Builders Supply.  But first, we did a U Turn to get a better look at a garden near Jack’s that is looking fine.  Garden tour next year?

an Ocean Park garden

an Ocean Park garden

driftwood and toadflax

driftwood and toadflax

lupines

lupines and foxgloves

a work in progress

a work in progress

Doing another U turn to get back to OBS, we saw that the poppy garden behind Jack’s is still there.  Jack himself started it, or his wife perhaps, and it is being carried on.

east wall of Jack's

east wall of Jack’s

Oman Builders Supply

After those distractions we got to Oman Builders Supply garden.

OBS garden

OBS garden

Mainly I wanted to make sure that the Eryngiums ‘Jade Frost’ and Lobelia tupa that we had planted last week had no transplant shock.  They were fine.  We could have spent quite awhile deadheading the Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ but more work called to us to keep moving.

The remaining deadheads can wait till next week.

The remaining deadheads can wait till next week.

hebe flowering at OBS

hebe flowering at OBS

Klipsan Beach Cottages

We pulled into our parking area at Klipsan Beach Cottages at a quarter to four.  Still on track for our day’s plan.  I knew the garden would be in good shape and that we could get it done in an hour.

Klipsan Beach Cottages

Klipsan Beach Cottages fenced garden

Allium albopilosum (Star of Persia)

Allium albopilosum (Star of Persia)

Allium schubertii

Allium schubertii

Rose 'Jude the Obscure'

Rose ‘Jude the Obscure’

The names of some of the roses are lost to us!

The names of some of the roses are lost to us!

rose

Last year this one did not open well but this year it looks fine.

Last year this one did not open well but this year it looks fine.

Last year Mary brought back some choice shrubs, and the one below is still in a pot because we have not found the perfect spot for it.  I think it is some kind of callistemon but if I am wrong, perhaps someone will enlighten me.

a recent acquisition

a recent acquisition

One of the two cats put on a charming show for me in the garden.

Sarah, who did get a belly rub

Sarah, who did get a belly rub

The foxgloves are restricting the view of one of the entry signs.

No one can bear to cut them down.

No one can bear to cut them down.

We would have left, as I had planned, by 4:45, but owner/manager Mary and I got into a conversation about Nora’s funeral, and life, and death, and afterlife or not, and walked up to the cottages and back, and so Allan and I did not leave till a little after five.

Corokia cotoneaster

Corokia cotoneaster in late afternoon light

Andersen’s RV Park

At last, we got to Andersen’s at five fifteen.  While Allan planted the new perennials in the garden shed garden, I weaseled out of my least favourite garden task (planting) to discuss with the staff what to do with one of those free planters we had been given in Ilwaco earlier in the day.  Jan came up with a good spot for it, and we waited for Al to return from walking his dog in order to suggest it, because it involved an area for which he had been seeking a design solution.

Al and Chewie return from the beach

Al and Chewie return from the beach

He liked the idea but since his shift was over, another staffer and Allan ended up doing it.   I hope Al was not disappointed the next morning to find it done, because he does like to have a project.  Jan’s idea was so good that it couldn’t wait till morning!

the round hollow wood

the round hollow wood

I snagged three gazania out of planters on the east side of the house where they closed up in the afternoon for lack of sun.

Till eight thirty, Allan and I weeded like mad in the beds behind the office, where the pernicious quack grass had returned; I walked the other beds and planters removing dead bulb foliage.  The results were satisfactory and now, on Monday, all we have to do is a light weeding from one end of the gardens to the other and all will be perfect…at the same time!  This is rare, because as you can probably tell, we have too many jobs to reach that state of glory very often on our larger garden jobs.

behind the office

behind the office

Having time to deadleaf as well as deadhead really makes a garden look perfect.

Buddliea 'Black Night' before...

