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Posts Tagged ‘Sanvitalia’

A VERY typical day indeed as we got back to maintenance.  The only thing approaching a project was Allan removing some lady’s mantle that was crowding three new blueberry plants at Diane’s garden.  He also transplanted some Cerinthe although, in my opinion, it would not hurt the blueberries at all (but Diane wanted the area cleared all but for the berry bushes).

Allan's project, before and after

Allan’s project, before and after

The blueberry to the left is ‘Pink Lemonade’ and had lots of berries.  I got all excited thinking that maybe my Pink Lemonade at home might have berries.  (I found at the end of the day that it doesn’t, even in its third summer here.)

Diane and Larry's 'Pink Lemonade' blueberry

Diane and Larry’s ‘Pink Lemonade’ blueberry

Meanwhile, I deadheaded the Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ at The Red Barn.  The lovely Helianthemum ‘Lemon Queen’ in that area does not need deadheading at all.

Helianthemum 'Lemon Queen'

Helianthemum ‘Lemon Queen’

beautiful in every stage of flower

beautiful in every stage of flower

beloved of all sorts of bees and the like

beloved of all sorts of bees and the like

bee

I do wish the whiskey barrels got more watering at The Red Barn!

two out of four barrels

two out of four barrels

The one closest to the barn door (left) gets the most water because people dump their stable cleaning buckets into it.  The next one gets far less (i.e. not enough) water.  Note the difference in the size of the nasturtiums.  (The third one, furthest from the door, is, of course, the paltriest!)

The happiest one is by the stable on the south side of the building, protected from the north wind.

lopsided but happy

lopsided but happy

In a wonderful gardening book that I just read, A Breath from Elsewhere, Mirabel Osler wrote a chapter about plants she dislikes.  One is sanvitalia (creeping zinnia) and I just don’t know why.  Yes, it is bright yellow, but with a charming green center.

I find sanvitalia to be just charming.

I find sanvitalia to be a delight.

At the barn, I feel sorry for the horses that are inside dark stalls with no one coming to put them out to pasture.

Indoors at one in the afternoon.

Indoors at one in the afternoon.

I will pick a handful of lush grass in for the poor horsie to eat.  Just a taste of the fresh outdoors.

These two were more fortunate.

The one on the foreground came over to say hello.

The one on the foreground came over to say hello.

two being led out to pasture

two being led out to pasture

After my work at the Barn, I went back to Diane’s (next door) and deadheaded her cosmos.  I have some lavenders to add to the roadside bed but am waiting for damper weather.

still so unsatisfying...will mulch with cow fiber!

still so unsatisfying…will mulch with cow fiber!

Larry, Diane’s spouse,  mulched the roadside bed with cranberry mulch but I don’t think it adds anything other than a nice dark colour.

Next came the deadheading of the welcome sign.  How very badly it needs more blue in the planting!

Yellow "stops the eye" but next year will have Geranium 'Rozanne'

Yellow “stops the eye” but next year will have Geranium ‘Rozanne’

In downtown Long Beach, Allan went to work on Coulter Park while I started walking around to deadhead the planters.  I thought at first I would get away without watering them, but they just were not damp enough to hold till Monday and look fresh and happy.  Soon the watering rounds will stop but not yet.

I keep meaning to Google for what type of Daphne this is:

short, fragrant, long period of bloom

short, fragrant, long period of bloom

The daphne planter is kitty corner from the cranberry harvest mural on the south wall of Dennis Co.

The daphne planter is kitty corner from the cranberry harvest mural on the south wall of Dennis Co.

In the planter by the Long Beach Pharmacy, one cosmos continues to behave strangely with green non-flowers.

an odd cosmos indeed

an odd cosmos indeed

It has some flowers low down on the stem.

It has some flowers low down on the stem.

I weeded and deadheaded at Veterans Field.

at three o clock, vendors were setting up for the afternoon farmers market

at three o clock, vendors were setting up for the afternoon farmers market

I am impressed by the continuing red white and blue-ness of the little Veterans Field garden.

Next year:  More Salvia 'Hot Lips' as it has been a great doer.

Next year: More Salvia ‘Hot Lips’ (right) as it has been a great doer.

Some of the short Cosmos has been excellent and some just terrible.  I have a feeling the ones called ‘Cutesy’ were the bad ones (and the reliable, tried and true ‘Sonata’ the good ones).

good (left) and bad (right)

good (left) and bad (right) with one paltry flower and a lot of dead

In the above right photo, you can also see a paltry Lobelia tupa.  Of three planted there, two of them look better:

a good tupa!

a good tupa!

but none have bloomed with the glorious flowers that we had from the Boreas Inn’s tupa!

Lobelia tupa, 8-2

Lobelia tupa should be doing this!

Back to the planter watering….I admired the schizostylis (river lily) now blooming under many of the trees.

Schizostylis in pale and dark pink

Schizostylis in pale and dark pink

At the restroom on Fifth Street, as elsewhere around town, the baskets from Basket Case Greenhouse still look wonderful.

 

basket

I think the park at Fifth Street is looking great, too.

I did not deadhead every cosmos...It would have taken hours.

I did not deadhead every cosmos…It would have taken hours.

I still long for the day when watering Ilwaco does not come right after Long Beach…so we can have crab rolls at Captain Bob’s Chowder!

When I got to Fish Alley, I did not have to bucket water the barrels.  (Joy!) I did chop back  the variagated sedum that still looked just awful.

water spots? too much rain? mildew? yuck!

water spots? too much rain? mildew? yuck!

I walked down Fish Alley and the alley to the east to get back to the Columbia Pacific Farmers Market.

looking east

looking east

I can’t bear to pull the Cerinthe that reseeded in the left hand barrel, even though they symmetry has been thrown off.

at the market

at the market

Kim from River Rock Farm was making bouquets out of dahlias (but cleverly avoided being photographed).

Kim from River Rock Farm was making bouquets out of dahlias (but cleverly avoided being photographed).

heirloom tomatoes from River Rock Farm

heirloom tomatoes from River Rock Farm

The Clatsop Weavers and Spinners Guild were doing a demo.

The Clatsop Weavers and Spinners Guild were doing a demo.

Our realtor friend and garden client Cheri is a member of this group but was off getting a treat at Sweet Celebrations cupcake shop!

I had been hoping that Wholesome Hearth Bakery would be at the market with their delicious little black bottom cupcakes.  They weren’t.  One of the spinners suggested I could go to one of the two Long Beach bakeries but I said the treat would not be as much fun if it did not come from the open air market.

Heading west again…a telephoto looking through Fish Alley to show that the view corridor goes all the way to the beach (half a mile west through the dunes).

looking west

looking west

The photo that got away:  Due to traffic I just missed a couple walking through Fish Alley carrying a bouquet of dahlias from the farmers market.  Imagine…

As I finished the planters, I realized that we should not have pulled the Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ out of the planter in front of Wind World Kites (of which just one blue corner shows above).  Not before Rod Run!   The Fuchsia that we had pulled the Crocosmia to reveal got almost totally smashed by Rod Run car-watching planter-sitters.

a lesson learned...

a lesson learned…smashed Fuchsia would have been protected by thickly planted Croscosmia!

I have no photos to show the excellent job that Allan did all around Coulter Park….

And will close with a selection of tomatoes that I picked at home while he went out to water the Ilwaco planters.

tomatoes

tomatoes

…and the still golden view from the south window.

dusk

Next:  If fate is willing and no catastrophe intervenes, I’ll be posting about something I have been looking forward to all summer long:  tomorrow’s Cannon Beach Cottage Tour!

 

 

 

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Today at the Ilwaco Post Office, the Lollipop Asiatic lilies have popped open.  It is actually not my favourite lily, but I got them for free somewhere, a good price for a volunteer garden.  I will be donating my one remaining Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ because I realized this morning that the post office is lacking one.

Ilwaco post office

Ilwaco post office

We went to Basket Case to pick up three Erysimum for the Ilwaco planters, an Azara microphylla for Larry and Robert, a Lobelia tupa for our own garden, and some Dianthus for Jo’s garden.  I sorted out the Sanvitalia situation.

Sanvitalia, a favourite annual

Sanvitalia, a favourite annual

Sunbini and Aztec Gold

Sunbini and Aztec Gold

Of the two cultivars offered at the Basket Case, I think Sunbini is a little tougher and can hold up better in the truly challenging conditions of the Ilwaco street planters.

Next time we go to the Basket Case, I hope to have room to finally get two hanging baskets for our garden, now that we will have a little more time to water them.  (Who am I fooling? With three gardens to get ready for the garden tour, when will that extra time be?)

Petunia 'Pink Lemonade'

Petunia ‘Pink Lemonade’

Here are the plants I wish people would go buy because they need to be in the ground!  First, ALL the Agastaches would love to have their roots in the soil.  Then, the lovely Sidalcea is getting so tall it is bending over!

Sidalcea...a favourite of my grandma

Sidalcea…a favourite of my grandma

The Lobelia tupa is an exciting plant that it seems no one but me is buying because it is not flowering yet.  The two Brunnera, Looking Glass and Jack Frost are excellent for shade.

Brunneras

Brunneras

There are still some hardy geranium ‘Rozanne’ available.  It has won the Royal Horticultural Society award for plant of the century!  Inspired by Adrian Bloom’s  photo of his river of Rozanne, I now have my own Rozanne river in my garden.  I think one of the reasons I moved to our sunny lot was just so I COULD have a river of Rozanne.

Adrian's Rozanne river, my Rozanne river

Adrian’s Rozanne river, my Rozanne river

His is curving and I like the effect of the grasses so much that, now that I look at his photo, I think I might add some grasses on either side of mine.

On to work!  We had dithered away the morning with sleeping late because of rain, waiting for rain to stop, and shopping.  We had two big projects to accomplish today at Andersen’s RV Park.

At last, on the east side of the house semi-shade bed, my weeding project:

before

before

and after

and after

The west side of the house behind the office was Allan’s project:

before

before

after

after

Allan's before and after set

Allan’s before and after set

There is some newspaper under the mulch to try and keep the pernicious quack grass from coming back too quickly.  Both projects were mulched with Cow Fiber (dairy manure) from The Planter Box.

Meanwhile, energetic park staffer Al was looking for a project, too, so I showed him an awful place in the garden shed garden.  A trench had been dug last year for some sort of plumbing or electrical fix, and had never been filled in because I was never sure the fix-it project was done.  Now we were running out of time to get it looking nice by summer.  I suggested it could be covered with rock, not made back into a garden, and in an amazingly short time Al fixed it.

Al accomplished this in one hour.

Al accomplished this in one hour.

This is a good spot to be graveled because sometimes a rig is parked by here and has to hook up to electric and cable.  I could put a pot here if we ever need a plant in this area.  It was a wonderful quick fix to a very unsightly area, full of quack grass that would have taken back over with a vengeance had I tried to weed it and plant it.

Al also weeded a raised bed with three blueberries in it and has cheerfully agreed to add liquid fertilizer every ten days when it is his shift to water the assorted planters.

Here are some beautiful things:

Allan's photo of Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

Allan’s photo of Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

I don’t know the name of the perennial poppy, below, that I got from Joy Creek nursery but it is just the sort of colour that Lorna most likes.

poppy

poppy

The picket fence garden today

The picket fence garden today

the poppy field, with Al walking by the back

the poppy field, with Al walking by the back

by the office

by the office

Agyranthemum 'Butterfly' and Petunia 'Pink Lemonade'

Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ and Petunia ‘Pink Lemonade’

A quite heavy rain came along at seven, so we went to dinner at the Depot Restaurant.  I had been anxious to see the garden, because I had been told that Susie of the Boreas Inn has taken Ciscoe by there to see it!  We had not checked on it over the weekend because our car was out of order, so I hoped it had looked good.  It did…till I got to the corner by the front door and found a big dead branch on the Cistus.  Oh no!   Allan lopped it off, and here it is, a great embarrassment, in our trailer.

It was really bringing down the tone.

It was really bringing down the tone.

Next Wednesday the Sisters on the Fly club will be at Andersen’s, and now that we have ALL the big clean up projects done at last, we just need one day to weed from one end of the gardens to the other and it will look spiffing.

Even more important, my friends Sheila and Harold will be staying at the park next month on garden tour weekend, and I want the gardens to be impeccable for that happy occasion!

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The day started with a sudden inspiration that instead of going to Andersen’s RV Park and weeding the east side as I planned, we should get the cow fiber to mulch the newly planted edges of the Marilyn garden.  Since we would be going by Oman Builders Supply on the way to M’s, we first went to Basket Case to get a couple of Eryngiums for that garden.

Basket Case cat

Basket Case cat

and a gorgeous basket

and a gorgeous basket

With Eryngiums in the car (and a few other irresistable plants to fill in along the repaired-after-weedkiller-damage edges at Marilyn’s) we went up and over and down a block to The Planter Box and got loaded up with two scoops of manure.  I picked out some more edging plants and one more six pack of Cosmos (for the Boreas Inn, if I can find time to get it planted there!).

my flat of plants being totaled at Planter Box

my flat of plants being totaled at Planter Box

With the addition of manure and more plants, Marilyn’s is beginning to look right again.

before and after

before and after

before and after

Mulch makes such a difference!

Mulch makes such a difference!

One of my gorgeous variegated Miscanthus there is reverted to green, really a shame and something I have not seen before with this grass:

half and half

half and half

Next week, we should have time to go down the middle of the garden and weed and then will just be in a holding pattern till tour day (July 20th).

the need to weed!

the need to weed!

If we had not had to spend so much time lately fixing the edges of the garden, the center would be well weeded by now.  I don’t dread the job, as I will find it so satisfying.  The hard part is we have to haul away all the debris.

The mulching and planting took less time than I thought it would;  I’d thought we might end up with extra cow fiber and my back up plan was to take it to Golden Sands.  But we had the perfect amount.  Since we had run into Andersen’s owner Lorna at the Planter Box, and she had there expressed a desire for some more small ornamental grasses, we figured our extra time could be spent fulfilling that request.

On the way we planted two Eryngiums and a Lobelia tupa at Oman Builders Supply, talked to them about the need to start watering regularly, and admired the size of the Alliums in the little garden.

Alliums schubertii and albopilosum

Alliums schubertii and albopilosum…very large

Then back we went to The Basket Case and got almost all their little grasses.  This is a boon for them because it is not a year round nursery, and when they sell out of plants, they will close for the rest of the summer and fall (probably in mid July)!

Here’s when the day got hard.  The area at Andersen’s where Lorna craved small ornamental grasses and some flowers was the barren end of the poppy bed, where poppy seedlings just do not “take” like they do at the other end.  This is not through lack of watering by the staff, and the bed has been mulched, but the other end is just moister.  We had not gotten round to weeding it and it was a mess of beach grass and couch grass, both with hugely running roots.  It was…just…hard work.  The kind of weeding job where you pull long long grass roots and know that only regular policing will keep the bad grass from coming back and swamping the desirable grass.  Worse yet, it has wild beach lupine whose roots are like iron.

before and after

before and after

A wheelbarrow full of plants went in.

little grasses and some flowers

little grasses and some flowers

Deer wander this garden so the non grass plants were Lobelia tupa (one, to try it out), Lavender, Catananche, Gaura ‘Whirling Butterfiles’ and ‘So White’, and Coreopsis ‘Baby Sun’.

It doesn’t look that different, yet, but should fill in well.

potential

potential

You can see where after the patch we weeded, all of a sudden the poppies are spectacular.  Dare we say we think it has something to do with the septic field?

Unfortunately, we still have three unweeded areas and might not get to them till next week.  One is the shade bed east of the house (our original plan for today) and two are near the office back door.  Oh, when?

still just befores!

still just befores!

This is one reason I am going to try to quit a job tomorrow by passing it on to a competent gardening friend who may be willing to take it over.  We’ll see.  I cannot stand being so overbooked and always running behind.

Even though we were plenty tired after this, at 7 PM we went to our last job.  I knew we absolutely had to water the Ilwaco planters now that the rains have stopped.  As has happened before, we were perhaps one day too late and in several of the planters the little sanvitalias were drooping flat on the soil and shriveled up.  I could not bear to photograph this.

The Ilwaco planters are round cement and the soil in them just bakes.  We bucket water them, or rather Allan does.  We do have a water truck but it takes an hour longer to water with it.  An hour extra would be more strain on the city budget and at the end of the day we do not have that extra hour.

Some of the sanvitalias were fine.  The stressed ones, eight in all,  I cut back hard, hoping they would put out more roots as the tops grew back, and I resolved that I cannot use this choice and cute little plant in the Ilwaco planters next year.  I had forgotten that it is more sensitive to dryness than Diascia or even Calibrachoa.  And dryness is the curse of the Ilwaco street planters.

As we watered and groomed the Ilwaco planters (in a wind so cold I put on a winter scarf), I became obsessively worried that the Sanvitalia in the Long Beach planters had suffered the same fate.  So after watering, at 8-exhausted-15 PM we drove back up to LB and cruised the car up and down the main street.  Ah, thank heavens above, the Sanvitalias were fine, perky, and pretty.  The LB planters are much larger and do not get dry as quickly.  They should hold until Wednesday, the day we plan to begin their regular watering.  (With a quick connect hook up and a short hose for each planter, no buckets for the ones on the LB main street I am glad to say!)

Here is a happy Sanvitalia in my garden tonight;  I hope the LB ones stay this happy until Wednesday.  Gardening can be such a big worry.  Times like the last half of today are not the jolly side of this business.

Wish they were all this happy.

Wish they were all this happy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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