Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Salvia viridis’

A Real Time Reminder

It’s garden tour day!

just a reminder that it is almost time for the Music in the Gardens Tour

just a reminder that it is almost time for the Music in the Gardens Tour

Here’s an article about the tour by our friend Debbie Teashon of Rainyside.com.

Now back to our chronological catching up.

Wednesday, 1 July 2015

Ilwaco post office

Ilwaco post office

I began the day still shaken from yesterday’s watering woes.  The sight of our volunteer garden at the post office cheered me up.  Then we were off to our north end jobs, with a couple of small jobs on the way.

The Red Barn and Diane’s Garden

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

watering the Red Barn Arena garden

watering the Red Barn Arena garden

one of the pretty horses

one of the pretty horses

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo showing the garden behind the pasture’s gate

Diane and Larry's garden next door

Diane and Larry’s garden next door with Stipa gigantea

California poppies in Diane's roadside garden

California poppies in Diane’s roadside garden

penstemon

penstemon

Salvia viridis

Salvia viridis

grooming the container garden (Allan's photo)

grooming the container garden (Allan’s photo)

Golden Sands Assisted Living

At Golden Sands, regular watering with the sprinkler system has the courtyard garden looking wonderfully lush.

The enticing view from the hallway window made me happy.

The enticing view from the hallway window made me happy.

SW quadrant

SW quadrant

SE quadrant

SE quadrant

NE quadrant

NE quadrant

Marilyn’s Garden

Next, we went all the way up to lower Surfside to do some weeding at Marilyn’s garden.

a neighbour of Marilyn's (Allan's photo)

a neighbour of Marilyn’s (Allan’s photo)

Marilyn's daughter, Nancy (of the Depot Restaurant) is doing a good job of watering.

looking south—Marilyn’s daughter, Nancy (of the Depot Restaurant) is doing a good job of watering.

elephant garlic about to discard its cap

elephant garlic about to discard its cap

Tall miscanthus now hiding the neighbours' garage.  The next layer down is Helianthus 'Lemon Queen' which will bloom in late summer.

Tall miscanthus now hiding the neighbours’ garage. The next layer down is Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’ which will bloom in late summer.

looking north—weeding the gravel path was my project today

looking north—weeding the gravel path was my project today

Klipsan Beach Cottages

After Marilyn’s we drove south again to our very favourite job, Klipsan Beach Cottages.

view from the west gate of the fenced garden

view from the west gate of the fenced garden

rose

rose2

in the background: tall Thalictrum ‘Elin’ with hazy purple flowers

Thalictrum 'Elin'

Thalictrum ‘Elin’

Erysimum 'Winter Orchid' and Agastache 'Acapulco Salmon and Pink'

Erysimum ‘Winter Orchid’ and Agastache ‘Acapulco Salmon and Pink’

Nicotiana langsdorfii

Nicotiana langsdorfii

I wish Mary still knew the names of all her roses.

I wish Mary still knew the names of all her roses.

Lily 'Landini'

Lily ‘Landini’

daylily

daylily

driveway garden

driveway garden

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

Rose 'New Dawn'

Rose ‘New Dawn’

This year we are getting an extra long bloom time from Euphorbia characias wulfenii.

This year we are getting an extra long bloom time from Euphorbia characias wulfenii.

Geranium 'Rozanne' embracing a boxwood.

Geranium ‘Rozanne’ embracing a boxwood.

the weekly view looking southwest over the bird bath

the weekly view looking southwest over the bird bath

fairy door (Allan's phot)

fairy door (Allan’s photo)

Andersen’s RV Park

We had been weeding and deadheading at Andersen’s for about an hour when owner Lorna came outside and told us the big news:  Barring any unexpected last minute glitch, the deal was about to close on selling the park.   I turned in our restroom key (and said we’d get it back next week if something went wrong at the last minute).  I might as well tell you now that the deal did close for sure a few days later, so our walk around the garden saying goodbye was really the last time.  I have always told Lorna that when she sells, we are leaving with her as it is a good time to further accomplish our goal of cutting back a bit on work.  She says the new owners, a young couple from California, intend to do the gardening themselves so it worked out for the best for everyone.

A farewell look at Andersen’s gardens:

picket fence and garden shed gardens

west garden, Payson Hall (blue roof), picket fence and garden shed (upper right) gardens

Payson Hall clubhouse

Payson Hall clubhouse

Payson Hall detail with Allium schubertii

Payson Hall detail with Allium schubertii and Brodiaea ‘Queen Fabiola’

one of six whiskey barrels on the west side

one of six whiskey barrels on the west side

the west garden

the west garden

west garden

west garden

west3

west garden telephoto

west garden telephoto

 

Crocosmia 'Lucifer'

Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’

Stipa gigantea

Stipa gigantea

garden behind office

garden behind office

office2

detail: Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue' and Crocosmia 'Lucifer' and godetia

detail: Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ and Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ and godetia

picket fence garden (east side of house and office)

picket fence garden (east side of house and office)

lilies

lilies

office

picket fence from inside

picket fence from inside

My only regret in leaving now is that I planted some of every kind of sweet pea that I had here, and now won’t see all the different colours bloom.

old fashioned wooden picket fence

old fashioned wooden picket fence

one of two big hydrangeas

one of two big hydrangeas

the garden shed garden

the garden shed garden

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

a guest arriving (Allan's photo)

a guest arriving (Allan’s photo)

I will miss the fun of seeing a “wagon train” of RVs come in, led by the first driver, who is known as the wagon master.

As we were leaving, Lorna gave us this chair.  She is packing to move full time to her Seattle townhouse.

It's on my covered front porch now.

It’s on my covered front porch now; Thank you, Lorna.

Jo’s garden

Jo and Bob had returned from Montana.  She had called to ask me to stop by because they had brought us a present.

Jo's garden all ready for Fourth of July company.

Jo’s garden all ready for Fourth of July company.

Verbascum and Nicotiana langsdorfii

Verbascum and Nicotiana langsdorfii

Jo's back deck with bunting

Jo’s back deck with bunting

Coco! (Allan's photo)

Coco! (Allan’s photo)

our present: Thanks, Jo and Bob!

our present: Thanks, Jo and Bob!

(She did not even know I had been whinging on about my watering woes yesterday.)

Port of Ilwaco boatyard

We ended our day watering at the Ilwaco boatyard.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo; we have to water from behind the fence

a bit of finger blight on the Echinops (blue globe thistle), as usual...

a bit of finger blight on the Echinops (blue globe thistle), as usual…

 

 

Stipa gigantea and lavender

Stipa gigantea and lavender

Stipa gigantea and Ceanothus

Stipa gigantea and Ceanothus

boatyard south end (telephoto compression)

boatyard south end (telephoto compression)

boatyard north end

boatyard north end

We took some of our bucket water to give the new curbside plants at the port a boost.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

So….what shall we do with the extra few hours from not going to Andersen’s?  I suppose we could put it toward weeding the Long Beach beach approach garden, or….we just might spend it on our own garden.

We are now down by several jobs, as we quit two small jobs over bad pruning and slow payment, and Todd has the Wiegardt garden, and we gave Casa Pacifica to Sea Star Landscape Maintenance, Cheri is doing her own garden, and Flowering Hedges has been doing Erin’s garden.  It has delighted me to be divested of all of these jobs; however, I suppose we need to be careful that we don’t go too far into early retirement and lose our ability to afford to go garden touring.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Wednesday, 2 July 2014

Olde Towne

Olde Towne

After the usual every-other-day stop at Olde Towne Café to switch compost buckets, we went to Long Beach to water all the main street planters.  I had a fairly good day physically and walked around town without much leg pain.

Allan's photo: tents selling fireworks promised much noise and chaos on the weekend

Allan’s photo: tents selling fireworks promised much noise and chaos on the weekend

a charming display outside of the Wooden Horse gift shop

a charming display outside of the Wooden Horse gift shop

In a few planters and under a few trees, Crocosmia 'Lucifer' is looking all firework-y, in time for the fourth.

In a few planters and under a few trees, Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ is looking all firework-y, in time for the fourth.

I used to have more Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ in town till I began to find it sort of a thug.  It is spectacular in its flowering, although its season is only a few weeks long, if that much.

The Salvia viridis is starting to bloom and will be the star of the planter show for a couple of months.

The Salvia viridis is starting to bloom and will be the star of the planter show for a couple of months.

Salvia viridis

Salvia viridis

cupid's dart and blue hardy geranium; this geranium, not long blooming like 'Rozanne', has come back after its first bloom because I cut it back hard when it started forming seedpods.

cupid’s dart and blue hardy geranium; this geranium, not long blooming like ‘Rozanne’, has come back after its first bloom because I cut it back hard when it started forming seedpods.

The Long Beach gazebo with baskets by Nancy of the Basket Case Greenhouse

The Long Beach gazebo with baskets by Nancy of the Basket Case Greenhouse

The planter closest to the Long Beach Tavern had been sat upon or otherwise somehow thrashed.

The planter closest to the Long Beach Tavern had been sat upon or otherwise somehow thrashed.

I took a whole bouquet of yellow Agyranthemum 'Butterfly' to the LBT crowd, as it had been broken right off.

I took a whole bouquet of yellow Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ to the LBT crowd, as it had been broken right off.

They told me they had seen a woman “messing with the planter for about fifteen minutes” not long before.  Wish I had caught her in the act!

This much painted sage was broken off, to my deep disgust.

This much painted sage was broken off, to my deep disgust.

Awhile later, to cheer myself up, I popped into my favourite shop, NIVA green, to have a quick natter with Heather.

Heather Ramsay, artist, makes many creations, including lamps made of tins.

Heather Ramsay, artist, makes many creations, including lamps made of tins.

another piece of Ramsay art

another piece of Ramsay art

I just barely resisted this teapot.

I just barely resisted this teapot.

With Long Beach all watered, we went on to the Anchorage Cottages north of town.

Anchorage, where we cut the stinky viburnum back earlier in the year,

Anchorage, where we cut the stinky viburnum back earlier in the year,

This resort was the favourite spot of our friend Kathleen Shaw before she bought her own cottage near the beach.

The Music in the Gardens tour poster, posted in the office window

The Music in the Gardens tour poster, posted in the office window

Peruvian daffodil by the office bench

Hyemnocallis festalis (Peruvian daffodil) by the office bench

and a floppy Allium albopilosum

and a floppy Allium albopilosum

Rose 'New Dawn' by the center courtyard

Rose ‘New Dawn’ by the center courtyard

Allan did some pruning on an Escallonia that had been badly hacked at on the south side of the cottages.

during....he'd already cut some floppy sideways branches

during….he’d already cut some floppy sideways branches

after: pruned to where the trunks are showing new foliage buds

after: pruned to where the trunks are showing new foliage buds

We also went out to the Sid Snyder beach approach road to turn on the soaker houses in those street planters.

In the westernmost planter, Back Alley Horse Rides is doing a good job of taking care of the petunias that they planted. (Allan's photos)

In the westernmost planter, Back Alley Horse Rides is doing a good job of taking care of the petunias that they planted. (Allan’s photos)

In the westernmost planter, Back Alley Horse Rides is doing a good job of taking care of the petunias that they planted.  (Allan's photo)

blue globe thistle in one of the planters, an excellent plant from back in volunteer planter days

blue globe thistle in one of the planters, an excellent plant from back in volunteer planter days

At home, back under the former danger tree, the Dranunculus vulgaris had bloomed for the first time.

two flowers

two flowers

dv

dv2

Although it is supposed to smell of rotten meat, I could detect no foul odor.

Although it is supposed to smell of rotten meat, I could detect no foul odor.

My lovely purple podded peas, from seeds given me by Garden Tour Nancy, had turned out to be purely decorative; I had not had time to pick and eat them.

My lovely purple podded peas, from seeds given me by Garden Tour Nancy, had turned out to be purely decorative; I had not had time to pick and eat them.

too old now...but I have enjoyed looking at them.

too old now…but I have enjoyed looking at them.

Calvin is getting bolder about coming out to take the air.  He even followed me partway into the garden.

Calvin is getting bolder about coming out to take the air. He even followed me partway into the garden.

In the evening, I continued to blog about our recent garden tours.  I finished writing about the very last (and one of my favourites) of over twenty gardens!

Meanwhile, Allan watered the Ilwaco planters.

While filling the water tank in the boatyard, he notcied a woman with a bird enjoying the Clamshell Railroad history sign.

While filling the water tank in the boatyard, he noticed a woman with a bird enjoying the Clamshell Railroad history sign.

The hose had popped again and he repaired another two feet of it with electrical tape.

The hose had popped again and he repaired another section of it with electrical tape.

 

 

Read Full Post »

Tuesday, 5 November, 2013

We overslept yet again, fooled by rain and…just tired.  Thus we missed perhaps an hour of good working weather.   Our mission for today: to fill Erin’s new garden boat with soil.

 On our way out of Ilwaco, despite being late, we had to stop when we saw two hens on Williams Street.

Inn at Harbour Village hens taking a stroll

Inn at Harbour Village hens taking a stroll

a friendly and unskittish pair

a friendly and un-skittish pair

At Peninsula Landscape Supply, we got a yard of Soil Energy…

soil

load

Next, a stop at The Planter Box as they have the best and thickest landscape fabric.

Teresa rolls up a length of fabric for us.

Teresa rolls up a length of fabric for us.

I realized we still did not have good scissors with us!

Teresa revealed to us the true weight of the pumpkin in her “guess the weight” contest.

150 pounds of pumpkin

150 pounds of pumpkin

She said she had ordered 150 pounds of pumpkins, but someone had left the “s” off on the receiving end of the order….

And then we drove to Erin’s, and up the side yard of her neighbours’ house (who does not seem to mind the traffic across their lawn) and rather suspensefully, across Erin’s lawn to park near the boat.  I have heard horror stories about vehicles sinking into old septic fields at old houses, so we stuck to the path that Chester’s truck had tested out when he delivered the boat!

Allan drilled some strategically placed holes in the bottom and soon I was able to start filling it.  I soon realized that I did not need to have soil in the dark spot under the prow of the boat (if that is the right term for inside the front of the boat).

filling the boat

filling the boat   

I told Allan my brainstorm and he went to the ruins of the original garden boat for reusable lumber.  (That boat has disintegrated over the  more than a decade since Robert and I first turned it into a garden boat.)

 scavenging the old boat

With his rechargable chainsaw, Allan was able to cut old wood to fit at the end of the open area of the new boat and save us from wasting a considerable amount of soil.

a fix it job on the spot

a fix it job on the spot

Eventually, when it’s needed as the old wood rots, he can make something better.

When I went to scavenge for a few small pieces to jam into a couple of holes in the makeshift wooden barrier, Felix appeared.

Felix

my friend Felix

my friend Felix

He hung around and helped us for awhile.

Felix and the boat

Felix and the boat

We had gotten the landscape fabric tucked underneath before making the boat heavy with soil.  As soon as we can (I hope tomorrow) we’ll cover the fabric with gravel and then decorate with river rock to make it look (with a lot of imagination) like it has washed up on a rocky beach.

Then came the careful backing and turning to get out of the yard without hurting the sprinkler heads.

the van and trailer in the big yard

the van and trailer in the big yard

Felix kept a careful eye on the proceedings.

Felix escorting us...

Felix escorting us…

on the fence at the northwest corner...

on the fence at the northwest corner…

and saying goodbye for now.

and saying goodbye for now.

We had a longish discussion about where to get the remainder of the soil to fill the boat.  If we went back to Peninsula Landscape Supply for another load of soil energy, the cost of material would be smaller but the cost of time and labour would be higher.  To make the soil richer, we could go to the Planter Box and get a load of cow fiber, but then we would have way more than we needed.   We decided that bagged soil from The Planter Box would be so time saving that it would pay off the extra cost of bags vs. bulk, and we would could buy enough for two other projects at the same time.

the drawback:  Allan loads the heavy bags

the drawback: Allan loads the heavy bags

Below:  Here’s the boat holding one yard of Soil Energy, two big bags of Gardner and Bloome potting soil and two bales of Gardner and Bloome Soil Building Compost.

ready to plant!

ready to plant!

Erin and I were discussing paint colours for the boat; she had said she liked white or green.  I realized today it should be white, with the red paint redone in the same green as the house’s shutters.

We had some daylight left and had only used two of seven bags of potting soil, so we went to The Anchorage Cottages where two containers awaited fresh soil.  While Allan filled them, I was suddenly inspired to tackle an annoying area of beach strawberry by some parking spots.  One of my goals in quitting some jobs this year is to at last be able to do some of the little things for which we just have not had time.   This was one:

before and 45 minutes later

before and 45 minutes later

The blue potato vine in this spot has a history of blowing over, and the courtyard garden has two others, so out it went.  I was sick of the schizostylis here, so it too was ousted.  When we have time to finish around the edges, the garden will be blank but for two Geranium ‘Rozanne’ and some lily bulbs.  Manager Beth saw the empty area and requested dahlias; I am not sure it will be enough sun (morning sun only) but we can give that a try…although I had had something more formal in mind.

I keep picturing small columnar evergreens.  Must be Pam Fleming’s influence.

We just had time then for a bit of Long Beach work.  Allan took potting soil to fill in the planter by the carousel (the one from which we had pulled vinca two days before).  I pulled Salvia viridis (painted sage) out of the planters in front of and across from the Home at the Beach shop.  I’d noticed driving past that they looked raggedy from Saturday’s wind.

Close up, a few of the blue ones did look quite bad, and one was still pretty.  And one of the pink ones looked almost as good as in midsummer…

In fact, the planter looked downright summery.

In fact, the planter looked downright summery.

Close up, you can see the pink one would need some deadheading to look perfect…

pink

And I was just tired of it, so out it came.  I almost immediately felt bad, and now feel worse looking at this photo…but it is NOVEMBER, for heaven’s sake, and these summer flowers are so last month!

I wonder how long it would have lasted had I left it alone?  I am tired of the nasturtiums, too, but I left them.  I figure that some visitors will be impressed that we have blooming nasturtiums this late and perhaps will not notice that they are rather tatty by now.  I suppose the same could have been said of the salvia…darn it.

I am hoping that tomorrow we can get gravel and river rock to make that faux beach at Erin’s house.  The idea of a garden on that huge lawn has me wanting to neglect other jobs in order to get it done…

Wednesday, 6 November, 2013

Back to the boat project!  We headed straight up to Peninsula Landscape Supply to get some pea gravel and river rock.  We cannot carry much of something that heavy in our little old trailer.

 a small scoop of river rock

a small scoop of river rock

The river rock went in the bottom of the trailer as it would be applied second.  The pea gravel went on top.  Allan set up some buckets so that some of the gravel would arrive ready to go.

topping off with a scoop of pea gravel

topping off with a scoop of pea gravel

Meanwhile, I handpicked two buckets of larger river rock.  Had I wanted to, I could have gone into the bin of rainbow rock and got an even larger one.

I like the pink one at lower right!

I like the pink one at lower right!

I fished some fairly big ones out of the bulk pile, though.

Then we delivered our rocks to the new garden boat at Erin’s.  Yesterday, we had tucked landscape fabric under the edges of the boat.  Today, I tucked some newspaper underneath as well, just to make extra sure of smothering the turf.

The hardest part of using the newspaper method of garden building is acquiring enough for a big project.  The second hardest thing is laying newspaper in wind.  (Today was calm, so no problem.)  The third is resisting the urge to read every article that looks interesting.  We had The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal today and because I have several friends who have had cancer recently, my eye was particularly caught by this article.

paper

boat with pea gravel

boat with fabric and newspaper, and pea gravel application in progress

For several years, whenever doing a dry creek bed or any sort of river rock effects, I would lay down landscape fabric, and then medium to small river rock, and then spend the rest of the lifespan of that garden tweaking the rocks so that the “underwear” (fabric) did not peek through.  FINALLY in 2007, when doing a  garden with a dry creek bed in memory of a man who loved to fish, I realized that small gravel would hide the fabric and added it after the fact, then had to shift and fuss with the rocks to get the larger pretty ones on top.  Now we always put down a layer of pea gravel, or even plain crushed gravel, first, to completely hide the fabric, and then dress it up with larger rocks.

first: a solid sheet of gravel.  second: river rock.

first: a solid sheet of gravel. second: river rock.

The part of the fabric and newspaper left showing is where more thick layers of newspaper will get laid down and soil put on top to meet the gravel “beach”.

Allan screwed it one bit of the boat that had come loose.

 

And I rejoiced that I had found the blue scissors that cut the fabric well.  We had struggled without them while cutting fabric for some Long Beach planters on Monday.  They had been in the van the whole time, hidden under some papers (not in the box they were supposed to be in).

triumph!

triumph!

over the picket fence, the dunes, and then the beach

over the picket fence, the dunes, and then the beach

Felix made an appearance but did not linger so no cute cat photo for Wednesday.

By now, what I wanted to do for the rest of the day was to get a yard of soil and start making a garden bed around the boat.  I had not brought enough newspaper for that as it was not in my original plan.  Perhaps, I thought, we could scavenge some from the recycling bin.  First, though, I should check the weather.  Oh dear, high wind and rain warning for tomorrow.  We had better go to one of our weekly jobs, Andersen’s RV Park, in case we were rained out tomorrow…And it does make more sense at this point in the Erin garden job to have a really big pile of soil delivered to just outside the picket fence. Unfortunately, now it will have to wait till after Bulb Time, and I am burning to do this garden…

Oh well, on to Andersen’s.  I had a project in mind for there:  removing lady’s mantle and three tired Stella D’Oro daylilies from the garden shed garden.

1:44 PM and 4:06 PM

1:44 PM and 4:06 PM

The rain came on a little after two PM.  Without wind, I found it sort of refreshing (for awhile).  This is the hottest spot to work in on a scorching (well, 65 degrees and up) sunny day.

While Allan cleared the long bed, I cleaned up a little area by the garden shed door.  Somehow this year it got full of beach strawberry, and there was way too much of  boring old Bergenia.  The Bergenia has been there since before I started caring for the Andersen’s gardens.

before and after

before and after

In between pecking away at the beach strawberry and bergenia, I worked over the areas Allan dug out to prep them for receiving wheelbarrows full of cow fiber, as with every trip he made to dump debris, he returned with a wheelbarrow full of mulch.

before with hideous Stella D'Oro

before with hideous Stella D’Oro

after

after

before:  I am SO over lady's mantle (Alchemilla mollis)

before: I am SO over lady’s mantle (Alchemilla mollis)

after

after

We even got started on the eastern end of the garden.

one huge lady's mantle gone from the corner...

one huge lady’s mantle gone from the corner…

The rain had become harder and chilly, so we were not inspired to finish all the way to the end today.

Now, what to plant next year in the lovely blank slate?  Lorna loves bright flowers and is fond of cosmos (as am I).  I wonder how she feels about dahlias?  Something extra bright might get some attention drawn to the garden as people drive into the park.

At dusk, we went to our appointment at NW Financial and Insurance where our insurance broker, Shelly Pollock, was finally able to help us register for the Affordable Care Act.  Yes, the state website was working and we are now officially enrolled.  Even though we chose one of the mid range plans, we are still going to save (and this will not be a typo) $937 a month over what our cost for a similar plan would have been in 2014.  And our ACA plan will have a much lower deductible AND will help with prescriptions, which our old plan did not.  “Obamacare”, at least in states with a Health Exchange set up, will be so beneficial to the working class.  No more will we be paying 20 to 25% of our income for health insurance, and local friends who have never been able to afford insurance are now able to sign on.  We believe this will be an stimulus to the local economy.  I can guarantee Allan and I will have a dinner out to celebrate and raise a toast to Obamacare.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Tuesday, 29 October, 2013

I awoke to white frost on the back lawn, as predicted.  All the tender plants in pots were safely in the greenhouse.  The ones that I want to save, anyway:  scented geraniums, tender salvias…

frost

frosty morning

Great, thought I, the annuals will perhaps be done in Long Beach.  I have wearied of their tired looking appearance; they have still been looking too colourful to pull as it might make shopkeepers and passersby said if I dispose of them them prematurely.

But NO!  They still look mostly wonderful.

painted sage, Agyr. 'Butterfly', nasturtium

painted sage, Agyr. ‘Butterfly’, nasturtium

still a tangle of colour by Home at the Beach

still a tangle of colour by Home at the Beach

Even a few of the cosmos still look good.

Even a few of the cosmos still look good.

Allan cut back the Panicum ‘Heavy Metal‘ ornamental grass back in the one street tree under which it grows.  I like the name of the grass and its metallic sheen.  However, I think that to most people it probably looks weedy.

Heavy Metal grass

Heavy Metal grass

This particular tree has no working water and has to be bucket watered from a nearby planter.

The park by Marsh’s Free Museum and one of our favourite little cafés, Captain Bob’s Chowder, still looks fine.

obelisk tiles by Renee O'Connor

obelisk tiles by Renee O’Connor

The work in the frying pan park is coming along….By spring, that clam statue will spout every hour on the hour again.

park

Allan took a break from Long Beach city work and pulled Geranium ‘A.T. Johnson’ from the Summer House  garden while I checked the rest of the planters.  I swear I did not plant the darn hardy geranium at Summer House.  It probably had one little seedling inside another plant.

Below:  Allan stands where a rose trellis should go IF Erin (who owns this vacation rental) wants to keep the rampant climbing rose in there:

I asked him to look like a trellis, but he is sideways.

I asked him to look like a trellis, but he is sideways.

Then he dropped me off to tidy up the Veterans Field garden while he dumped debris.

Veterans Field garden

Veterans Field garden

still very faintly red white and blue

still very faintly red white and blue

We had an appointment at NW Financial and Insurance regarding the Affordable Care Act (which I believe will be very beneficial to us).  The main website was down again, even though it had been working all day.

My friend Bella greeted me at the insurance office!

My friend Bella greeted me at the insurance office!

The best thing I have read about this is:  “War is a crisis.  Poverty is a crisis.”  And then something about the computer problem being an inconvenience.  We will go back next week.  If anyone local (Southwest Washington or Northwest Oregon) needs help figuring out the Affordable Care Act paperwork, Shelly Pollock is a wonderful helper and her services are free.

We concluded our work day by pulling some Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ foliage clumps and a doing a bit of weeding on the Bolstadt beach approach.

Bolstadt approach buoy

Bolstadt approach buoy

two birds

two birds

another two birds

another two birds

bird

Bolstadt beach approach garden, looking toward town

This walk is so popular with townfolk and tourists alike.  One can walk up Sid Snyder Boulevard ten blocks south, then along the boardwalk with its view of the beach and back down this street….or vice versa.

rugosa rose autumn colour

rugosa rose autumn colour

with dwarf mugo pine

with dwarf mugo pine

Something amazing happened when I pulled a weed from the easternmost Bolstadt planter….

full of chocolate mint planted back in volunteer days

full of chocolate mint planted back in volunteer days

The mint started to peel up just like taking up a carpet!   I was thrilled!!

before and after

before and after

Next year we can make this planter right by the arch look so much better.

Next year we can make this planter right by the arch look so much better.

While Allan tidied that up, I cut back a few lily stalks on the south side of city hall and observed with dismay that a purple ajuga had gone aggressively running through the whole bed.

Anyone want some purple ajuga??

Anyone want some purple ajuga??  will fix this later

Just west of city hall, reflections of sunlight fell on the sign for the upcoming new coffee shop.  I was excited to see that Pink Poppy Bakery’s logo had been added to the sign.  My ultimate loyalty still likes with Ilwaco’s Olde Towne coffee café but I will love being able to get Pink Poppy treats while working in Long Beach.

Akari Space

Akari Space

Although I could tell a great sunset was brewing, the dumping of debris had to take priority.

looking west from city hall

looking west from city hall

While at the city works yard, we could see the sunset developing.

over the water treatment plant

over the water treatment plant

With work done, we went back to Bolstadt.

Another sunset watching group had gathered on the big picnic shelter.

crows

closeup

The sunset started as a moody grey and pink one, and I thought it would continue that way.

Allan’s photos:

bird

grey

grey

grass

west of the boardwalk

buoy

my photos:

from the end of the Bolstadt approach

from the end of the Bolstadt approach

pink

boardwalk

boardwalk

band of colour

band of colour

Thinking it was fading, we turned to go back to town and saw the tail lights of the cars of other sunset watchers driving away….

Long Beach from the boardwalk

Long Beach from the boardwalk

One glance back and we turned to the west again as the colour suddenly intensified.

colour

bright

And then it did fade.

last

At home, I took a quick walk along Spruce and Lake Streets to check out progress in the Ilwaco flatlands Halloween preparations.

the J's house across the street

the J’s house across the street from ours

on Spruce

on Spruce

Soon would come the yearly Halloween extravaganza.

Read Full Post »

September 19, 2012

Oh, I am so hard to please about the weather.  Today was too darn hot.  Tomorrow a big rain storm is supposed to come, and then a rain and wind storm on Sunday.  I resolved not to complain that I was sweltering today because a cold and windy summer day is far worse.  But…it was hot.  All of  74.8 degrees F.

As we got ready to go to work, I noticed a good example of Cosmos ‘Seashells’ in the garden.  I couldn’t get much of it (my favourite cosmos cultivar) this year so wanted some good photos.  A friend of mine decided he just had to be in the photo shoot.

Cosmos 'Seashells'

Cosmos ‘Seashells’

cos

cos cos

Smokey has on his BirdsBeSafe collar.  He usually does not look this sinister.

Cosmos 'Seashells'

Cosmos ‘Seashells’

We did our usual compost buckert switch stop at Olde Towne…where more out of town bicycle tourists were enjoying the great ambience.

Olde Towne Café

Olde Towne Café

And then went to Seaview to have a look at a couple of landscaping needs at the Sou’wester Lodge.  Oh what memories it brought back to be there because for my first year on the Peninsula, that is where I lived.