Buddliea ‘Black Night’ before…

and after picking off yellowed leaves

and after picking off yellowed leaves

If an RVer who is also a gardener camps here, s/he must be pretty impressed with the beauty of the gardens at this time of year in evening light.  Tired though we were, we lingered to take some pictures in the late evening.

poppies and Payson Hall

poppies and Payson Hall

Baptisia (false indigo)

Baptisia (false indigo)

Stipa gigantea, my favourite ornamental grass

Stipa gigantea, my favourite ornamental grass

Stipa and Payson Hall

Stipa and Payson Hall

gold spangles

gold spangles

sunset light

sunset light

On the way out, we swung by the garden shed so I could see the new plants in.  It does look more filled out with the addition of a couple of Gaura ‘So White’, a Cistus, a Phygelius ‘African Queen’ and…something else…I forget what!

garden shed garden

garden shed garden

Al had, earlier in the day, made the gravel path at the very far end look spiffing but it does not show in this photo.

An emergency

Finally we could go home!  As we drove south through Long Beach, I checked my messages on Facebook to get an update from my gardening neighbour (four doors down), Judy.  As I read her fairly reassuring message about her visit to the cardiologist, another message popped up from a client at a commercial establishment.  There were caterpillars all over a shrub, having stripped the leaves, and looking horribly unsightly right next to a venue for an event on Saturday.  Could we come tomorrow (Saturday morning) and cut it down?  I won’t name the business because no one wants to think about horrid caterpillars.  It was on our way home, and Saturday morning was fully booked with events (Saturday market, visiting friends, cash mob) so we had to make an emergency detour with loppers and a chainsaw and cut the shrub (a Leycesteria formosa) to the ground at dusk-thirty.  I felt terrible because a hummingbird was feeding on the flowers; every leaf was gone, but the flowers remained.  One on the other side of the building (away from the next day’s event) was still leafed out, although a bit chewed, and I think the hummer could find it.

In my own garden I would have left the shrub alone to leaf out again, but at a business such ugliness cannot stand, especially if caterpillars are dropping onto customers!

We could not haul the debris.  Nay, would not.  No caterpillars allowed in our work trailer or at the site where we dump.  Fortunately there was a place we could stash the branches till the infestation is gone.

By then it was far too late to blog about such a long day so I made a placeholder entry via my iPhone on the way home…where we collapsed in front of the telly and had a comforting dinner quickly whipped up by Allan and watched Master Chef.  Just before that, as I did the evening spreadsheet on my computer, Allan came in to my office to show me this riding on his shirt.  If anyone knows caterpillars,  perhaps they can tell me what this horrid creature will become.  Nothing nice, I bet.  I shudder to think how many hitched a ride on our clothes.

a garden pest

a garden pest

I am hoping for no more days this long unless they are that long…in my own garden.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

I did not leave the property today which is just the way I like a Sunday to be.  We had been invited to visit friends, and even offered a ride due to our defunct car, but we asked them to come visit us instead and they did.

Pat, Larry, Margaret

Pat, Larry, Margaret

We sat in the shade because Margaret is going through chemo.  I know so many friends who are, or who have done so.  They all soldier on so bravely and cheerfully.  Margaret and Larry have a charming garden in Long Beach where we put in a flower garden, and Patricia waters it for them.

We put Smokey (the friendliest cat) in the laundry room because Margaret cannot risk getting a scratch.  Where people are, Smokey will surely be.  Frosty usually follows him, and was mystified why his brother had been put away.

Frosty in the hallway

Frosty in the hallway

I decided Frosty should go in the laundry room (where the cats have food, water, and litter box) to keep his brother company, so that Smokey did not feel singled out.

After our delightful visit with human friends, we went back in the house to find that the cats had reached under the door, grabbed the hallway rug, and dragged it almost all the way into the laundry room.

disappearing area rug

disappearing area rug

How in the world did they get all that rug under the door in such a relatively short time?

all ruched up

all ruched up

They hightailed it out the cat door as quickly as they could.

out they go!

out they go!

If our friend Kathleen S has sharp eyes, she will see the cool fire extinguisher bell that she gave us.  It has been so unseasonably windy around here, we have been waiting to hang it outside til the weather settles a bit!

For most of the afternoon as I weeded and clipped in the garden, I had the mildly ominous feeling that in the evening we had to go out and water the Ilwaco planters (on foot) and the boatyard.  Oh how I wanted to just stay at home.  Then I came up with the most cunning plan.  Tomorrow, Allan can take the car into the auto shop (turns out it will “go” long enough on a battery charge to get up the highway that far) and then water Long Beach and come home on the bus, while I will water the planters, boatyard, weed down at Howerton and maybe even the mayor’s and Cheri’s gardens.  Tuesday, we could do Ann’s garden and if we are lucky enough to get the car back by Wednesday (depending on how fast an alternator can be delivered), I might not have to take the bus at all.

I am a big proponent of public transit, but the bus here is maddeningly intermittent.  Oh, and we found so many extra costs in renting a cargo van (such as one that size not even being available here) that we gave up on that plan for now.

With the burden of work off my mind, I was able to find more complete enjoyment in the rest of the day and got almost every part of the garden at least partly dealt with, except for the bogsy wood which has gone to the wild!

We had a raspberry fail; the canes of the early raspberries, loaded with berries, became burnt looking and the berries stopped growing.  Fire blight?  Allan cut those cane to the ground and they went into the wheelie bin.  What a shame, but perhaps the fall bearing ones will be all right.

Phooey!

Phooey!

I do hope all the canes are all right next year.  They are sentimental to me because most of them came from my mother’s garden.

We have all these plants to plant here and there and no way to get them to work in the very near future, so I will just get to enjoy them here a little longer!

holding area

holding area

The garden sometimes looks magical in the late evening light.

the patio

the patio

Night Owl? rose

Night Owl? rose

I was sitting at my computer typing away, about to share a passel of rose photos because not much happened today at home, when there was a knock on the door.  Allan said, “It’s Bill from the Boreas!”  I did not even make the connection in my mind that Ciscoe Morris, who was here today to give a lecture benefiting the local Boys and Girls Club, was staying at Boreas Inn tonight.  I had not gone to the lecture because of the feeling of being so far behind in the garden and having just one day off and because it was during the day when I just have to be outside.  So it took me quite by surprise that Susie and Bill had brought Ciscoe to see our garden!!

Susie had asked me if I wanted to come meet him at the inn but I felt all shy and Emily Dickinson-ish (“I’m nobody, how about you?”) and like it must be tiresome for him to have someone coming to meet him during his quiet time at the inn between events.

And here he was!

Ciscoe and the saying that would relegate me to just weeding if all my clients took it to heart.

Ciscoe and the saying that would relegate me to just weeding if all my clients took it to heart.

Classic Ciscoe!

Classic Ciscoe!

(“Nobody can design a better garden for you than the one you think out for yourself.  It could take years, but in the doing of it, you should be in paradise.”)

Oh!  And when he saw the feathery plant that is on a pot behind him in the above photo, he grabbed a frond and said “A restio!” and something complimentary about cool plants.  Yay!!!!  (You don’t see Restios much around here because, well, they look a little or a lot like horsetail, but they are wonderful!)

I was awfully glad we were not out watering the Ilwaco planters when they all showed up;  I had, as often happens, not turned on my phone during the day, so had missed Susie’s call.

me, Ciscoe, Allan, Susie

me, Ciscoe, Allan, Susie

with Ciscoe

It was a particular thrill for me when we were partway back into the garden and he said again that I had a lot of cool plants that you don’t see everywhere, and asked where I got them, and of course knew exactly what I meant when I said I used to mail order from Heronswood, and that we take a trip most years to Cistus and Joy Creek, and that I had gotten some at Dancing Oaks near where Sheila lives.  He said we must go to Far Reaches Farm, and I very much want to.  I said we had been to Dragonfly Farms and he beamed. I told him I get to help pick the plants ordered by the Basket Case and that Back Alley Gardens in Gearhart gets plants from Xera.  He agreed that if a plant has a Xera tag it is worth trying out, and admired the Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’ and the Verbascum ‘Eleanor’s Blush’ (which was new to him!) that I had ordered through Basket Case.  Oh!!  And when I said my plant table in the bogsy wood was big enough to be George Schenkian, he knew exactly what I meant.  It was just so fun to not have to go into the whole explanation of what lay behind the idea.  Not that I don’t enjoy recommending George Schenk’s great gardening books to people!

He wasn't used to our chilly evening wind!

He wasn’t used to our chilly evening wind!

He had interesting information about many of the plants, and of course my mind was sort of reeling and I probably have forgotten some of it.  I think tomorrow I’ll walk our route around the garden and see what I remember.  One particular thing he said was, upon admiring a pinky-mauve Astrantia in the front garden, that in England a garden was planted almost all in Astrantias and the garden had no slugs and snails so they might actually repel slugs.  Must get many more of them.

poppy admiration society

poppy admiration society

He remarked upon a particularly large Oriental poppy that had thrived on the dairy manure.  Susie was very pleased to hear it is one that I acquired from her former volunteer planter in Long Beach where I thin them out and replant them here and there so they don’t take over the planter and then leave a big gap when they go over.

the tale of Susie's poppy plant

the tale of Susie’s poppy plant

I promised Susie to bring a piece back to her garden!

Everyone was in an exuberant and happy mood.

in the garden

Ciscoe admired Allan’s own garden and seemed to think it clever that I had offered him a larger area so I don’t have as much to weed.  Of course, he is famous for his funny stories about how he and his wife have separate garden spaces and sometimes compete for plants.

by Allan's garden...Bill finds something very funny!

by Allan’s garden…Bill finds something very funny!

He also seemed to enjoy Allan’s spreadsheet of all the plant names, but could not help identify the one mystery fern that we just call the lettuce fern.

reading the spreadsheet

reading the spreadsheet

admiring Allan's garden

admiring Allan’s garden

discussing the fern of mystery

discussing the fern of mystery

And like me, he was amazed at the chocolate scent of one my Xera plants, new last year, that had finally bloomed and that he had never heard of either!

nodding chocolate flower

nodding chocolate flower

the tag, from Xera plants

the tag, from Xera plants

a closer look

a closer look

You have to lift the blossom to smell it.  Ciscoe said “Now I want a candy bar!”  Maybe he even said “Ooh la la! Now I want a candy bar!”

As we lingered around Allan’s garden, we heard our friend Devery’s voice at the gate.  Not ten minutes before, I had been telling Ciscoe (as we were by the transparent fence that gives a clear view of Nora’s house and gave Nora a view of our garden) about how when Nora and a friend of hers and Devery had heard Ciscoe was coming, and when I said (but not seriously believing it) that Susie had wanted to bring him to our garden, they all got very excited!  Especially Devery, who is a big fan and watches his show every Saturday and just loves him and Meeghan Black.    It was poignant that Nora’s funeral had been yesterday (I was explaining the big gathering of chairs for our memorial get together in the garden afterwards.)

Devery was walking by our house on her way to close the curtains of Nora’s house, and she had heard and recognized Ciscoe’s voice in the garden.  Oh please, do come in and meet him! I said.  She was so filled with delight, I could not have thought her naturally happy personality could get any bubblier, but it did!

joy!

joy!

Devery and Ciscoe

Devery and Ciscoe

Ciscoe takes off his hood for a better pic

Ciscoe takes off his hood for a better pic

Devery and Ciscoe

Devery and Ciscoe

a delightful moment

a delightful moment

This made me happier than anything, to have a part in bringing Devery so much happiness.

Allan, Devery and I were all quite giddy after Ciscoe left to go back to the inn with Susie and Bill, and we hung about the front steps chattering and laughing until it got so cold that we parted.   Devery said we must get together more, and idea that I was so glad to hear because we like her so very much and I have been worried we would lose touch with Nora gone.

There are people who just exude joy and bring happiness wherever they go.  Ciscoe is one and Devery is another and the fact that they got to meet in our garden is the happiest thing of the whole delightful evening.

Read Full Post »

I procrastinated all morning, but there were reasons: catching up on the blog, and bad (ish) weather. Maybe I was sick of planting plants, but I had many to plant here and needed to get started. Finally I got myself outside with the memory that I had very much been looking forward to another go-round of pulling Impatiens (jewelweed, touch me not) out of the front border.

2:38 PM, front garden

2:38 PM, front garden

after editing

after editing

I need to learn to mark the spot where I take my before photo to make the results more clear!

I was amazed at how big this cardoon has gotten since last time I noticed:

humungous

humungous

Another task that I had been longing to do in the back garden was to use the hedge shears to lop back the Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’. It gets so lush that it flops open. Last year for the garden tour I had to use all sorts of short bits of rebar to hold it up and make it halfway decent looking. By chopping it at this time of year, the plant stays more compact and still flowers, but with smaller, not so heavy flowers so it does not fall open. I recently did the same to all the ‘Autumn Joy’ in the Long Beach planters.

before

before

Unfortunately, when I tried to use the hedge shears my right arm protested mightily. It has been plaguing me for two days….”planter’s arm”, apparently. Allan stepped in and did the job.

after (but not picked up yet)

after (but not picked up yet)

The creeping sorrel in the raspberry patch had suddenly leaped to almost as tall as the berry canes.

Yikes!  When did that happen?

Yikes! When did that happen?

After running some errands of his own, Allan stepped in here also and did a wonderful job.

Thank you, Allan!

Thank you, Allan!

By then, I was heavily into planting annuals and perennials. I told myself I would get at least thirty plants planted before I let myself get back to the enjoyable task of weeding, and I am sure I surpassed that number. While planting on the west side of the house, I kept catching myself thinking “Nora and Devery will like these.” (Devery was Nora’s wonderful caregiver.) Then I would remember with a huge pang that Nora was gone. I had made sure over the last two years that the west side garden that she can, I mean could, see from her front window was vibrant with bright colour.

Tomorrow planting hell will surely conclude, because all I have left to plant are these:

holding area on east side of house

holding area on east side of house

(Not as bad as it looks, because some of those are in permanent pots. Probably about ten plants there that need planting.)

And this line up on the path to Allan’s shop:

mostly cosmos and painted sage, and some of the cosmos will go to Ann's on Tuesday.

mostly cosmos and painted sage, and some of the cosmos will go to Ann’s on Tuesday.

Then there are some tomatoes in the greenhouse, and I could have done them during the blustery morning inside the greenhouse, had I remembered them!

tomatoes

tomatoes

Oh, drat, and these also, which I almost forgot were waiting next to the greenhouse.

more cosmos.  I like them.

more cosmos. I like them.

So tomorrow will be the planting of the six packs of cosmos all over this garden.

The relatively small amount of cosmos that will be left for Ann, along with two Penstemon ‘Burgundy Brew’ for two wine connoisseur clients, two Rosemary for Chef Michael at the Depot, and …oh….I should get some blue and white painted sage for the mayor’s garden….Those plants that are left are not enough to constitute a hellish amount of planting. So I am fervently hoping that by eight PM tomorrow I can declare annuals planting hell over for 2013.

My right arm will be grateful.

At almost dusk, I took a walk around the garden to photograph plants that had caught my eye during an afternoon of planting. (Like most gardeners do, I walk round and round with a perennial pot in hand trying to figure out where it could go.)

Clematis on east fence...most blooming on my neighbours' side!

Clematis on east fence…most blooming on my neighbours’ side!

another east fence clematis

another east fence clematis

Siberian Iris

Siberian Iris

Smokey toured with me.

Smokey toured with me.

shade bed

shade bed

I so look forward to a satisfying weeding of that shade bed. It was too windy to weed this close to the bogsy wood today, especially since the alder right over the shade bed has died! It is a great snag for birds but I fear a big branch breaking off in wind so I stay out from under on days like today, with gusts of 26 mph!

ominous

ominous

I wonder why this one alder died. I did not pile soil deeply around its base or anything bad… I skittered back to safety away from the tree.

west border

west border (Hi, Mary’s red boat shed!)

a new rose by the west gate

a new rose by the west gate

another new rose

another new rose (and…horsetail)

The new roses are from Heirloom roses, and I am going to sort out their names later this year!

I do NOT remember planting these iris.  I think they are too big to be from the ones Kathleen Sayce gave to me and Ann....

I do NOT remember planting these iris. I think they are too big to be from the ones Kathleen Sayce gave to me and Ann….

view down west path to the bogsy wood edge

view down west path to the bogsy wood edge

In the front garden, some truly accidental colour matching pleased my eye.

Imagine this astrantia...

Imagine this astrantia…

when this clematis that is behind it gets big enough to show above the astrantia.

when this clematis that is behind it gets big enough to show above the astrantia.

And the Allium bulgaricum also matches!

And the Allium bulgaricum also matches!

In closing, Allan’s excellent garden in the dusk…

perfectly weeded

perfectly weeded

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »