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Posts Tagged ‘Santolina’

Thursday, 5 July 2018

at the post office

our post office garden

matchy matchy Asiatic lily (probably ‘Landini’) and a sanguisorba

Depot Restaurant

weeding and watering…

Dierama (Angels’ Fishing Rod) is blooming.

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’, Agastache (‘Blue Boa’, maybe) and Cornus ‘Hedgerows Gold’

Long Beach

Allan string trimming around the welcome sign

back side

We watered the Long Beach planters downtown.

busy tourist town (Allan’s photo)

Cosmos ‘Xanthos’


We will crisscross the street to do the other three planters in a group of four while waiting for a large crowd to move on.  Still, we do end up having to ask people to move so we can water.

Only once years ago did someone get angry and ask me to come back later; I said gently that we were on our way to water all the Ilwaco planters after Long Beach so no, we could not come back later—and she did move.

Sometimes, even though Long Beach is fun, I get tired of the noise and traffic in summer and end up counting off how many planters I have to do before I am done watering.

Sanguisorba ‘Pink Elephant’ persists in a planter even after I decided it was too tall and moved it to Fifth Street Park.

One of the shop workers arrives to work on this. (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Fifth Street Park (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

We tidied up the gardens in Veterans Field for the Friday farmers market.

Brodiaea ‘Queen Fabiola’…and a white one.

Due to sprinkler problems, the monarda looks stressed. I think I don’t want it in this bed anymore. (Sprinkler probably blocked by too many plants—typical of our gardens.)

Port of Ilwaco

We watered some, but not all, of the curbside gardens.

my one pitiful eremerus (Allan’s photo)

by Ilwaco pavilion

A pleasant fellow stopped to ask about santolinas; he liked them.

My favourite bed is still marred by finger blight.

The lavenders may not heal up. Certainly not by the big fireworks show on July 7th.

The santolina will heal…eventually.

Don Nisbett’s signs have been installed!

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ gets the most comments and queries nowadays.

We were tidying because of fireworks show crowds on Saturday and Art Walk on Friday.

This is what a properly pruned santolina looks like.  It will flower later.

This is the only one I forgot to clip!

We got the watering done from David Jensen’s architecture office all the way to Time Enough Books; then I did a walkabout of the Ilwaco planters while Allan watered them.

downtown window

before chickweed removal

after…it lurks beneath though

Diascia ‘Blackthorn Apricot’ (top) is my favourite. I was worried people would not find it bright enough.

matchy!

Good citizen Ethel was string trimming and then raking along the sidewalk for art walk night.

Ethel’s efforts to beautify the town were a perfect example of action instead of big talk and complaints.

While Allan continued watering the planters, which takes an hour and a half minimum, I watered the boatyard garden.  It used to take us half an hour or forty five minutes to water the planters back when we bucket watered them, before the water trailer.  But we are just no longer up to hauling what was literally 800 pounds of water twice a week.

view from behind the boatyard fence; the shadow is of a boat prow that was above me

While watering, I pulled some horsetail and grass away from the back of the fence.

I was daunted by huge slugs hiding down there.  I had not brought to the far end of the fence my slug disposal tools or a pair of gloves.  I was just pulling with bare hands.  I do hate touching a slug.

Afterwards, I looked at my particularly arthritic finger and for a creepy few moments I felt like it was just going to break right off at the joint.

horrific, depressing old age

I walked down to the other far end of the boatyard and the hose was not there.  (I use a series of hoses that lay around by the faucets…usually.)  I simply could not hobble all the way back to the middle of the other stretch of fence and drag a hose back.  Fortunately, Allan, who has no arthritis that we know of, showed up in the nick of time and watered the south end of the garden while I sat in the van in a state of collapse.  So glad to be home at dusk.

 

 

 

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Tuesday, 9 February 2016

We again joined forces with Sea Star Gardening for the first clean up at the Port of Ilwaco boatyard.

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before (Allan’s photo)

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There’s Melissa, just getting started on the job.

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Allan’s photo

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The garden is three blocks long.

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before (Allan’s photo)

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Artemisias and Santolinas waiting to be clipped

 

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santolina before clipping

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Melissa likes to use hedge shears on the santolina.

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a santolina after clipping

Clipping back (which can be done even more sternly than above) keeps the santolinas (silver ones and green ones)  beautifully rounded instead of splayed open.

