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Posts Tagged ‘Salvia Africana lutea’

Sunday, 1 March 2020

Allan went off shopping across the river, partly for a new string trimmer and partly for pandemic supplies—in other words, enough canned goods, rice and beans and other staples to enable us to avoid shopping for a month if, heavens forfend, there is a coronavirus pandemic here. We should be able to go to work since our work can be pretty much non-peopling. I’m not scared, exactly, but I am depressed to have to think about all this, and worried for friends who are in fragile health, and sad because Seattle Carol (a Seattle metro bus driver) will probably cancel an early April visit during this uncertain time. Of course, I am made for being a recluse but would rather not have such a potentially dire reason.
Today I did a bit of propagating for my plant sale, wondering if fate will even allow The World’s Longest Garage Sale to take place as usual on Memorial Day weekend in late May.
The big plan was to prune all my roses that are not the old fashioned kind. The ramblers and shrubs I just let do what they will except for removing dead wood.
After the front garden roses, I got distracted with other projects….

Weeding a small front garden bed…

Yesterday ….

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Today….

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I removed yet another Ilex ‘Sky Pencil’ that had suddenly died, as they seem wont to do…

4B339961-5D3B-4C2C-AE12-77746D5BDBCCIn the background, behind the Melianthus, said ilex had been fine till it turned up its toes just last week. I probably won’t replace it with another shrub since the Melianthus would shade it out unless I put in something quite tall to begin with.  My budget doesn’t run to that.

I decided I must get the celandine out from the two beds by the front gate. Its pretty bright yellow daisy flowers set a bad example, making passersby think that it is a lovely winter bloomer that they should have.
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It has smothered out some choice small flowering bulbs that I used to have in that area. Because its root clumps leave tiny earth colored nodules behind, it will be back next year no matter how much sifting I do, thus the removal is not impressive as it might look.
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In the far back garden where I dug and sifted and fretted over every nodule last spring, the celandine now looks like this, stronger than ever.
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Utterly maddening.
In Modern Nature, Derek Jarman says this about a childhood memory of celandine.
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Instead of pruning all of the back garden roses as planned, I allowed myself to be distracted by the second pile of compost and leaves, this pile actually on the back corner of the Nora House driveway, which is a rather rude encroachment even though I know that her granddaughter, Alicia, does not mind.
Yesterday, before and after Allan dealt with the bamboo:

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My leaf bin contents had sunk during the winter and so, after moving the compost debris to the big bins, I was able to fill the leaf bins to the top with the tarped leaves. The rest were strewn onto the driveway garden bed and the final amount filled two oyster baskets.
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My audience:

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I had found it all so exhausting and so very cold that I almost quit several times. To finish the pile was revitalizing enough that I found the oomph to prune my mother’s two tea roses, but no more.
There is still much cutting back to do, including six Stipa giganteas….

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….and two more large roses. I would have done them a disservice to prune them at the end of the day when so very tired and cold.
The last thing I managed was a brief back garden appreciation walkabout.
Oh no, some stray celandine. Was too tired to get shovel…must remember before this makes a new big patch.
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We did not get cold enough weather to kill the Azolla that covers the ponds.

3FDE589F-018C-4169-B3A2-EB6C5FACB3F1In better news, I found….

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Pulmonaria

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Physocarpus ‘Dart’s Gold’

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Corylopsis pauciflora

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Crocuses

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Thick new shoots of Dranunculus vulgaris

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Yellow hellebore

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Narcissi in the Bogsy Wood

…and in the greenhouse…

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Echeverias flowering

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Salvia Africana-lutea

…and in Allan’s garden at dusk some crocuses toning well with a hebe.
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Tomorrow just had better be an all day Jarman reading day. I’m tired of waiting!

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into the autumn….still with no rain…at Klipsan Beach Cottages.

4 October

Agapanthus seedheads

Agapanthus seedheads

Sedum 'Autumn Joy' and Sanvitalia

Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ and Sanvitalia

climbing roses

climbing roses

roses

roses

rose and Melianthus major

rose and Melianthus major

Knock Out rose

Knock Out rose

Knock Out roses

Knock Out roses

sweet peas

sweet peas

white sweet peas

white sweet peas

Hydrangea 'Izu no Hana'

Hydrangea ‘Izu no Hana’

a Clematis from Joy Creek Nursery

a Clematis from Joy Creek Nursery

Dierama (Angel's Fishing Rod) seedheads

Dierama (Angel’s Fishing Rod) seedheads

driveway garden

driveway garden

Mary’s idea for 2013 is to make the shape of the driveway garden by the house more curvaceous.

10 October

office

office

At last I have some photos that show how it all fits together.  You drive in and park below the office…where you would have the view below:

from the driveway parking:  view across lawn to the fenced garden (looking northwest)

from the driveway parking: view across lawn to the fenced garden (looking northwest)

Fuschia containers by the driveway

Fuschia containers by the driveway

golden yews at center of fenced garden

golden yews at center of fenced garden
second area of fenced garden.  To the left, Hydrangea 'Izu No Hana'

second area of fenced garden. To the left, Hydrangea ‘Izu No Hana’

Hydrangea 'Izu No Hana' flower

Hydrangea ‘Izu No Hana’ flower

lower fenced garden with Knock Out roses and view of cottages

lower fenced garden with Knock Out roses and view of cottages

sweet peas

sweet peas

sweet peas and cottages

sweet peas and cottages

figs

figs

Bronze fennel (now officially considered something of a noxious weed)

Bronze fennel (now officially considered something of a noxious weed)

In the foreground, above, Sedumn ‘Autumn Joy’ and Euphobia characias wulfenii, which bloomed mightily and at length in the early spring.

Salvia patens and Helichrysum 'Limelight' in center of fenced garden

Salvia patens and Helichrysum ‘Limelight’ in center of fenced garden

Salvia africana-lutea in a container

Salvia africana-lutea in a container

The above very cool brown Salvia has leaves that smell, to me, a bit of root beer.  I have brought it through winter in a cold greenhouse before.

In the background above, the fabulously tall Thalictrum ‘Elin’ from Dan Hinkley’s Heronswood.

Rose, Coreopsis 'Flower Tower', Melianthus major

Rose, Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’, Melianthus major

I got Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’ from Joy Creek Nursery a couple of years ago, and in summer 2012 was able to get more at The Basket Case Greenhouse locally.  It is a fun plant because the usual small yellow coreopsis flowers bloom on a towering stem that can get taller than me.

25 October

flowering currant

flowering currant

From the bench above, looking south, we have this view of the garden:

looking south

looking south

On the very right in the background, above, you can see the tallness of Thalictrum ‘Elin’.

The showy autumn stems of the very tall Thalictrum 'Elin'

The showy autumn stems of the very tall Thalictrum ‘Elin’

Japanese maple at the A Frame

Japanese maple in the A Frame garden

mophead hydrangeas in the A Frame garden

mophead hydrangeas in the A Frame garden

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On October 6th, Erin and Diego Glenn were the very last of our garden visitors.  But the garden put on a good show that went strongly through the middle of the month.

Diego in the bogsy woods

Diego in the bogsy woods

8 October by Allan's shed; plants from The Basket Case Greenhouse

8 October by Allan’s shed; plants from The Basket Case Greenhouse

8 Oct, new plant table acquired from a neighbour one street over; we saw it for free and grabbed it.

8 Oct, new plant table acquired from a neighbour one street over; we saw it for free and grabbed it.

8 October, Echinacea 'Tomato Soup'

8 October, Echinacea ‘Tomato Soup’

I planted this once upon a time in the McDonalds garden back when I did that job.  It would be better for a restaurant that actually serves tomato soup.

8 Oct, Salvia Africana lutea.  I hope to bring this through in the greenhouse.

8 Oct, Salvia Africana lutea. I hope to bring this through in the greenhouse.

8 October, Lochroma (Violet Tubeflower), a cool plant from Back Alley Gardens in Gearhart.   Might make it in the cold greenhouse!

8 October, Lochroma (Violet Tubeflower), a cool plant from Back Alley Gardens in Gearhart. Might make it in the cold greenhouse!

8 October, Lochroma (Violet Tubeflower)

8 October, Lochroma (Violet Tubeflower)

8 October, Lochroma (Violet Tubeflower) with green Zinnia

8 October, Lochroma (Violet Tubeflower) with green Zinnia

8 October, Rudbeckia (maybe 'Cherry Red')

8 October, Rudbeckia (maybe ‘Cherry Red’)

garden boat, 8 October

garden boat, 8 October

By October 8th, I had stopped deadheading the cosmos in the garden boat.  My excuse was that birds like the seeds, but really, I was just sick of deadheading.

back garden, 8 October

back garden, 8 October

above: Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’. Solidago ‘Fireworks” (a well behaved goldenrod), Aconitum (monkshood)

8 October, the cat bench

8 October, the cat bench

8 October, Nicotiana langsdorfii

8 October, Nicotiana langsdorfii

This Nicotiana (flowering tobacco), painted sage and cosmos were the plants that were repeated throughout the garden from front to back.

shade bed, 8 October

shade bed, 8 October

Passiflora caerulea (passionflower)

Passiflora caerulea (passionflower)

Dicentra scandens by front porch, 8 October

Dicentra scandens by front porch, 8 October

and two presents on the front porch...the birthday basket from Nancy and a cute little tick tock sunflower from Jenna.

and two presents on the front porch…the birthday basket from Nancy and a cute little tick tock sunflower from Jenna.

I snuck back into this post at the end of October to add a few more photos:

sweet peas still blooming on the deer fence, 15 October

sweet peas still blooming on the deer fence, 15 October

Cosmos on October 20th

Cosmos on October 20th

a black Scabiosa that I grew from seed, 20 October

a black Scabiosa that I grew from seed, 20 October

23 October:  I did manage to grow some red runner beans

23 October: I did manage to grow some red runner beans

and they were quite beautiful in pink and black...

and they were quite beautiful in pink and black…

 

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