Sou'wester in snow, Dec. '92

Sou’wester in snow, Dec. ’92

Now under new ownership, The Sou’wester has a plants for sale area by the front door.

plants

To the north of the front door, the garden I planted years ago has turned to an area of large shrubs and trees.

part of my old garden

part of my old garden

In the almost twenty years since I left there, many of the garden beds around the cabins have turned back to plain lawn, as one would expect, but some plants remain including the rose Felicité et Perpetué.   I did not take as many pictures as I should have because of having an interesting time talking with new owner Thandi Rosenbaum.

I had not been back into the big historic lodge since President’s Day weekend of 1994. It was wonderful to be there again and brought back memories good and bad, but all worth having.

I had forgotten much, like what the fireplace looked like, even though I must have cleaned the hearth many times.

I had forgotten much, like what the fireplace looked like, even though I must have cleaned the hearth many times.

We looked at the four nightly rental apartments on the second floor of the lodge.  The “honeymoon suite” has a different lace curtain hanging over the sleeping nook but has the same magical feeling.

On the second floor.

Lacy sleeping area…On the second floor.

The Sou’wester is known for its vintage trailer accommodations and Thandi has  commissioned some trailer art.

trailer paintings in apartment three

trailer paintings in apartment three

I have always loved the way the light falls through the windows of the lodge.

probably in apartment two

probably in apartment two

I think two is the one with the lacy bed…one the one with a red rug…and three and four the two west facing ones.  It has been a long time!

This window of number four faces the second story porch.

This window of number four faces the second story porch.

I took this photo from the same window in 1992.

I took this photo from the same window in December 1992.

I love the postcards over the bed in one of the apartments.

postcard art

postcard art

The view from apartment four made me think about how now I would know better than to plant that beech under the power lines.  I NOW remember that I thought it was going to be a short, weeping tree.  I got it from Hall Gardens, a wonderful home nursery that existed near Nahcotta way back then (and later became the private home called Gypsy Pond).

view with a potentially too large tree

view with a potentially too large tree (planted by me in 1993)

Amy, the housekeeper who has worked there for many more years than I did and who also sells plants there, asked me if I could identify two shrubs out by J Place.  One we thought must be an Osmanthus.  The other…I can almost remember.  I got it from Heronswood mail order, probably.  Thandi stands next to it for size:

She's 5'2".

She’s 5’2″.

Here’s a close up of the leaves…not very good because it was such a hot sunny day.

mystery shrub

mystery shrub

leaves

leaves…what is???

We looked inside the amazing two story trailer called The African Queen, of which I had fond memories just because I liked it.  When Amy spoke of not loving to clean it, I do remember it was a challenge with all its nooks.  I also learned that in later years the previous owners of the lodge, cabins and trailers, for whom I had worked, had the staff (staff? before, it was just me!) just put sheets and bedding in the trailers and not make up the beds.  I had to make every bed, and..with eighteen or so apartments, cabins and trailers, there were…oh I don’t even want to remember.  The trailers were, of course, the hardest, being built in tightly.

While we looked at the interesting vintage RV, Thandi and her friend Alex pulled Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’, after we told them it could be pulled and not just cut back.

next to the African Queen

next to the African Queen

I used to have African Queen Oriental lilies and an African Queen Buddliea planted by The African Queen…I had forgotten the latter even existed till Amy reminded me.  (It is still there, planted long before Buddleias made the invasive list….)

I said the volunteer tree should be cut down so the trailer mural shows!

The mural on the Disoriented Express still shows up well.

The Disoriented Express

The Disoriented Express

I told Thandi, looking at the remains of my old garden and at the shrubs which would look so much better deadwooded, that I could imagine, if I lived in walking distance, coming over just for the fun of bringing some of it back.  She offered to have me chauffeured from Ilwaco.  Hmm.

one of my Sou'wester garden beds in 1993

one of my Sou’wester garden beds in 1993

Through making this garden I met Maxine…and her daughter Jo…and my gardening career started so it was worthwhile.

We passed this year’s possible landscaping job at Sou’wester on to our friend Ed Strange who has a young(er) helper who might feel more inclined that we do to tear out an overgrown garden bed.  Then we can help plant it with something better than Siberian iris and the blah running yellow kind of Hypericum.

After all this goofing off, we went up to Long Beach to deadhead.  With rain predicted, we skipped watering the planters.  The soil was damp, yet the plants looked a little thirsty….but a good rain will be effective because of the already wet soil in the planters.

painted sage still looking grand

painted sage still looking grand

It better HAD rain or we will have to go back and water!

painted sage and cosmos

painted sage and cosmos

Oh, big news….I know the names now of the three cultivars of painted sage (Salvia viridis, sometimes called horminum):  Marble Arch White, Blue, and Pink…looked at the seed packets at The Planters Box for a friend who needed the information.

Every year, when I see the dahlias in a couple of the planters, I think I simply must plant more “patio” dahlias.

fabulous dahlias

fabulous dahlias

Maybe in 2014 I will remember to do so.  They come back every year and bloom like crazy.

Speaking of crazy, check out the nasturtium…this one gets extra liquid fertilizer when the city crew waters the hanging basket overhead.

in front of Home at the Beach

in front of Home at the Beach

trailing into the street!

trailing into the street!

by the door of the Wooden Horse gift shop, very beachy

by the door of the Wooden Horse gift shop, very beachy

We next went to the Anchorage Cottages.  I intended to do nothing but quickly deadhead the containers, as we had done a lot of pruning there on Monday.  Somehow, more pruning ensued today.  Manager Beth asked if we could limb up a tree so she could get to the outside of the office window.

done, and looks great although I forgot before pics!

done, and looks great although I forgot before pics!

The volunteer hebe that was under a low limb is getting sun for the first time!

We also pruned the Ceanothus so that the number one shows really well at last.

Ceanothus, pruned

Ceanothus, pruned

During the course of getting tools in and out, I photographed our rake in the back of the van.

Yesterday, I told Allan this rake makes us look poor.

Yesterday, I told Allan this rake makes us look poor.

We like the style very much and cannot seem to find a new one like it.

After The Anchorage, we deadheaded cosmos and weeded at the Boreas Inn.

Boreas Inn, west garden, with the sun cooling off a bit at last.

Boreas Inn, west garden, with the sun cooling off a bit at last.

The only Lobelia tupa that bloomed for me this year still looks magnificent even as it goes to seed.