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The garden was carpeted with weeds mixed in with poppy seedlings.

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Allan’s photo

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A barrow fill of santolina and artemisia clippings Allan’s photo)

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As we worked, Mr. Magoo entered the boatyard from the water.

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Dave commented that he usually doesn’t find fish heads in a garden.

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Weeds didn’t stand a chance.  (Allan’s photo)

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Allan’s photo

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rosemary in bloom

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finishing up the long stretch to the north of the gate

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Time to move to the other side of the gate

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From the gate looking north, I felt pleased with our results.

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a full load to take to the debris pile

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Allan installed his new signs.  Note that is is positively worded instead of a “DON’T” message.

Between the sections, Allan dumped load one of debris at the debris pile with a view.

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Allan’s photo

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It was an 80 degree day in Long Beach.  Fortunately for us, Ilwaco was a tad bit cooler.  (Allan’s photo)

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Allan returned to find us ready to start the south stretch of garden.  

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south of the gate, before weeding and clipping

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looking north from the historic railway sign

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Allan’s photo

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finishing up

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a job well done

Too bad that I know that soon big horsetail will be sprouting all along this garden.  Also too bad we can’t work with Sea Star all the time as it was awfully fun and productive.  However, we will be lucky to get them for a couple more spring cleanups before they are well immersed into their own round of jobs.

The sun was setting as we finished the job.

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Ginger’s Garden Diaries

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Ginger’s Garden Diaries

I am incorporating my mom’s garden journal from the 90’s into this 2016 journal.

February 9, 1998 (age 73)

[Robert, my spouse at the time, and I were visiting mom at her home near Olympia.]

Robert did a few minor jobs for me.  Then we all worked on bringing firewood up to the porch.  They emptied all the last year wood from the shed and brought up quite a lot from behind the shop.  Now that the shed is empty I will be able to put in there the cut up wood from all the branches (when I get them sawed up).

 

 

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I created the garden on the east side of the Ilwaco boatyard as a volunteer project in the mid 90s, and, over the years, it turned into a job for the Port of Ilwaco.  The garden is a challenge because of being deeply infested with horsetail and bindweed and because it needs to be hand-watered from behind the fence.  Most of it is drought tolerant so we only water once or twice a month.  The silver balls that you’ll see in many of the photos are Santolina (lavender cotton), one of my favourite perennials.  We removed the tall bronze fennel at the end of this season because, while it was a welcome plant back in the 90s, it is now on the noxious weed list.

A good source for multi-coloured California poppies is the One Stop Poppy Shop.  They come not just in orange but also in pinks, dark orange, almost red, pale yellow, and cream.

Here is the garden in 2015.   I decided to present the photos as a gallery rather than a slide show so that those who wish can see them in more detail.  If you click on the first one to biggify, you will get a nice display with backward and forward arrows.

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Thursday, 9 July 2015

The Depot Restaurant

watering and weeding the Depot garden

watering and weeding the Depot garden

north side of deck

north side of deck

depot2

Dierama (Angel's Fishing Rod)

Dierama (Angel’s Fishing Rod)

Dierama is the star of the show right now.

Dierama is the star of the show right now.

dierama

Dierama and Nicotiana langsdorfii (backed with Lonicera ‘Baggeson’s Gold’

further admiration

further admiration

the front with planting by Nancy of Basket Case Greenhouse

the front with planting by Nancy of Basket Case Greenhouse

Long Beach 

the welcome sign

the welcome sign, front: Cosmos ‘Sonata’, Bidens, Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’

from the sidewalk

from the sidewalk (godetia in foreground)

I hope Parks Manager Mike has noticed the godetia; he likes it.

I hope Parks Manager Mike has noticed the godetia; he likes it.

welcome sign, back

welcome sign, back: Cosmos ‘Sonata’ and white bacopa

We knew that an art show would be held in the Coulter Park historic train depot over the weekend, so Allan pulled the birds foot trefoil out from among the Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ there.

This area is tricky to get into because of the new railing, so we've let the Crocosmia totally take it over.

This area is tricky to get into because of the new railing, so we’ve let the Crocosmia totally take it over.

the birds foot trefoil is as beautiful as the crocosmia, too bad it is seen as a weed here.

the birds foot trefoil is as beautiful as the crocosmia, too bad it is seen as a weed here.

such a pretty weed

such a pretty weed

after: now more acceptable to the public

after: now more acceptable to the public

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more Crocosmia down the block

more Crocosmia down the block

Next, some weeding at Long Beach City Hall.

looking west

looking west

Gladiolus nanus

Gladiolus nanus

gladiolus nanus

gladiolus nanus

west side, Gene and Peggy's planting of Crocosmia

west side, Gene and Peggy’s planting of Crocosmia

rosemary and lavatera

rosemary and lavatera with Nicotiana langsdorfii (lower right)

a different gladiolus nanus

a different gladiolus nanus

Allan's photo: deadheading Armeria maritima (sea thrift)

Allan’s photos: deadheading Armeria maritima (sea thrift), before

after

after

The tragic thing was that I was going to pull that whole clump out, as it is infested with creeping buttercup and is rather old and tatty…but I forgot till he had already deadheaded it, so I left it alone.

Next: watering the city planters.

dog

a Basket Case basket

a Basket Case basket

Resolved: redo and improve the planter by my favourite shop, NIVA green, next year.

Resolved: redo and improve the planter by my favourite shop, NIVA green, next year.  It is blah.

Kudos to Scoopers ice cream for making this planting by the sidewalk.

Kudos to Scoopers ice cream for making this planting by the sidewalk.

I want the NIVA planter be more like this one.  It is, however, less sheltered than this one.

I want the NIVA planter be more like this one. It is, however, less sheltered than this one.

Cosmos 'Sonata' with Agastache

Cosmos ‘Sonata’ with Agastache

Cosmos, Agastache, Fuchsia 'Golden Gate', blue bacopa

Cosmos, Agastache, Fuchsia ‘Golden Gate’, blue and white bacopa, Salvia viridis

same planter from the sidewalk

same planter from the sidewalk

Fuchsia 'Golden Gate'

Fuchsia ‘Golden Gate’

Not so nice: the tree garden outside Dennis Co was trampled in some way.

Not so nice: the tree garden outside Dennis Co was trampled in some way.

It still has one good side with a helianthemum.

It still has one good side with a helianthemum.

Heather from NIVA green came strolling up the street with her little dog, Buzz.

Heather from NIVA green came strolling up the street with her little dog, Buzz.

I admired my favourite planter from the other side of the street.

I admired my favourite planter from the other side of the street.

didn't have time to sit a spell at NIVA green...

didn’t have time to sit a spell at NIVA green…

Allan's photo: tigridia by the carousel

Allan’s photo: tigridia by the carousel

I relished the increasingly cool, grey weather.

I relished the increasingly cool, grey weather.

outside Captain Bob's Chowder

outside Captain Bob’s Chowder

We did a quick weeding and fluffing of Fifth Street Park and then heading south to water in…

Ilwaco

I watered the boatyard garden and then did some weeding there, while Allan watered the street trees and planters in town.

at the boatyard...

at the boatyard…

...a departure

…a departure

...and the Marine Travelift just squeaks by where Allan is parked filling up the water trailer.

…and the Marine Travelift just squeaks by where Allan is parked filling up the water trailer.

Allan's photo as the travelift eases by.

Allan’s photo as the travelift eases by.

I have to water from behind the fence, which is frustrating when I see weeds.

I have to water from behind the fence, which is frustrating when I see weeds.

in the boatyard

in the boatyard: the watering obstacle course

looking north from the boatyard gate

looking north from the boatyard gate

south end of boatyard garden

south end of boatyard garden

Horsetail and bindweed are the curse of this garden.  The rose campion does not like the dry soil.

Horsetail and bindweed are the curse of this garden. The rose campion does not like the dry soil.

Santolinas are poised to be the stars of the garden when I pull the poppies.

Santolinas are poised to be the stars of the garden when I pull the poppies.

santolina, rose campion, achillea, poppies

santolina, rose campion, achillea, poppies

blue catananche

north end

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

santolina and pink achillea (yarrow)

santolina and pink achillea (yarrow)

The Cove Restaurant

At seven thirty, we met Dave and Melissa of Sea Star Landscape Maintenance for our tradition, which now includes catching up with them on a week’s worth of happenings in the garden.

Allan's noodle bowl

Allan’s vegetable stir fry with chicken

Dave's lomo saltado

Dave’s lomo saltado

my ahi tuna

my ahi tuna

Dave and Allan dig in.

Dave and Allan dig in.  Melissa had the delicious Prawns solo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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A reminder:

just a reminder that it is almost time for the Music in the Gardens Tour

just a reminder that it is almost time for the Music in the Gardens Tour

Monday, 29 June 2015

The day started well with this note enclosed with a client's cheque.

The day started well with this note enclosed with a client’s cheque.

Garden Tour Nancy had been texting me during our trip to the Hardy Plant weekend to reassure me that the local weather had turned misty and cool.  All the planters had held up well after not having been watered since Wednesday (Long Beach) and Thursday (Ilwaco).  Our mission of the day was simply to water our city planters and street trees in Long Beach and Ilwaco, and to add some Hellstrip Gardening inspired colour at the port.

Long Beach

my little friend, Tam, the smoke shop dog

my little friend, Tam, the smoke shop dog

planter

santolina

santolina


santolina: clipped in early spring, good from every angle

santolina: clipped in early spring, good from every angle

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California poppies and Cosmos 'Sonata'

California poppies and Cosmos ‘Sonata’


with dahlias

with dahlias


pink California poppies

pink California poppies

bee

bee2

bees

bee3

California poppies and lavender

California poppies and lavender

California poppies

parsley

parsley

Thinning some parsley that I use as an ornamental, I remembered Evelyn Hadden suggesting that taprooted plants might help break up compacted soil and encourage deep water penetration in curbside gardens (hellstrips).

Agastache and Cosmos 'Sonata'

Agastache and Cosmos ‘Sonata’


Geranium 'Rozanne' (Allan's photo)

Geranium ‘Rozanne’ (Allan’s photo)

Allan found this tableau in one of the street tree gardens:

"Hey kids, don’t take up smoking. I found myself tossed to the side of the road. If only I hadn’t…"

“Hey kids, don’t take up smoking. I found myself tossed to the side of the road. If only I hadn’t…”

He was unhappy to find that the hardy fuchsias he had recently planted in the street tree garden in front of Castaways Grille had been destroyed.

dag blag it

dag blag it; even the roots seem to be destroyed


"Doing over" this tree garden seems impossible because any new plants get  trompled.  We need to plant more, and sizeable plants, but now the dry season is not a good time. We may just have to wait for the vigorous golden lemon balm to fill it up again.

“Doing over” this tree garden seems impossible because any new plants get trompled. We need to plant more, and sizeable plants, but now the dry season is not a good time.
We may just have to wait for the vigorous golden lemon balm to fill it up again.


Allan's photo:  The line at the Cottage Bakery is so long in the summer that we don't even try to get tiger paws.

Allan’s photo: The line at the Cottage Bakery is so long in the summer that we don’t even try to get tiger paws.


Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue' in the Veterans Field garden

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ in the Veterans Field garden


I've gone off blue oat grass...these are coming out in the fall (or sooner!)

I’ve gone off blue oat grass…these are coming out of the flag pavilion garden in the fall (or sooner!)


flag pavilion garden

flag pavilion garden


my version of red white and blue

my version of red white and blue


the new vet field corner garden filling in

the new vet field corner garden filling in


hardy gladiolas at city hall

hardy gladiolus at city hall


city hall west side (planted by Gene and Peggy Miles)

city hall west side (planted by Gene and Peggy Miles)


sanguisorba in Fifth Street Parks

sanguisorba in Fifth Street Park


Allan's photo: he tackled the weeds in this damp corner.

Allan’s photo: he tackled the weeds in this damp corner.  (The grassy looking plant is schizostylis, which always needs thinning.)

Ilwaco

In a Long Beach realtor’s window, Allan had noticed how inexpensively one can still move here.

This house only has room for a pocket garden.

This house only has room for a pocket garden.


home to get the battery for the water trailer...with a bit of rain

home to get the battery for the water trailer…with a bit of rain

A sprinkle of rain did not mean that the thirsty Ilwaco planters did not need Allan to water them.

He barely had room to squeeze the water trailer out of the Ilwaco works yard.

He barely had room to squeeze the water trailer out of the Ilwaco works yard.


foggy mist...does not mean not having to water (Allan's photo)

foggy mist…does not mean not having to water (Allan’s photo)

It was one of those frustrating watering sessions at the port where the water at the boatyard was turned off, so he had to fill the tank at the community building (where lesser water pressure makes it take 15 minutes longer).  He used the opportunity to weed a bit and then to give some plants there a drink.

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Our new addition of Sedumn 'Autumn Joy' is doing well.

Our new addition of Sedumn ‘Autumn Joy’ is doing well.


typical: roofers left a mess of sawdust on the sidewalk.

typical: roofers left a mess of sawdust on the sidewalk.


Allan photographed the cute container garden at the Portside Café.

Allan photographed the cute container garden at the Portside Café.

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The city planter by Portside Café

The city planter by Portside Café


Nasturtiums are being browsed by deer.

Nasturtiums are being browsed by deer.

I collected some new plants and went to the port to do a bit of hellstrip improvement, inspired by Evelyn Hadden to make ALL the curbside gardens look as good as the ones by the port office.  I have only recently taken over most of the gardens along the port.  While I’ve been doing the Time Enough curbside bed for years, for some reason I have never packed it full of plants.  I was daunted by all the river rock, until I realized it has the makings of a rock (scree) garden display.  It has perhaps the worst soil of any of the port beds, and I am thinking that I could add some mulch and work it into the rocks.  I can care for these new plants properly because there is hose water available at this garden.

It took swinging a pick to make holes for new plants: perovskia and a penstemon

It took swinging a pick to make holes for new plants: Perovskia and a penstemon


veronica

veronica


ornamental oregano (Kent Beauty, I think)

ornamental oregano (Kent Beauty, I think)


more agastaches and penstemons

more agastaches and penstemons


curbside by the port office

curbside by the port office


port office curbside

port office curbside

I pushed my wheelbarrow with some more plants down to the old Wade Gallery garden.  (Last year, I did not have water there so did not plant anything new, and the old plants there died of thirst.  Now we are reviving it because there is hose water available.)   On the way I saw that someone had further pruned the bank garden.  Why???  Whoever did it had left clippings all over.  GAH!  (I found out later it was an intern from the port who had not been told to pick up the clippings…I guess.  In my opinion, we had already pruned the shrubs short enough, even though I agree the shrubs—not planted by us!— are a problem for sightlines and should be removed.)

clippings...argh!

clippings…argh!


dead clipping dropped down into the shrubs

dead clipping dropped down into the shrubs


more plants for the next section

more plants for the next section


a foggy view while getting the hose...so nice after Portland heat

a foggy view while getting the hose…so nice after Portland heat

Allan joined me and started to clean up the mess at the bank garden, so I did some pruning of a ceanothus to keep busy; now that it is done blooming, it should not be over the sidewalk.

Allan's photo of the mess left all along the bank curbside garden

Allan’s photo of the mess left all along the bank curbside garden


clippings from the bank garden

clippings from the bank garden


before

Pruning the ceanothus, before


after (if it were up to me, I'd let it encroach on the sidewalk more, but I like to keep the powers that be happy)

A bit off the top and sides. (If it were up to me, I’d let it encroach on the sidewalk more, but I like to keep the powers that be happy)


delicious fog

delicious fog

 

 

 

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Wednesday, 20 May 2015

Ilwaco

The grey, chilly, dark, and sometimes misty weather continued.  I welcomed it as it saved us worrying about watering all the plants we have recently planted.  The pressure of Annuals Planting Time is slowing down, so that even though we still have planting to do, it is not all planting all the time.

First thing today:  We usually do a little something to our volunteer garden at the post office during our daily mail stop.

Ilwaco Post Office garden

Ilwaco Post Office garden

post office detail: Eryngium 'Jade Frost' and Allium albopilosum

post office detail: Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’ and Allium albopilosum

I wanted to check on the rest of the Howerton Avenue gardens, the ones we had not gotten to yesterday, as the port will be a busy place during Memorial Day weekend.

the bed by the Ilwaco pavilion

the bed by the Ilwaco pavilion

pink California poppies

pink California poppies

green santolina in the next bed to the east

green santolina in the next bed to the east

the tiny and vulnerable "drive-over garden"

the tiny and vulnerable “drive-over garden”

The Marie Powell gallery garden bed

The Marie Powell gallery garden bed, looking west

The new ArtPort Gallery is located in the space that once housed the beloved and much-missed Pelicano Restaurant.

Powell Gallery bed, looking east

Powell Gallery bed, looking east

Eryngium and Lavender

Eryngium and Lavender further to the west

With the port gardens having achieved something near to perfection, we drove north to our next job.

The Anchorage Cottages

My good friend Mitzu greeted us.

My good friend Mitzu greeted us.

Anchorage manager Beth told us that Mitzu probably expected a doggie treat like the UPS man brings.

I think she's right.

I think she’s right.

We had some milk bones that I carried for the Casa Pacifica dogs; they were too big or not tasty enough, as Mitzu was not interested in having a small corner off of one.  So I gave her a tiny bit of cheese from our lunch box.  We must add some small dog treats to the items we carry with us.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

the north garden by the office

the north garden by the office with Geranium ‘AT Johnson’ beautifully run rampant

This is one job where I don’t mind this particular hardy geranium filling in a large area….at least for now, till it starts to look tatty.

I am usually obsessed with pulling this one.

I am usually obsessed with pulling this one.

Ceanothus and one of those Canadian Explorer extra hardy roses (I think)

Ceanothus, barberry, and one of those Canadian Explorer extra hardy roses (I think)

I added some more plants to the various containers while Allan did some weeding.

On the way to our next job, we stopped at both the Basket Case and The Planter Box to get some assorted Eryngiums for an end-of-day project.

The Basket Case

Allan did a photo essay at The Basket Case about why we trim sword ferns in the early spring:

Hidden behind the greenhouses, here is an untrimmed sword fern.

Hidden behind the greenhouses, here is a completely untrimmed sword fern.

Here is one that was trimmed last year (by Allan, during a time when he was waiting for me to shop) but not this year.

Here is one that was trimmed last year (by Allan, during a time when he was waiting for me to shop) but not this year.

Here is one that Fred just trimmed in the display garden.  (You can trim them carefully at end time; it is easier in early spring before the new fronds have unfurled.)

Here is one that Fred just trimmed in the display garden. (You can trim them carefully at end time; it is easier in early spring before the new fronds have unfurled.)

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Allan's photo in the south greenhouse

Allan’s photo in the south greenhouse

Regarding petunias, one situation where they are FABULOUS is in Nancy’s baskets.  (The one above mainly features calibrachoa (million bells); I see petunias in a couple of the background baskets in that photo.)

Allan's photo: me and Fred

Allan’s photo: me and Fred.  I have a Miscanthus ‘Gold Bar’.

Fred pointed out to be that he had two shrubs I had requested; I had not even realized that.  I grabbed me one of each: Dichroa febrifuga and Itea ilicifolia.  There was one left of each, so get ’em if you can; if they are still there at the beginning of June, I am taking them both!

Right: Dichroa in my garden two years ago.  Stunning.

Right: Dichroa in my garden two years ago. Stunning.

The Planter Box

From the Basket Case to the Planter Box, across Cranberry Road

From the Basket Case to the Planter Box, across Cranberry Road

We swung over to the main highway to get a couple more Eryngiums that I new the Planter Box had in stock.

at  The Planter Box, Allan's photo

at The Planter Box, Allan’s photo

me and owner Teresa, Allan's photo

me and owner Teresa, Allan’s photo

checking the progress of the painted sage second sowing (Allan's photo)

checking the progress of the painted sage second sowing (Allan’s photo)

Andersen’s RV Park

Next, we had alloted a couple of hours to weeding, as far as possible in that time, all the beds at Andersen’s RV Park.

a grey day at Andersen's

a grey day at Andersen’s

In the women's restroom:  my former partner, Robert, painted this "Desert Rose" mirror.

In the women’s restroom: my former partner, Robert, painted this “Desert Rose” mirror.

I surely do wish I could have that mirror if the RV park sells….

I had weeded the garden shed and the picket fence gardens and helped Allan on the west garden with the rest of our time.  I had suggested he use the string trimmer on the path; being light sand, I thought that might work way faster than hand weeding.  It was not fast, but it did the job.

before, Allan's photo

before, Allan’s photo

after, Allan's photo

after, Allan’s photo

before:  Allan's photo

before: Allan’s photo

after, Allan's photo

after, Allan’s photo

The poppies are just barely beginning to bloom here.

The poppies are just barely beginning to bloom here.

Still did not get this edge weeded by the office back door.

Still did not get this edge weeded by the office back door.

in that same area:  Oriental poppies and Halmiocistus wintonensis

in that same area: Oriental poppies and Halmiocistus wintonensis

While weeding, I admired the fine specimen to Stipa gigantea from several angles.

Stipa backed with Payson Hall club house.

Stipa backed with Payson Hall club house.

with Miscanthus variegatus, another of my favourites

with Miscanthus variegatus, another of my favourites

looking through to office back door

looking through to office back door

house2

looking south from Payson Hall

looking south from Payson Hall

Ilwaco again

My shopping for Eryngiums culminated in adding five cool plants to the garden in front of the soon-to-be-open Salt Hotel on Howerton.  It’s a tough area to plant because thick landscape fabric must be cut for each plant.  Allan did it while I pruned the ceanothus back from the sidewalk at the Time Enough Books garden to the east.

Allan ready to plant

Allan ready to plant

Eryngium 'Big Blue' from The Planter Box

Eryngium ‘Big Blue’ from The Planter Box set up to plant

The old Harbor Lights will become Salt, as soon as the sign arrives.

The old Harbor Lights Motel will become Salt Hotel, as soon as the sign arrives.

The new owners, Julez and Laila, have added some plants of their own.

The new owners, Julez and Laila, have added some plants of their own by the building.

Allan's photo: Each plant must have a hole cut through fabric to plant.  Oh, we do hate fabric in a planting bed.

Allan’s photo: Each plant must have a hole cut through fabric to plant. Oh, we do hate fabric in a planting bed.

Allan's photo: step two

Allan’s photo: step two

This time, he added some potting soil to the hole, I don’t usually believe in coddling a plant with special soil in the ground, for fear its roots will just circle in the good stuff.  Here, though, we decided to try it as the soil is so bad and rubbly.

Allan's photo: rocks replaced and washed with water.

Allan’s photo: rocks replaced and washed with water.  Eryngium ‘Big Blue’ from The Planter Box

He figured out that each plant took 12 minutes to plant here.

Eryngium 'Jade Frost' from The Basket Case.

Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’ from The Basket Case.

Miscanthus 'Gold Bar' from The Basket Case

Miscanthus ‘Gold Bar’ from The Basket Case

Gold Bar Miscanthus will stay nice and short.  Yesterday, I had been going to plant some of my stash of Panicum ‘Northwind’ in here…till I learned from Todd that it gets 4-6 feet tall.  We try to stay low with plants along Howerton, to avoid blocking traffic sightlines.

planted these and Eryngium 'Blue Hobbit'

planted these and Eryngium ‘Blue Hobbit’

on the water side of the hotel

on the water side of the hotel

Once again, we worked till eight. typical for the big push of getting ready for the holiday weekend.

 

 

 

 

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Tuesday, 19 May 2015

While the weather did not look promising, we headed out anyway as we had much to do before the Memorial Day weekend.

at the Ilwaco Post Office

at the Ilwaco Post Office

We had an all Ilwaco day planned.  At least it would be a good day to plant cosmos without having to water them in.  I reminded myself that at the end of the day, we would watch The Deadliest Catch, and I would feel silly if I complained about working in a little light rain on solid land.

We began by adding a few more diascia to the Ilwaco planters.

A nasturtium is already blooming in this one.

A nasturtium is already blooming in this one.

I planted a Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ from my endless supply under the street tree whose garden got vandalized.

One sedum in...

One sedum in…

While admiring the lush poppies under the unvandalized tree garden just across the street, I noticed some debris from the local tavern.  Fortunately, the tavern owner came out and cleaned it up.

tree

One of the poppies from that tree had been pulled or kicked out.  Yes, I notice everything.

One of the poppies from that tree had been pulled or kicked out. Yes, I notice everything.

At that moment, Carol Clearman drove by and I told her all about the tree garden being flattened (so you knew, Carol, before it was in published in the blog!)

When we got to the boatyard, I also noticed several places along the sidewalk where soil was missing, and probably little poppies, too.

pretty sure someone dug out a few of the poppies to take home

pretty sure someone dug out a few of the poppies to take home

As you can see, there are many poppies.  I’m glad that poppy scavenging does not happen often, or there would not be many.

I planted six 6 packs of cosmos all along the boatyard, a rather tedious project as planting is so not my favourite thing.  As I was weeding and planting, I heard a familiar voice, and my former partner, Robert, rode up on his bicycle.

Robert (Allan's photo)

Robert (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Robert told me that he had had emergency triple bypass surgery in February, and was feeling much better than he had in years.  He had had his first heart attack in 2002.

Allan and Robert

Allan and Robert

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

It was so poignant to see him, especially since it was his birthday.

He bicycled on to visit a friend at the marina.

Allan then did some strimming behind the north end of the chainlink fence.

Allan's photos: before....

Allan’s photos: before….

after: He also pulled some of the bigger weeds along the fence.

after: He also pulled some of the bigger weeds along the fence.

While Allan was thus occupied, he got an unexpected call from Todd, whose plan was to track us down and help us weed.  I planted the last of the cosmos and then took some photos before Todd arrived, so that I could look industrious after he got there.

It was gratifying that several passersby, including two young 20-ish men that one might stereotype as not being “into” gardens, said that they enjoy the flowers every day.

Lavender and Santolina

santolina and lavender

rose campion and California poppies

rose campion and California poppies

from the gate looking north

from the gate looking north

from the gate looking south

from the gate looking south

burnt orange California poppies

burnt orange stripey California poppies

white California poppies

white California poppies

pink California poppies

pink California poppies

pink California poppies

pink California poppies

Todd arrives to help out

Todd arrives to help out

I had asked him to ID a certain vigorous looking plant whose strongly emerging foliage scared me with its resemblance to Japanese knotweed.  At first. he also thought it looked ominous, and then he asked “Do you grow mirabilis here?”  My response to that was “Huh?” until he said “Four o clocks.”  Why yes, as a matter of fact, I had a clump of four o clocks, of a lovely peach shade, in this very spot.  So that is what the scary clump of foliage was: a good thing.  (Sorry I didn’t take a photo of it.)

the crew

the crew

I told Todd I don’t even really know WHY I insist on planting cosmos all through a garden like this.  It would be good enough without them.  I just love ’em, and in a crowded garden, there is no room for seeding (and unlike our friend Ann, I am not good with growing any but the easiest seeders).

We finished the boatyard garden and went around the corner to Howerton, to weed the garden closest to Nate’s Coastal Cones and Snacks.  This seasonal business would be opening for the year on Saturday.

Todd weeding

Todd about to start weeding

weeding (Allan's photo)

weeding (Allan’s photo)

Todd enjoyed and pointed out this vignette with lambs ears and grasses.

Todd enjoyed and pointed out this vignette with lambs ears and grasses.

ears

Allan sweeps up

Allan sweeps up

Just before leaving, Todd walked back from his truck and asked if he could “put his sign in the garden”.  Bemused, I said “Sure”, knowing that it could not be a serious “Weeding by Todd Wiegardt” sign.

a t shirt on a frame

a t shirt on a frame

from his former job, Plant Delights Nursery!

from his former job, as display garden curator at Plant Delights Nursery!

DSC00886

He’d been waiting till he could find us during Annuals Planting Time to show us this.  We all laughed and laughed (and I do not buy petunias.  Well.  I did buy four Pretty Much Picasso petunias, but don’t tell.)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Thanks, Todd, we owe you for a good laugh (and a good prank) and a lotta lotta weeding.  We got the jobs done much more thoroughly than we would have had time for otherwise.

While Allan dumped the debris, I weeded at the other end of Howerton in the easternmost garden bed.  Of course, I got more involved than I intended to so we worked for another hour.

the easternmost garden, looking west

the easternmost garden, looking west

looking east

looking east

Bachelor buttons from seed, maddenly out of focus.

Bachelor buttons from seed, maddeningly out of focus.

'White Linen' California poppies

‘White Linen’ California poppies

The pink armeria would look perfect if we deadheaded it all.  We did not.

The pink armeria would look perfect if we deadheaded it all. We did not.

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue' in silver.  (It will turn blue.)

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ in silver. (It will turn blue.)

Stipa tenuissima and Lavender.  I love this bed.

Stipa tenuissima, blue oat grass, santolina, white armeria,  and lavender. I love this bed.

And then, as planned, home to blog and to then watch The Deadliest Catch with our ten o clock dinner.

makes our job look so easy

makes our job look so easy

The annuals planting list is getting gratifyingly smaller on the work board.

The annuals planting list is getting gratifyingly smaller on the work board.

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