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Posts Tagged ‘Salvia patens’

Wednesday, 6 September 2017

We took the morning off to receive guests Jay and Diane, all the way from Florida!  I’ve been Facebook friends with Jay since he first visited our garden in 2014.  On that occasion, I was smitten with his insightful questions.  For example, he wanted to know who had been my greatest gardening influence.  When I said my grandmother, he asked to know her name “because it is important to say people’s names.”  He was here visiting his Long Beach sister, along with his good friend, Diane.

Jay and Diane arrive

Jay gave Allan and I each a t shirt of this delightful design from a place called Barberville Pioneer Settlement.

We walked out into the garden.

It’s looking rather autumnal.

I took note of what they noticed.

honeysuckle

honeysuckle berries

honeysuckle flowers

 

wild impatiens (touch me not, my small and controlled patch of noxious weeds)

Everyone jumps when the seed pods pop.

an odd dandelion seedhead with a topknot

Diane said the Leycesteria (Himalayan honeysuckle) reminded her of shrimp plant.  She ate a creme brulee tasting berry.

fence decor

We sat around the fire circle for awhile (where we are not having fires lately because of dry conditions).

Diane wanted to visit the willow woods outside the south gate.

the swale between us and the port parking lots

the willow woods (Not many people ask to come this far into the depths of the property)

followed by Skooter and Smokey

We all smelled the fizzy leaves of the Stachys ‘Hidalgo’ (7 Up Plant).

Diane noticed my carniverous sarracenia.

Jay went with Allan to the workshop to look at two autoharps that he is borrowing for the week of his visit.  Diane and I walked around some more, and I noticed what she noticed:

Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’

Helenium ‘Carnival’

Pink phlox (left) and escallonia (right)

this hardy fuchsia

my mom’s red velvet rose

By now, Jay and Allan had repaired to the house to look at more of Allan’s old musical instruments.

a dual player dulcimer that Allan built back in the 1970s.

Jay and Diane left, with Jay carrying two autoharps.  Two more plants were especially noticed:

a white passion flower

and of course, they had to smell the peanut butter leaves of Melianthus major. (Tetrapanax in the foreground.)

Melianthus major

Allan and I waited for a couple of hours before going to water at the port; he was typing away at a boating blog post while I read the ever-disturbing news (hurricanes, Dreamers in jeopardy, fires, flooding).

Had a greenhouse tomato for lunch: Black Krim, very mild.

Then we were off to do a couple of hours of watering and weeding at the port.

hooking our hose up to the hose at Time Enough Books

watering the Time Enough Books curbside garden

the westernmost bed

I am not cutting plants back right now.  More plant life will help keep people from standing in the garden during Slow Drag on Friday (I hope).

west end of Waterfront Way

Foghorns out on the river have been a constant for the last couple of days.

The river is out past the marina, which is entered through a rather narrow channel.

I had intended to do the boatyard garden as well today.  Our working drive was weak.  Allan wanted to get back to typing, and I was not averse to going home and postponing the rest of the work till tomorrow or Friday.

I took another walk around the garden, noticing things.

Everywhere I stepped, Frosty was underfoot, as he had been with our visitors today.

Rudbeckia ‘Cherry Brandy’

a table of ladies in waiting

I managed to get just one plant planted:

Melianthus ‘Purple Haze’ from Xera Plants

back garden…not quite sure, a varieated lonicera maybe?

very autumnal with Darmera peltata and astilbe

I long for a campfire. The fire danger is excessive right now.

Even well watered astilbe is crisping up.

I am giving up on hostas as soon as I find the strength to dig these out!

I couldn’t get a GOOD photo of my favourite bird, the common flicker.

Have been completely lax at deadheading my own cosmos.

fragrant Sinningia tubiflora from Xera Plants.

Salvia patens backed with Roscoea purpurea ‘Spice Island’

Am pleased with this basket I made with ‘Lemon Slice’ calibrachoa, black eyed Susan vine, and Tradescantia ‘Sweet Kate’.

That was an excellent day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thursday, 8 October 2015

Because a big storm was predicted, we did not go to our north end jobs this week.  It seemed a waste of clients’ money to groom gardens for a weekend when guests would be unlikely to be in them.  So we focused on Long Beach, which always has tourists walking by the gardens no matter what the weather.

The Planter Box

First, we took a summer worth of pots to The Planter Box for re-use.

First, we took a summer worth of pots to The Planter Box for re-use.  We must have the garage clear for Bulb Time soon.

clematis for sale

clematis for sale

I bought three pumpkins and found this little fella under one.

I bought three pumpkins and found this little fella under one.

Suddenly a gardening convention began when both Dave and Ed Strange showed up.

Dave, Jackson, Ed

Dave, Jackson, Ed

Ed, Jackson, Teresa

Ed, Jackson, store owner Teresa

pumpkins!

pumpkins! and bulb food

Long Beach

The big mission of the day was to dig out two daylilies from Fifth Street Park.  They are a lovely big maroon colour, but since we only do the park once a week, they don’t get deadheading often enough.

Fifth Street Park before (Allan's photo)

Fifth Street Park before (Allan’s photo)

after (Allan's photo)

after (Allan’s photo)

before (Allan's photo)

before (Allan’s photo)

after (Allan's photo)

after (Allan’s photo)

While Allan did that, I checked the planters that I had not attended to yesterday.

I got to meet a sweetheart of an 8 month old Malamute, which was an extra treat since I have been reading Susan Conant’s Dog Lover’s Mystery series with two malamutes as recurring characters. 

a darling!

a darling!

Cosmos and painted sage

Cosmos and painted sage…amd a bee caught by a spider.  The spider was gently deposited into the grass behind me.

The last day of lush planters if the storm comes...

The last day of lush planters if the storm comes…

Salvia patens

Salvia patens

This tree garden looks moderately nice.

This tree garden looks moderately nice. (I still compare them so unfavourably to Pam’s Seaside gardens.)

gunnera in Fifth Street Park (east side)

gunnera in Fifth Street Park (east side)

Fifth Street Park waterfall pond

Fifth Street Park waterfall pond

big hydrangea at the back of Fifth Street Park

big hydrangea at the back of Fifth Street Park

northeast side of Fifth Street Park

northeast side of Fifth Street Park

lots of Gaura 'Whirling Butterflies' and another of those non blooming cosmos!

lots of Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies’ and another of those non blooming cosmos!

The carousel is further dismantled.

The carousel is further dismantled.

We headed off to the city works yard to dump our debris and get some soil, attending to the northernmost block of planters on the way.

Geranium 'Rozanne' will be battered by the storm.

Geranium ‘Rozanne’ will be battered by the storm.

So pleased my Dianthus 'Charles Musgrave' came back. (with Erysimum 'Bowles Mauve')

So pleased my Dianthus ‘Charles Musgrave’ came back. (with Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’)

my favourite planter of the year

my favourite planter of the year

(Two days later, when we drove through town, the storm had battered the planters so much that this was indeed the last day of a beautiful flower show for 2015.)(Or so we thought!)

Next: getting some soil from our dwindling pile at City Works yard (Allan's photo)

Next: getting some soil from our dwindling pile at City Works yard (Allan’s photo)

after filling the holes (Allan's photo)

after filling the holes (Allan’s photo)

(Allan's photo)

(Allan’s photo)  More room for cosmos next year!

One of the daylilies, which originally came from my garden, will go to Debbie for her Master Gardener plant sale.  The one that got infested with orange montbretia went right into the city debris pile.

Ilwaco

We drove along the port gardens just to check on them.  They must be weeded next week for sure!

at the boatyard

at the boatyard

All we did today was pull the cosmos out of the Port Office garden.

All we did today was pull the cosmos out of the Port Office garden.

at home

I realized at the city works yard that, since the wind had not yet arrived, we could have a campfire.

evening light

evening light

I hope not the last one of the season. (Allan's photo)

I hope not the last one of the season. (Allan’s photo)

DSC00494

Smokey enjoys a fire.

Smokey enjoys a fire.

He likes his own chair.

He likes his own chair.

I thought the sky promised a good sunset. Instead, it just turned to grey.

I thought the sky promised a good sunset. Instead, it just turned to grey.

how I love a campfire! (Allan's photo)

how I love a campfire! (Allan’s photo)

Smokey in his chair.

Smokey in his chair.

toasted hot dogs followed by buttered corn roasted in foil

toasted hot dogs followed by buttered corn roasted in foil

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

 

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Wednesday, 6 August 2014

First, a project in our garden:

Allan dug out the old white rose that I had clipped yesterday evening.

Allan dug out the old white rose that I had clipped yesterday evening.

all dug out! (we hope)

all dug out! (we hope)

I think this is a pink phlox of some sort, deer resistant (or so I have found in unfenced garden)

I think this is a pink phlox of some sort, deer resistant (or so I have found in unfenced garden)

a stunning rose; this winter I am going to figure out which roses I have!

a stunning rose; this winter I am going to figure out which roses I have by looking at old order lists.

Our workday began, as it does every three days or so, with the compost bucket switch at Olde Towne Café just north of the Ilwaco stoplight. Luanne had moved the couch and coffee table and I think the new arrangement looks ideal for introverts. We had no time to linger there as much work had to be done.

I would like this spot better than when the couch faced the room.

I would like this spot better than when the couch faced the room.

Before we could really get to work, we ran the load of rose canes and roots over to the dump; it was too mean and not something we wanted to inflict on the debris pile at Peninsula Landscape Supply. Then….

Long Beach

Watering the planters takes longer now because of a lot of deadheading. Some of the painted sage is just a tad past its prime:

Painted sage comes in pink, white, and blue.

Painted sage comes in pink, white, and blue. The colour comes from bracts; the flowers a tiny white things.

Some stems are almost done flowering.

Some stems are almost done flowering.

So I cut those stems down to a junction with two small flower buds for a less spectacular later bloom.

So I cut those stems down to a junction with two small flower buds for a less spectacular later bloom.

cute pots outside The Wooden Horse gift shop

cute pots outside The Wooden Horse gift shop

I can see these paintings somewhere on my house...

I can see these paintings somewhere on my house…

While I watered, a Summerfest musician entertained me (and all passersby); he was good.

While I watered, a Summerfest musician entertained me (and all passersby); he was good.

I got a little teary when he sang Mr. Bojangles as it reminds me of my ex “who drinks a bit” but has many talents. And since I am publishing two weeks behind because of garden tour posts, I can add that ever since that day, these lines have made me misty eyed daily: “He spoke through tears of fifteen years how his dog and him traveled about. The dog up and died, up and died, and after twenty years he still grieves.” I read up a little bit about the song, Jerry Jeff Walker actually did meet an old man by that name in a jail cell. When the man told the story about his dog, the mood became so heavy that the cellmates ask the old man to dance.

planter, re-done this year (reclaimed from Crocosmia 'Lucifer), by Campiche Gallery

planter, re-done this year (reclaimed from Crocosmia ‘Lucifer), by Campiche Gallery

a good planter by Paws by the Sea

a good planter by Paws by the Sea

The planter above is a challenge as a former volunteer planted full sized shrubs: two Escallonia ‘Pink Princess’ and a ‘Rosy Glow’ barberry. Cutting them to the “ground” every year seems to work although that leads to an awkward ugly stage for awhile in springtime.

Also a would-be enormous golden Eounymous...sigh...

Also a would-be enormous golden Euonymous…sigh…

in front of Home at the Beach

planter in front of Home at the Beach with nasturtium and Salvia patens

Fuchsia in planter by Wind World Kites (Allan's photo); the kite guy likes the Crocosmia 'Lucifer' so it stays in this one.

Fuchsia in planter by Wind World Kites (Allan’s photo); the kite guy likes the Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ so it stays in this one.

Meanwhile, Allan watered the trees and turned on the soaker hoses on the Sid Snyder Drive planters, where he fixed a major leak.

No wonder this planter was not doing well!

No wonder this planter was not doing well!

P8060004

fixed

fixed

I much prefer the hand watering on the main street to these soaker hoses and wish Sid Snyder had quick connect faucet fittings. Soaker hoses never do get the planters evenly moist. I also think it is good to be able to spray the salt and dust off of the plants.

While watering the street trees and the planters on the northernmost block, Allan saw our old dark green two door Saturn; can you believe we worked for eight or nine years out of that little tiny thing??

It is so small I always felt I was going to be squashed like a bug!

It is so small I always felt I was going to be squashed like a bug!


I felt just…happy all day long. This happens fairly often with right livelihood.

home

In the evening, I weeded all down the west side fence, or most of it till I ran out of steam, and Allan dug out a sad Darmera peltata. On a roll in the home garden, I intend to get a yard of Soil Energy to fill in where that rose came out and will have enough for a few other spots as well.

sad, sad Darmera in a spot that was too dry.  (It started itself there.)

sad, sad Darmera in a spot that was too dry. (It started itself there.)

the former rose spot empty and waiting

the former rose spot empty and waiting

and some white lilies just coming on

and some white lilies just coming on

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from yesterday, the gorgeous Weigela at Casa Pacifica

from yesterday, the gorgeous Weigela at Casa Pacifica

21 May 2014

Annuals planting time continues to be over even though considerable planting was done today.  That’s because most of the plants were perennials and because we did not plant all the livelong day. Still, I did not think I would end up with several flats of plants to plant today…

We began with a quick compost bucket switch at Olde Towne Café; it has been weeks, it seems, since we have had time to linger there, much less have a tasty meal.

Olde Towne

Olde Towne

Outside, Luanne's container garden and one of the city planters

Outside, Luanne’s container garden and one of the city planters

While I was pulling some bulb foliage out of the city planter, the city works manager stopped and told us that they are not going to be able to put water spigots in at each intersection…too much digging through concrete…but that they would hook us up to the fire hydrants (with a hose connection).  I said that would not work because of the odd and usually late evening hours when we can find time after other jobs to work on the Ilwaco planters.  In the course of the conversation, we decided we could try going back to the water trailer with its big pump tank.  What used to take so long was coiling and uncoiling maddening, kinking hoses.  We will try one of those new collapsible hoses.  I immediately got in touch with our liaison from the Ilwaco Merchants Association and said we would need four things:  a new battery, a fancy new hose, new tabs for the water trailer, and a place to park the darn thing because we don’t have room in our yard to be moving it in and out regularly.  As often happens with mobile phones around here, the call got cut off and had to be continued later.

Meanwhile, we kept on working, planting a Lavatera ‘Barnsley’ at Diane’s garden, stopping at the Basket Case for more soil for the Long Beach city planter that we got stymied on last night, and went on to weed at Andersen’s RV Park.

I had to plant ONE annual there, a godetia that had got forgotten last time.  One of the staff had rescued it and kept it watered for me.  And one Salvia patens and three Diascia ‘Blackthorn Apricot’ just because Lorna will love them in a pot by the office.

Other than that, it was all the pleasure of weeding.  I found out that Lorna wanted a new blueberry to replace a large almost dead one.  I am learning to delegate and asked if the staff could dig the old one out.  It worked, and I was most appreciative.

delegation, what a concept!!

delegation, what a concept!!

While I weeded by the garden shed and in the picket fence garden, Allan made the poppy field path nice again.

an oval path around the poppies

an oval path around the poppies

He took this photo to show the annoying creepiness of creeping sorrel roots.

He took this photo to show the annoying creepiness of creeping sorrel roots.

defined again

after:  the path defined again

much more inviting

much more inviting

There is supposed to be a bench about halfway up.  I think it is being repainted.

RV club members gathered at Payson Hall marveled over the Alliums in the planters right outside.

round:  Allium albopilosum starry:  Allium schubertii

round: Allium albopilosum
starry: Allium schubertii

in the picket fence garden:  Allium 'Purple Sensation'.  There should be white 'Everest' too.  Huh.

in the picket fence garden: Allium ‘Purple Sensation’. There should be white ‘Everest’ too. Huh.  That’s weird!

I guess the Everest did not come back well, as down in the garden shed garden, where I planted new ones this year, tall white alliums abound.

While we were at Andersen’s, I got a call from my Ilwaco merchants liaison and found that all is GO with getting what we need for the Ilwaco water truck.  That changed my plans for the day to include another plant shopping trip.  We got Lorna’s blueberry at The Planter Box and picked up some diascia and some Oregano rotundifolium as well, drought tolerant plants that can take the tough conditions in the Ilwaco planters.

The Planter Box has some gorgeous verbascum in bloom.

The Planter Box has some gorgeous verbascum in bloom.

They also have Salvia patens, a tender perennial that is rare to find in nurseries.

They also have Salvia patens, a tender perennial that is rare to find in nurseries.

The flower of Salvia patens, one of my favourites for containers

The flower of Salvia patens, one of my favourites for containers (although it is too delicate for the droughty condition of the Ilwaco planters)

It’s especially good to get small plants of Salvia patens; when they are sold in gallon containers, they tend to be too wobbly and break off at the main stem.  Small plants like those above are better (and cheaper!)

I bought some statice for the Long Beach planters and the boatyard.  Everlasting papery flowers, foliage that people think is a dandelion at first.

I bought some statice for the Long Beach planters and the boatyard. Everlasting papery flowers, foliage that people think is a dandelion at first.  Drought tolerant.  I recommend it.

soothing to the eye

soothing to the eye: the view from where I sat waiting for check out

Then over the The Basket Case to get more diascia, some trailing rosemary, and some little sedums for Ilwaco.  Before Ilwaco, we finished that planter at the end of Long Beach’s Sid Snyder beach approach road.

what a horrible weedy mess

yesterday’s horrible weedy mess

done

done, WorldMark resort in background

variegated golden thyme, statice, green santolina, silver santolina, Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ that was dug out of a downtown planter last week, Armeria maritima (sea thrift), Dianthus ‘Essex Witch’; will bring some creeping sedums from another planter next time we water in town.

I do hope this planter does not get messed with.  Many eyes from two hotels will be upon it and that may give pause to vandalism.  We got several lovely compliments.  My favourite was when two young women walked by and one said she had seen earlier in the week that the planters were all “bushy” (meaning weedy) and now they looked “fanatastic”!

Adrift Hotel and The Pickled Fish...I rather envied the diners in the restaurant window at 5:30 PM.

Adrift Hotel and The Pickled Fish…I rather envied the diners in the restaurant window at 5:30 PM.

These two seagulls at a Discovery Trail entrance looked like carvings...

These two seagulls at a Discovery Trail entrance looked like carvings…

but were real birds.

but were real birds.

just past the planter we worked on...

just past the planter we worked on…

Wouldn't that be nice?

Wouldn’t that be nice?

No beach walking for us today.  We went to Ilwaco and slogged away on the planters, getting done with work at about eight thirty.

The first one, freshly planted, is the only one I had the energy to photograph.

The first one, freshly planted, is the only one I had the energy to photograph.

The most pleasant ones to do were the four that were empty of plants and three that were almost empty.  (Well, one had a big boring hebe that Allan dug out; THEN it was empty.  We had been short on “plant material” when some planters were added late last year.)  The reason that some were empty was because they had been added last year and our hard winter pretty much did in whatever was in them.  And one, by Don’s Portside Café, had gotten clogged up with water and the plants drowned.  Less fun than planting a roomy planter is poking into the planters that have established perennials and trying to find room for much much needed colour accents to carry them through summer.  We had intended to dig out the soil in the Portside planter and see why it is not draining…and then decided to wait till fall.  It should be ok now that big rains have stopped and hey, I can plant some sanvitalia in it and the slightly damper soil will keep it happy.  Next fall, we’ll dig it out and fix the hole before winter sogs it up with water again.

We got the weeds and old bulb foliage out of all of them and made a list of how many more uppies and trailies we need to finish the job.  I want it to look good for the Memorial Day weekend (two days away).  Funny thing is, we kind of liked the idea of not doing it anymore as it would free up three evenings a week and yet…if not us, who?  No one else stepped up, and the city is doing all they can (other than digging holes in the sidewalk for spigots) to make it easy, so we will keep this job going because we take pride in our little town.  Adding the job to what we need to do before the holiday weekend is something I feel driven to do.  I hope we get everything done in time…Still to do, in two days??  water the planters and weed Fifth Street Park in Long Beach town, check up on and take care of whatever needs doing at Klipsan Beach and Anchorage Cottages and Depot Restaurant, plant an ornamental grass at the Boreas Inn, weed-eat the little lawn at Golden Sands, plant Lorna’s blueberry at Andersen’s, finish the Ilwaco planters, and the world might end if we don’t get the Port of Ilwaco gardens perfectly weeded for the influx of holiday weekenders.

 

 

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In my continuing quest to catch up to the present day….

Monday, September 2, 2013

The day began inauspiciously with the discovery of a broken glass ball in the garden by the front steps.  It had been tucked into that bare spot by the pot of water….How it rolled so far is beyond me.  Allan blames cats.

There was no fallen apple to explain it...

There was no fallen apple to explain it…

Before we left for work, our friend and fellow garden businessperson Ed Strange stopped by and what with sitting around schmoozing for awhile, all of our days got off to a late start.  No wait, Ed had probably been working since eight AM and was taking a late morning break!

We accomplished a one-off weeding job that had been on the schedule for a couple of weeks.  Last week’s rain put it off because it is not a job we would want to do in bad weather.  Too many people driving on busy Sandridge Road would feel sorry for us.

helping out at The Basket Case...before and after

helping out at The Basket Case…before and after

Next, Jo’s garden, where we have been working once a week to keep it up to the perfection it enjoyed on garden tour day.

Jo's garden

Jo’s garden

Jo kept saying how sad it was to see the garden going down…and it is, even though many of the flowers keep blooming.

the northwest side

the northwest side

A pair of doves or pigeons (I’m not much of a birder) cooed in the tree by the birdfeeder area….

pigeons

And I wondered if they caused competition for the little birds.

Pine siskins I do know!  (I think.)

Pine siskins I do know! (I think.)

That was not much to accomplish for one day.  A weekend off seems to make it hard to get revved up on Monday, and added to that the fact that it was the Labour Day holiday Monday seemed to sap our will to work into the evening.    We remembered that the Depot Restaurant was having its annual Labour Day ribs special and were lured into an early dinner….at 5:30!   We usually eat at 11:00 PM at this time of year…after I am done with a blog entry (and thank goodness Allan cooks or it would be cold cereal for me).

inside the Depot

inside the Depot

Gazpacho soup

Gazpacho soup

Just imagine:  “Gazpacho Seville: Traditional Cold Spanish Soup with Plum Tomatoes, Cucumbers, Sweet Bell Peppers, Smoked Paprika topped with Grape Tomato Salsa ”

Oh my, it is my favourite summer menu item.

Outside, the Solidago ‘Fireworks’ put on an excellent show even though last week’s rain had somewhat knocked them over.

'Fireworks' goldenrod and cosmos in the Depot garden

‘Fireworks’ goldenrod and cosmos in the Depot garden

When we got home there was still enough light to cut out another strip of lawn to fill the wheelie bin.  I continue my internal debate about whether or not to turn this whole area to gravel paths and a scree garden.

it's not the prettiest lawn....

it’s not the prettiest lawn….the concrete to the right is my neighbour’s driveway

Tomorrow we would have to get cracking on work again, but for now…dusk is peaceful at home.

back garden at dusk

back garden at dusk

Tuesday, September 3, 2013

In the morning watering of the greenhouse and patio plants, I noticed that my miniature cattail was in bloom.

catttails

cat tails

I would never make the mistake again of planting them in a natural pond (as I did at my old house) but they look great in a water tub.

The Sugar Magnolia pea that Nancy Allen gave me is blooming and making pretty purple peas even though I planted it quite late.

Sugar Magnolia pea

Sugar Magnolia pea

garden boat in the morning

garden boat in the morning

front garden looking east:  still pondering whether to make gravel paths

front garden looking east: still pondering whether to make gravel paths

As is convenient when I dawdle while Larry and Robert’s garden needs watering, Allan had left for their place five doors down across Pearl Street.  I walked down and joined him.

Past Tom and Judy's house

Past Tom and Judy’s house, heading west

the Larry-Robert garden boat, looking south

the Larry-Robert garden boat, looking south

sad

sad little squirt on this side of the three river rocks

While we have been watering pretty regularly, the state of this Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’ (should be at least five, if not eight, feet tall! rather than about six inches) shows that it is not enough.  We will be mulching this whole garden with cow fiber as a fall project and it will hold moisture better next year.

In concern over the weightiness of the new this year Robinia pseudoacacia ‘Frisia’…..seems to be leaning way too much…I pruned it a bit and hope I don’t regret it later.  Allan brought the tree back from Seattle.  I wish it had started out smaller and more upright.

before and after

before and after

Next we drove to Casa Pacifica, a garden near Wallicut Farms.  It had been three weeks or so (more?) since we had been there.  It has water problems so nothing grows much in summer, not even the weeds.

the two shy dogs, Darcy and Spook

the two shy dogs, Darcy and Spook

two indoor kitties watching from a screen door

two indoor kitties watching from a screen door

Even that bit inland the day was hotter.  We deadheaded the twelve whiskey barrels of annuals.  A daisy had made its way into one of them.

daisybee

There wasn’t much to do in the garden borders.   Spider season has begun and they are all over the gardens.

spider

Right after I took the above photo and then had to deadhead the buddliea to which the spider had attached its web, it ended up on my wrist trying to crawl up my sleeve.  My cries of “NO!” were more gutteral than shrill and seemed to scare the spider away.

Next we deadheading the Long Beach welcome sign…hundreds of dead little blossoms of Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’.

Acidanthera just started to bloom at the welcome sign

Acidanthera just started to bloom at the welcome sign

yellow Bidens along the edge is self cleaning....

yellow Bidens along the edge is self cleaning….

While we watered the Long Beach planters, I considered that the reason that people sometimes thank me for working is that they think I am volunteering.  Even though we took over all the planters several years ago, some of them still have signs naming a business or individual who used to maintain them.

sign

Some of the business names don’t even exist anymore, like The Rocket Diner and Las Maracas Restaurant.

sign

 

One of my planter favourites:  Salvia patens

One of my planter favourites: Salvia patens

While I watered the main street planters, Allan was bucket watering the Bolstadt beach approach planters and hose watering the street trees.  I still had nine planters to go (of 37 plus six whiskey barrels) when I looked north and saw him watering his last tree.

He's so far away you can't see him in the photo...but I could.

He’s so far away you can’t see him in the photo…but I could.

Just about then, I looked in the planter just showing at the bottom of the photo and saw three gleaming jewel cases.  CDs, I thought; what could they be?

not very hidden

not very hidden

I am sorry to say they turned out to be three porn movies.  Particularly creepy ones purportedly featuring teenage girls.  They ended up broken in the garbage but I had to wonder….I have often found empty beer cans and liquor bottles in the planters near bus stops, but….Wouldn’t someone have to be pretty drunk to forget their porn when the bus came?

the bus stop from across the street

the bus stop from across the street

I’m glad I found the discs before someone’s child did.

Shaking off that weird experience, we finished the day with Allan watering the Ilwaco planters while I weeded the boatyard.   The port and boatyard gardens needed to be perfect for the annual Slow Drag at the Port, coming up on Friday.

boatyard garden

boatyard garden

a good section with Gaura 'Whirling Butterflies'

a good section with Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies’ and cosmos

Solidago 'Fireworks'

Solidago ‘Fireworks’

I can think of a few gardens we do that do NOT have Solidago ‘Fireworks’:  Boreas, Ann’s, KBC and The Anchorage.  What an oversight!

We then dumped our debris in the peaceful boat trailer parking area at the east end of the marina.

field

I love this view and am sad there is going to be a building and parking lot put here, or at least that’s the word around town.

view

The words “paved paradise and put up a parking lot” come to mind.

sunset

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I’m still running behind on blogging due to the caterpillar emergency evening, so here I continue to attempt to catch up.

Larry and Robert’s garden

Monday morning, the first item was to water Larry and Robert’s garden because we had planted a new little tree. We could not count on rain to keep the new plants happy, and in fact found a couple of perennials with thirst-wilted leaves. (The green Echinacea seems highly miffy when it comes to needing water.) Allan drive and I walked a bit later as I still had a few potted plants to water in my own garden. On the way, I looked over the fence to admire Judy’s Eryngium, nicknamed “LB”.

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

Saliva patens on Larry's front steps

Saliva patens on Larry’s front steps (from The Planter Box)

watering

watering

The Depot Restaurant

We next checked on the Depot garden to see if those plants needed water. The Eryngiums had fallen over a bit.

but we were stakeless

but we were stakeless

The garden did need watering because the sprinkler system does not hit the new garden.

Planter Box and Basket Case

Next, The Planter Box…for some Dr Earth organic CATERPILLAR spray. We have to deal with them at a commercial job, whereas, as I have said, in my own garden I would let nature take its course. Look at all the glorious cosmos that Planter Box still has for sale:

glorious cosmos for sale at Planter Box

glorious cosmos for sale at Planter Box

another great Planter Box annual: Salpiglossis

another great Planter Box annual: Salpiglossis

I bought some stunning Gazania there, and we then nipped over to The Basket Case to get a different kind of Gazania. There we saw a sign welcoming the Sisters on the Fly club, and Fred told us that he’d gotten an email from Lorna of Andersen’s RV letting him know that the club was collecting “something blue” on this trip. He and Nancy had put a collection of blue flowering plants at the front of the center greenhouse. Very clever. Geranium ‘Rozanne’, Lithodora, Salvia ‘Queen Victoria’. With this knowledge, we bought some Queen Victoria to add to the Payson Hall planters because the rest of our day would be spent at Andersen’s.

Basket Case

Once upon a time, I had several old nonfunctioning wheelbarrows planted with flowers, and I then “went off” the idea, but seeing how great the Basket Case wheelbarrows look, I will try again the next time one becomes not work worthy.

planted with Nancy's magic touch

planted with Nancy’s magic touch

Andersen’s RV Park

At Andersen’s, we stopped at the road box to add Gazania. The reseeding nasturtiums are being slow and not putting on any show so far.

workin' on the road box

workin’ on the road box

a Gazania 'Stars and Stripes mix' from Planter Box

a Gazania ‘Stars and Stripes mix’ from Planter Box

It is always a trick to plant this planter because nothing in it can be too tall or signs will be blocked.

for example...

for example…

We finished the detailed weeding of the picket fence and west gardens. Meanwhile staffer Rob was appreciating the flowers by taking some photos which are slated for the Andersen’s website.

with a macro lens

with a macro lens

We brought some coils of fishing rope which had been left in the bogsy woods by David Maki, the son of the former owner of our house, Shirley Maki. Some of it has gone to decorate at Queen La De Da’s, some hangs on our fence, and now some is at Andersen’s artistically enhancing two big planters.

Al starts uncoiling rope

Al starts uncoiling rope

pot number one

pot number one

It took three staffers to coil the rope around; it is quite stiff, and I was impressed that they managed it!

having at pot number two

having at pot number two

finished

finished

We got the weeding done and Payson Hall deadheaded but not before a big storm moved in. It rained so hard I felt like I was breathing rain, and we did not even have our raincoats with us as had not expected it til Tuesday.

Payson Hall planters all refreshed

Payson Hall planters all refreshed

I was, in fact, thrilled because the rain meant that we did not have to drive far north to Surfside to water Marilyn’s in the late evening. I could only hope (because the Peninsula is long enough that the weather differs) that it also rained reasonably hard up there, although the sky looked suspiciously light in that direction.

The group leaders of the Sisters on the Fly and a few other trailers had already arrived. There will be many trailers by Wednesday evening and we must get back to see them. (Payson will need deadheading again anyway for such a special event; the women will be dining there.) Here is a sampling. They were even cuter before the rain came and some of the decor got put away.

trailer

Rod and Reel

Rod and Reel

two cuties

two cuties

another cutie

another cutie

another cutie

We have the pleasure of knowing that the gardens are just about as perfect as we can get them for this fun group and we look forward to stopping by later this week to see all of the painted and decorated vintage trailers.

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Today we got the last of the Cosmos planted. I could think of two unplanted places that might take some, so I suppose I might buy a few more six packs, but maybe not! It is a shame that there are still some very nice Cosmos at the Planter Box that need a home. I suggest local gardeners go buy some. Oh, but not all the Cutesies. I am dissatisfied with having Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ as the only tall plant on the LB welcome sign, south side. The north side, with Cosmos, looks better. So I think we will add four six packs of cutesy cosmos there. (It, like ‘Sonata’, is short.)

Today, we were surprised by a fierce rainstorm while at the bank, so we went to Olde Towne, just a block away. We wound up staying a bit after the rain stopped, just because life is pleasant there.

Olde Towne Café

Olde Towne Café

We put in Luanne’s two flower containers the two different colours of Salvia patens grown by the Planter Box. Not sure what the blue one was called in the seed catalog but the pink is called “Patio Pink”. I adore Salvia patens and before this year have only seen it in cobalt blue and “Cambridge” (light) blue.

The cobalt blue is still my favourite.

The cobalt blue (left) is still my favourite.

We stopped at Larry and Robert’s to put two Petunia ‘Pretty Much Picasso’ in the boat and two Salvia patens in the pots on the front steps. I just needed a home for my last four Salvia patens, and now they are dealt with!

Larry and Robert's east side

Larry and Robert’s east side

I discussed with Larry some exciting plans for the back yard, now that they have had their old deck removed!

Next, on to Mayor Mike’s…but a pause to wait out more of this:

rain

intense squall; not worried because ’twas light around the edges.

In the front corner, closest to the street, I planted a signature patch of three Cosmos and three painted sage, and three more of each elsewhere in the garden. Now the painted sage is all planted (but there are a very few more six packs available at The Planter Box; tell ’em I said it is ok to sell them to you!)

corner signature

corner signature

I pulled a big patch of horrible scilla: a precursor to the end of the day… Should have taken a photo of how bad the area it was in looked before pulling and how nice afterward. More on this later!

scilla by the bucket (with a spent iris)

scilla by the bucket (with a spent iris)

Allan did a beautiful job of weeding the path and path edges:

well done

well done

Oriental poppies

Oriental poppies

I probably would not plant Oriental poppies in such a small garden because they leave such a gap when they are done.

Below is that little daisy…What is it? One sees it in photos of famous British gardens, between stair pavers or on walls…

I have forgotten its name!

I have forgotten its name!

We then spent over an hour at Cheri’s garden, where I planted one of the two Penstemon ‘Burgundy Brew’ that I thought should go to oenophile clients. And six cosmos. I forgot to take any photos at Cheri’s garden even though I meant to show how well filled in is the area where we put transplants that needed to be moved last month from the future outdoor cat run. I was distracted by another rain squall and then an amusing conversation with Charlie (who asked us when we were going to retire…oddly, a thought I had just been pondering myself!).

We then went to our last job of the day, Ann’s garden, which we have sorely neglected all month because it is not a major destination for annuals.

south border, before and after, weeded by Allan

south border, before and after, weeded by Allan

Ann has the oddest weed, one that is unfamiliar to me. It looks just like a forget me not but has small greenish flowers, maybe with a tiny it of blue, so is useless and yet as invasive as forget me nots are! The foliage is kind of yellowy at this time of year. It was all over the edge garden, above left.

Now, here is why I hate, hate, hate, scilla (blue bells). Ann, and my grandmother, and many other gardens have the big coarse one, but I was just reading that the delicate Siberian Squill is also quite pesky. My grandma’s garden was over run with lank dying horrid scilla foliage in springtime, swamping and burying other plants, and so is Ann’s and several other gardens I know. It has appeared in areas of my own garden from where it had been growing in the lawn.

scilla, rampant and hideous

scilla, rampant and hideous

The lank dying foliage is a home for slugs, and smothers other plants, and mingles with the narcissi so that when one pulls the scilla out, out comes a good narcissi bulb by mistake. So annoying! We pulled buckets and buckets and buckets of it and only got four smallish areas done. This is why I cried “NOOOOOOOO!” when I saw that someone had in a kindly meant and sharing way planted some in a new garden we had created for a friend. Fortunately, our friend believed my warning and is removing it….but slowly, so as not to hurt HER friend’s feelings.

The lily of the valley that we have weeded out twice, roots and all (we hoped) has, but of course, sprouted back. This is another plant someone might share with you. Don’t accept it!

here it comes again

here it comes again

I was glad to get back into this interesting garden, despite my dismay with there being scilla everywhere (as I knew there would be from the fact that everywhere one digs, one finds white scilla bulbs). I managed to fit in five six packs of cosmos, in hope that the deer will leave it alone. (They usually do.) I Sluggo-ed heavily because so many slugs were hiding in the scilla leaves.

oriental poppies

frilly Oriental poppies

frilly Oriental poppies

peony and iris...after much removal of scilla and that weird faux-forget me not.

peony and iris…after much removal of scilla and that weird faux-forget me not.

Ann's enclosed veg garden is looking wonderful.

Ann’s enclosed veg garden is looking wonderful.

I hope we can spend a whole day here next week.

Our last small task was to plant one pink Calibrachoa to fill the planter in front of Peninsula Sanitation office. This entailed a drive past the boatyard where we saw two boats named after friends of ours.

for Nancy and Mary

for Nancy and Mary

We were too wet and cold from having been considerably rained on while weeding Ann’s garden to spend the last half hour of daylight weeding the east end garden bed on Howerton at the Port. Tomorrow? At home, before getting dry, I popped in three remaining cosmos and can now declare that annuals hell is over. These are the only unplanted plants in our possession now:

all that is left!

all that is left!

Two rosemary for the Depot, a Burgundy Brew for Gene, a four o clock donated by Planter Box for Golden Sands, three artichokes for Leanne (Casa Pacifica), a ‘Green Jewel’ echinacea for the Wiegardt Gallery, a golden thyme for a beach approach planter and a Verbascum ‘Jackie in Yellow’ for Erin’s garden to which we STILL have not been this year. (Someone else has been weeding there, thank goodness!)

We need more yellow flowering plants for Erin. Why NOT use Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ even though it is an annual? Some short cosmos to punch up the effect at the welcome sign. Eight more beachy perennials for the Bolstadt beach approach planters. Some plants for Larry and Robert’s front stairs pots. (Kind of shady there. I think they want colour, though, flowers, not a tasteful perennial planting.) Those will be fun to gather and do not represent a descent back into planting hell.

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