The Boreas tupa....

The Boreas tupa….

a garden doodad backed with Phormium

a garden doodad backed with Phormium

If the Lobelia tupa is blooming here because it is happy next to the Phormium, we have a problem…because I like to get rid of Phormiums now whenever I can!

Boreas, looking east

Boreas, looking east

Allan remembered that we had to deadhead the Long Beach welcome sign; I might have forgotten.

back side of welcome sign with Acidanthera

back side of welcome sign with Acidanthera

Six Agyranthemum Butterflies later, we departed to water again at Crank’s Roost.

Crank's, view from the back porch

Crank’s, view from the back porch

Finally, in the last hour of daylight, we filled water buckets at the boatyard and Allan watered the Ilwaco planters while I groomed them.

Ilwaco boatyard

Ilwaco boatyard

I happened to see Thandi and Alex from the Sou’wester again as I deadheaded near the Ilwaco Antique Gallery.  After another pleasant conversation they went off to walk along the port and watch the moonrise.  While I did the last few planters, I suddenly had this vision of living in an old trailer at the Sou’wester again and bringing back my old gardens.  In an alternative universe, that would be fantastic.  In this one, I guess I can’t go back!

Allan and I dropped off the trailer at home as the sun set….

looking west on Lake Street

looking west on Lake Street

We had a choice between making a fire in the back yard fire pit before the rains come and get our alder wood all wet…or going to see the harvest moon rise at the port.  It would be too hard to set up a campfire at the last minute in the twilight, so the port moonrise won.

harvest moon

harvest moon

moon

The sky seemed to get lighter as the big moon rose.

moon

 

moonlight path

moonlight path

Allan’s photos:

moon

Allan did the best job of getting the moon's face.  (We both have dinky cameras.)

Allan did the best job of getting the moon’s face. (We both have dinky cameras.)

higher

higher

and higher still

over the tidal flat

over the tidal flat

moonlight on the water

moonlight on the water between the port and Stringtown Road

And then, home….to pick some eggplants, as the edible harvest continues.

another little harvest

another little harvest

These are the first eggplants I have ever grown.  I hope they were picked at the right stage.  Allan has prepared them according to Joy of Cooking while I wrote this, and now it is time to eat them.!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

July 20, 2013

from the program:  Instead of being “deer resistant”, this garden is wildlife friendly and proof that you can coexist with deer and still have plenty of flowers.  Nancy and Marilyn call this their healing garden because, while recovering from knee surgery and from cancer, they have been inspired and comforted by watching plentiful birds and a mother deer and fawns living in the garden.  It was designed and planted by Tangly Cottage Gardening to be viewed and enjoyed year round with structural perennials and ornamental grasses for winter interest. There will be a page at tanglycottage.wordpress/deer featuring deer resistant plants.

This garden on a small lot is one that Allan and I began from scratch in 2006.   I’ve written about it a lot since then, so will just do a walk through here from the day before tour day (when we did the final tidy up) and tour day itself.  I hope the tour guests understood that while small, the garden shows off how you can have lots of flowers even though the deer amble through daily.  If you can see a hose in the photo, it’s the day before tour day.

the view from the street

the view from the street

To the left of this photo (out of the picture) is the driveway, where the neighbour to the east and Marilyn and Nancy have planted shrubs for privacy…eventually.

driveway and corner of garage and neighbour's house

driveway and corner of garage and neighbour’s house

between the driveway and the lawn is a deep shade garden with Hellebores and ferns amid alders and one conifer.

between the driveway and the lawn is a deep shade garden with Hellebores and ferns amid alders and one conifer.

shade garden the day before tour day, looking west from driveway

shade garden the day before tour day, looking west from driveway

looking north at the shade garden, day before tour day

looking north at the shade garden, day before tour day

looking south

Above, looking south: We took up our nicest table and chairs, and Nancy thought it was so great to have a sit spot on the lawn that she says she is going to get a table and chairs for it!

Nancy ready for tour guests

Nancy ready for tour guests

She served cookies made by her spouse, Chef Michael of the Depot Restaurant.  There were 200, I believe, and my first hint that the tour was quite successful is when we arrived to find all the cookies gone.  I did not mind at all because I was so happy we had had that many people come through.

The deer, for some reason, focus on the area in front of the front porch, but they have left the lady’s mantle and geranium ‘Rozanne’ alone.

Barbara Bate

Barbara Bate

Barbara Bate was the musician for this garden.  She does a great deal for the community.  She sang at my mother’s memorial service and knew the words to the song my father used to sing, “Because”.  (We made a garden for her in 2008, not the sort we go back and maintain.)  Barbara’s musical repertoire is vast and she was perfect for this venue.  Last year, she was the musician for the Hornbuckle garden, and later Tom and Judy told me people were dancing in their courtyard.

Barbara

side view of front porch (looking east) with Barbara

barbara

looking west

looking west from the lawn

Allan (left), Sheila (right) and I

Allan (left), Sheila (right) and I

NW garden at edge of lawn, photo by Kathleen Sayce

NW garden at edge of lawn, photo by Kathleen Sayce

The only pre-existing plant in the flower borders was the orange monbretia that had run over the neighbour’s garden to the west.  I consider it a thug, but don’t fight it in the front corner by the street because it intermingles with salal (speaking of thugs!) and adds some colour.

Sheila and Debbie take a break.

Sheila and Debbie take a break.

where the lawn meets the gravel path

Above, where, the lawn meets the gravel path:  Phygelius, Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’. Knautia ‘Thunder and Lightning’, lady’s mantle, backed with Miscanthus.

looking southwest-ish the day before tour day

looking southwest-ish the day before tour day

looking south the day before tour day

looking south the day before tour day

west of porch:  Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue', Salvia viridis, and Lavender

west of porch: Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’, Salvia viridis, and Lavender

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue', photo by Kathleen Sayce

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’, photo by Kathleen Sayce

against west wall of house:  Papaver 'Lauren's Grape' and Salvia viridis

against west wall of house: Papaver ‘Lauren’s Grape’ and Salvia viridis

looking south on tour day

looking south on tour day

looking south

figs

The fig tree grows larger and larger on the east side of the path against the house.  The deer do not eat the figs!

tour guests

tour guests

tour

guests

guests

Shasta daisies, blue glove thistle, bronze fennel, cosmos, painted sage, photo by Kathleen Sayce

Shasta daisies, blue glove thistle, bronze fennel, cosmos, painted sage, photo by Kathleen Sayce

photo by Kathleen Sayce

photo by Kathleen Sayce

I brought my Deer Xing sign for the chair by the southwest corner of the house and a bowl to fill with water.  It had occurred to me that this bird and deer friendly garden had no water!  Nancy was so taken with this that she agreed a bird bath would be an excellent gift for her mother, Marilyn.

day before

day before

I decided to present the garden quite honestly and did not trim the stems where deer had eaten the white mallow and Crocosmia as they nibbled their way by.  It is impressive enough that there are enough flowers to share and enough things they do not eat.  A chaise lounge is kept across the back porch or the deer will climb right up there and eat flowers (although in my experience, they usually leave dahlias alone).

back porch, photo by Kathleen Sayce

back porch, photo by Kathleen Sayce

To the south side of the house is a river rock dry pond which is good for drainage in the winter.  On its south side grow native shrubs and trees along the property line, and on the house side we have a path and a planting of Siberian iris, Persicaria ‘Firetail’, and double orange daylilies.

river rock swale

river rock swale

Hops grow up on the east side of porch railing (not shown).  I’ve tried to grow a honeysuckle on the south side but the area does not get watered and so that has not been a success.  If I remembered to water it whenever we check on the garden, it would do much better.

On tour day, we went in to visit Marilyn and saw the garden from a different perspective: from the inside out.

From this window, the view west has been blocked by the fig tree.

From this window, the view west has been blocked by the fig tree.  Oops.

I planted that tree between two windows and did not expect it to do this well!  Next time we visit the garden we will do some pruning.

another west window...that's better

another west window…that’s better

From this window, a deer has been observed birthing a fawn right in the garden.

another west window

another west window

from the kitchen window, looking south to the greenbelt

from the kitchen window, looking south to the native shrub and tree border

the walk to return to the front lawn (taken the day before)

the walk to return to the front lawn (taken the day before)

As we drove away, we saw one of the garden residents just down the street.

waiting for the tour guests to get out of the garden!

waiting for the tour guests to get out of the garden!

Read Full Post »

We have done a small flower bed at Seaview’s Depot Restaurant (our favourite!) for several years.  Here is how the north side garden bed looked in the mid 90s:

Depot garden before

Depot garden before

Sometime around maybe 2007 we started to garden there.  (This is the sort of moment when I really miss iPhoto and its dates in my defunct computer.  I could reload it year by year from discs but am hoping to find an expert who can extract it into my new computer in one fell swoop.)

And here is is during the first year after we made a flower garden there.

And here is is during the first year after we made a flower garden there.

I had been wanting to get rid of that strip of lawn for several years, especially since restaurant owner Nancy wanted more colour that could be seen from the street.  In 2012, we were given the go ahead and …

8 May 2012, 11:16 AM

8 May 2012, 11:16 AM

8 May 1:39 PM

8 May 1:39 PM

8 May 5:54 PM

8 May 5:54 PM

We waited til the next day to plant because the Soil Energy mulch was hot.

22 June, the garden coming on

22 June, the garden coming on

22 June, under the northeast window

22 June, under the northeast window

Above, my favourite perennials, Ergyngium ‘Sapphire Blue’, Cistus, and Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’.

22 June, early summer rain

22 June, early summer rain

28 June

28 June

The new part of the garden is planted mostly with Savlia viridis (painted sage) and assorted tall Cosmos grown at The Planter Box.

28 June

28 June

Cosmos

Cosmos

3 July

3 July

3 July

3 July

The lattice is behind the garden covered with hops.

22 July, Dierama (angel's fishing rod) on east wall

22 July, Dierama (angel’s fishing rod) on east wall

23 July

23 July

23 July

23 July

The shrub to the left is Leycesteria formosa (Himalyan honeysuckle), a particular favourite of Chef Michael’s.

12 September

12 September

12 September, exactly the way I wanted it to turn out!

12 September, exactly the way I wanted it to turn out!

12 September, cosmos and Solidago (goldenrod) 'Fireworks'

12 September, cosmos and Solidago (goldenrod) ‘Fireworks’

21 September, Salvia viridis (painted sage) overhung with Leycesteria formosa

21 September, Salvia viridis (painted sage) overhung with Leycesteria formosa

21 September

21 September

21 Sept; the hops went crazy with improved soil.

21 Sept; the hops went crazy with improved soil.

21 September

21 September

21 Sept from the NE corner of the restaurant.

21 Sept from the NE corner of the restaurant.

foreground: Schizostylis (pink, blooms late), Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ (yellow), Acidanthera (white)

On October 30th:  Here’s a first: the hops we grow at The DEPOT Restaurant were included in an ale made by Astoria’s Fort George Brewery.

30 Oct, Co-Hoperative Ale

30 Oct, Co-Hoperative Ale

drawing a glass

drawing a glass

and very delicious it was.

and very delicious it was.

Not only that, but the Fort George harvesters did an impressive job of picking the hops without trampling the garden.  Thank you!

On December 5th, the Cistus and Ageranthymum were still blooming (both from The Basket Case Greenhouse).

5 Dec, Cistus

5 Dec, Cistus

5 Dec, blooming Schizostylis

5 Dec, blooming Schizostylis

The cosmos had gone over and we pulled them, and mulched the new garden with a yard of scrumptious washed dairy manure from The Planter Box.  (Photos to be inserted, perhaps, if/when I get my iPhoto revived…if I took any that day.)

At Chef Michael’s request, we stuck some greens and some bits of Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ dried flowerheads into the windowboxes to replace dead annuals.

windowboxes

windowbox

windowbox

windowbox with holly sprigs, evergreen huckleberry, Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’, red and yellow twig dogwood

(Preview:  I am pleased to tell you these still looked passably good on February 10th 2013!)

Nancy had wanted colour that showed from the street to draw attention to the restaurant, and at the end of the season, she told us that with the new garden bed expansion, “You knocked it out the park!”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »