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Posts Tagged ‘Rubus lineatus’

Saturday, 25 August 2018

Kuestner garden, Manzanita

This garden was in the tour book for the Hardy Plant Society of Oregon.

We had met the owner, Mark, hosting a garden on the Tillamook Spade and Wade tour in July.

arriving with Prissy, Pam, Beth and Ketzel.

Allan’s photo

When we arrived, Mark was briefly absent on a home tour, but we were more than happy to stay till he returned.  The garden far surpassed my expectations.  I looked up an old view of the house and was able to find, because the garden is so new, what it used to look like:

What a transformation!

Mark’s wife, Linda, gave him all the credit for the garden.

Allan’s photo

streetside bed

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

one way in from the street

Allan’s photo

my kind of folks

looking over the fence into the back garden

Canna ‘Stuttgart’

Closer: Canna ‘Stuttgart’, must have!

Pelargonium capitatum

The tags were usefully tucked it at the base of most of the plants.

I was utterly gobsmacked by this garden.  Mark is a regular customer of Xera and Cistus nurseries, my two favourites, and he also orders from Annie’s Annuals.

cleome

Salvia ‘Black and Blue’ or ‘Black and Bloom’

Allan’s photo

A high standard of garden maintenance (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

path to the back

Mark said he was short on pavers so he used the tops of water meter boxes, and he used the boxes as planting troughs.

Salvia patens, and a water meter box “trough” to the left

Allan’s photo

I thought this was Salvia argentea but now I think not fuzzy enough, so what is it?

?????

a little geranium, below, that everyone was excited about

further along

lots of brugmansia in this garden (and lots of hummingbirds)

Looks like my good friend Pittosporum ‘Tasman Ruffles’ behind the birdbath. Grevillia ‘Marshall Olbrich’ to the right

closer

coming around the corner to the back

abutilon and fuchsia

back garden sit spot

view from back porch: room to expand the garden

back porch

Senecio cristobalnesis (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

around to the other side

water meter trough garden

I came back around to the front.  Mark had returned home.  I can imagine how delighted I would be if I came back from a brief absence from my garden on tour and found that my visitors included Pam Fleming and Beth Holland, renowned gardeners from Seaside and Cannon Beach, and garden writer Ketzel Levine.  I would be well chuffed.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

I was so thrilled with this garden that I was happy to go round some more (and I hope you are, too.)

I found myself craving Rubus lineatus again (background, below):

I removed it from my garden because it was such a runner, and tried to save and replant one little piece but it did not take.  I love the silvery unfurling of the new leaves.

Rubus lineatus…amazing leaves. (in another garden) See how silver they are as they emerge (top left)?

Salvia vazquezii from Annie’s Annuals

further admiration of Canna ‘Stuttgart’

Lepechinia hastata (pitcher sage)

Clianthus puniceus (Parrot’s Bill)

jewels on the trellis line (Allan’s photo)

plant excitement (Allan’s photo)

Azara microphylla ‘Variegata’

covered porch; to the left is Eucryphia lucida ‘Spring Glow’

Allan’s photo; A friend of Mark’s had once said, “You can’t have this many water meters!”

Allan’s photo

looking back toward the street

Ketzel and Mark

Allan’s photo

We went back out to the streetside garden.

I asked what this is, and immediately forgot.

Mark giving out cuttings.

This was exactly the sort of garden I like, full of plants interwoven, interesting and unusual and thriving.  Mark’s said his secrets for success are using 15-15-15 fertilizer and a lot of watering.

Takeaways: fertilize more, buy more plants, stuff more plants in!

Something fortuitous happened next.  I had been wanting, while in Manzanita, to see the garden of Jane, the woman originally from Leeds whom I had met in July at the same Tillamook garden as Mark.  I had bought some of her photo cards featuring her garden and had a strong desire to see it.  I had intended to try to track her down but got so busy at work I had not followed through after being unable to find her on social media.  On the way to this garden, I learned that Ketzel had recently met her, so Ketzel left a phone message asking if we could visit. Before she could even check for a reply, up the walkway came Jane to tour Mark’s garden!

Jane and Mark (Allan’s photo)

She immediately agreed that we could visit hers and she would then return to Mark’s, so we were off with Pam and Prissy to tour Jane’s garden.

 

 

 

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I relished almost a week of rainy weather during the second half of January.  On the nicer days, I had to go out and garden.  I just can’t sit in and read all day on a nice day, much as I would like it.  In my 20s and early 30s, I was quite capable of staying in no matter what the weather…until the fateful year, round about 1988, when I became obsessed with gardening.

Friday, 16 January 2015

The big gardening excitement today was that MaryBeth came over with some sizeable peony starts.

peonies from Debbie

peonies from Debbie

Peonies are terribly expensive to purchase, so I was pleased indeed.

We had a good visit and then walked around the garden so that I could pickaxe out some starts of Darmera peltata for her.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo; Smokey is walking behind me and so is MaryBeth.

handing off the Darmera to MaryBeth

handing off the Darmera to MaryBeth

DSC00445

Saturday, 17 January 2015

The weather cooperated for reading, as these photos from inside the house show.

view to the south

view to the south

patio water gardens (and the last of the paperwhites, done)

patio water gardens (and the last of the paperwhites, done)

just the weather I wanted to see

just the weather I wanted to see

bogsy woods telephoto

bogsy woods telephoto

Monday, 19 January 2015

All of these gardening days are actually half days, as we are still firmly on night owl staycation time.  Weather forced me out on the 19th to weed here and there in a scattered way.  And I got the peony starts planted.

hellebore in the front garden

hellebore in the front garden

west side, some curly teucrium piled to give to Debbie for plant sale

west side, some curly teucrium piled to give to Debbie for plant sale

west side, some crocuses in bloom

west side, some crocuses in bloom

spot of sunshine (and I like the way the soil looks)

spot of sunshine (and I like the way the soil looks so rich and crumbly)

Clematis 'Freckles' has been blooming for week after winter week.

Clematis ‘Freckles’ has been blooming for week after winter week.

I should order one of those Clematis for Klipsan Beach Cottages and for the Anchorage for some midwinter joy.  I am pretty sure I got it from Bluestone Perennials, but a search shows they don’t carry it, so maybe I got it at Joy Creek Nursery in Scappoose, Oregon.  They do, indeed, list assorted Clematis cirrhosa in their catalog (and I would like to acquire more cultivars for the winter blooms).

buttery ranunculus

buttery ranunculus

Often while I am gardening at home, I see the Life Flight helicopter go by, and it gives a moment of sadness as I know that it is a scary emergency for someone.

It is going from the hospital in Ilwaco to a larger city hospital inland.

It is going from the hospital in Ilwaco to a larger city hospital inland.

My young Garrya has winter tassels.  I’d be thrilled were it not for the sad fact that the leaves are all spotted and ugly. I wonder if I should pick them off?

sad looking leaves

sad looking leaves

I have too many weeds to pull to fuss with picking leaves off of the garrya.

I have too many weeds to pull to fuss with picking leaves off of the garrya.

I had piled some fairly dry wood into the fire pit and had a strong urge to have the first campfire of the season…

It looked enticing....

It looked enticing….

until I realized there was standing water in the lawn all around it.

until I realized there was standing water in the lawn all around it.

still too wet

still too wet

Tuesday, 20 January 2015

I went out with no firm project in mind and then suddenly decided that I would dig an edge outside our west fence all down the Nora side, to make weeding easier.

beginning the afternoon project

beginning the afternoon project, with Smokey in attendance

a half-mooned edge

a half-mooned edge

This is only about one third of the wood that I picked from Nora’s back lawn and brought in for our campfire stash.

storm fall of alder branches

storm fall of alder branches

Meanwhile, on an outing to town, Allan found that some tiny crocus are blooming in the Ilwaco planters.

Allan's photo: By the Ilwaco Pharmacy

Allan’s photo: By the Ilwaco Pharmacy

Allan's photo; we hope passersby are noticing and enjoying.

Allan’s photo; we hope passersby are noticing and enjoying.

Wednesday, 21 January 2015

I had an audience of noisy crows while I weeded.

I had an audience of noisy crows while I weeded.

I tried out the panorama feature in my new-ish iPhone.

I tried out the panorama feature in my new-ish iPhone.

As I worked in the shady southeast corner of the garden, by the gate that goes to the gear shed next door, I found that the sword ferns are already started to unfurl.  This seems early to me.

There will be a lot of sword fern trimming when we go back to work.

Early unfurling. There will be a lot of sword fern trimming when we go back to work.

Allan gave the lawn its first mowing of the year.

Allan gave the lawn its first mowing of the year.

Hellebore buds in foreground

Hellebore buds in foreground

freshly mowed

freshly mowed, and a barrow of weeds

fragrant winter Lonicera (honeysuckle) in bloom...The hummingbirds were feasting from this.

fragrant winter Lonicera (honeysuckle) in bloom…The hummingbirds were feasting from this.

As dusk came, we were able to get a campfire starts and had our first hot dog roast of the season with the help of some of the dryer wood that I had stashed in the dry storage behind the garage.  The evening felt balmy and the chorus of frogs was loud beyond the bogsy woods.

fire

Thursday, 22 January 2015

I continued weeding along the east fence and next to the bogsy wood.

moss in the bogsy wood

moss in the bogsy wood, and some shells that Sheila once brought me from Mexico.

This area was the focus of my attention.

This area was the focus of my attention.

Onyx from next door kept me company for awhile.

Onyx from next door kept me company for awhile.

Onyx

Onyx

contorted filbert at the end of the center bed

contorted filbert at the end of the center bed

Sunday, 25 January 2015

a sunny day

a sunny day

a rare sighting of Calvin in the garden

a rare sighting of Calvin in the garden

I have found a spot for the two heavy blue wooden chairs, where they will not have to be moved when the lawn gets mowed.  We will use all light, inelegant plastic chairs back by the fire circle (and I won’t have to worry about them getting smashed by falling branches during windstorms).

a most satisfactory idea

a most satisfactory idea

Mary in the garden

Mary in the garden

Calvin and Smokey

Calvin and Smokey

cal

I’m pleased to see Calvin getting braver.

Calvin and the brothers, Smokey and Frosty, are ten, and mother Mary is possibly as old as thirteen.

Sunday was actually hot, in the low 60s.  I turned out a compost bin and further tidied up the debris pile next to Nora’s driveway.

compost

compost bin, before. It is supposed to spin, but doesn’t.

Now that we are no longer collecting compost from the local coffee shop, I have extra bins so I also dragged two of the plastic bins up and placed them right behind the house for composting yard waste (thus decreasing the size of the debris pile).

The job of digging out that non-rototing deep bin plumb wore me out.  Allan came home from his outing and helped me finish, thank goodness (thank Allan, actually).

Aftereward, I went back to the bogsy wood to cool off by looking at water.

still water in the bogsy woods

still water in the bogsy woods

inside the south fence, from the bridge

inside the south fence, from the bridge

I had been wanting since autumn of 2010 to have a bench outside the south fence, by the meander line.  Finally, I had one to spare: the bench that used to provide a sit spot where the blue chairs are now.

mission accomplished at long last!

mission accomplished at long last!

I sat out here very content while the sun went down and because I was quiet, the frogs started chirping…although not in the big pool right in front of me.

the seasonal pool at the meander line

the seasonal pool at the meander line

 

If i hadn't pulled some grass last fall, that pool would be like this area to my left.

If i hadn’t pulled some grass last fall, that pool would be like this area to my left.  (Better for frogs to have some wild areas.)

Mary joined me.

Mary joined me.

She approved of the new bench.

She approved of the new sit spot.

m

 

mary

evening willows and water

evening willows and water

looking west

looking west

looking east

looking east

I could just see, beyond the green gear shed, the roof of the community college annex where I had planned to sign up for a water colour class.  I think it was starting tomorrow and I had simply not mustered up the energy to take it.  I treasure my evenings so much that I did not want to give any up, and I did not feel up to the conversational aspects of taking a class.  I have to admit that the Waterlogue phone app has satisfied some of my need to see how scenes would look as a watercolour.

"painted" with one click.  I know it is cheating!

“painted” with one click. I know it is cheating!

Looking straight south...

Looking straight south…telephoto

I feel I am sitting a bit below the street by the port buildings.  Where I sit used to be waterfront; everything to the south was built on fill in the 1950s.

setting sun over Cape Disappointment from my new sit spot

setting sun over Cape Disappointment from my new sit spot

It would have been the perfect evening for a fire, but we had a party to attend at the Sou’wester Lodge instead (see tomorrow’s post for that).

Monday, 26 January 2015

Still working in the back corner.  This used to be Mount Sod, where the grass dug up from the front garden ended up.  When we began the garden in November 2010, we dug up the front lawn so that I could plant bulbs right away.  The back beds I made with soil piled on newspaper right over the sod.  I planted potatoes in pockets of soil in Mount Sod and they worked very well at cleaning the pile and turning it into good dirt.  But now I want it completely de-spudified so I can plant shrubs and trees.  It turns out to be quite hard to get rid of every last potato.

questing for potatoes

questing for potatoes

I am moving some of the spuds to the debris pile behind the garage, and I’m trying something I read about: planting some of them in cardboard boxes.

Allan gave me some boxes from his shed.

Allan gave me some boxes from his shed.

Planted with Yukon Gold and red fingerling potatoes

Planted with Yukon Gold and red fingerling potatoes

The boxes, with soil in them,  will get buried by debris, and maybe they will make it easier to harvest potatoes at the end of the season.  I might try the same thing with some squash plants, and the foliage can cover the debris pile for the summer.  My eventual plan is to put a cute little garden shed here to provide privacy between the two houses.

a hellebore to enjoy while digging for spuds

a hellebore to enjoy while digging for spuds

On the 26th, I had some reading weather (at last!).  On the 28th, I swanned about with Nancy, and on the 29th we worked.  When we got home from the workday, I heard an ominous dripping sound from under my bathroom floor.  Worse yet, I remembered I had heard it in the wee hours of the night before and thought it was merely the sound of drizzle.  Allan crawled under the house and found this:

29 January: a sad sight indeed

29 January: a sad sight indeed

It was hot water, too.  We had early baths and then turned the water off till the next morning.  The next day, we got a notice from the city that they thought we had a leak somewhere.  That was kind of them, and is also an ominous hint that our bill may be high.  (I hope they  had JUST read our meter!)

Friday, 30 January 2015

To the rescue!

To the rescue!

The plumbing situation had us up very early.  (Allan got a call-back from Taft at 7 AM).  Neither of us had a whole lot of energy as a result.  The air felt rather chilly till I actually got going on a task.

I puttered around with weeding

I puttered around with weeding.

I set myself some small tasks that would give satisfaction.

the weedy base of a rose

the weedy base of a rose

That is a very mean rose, and yet is sentimental to me as it’s a white rambler that I started from a cutting from Maxine’s garden.  Maxine, Jo’s mom, was my first gardening client on the peninsula.

I trimmed the lower branches in order to access the weedy grass.

very satisfying

very satisfying

Allan tied down some branches from the Paul's Himalayan Musk rambling rose.

Allan tied down some branches from the Paul’s Himalayan Musk rambling rose.

Mary enjoyed the sun.

Mary enjoyed the sun.

the contorted filbert

looking north through the contorted filbert

hellebore admiration

hellebore admiration

Smokey and Frosty get a visit from Onyx

Smokey and Frosty get a visit from Onyx

We decided to have a fire.  It took the bellows to get it going.

bellows

I had just been reading an enjoyable psychology book called The Upside of Your Dark Side.  One thing it said was that sometimes we want something more than we actually like it when we get it.  Tonight’s fire was sort of like that, as the temperature had dropped and it was not entirely pleasant to sit out.

campfire

fire

We did enjoy toasting and eating spicey cajun sausages.

dogs

I have Googled what we can toast on a fork that is healthier for summer campfires as we cannot live on a diet of roasted hot dogs.  (Bell peppers and apple slices are one suggestion.)

Moon over the gear shed.

Moon over the gear shed.

I liked the glow in the window of the gate-door.

I liked the glow in the window of the gate-door.

We did not linger outside after our campfire dinner.  I was hoping for rain on Saturday as a large stack of books had been accumulating during all this gardening weather.

Saturday, 31 January 2015

Still no rain!  I worked on a blog entry about January outings for awhile but could not stay indoors.  I did not have a big plan so just started some weeding in the front garden.

before

before

The carex (Ice Dancer?) all along the edge looks tatty, so I chopped it hard with hedge shears.

The carex (Ice Dancer?) all along the edge looks tatty, so I chopped it hard with hedge shears.

Early crocuses have nicely clumped up.  I have gotten NO snowdrops so far in my own garden, and I find that disturbing.

Early crocuses have nicely clumped up. I have gotten NO snowdrops so far in my own garden, and I find that disturbing.

I was inspired to radically thin my clump of Rubus lineatus.   I’d planted it with a casual feeling that it would die in winters anyway, as it had died in winter every time I planted it in my former garden.  However, it has thrived and it is spreading vigorously.

That tall...um..Rubus something?? that I wanted for a long time and now have might be a bit vigourous.

From summertime: “That tall…um..Rubus something?? that I wanted for a long time and now have might be a bit vigourous.”

Rubus linneatus...amazing leaves.  Also had it, and it died, and I just bought it again....a familiar theme.

In my former garden: “Rubus linneatus…amazing leaves. Also had it, and it died, and I just bought it again….a familiar theme.”

The new leaves have a pretty little white feathery effect, provided by silvery-white undersides, when they start to emerge.  I don’t have a good photo of that.  Wikipedia commons does:

800px-Rubus_lineatus

So in the winter, I could see how it was spreading into other things, including my very special new tree (protected by bamboo).

The bamboo protects my variegated Davidia.

The bamboo to the right protects my variegated Davidia.

All the stems of the Rubus came up with a good yank except for this one, on the edge of a hellebore, that needed some hard shoveling.

All the stems of the Rubus came up with a good yank except for this one, on the edge of a hellebore, that needed some hard shoveling.

The Rubus is now strictly editing.  (In the foreground is a bamboo pole for a lily support).

The Rubus is now strictly editing. (In the foreground is a bamboo pole for a lily support).

Got lots of rooted clumps with sprouts at the base.  Planted some in the bogsy woods...to regret later?  and saved some for Debbie to collect for the plant sale, if she wants them.

Got lots of rooted clumps with sprouts at the base. Planted some in the bogsy woods…to regret later? and saved some for Debbie to collect for the plant sale, if she wants them.

end of day; Allan had kindly dug out some running clumps of the carex (also saved for Debbie).

end of day; Allan had kindly dug out some running clumps of the carex (also saved for Debbie).

a young witchhazel just coming into bloom by the front gate

a young witchhazel just coming into bloom by the front gate

My BIG plan for January had been to get a load of maybe five yards of mulch delivered to build up the edges of some of the garden beds.  I delayed too long, and now rain (reading time!) is predicted.  (Surely on Sunday!)  A load of soil blocked our garage access and needs to be moves as quickly as possible.  I think I will just get one yard at time at the end of work days since my BIG plan did not come to fruition.

To close the month, we went to a musical performance at the Sou’wester.  (See tomorrow’s post.)  I have extended staycation for at least one more week.

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Tuesday, 2 September, part two

I woke up at eight, early for me (way early), all excited about going to see Steve and John’s garden. Unable to fall back asleep, I decided to get up to make sure I had time to pick a really good bouquet for them. I took my camera out into the garden because I usually do not see it in morning light.

The mermaids were chatting.

The mermaids were chatting.

Roscoea purpurea 'Spice Island'

Roscoea purpurea ‘Spice Island’ (a hardy ginger, came back this year)

view to the southwest

view to the southwest

the west bed, back garden

the west bed, back garden

I swear that since we cut a limb on Nora’s tree, we can now see the house on the hill better. I don’t want to see it from my garden. That’ll teach us to mess with someone else’s tree (although it was a limb hanging way over on our side and one that was crossing another and made the tree look lopsided).

Leycesteria 'Golden Lanterns' from Joy Creek Nursery

Leycesteria ‘Golden Lanterns’ from Joy Creek Nursery

Agastache 'Blue Boa' or maybe 'Blue Fortune' from The Basket Case

Agastache ‘Blue Boa’ or maybe ‘Blue Fortune’ from The Basket Case (via Blooming)

sedum flower, a variegated one

sedum flower, a variegated one

I have every intention of sorting through all my tags this winter and making a master list of plants like John has done for the bayside garden. I really mean it this time.

a golden heather Allan brought back from Seattle; he brought three so I ended up with two in my garden.  Excuse the dratted creeping sorrel mixed in, such a bad weed.

a golden heather Allan brought back from Seattle; he brought three so I ended up with two in my garden. Excuse the dratted creeping sorrel mixed in, such a bad weed (but edible and deliciously lemony)

Some chelone (pink turtlehead) ended up in the bouquet.

Some chelone (pink turtlehead) ended up in the bouquet.

The pink turtlehead was in the front garden, where it was too dry. I moved it to the back garden last fall, where the water table is high. Some popped back up in the front garden and will get moved to Golden Sands Assisted Living and to Jo’s garden.

Physocarpus (probably 'Dart's Gold') and an astilbe

Physocarpus (probably ‘Dart’s Gold’) and an astilbe

In the front garden, Tetrapanax papyrifer 'Steroidal Giant' with the great Allium 'Forelock'

In the front garden, Tetrapanax papyrifer ‘Steroidal Giant’ with the great Allium ‘Forelock’ (expensive, thus only two, getting more this year)

white lilies and Rubus lineatus

white lilies and Rubus lineatus

At the post office, I was excited to get a book in the mail. Allan had ordered me a copy of Linnets and Valerians by Elizabeth Goudge, after I was reminded of her by seeing a book at Olde Towne Café. Oh, my! Was this a sequel to Linnets and Valerians?

The Runaways

The Runaways

Later in the day, I was sorry to learn that this book was Linnets and Valerians under a boring title. I guess the publishers thought Americans would not by a book with the original title, which is so so so much better. Now I am trying (or Allan is trying for me as he is better at online shopping) to find a copy with the proper title.

We headed north on Sandridge Road with perfect timing to be at Steve and John’s on the dot of 11:30…till we got to the highway 101 crossing and I realized I had forgotten the book I wanted to show them, my hand gardening tools for later in the day, and the two plants I wanted to give them. So back we went, circling around Black Lake; getting the two plants was the most important thing.

The plants were part of the swag from the Bloggers Fling banquet and we had an extra of each one and figured Steve and John would enjoy trying out these 2015 introductions:

wiegela

disporum

Then we had our visit and tour of Steve and John’s bayside garden (see yesterday’s post). As we left their garden, rain had begun in earnest. I was hoping for a break so we could dump the weekend’s load of yard debris at Peninsula Landscape Supply and pick up a yard of Soil Energy mulch for our garden; the original plan had been to work for a couple of hours at Andersen’s RV Park between the mulch acquisition and home. I had already decided that was not going to happen, but I did want my mulch. (If I had woken up to rain, with the prospect of it lasting all day and nowhere to go, I would have been thrilled to just read.)

The weather got worse every moment. Allan pointed out how miserably drenched we would be if we followed the debris dumping and mulch plan.

We drove on past Peninsula Landscape Supply toward home.

We drove on past Peninsula Landscape Supply toward home.

I imagined an afternoon of reading, with rain outside. My desire for mulch was so strong that I couldn’t let it go and I said to Allan (gently, really) that if it were just me, I would unload the debris and get the mulch and get drenched….for the sake of fulfilling that desire. He took that as a challenge, he said, and turned around at the Red Barn Arena.

entering Peninsula Landscape Supply

entering Peninsula Landscape Supply

debris unloaded, getting a yard of steaming mulch

debris unloaded, getting a yard of steaming mulch

As we were getting loaded up, I sensed that the sky was lightening to the west.

I could feel the rain was about to cease.

I could feel the rain was about to cease. Light around the edges!

looking south, definitely light around the edges

looking south, definitely light around the edges

By the time we got home about fifteen minutes later, the sky was breaking into blue all around us.

looking south from front garden

looking south from front garden

looking west

looking west

and north, beautiful blue

and north, beautiful blue

Allan did most of the wheelbarrowing to fill in the new woods bed.

Allan did most of the wheelbarrowing to fill in the new woods bed.

I filled in some holes and low areas in the front garden where I had dug up a boring daylily, a clump of lady’s mantle, and other undesirables. (And, sadly, an Edgeworthia chrysantha that had died after being purchased and planted in glorious bloom in early spring of this year.)

I carried about nine five gallon buckets of mulch into the garage to save for later transplanting projects. Only for the last two did I get organized enough to use the wheelbarrow to make it easier. Then I stuck a shovel in the ground around a big Joe Pye weed to see how hard to would be to dig out.

It would be difficult.

It would be difficult.

Joe Pye wants to be in a damper spot (as do all the sanguisorbas in the front garden). Allan saw me poking at it and said he would not mind digging it up for me. Joy!

after

after

Of course, I had to haul most of my buckets of mulch back out of the garage to fill this in. My plan is to plant my new Rosa pteracantha there, as I have noticed that the area gets backlit by the sun and so its huge translucent red thorns should show up well.

Rosa pteracantha still in its pot.

Rosa pteracantha still in its pot.

The planting will have to wait as the mulch is still too hot to plant anything in it.

Cautionary tale: Whoever originally planted the Shorebank garden on Howerton Avenue at the port (not me!) put down steaming hot soil and planted immediately. Within days, all the shrubs they planted were dead and had to be replaced at great expense to the landscaper (who went out of business and shall not be named and shamed).

Sadly, another plant that went away was the contorted hawthorne from Joy Creek Nursery. Another cautionary tale: There was much argy bargy when Allan and I were planting the tree. “Don’t hold it by the trunk!” was the cry of dismay, and then there was an ominous cracking sound right where the trunk meets the root ball. For three or four years, the little tree put out some leaves (never any flowers) in spring and then went completely bare all summer, and it never grew an inch. I finally gave up.

contorted Paul's Scarlet Hawthorne...a goner

contorted Paul’s Scarlet Hawthorne…a goner

It’s back behind the house waiting for me to think of something to do with the branches. The root ball is the same size as when it was planted.

when I bought the poor thing, in 2011 at Joy Creek

when I bought the poor thing, in 2011 at Joy Creek

Moral: Plant trees carefully; they are not as tough as they look.

It’s going to be a challenge to get all the work done before the crowds for Rod Run weekend arrive by Friday afternoon. Even so, someone besides myself and Allan was pleased about our unexpected day off.

Smokey likes me to be at home.

Smokey (in his Birds Be Safe collar) likes me to be at home.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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