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Posts Tagged ‘Sauvie Island’

Friday, 26 June 2015

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend, Portland 2015

a side trip to Cistus Nursery on Sauvie Island

We were skipping two of the tour gardens today so that we would have time to visit two nurseries.  The first was one of my all time favourites, Cistus on Sauvie Island.

hot

much rejoicing at our arrival at Cistus

much rejoicing at our arrival at Cistus

We rarely get to this nursery as it is over a two hour drive from our house.

driveway between two display gardens

driveway between two display gardens

plant nerd crossing

plant nerd crossing

This is the plant nerd crossing from sales area to parking lot, from my passenger window.

This is the plant nerd crossing from sales area to parking lot, from my passenger window.

The display garden is full of plants I cannot easily identify.

The display garden is full of plants I cannot easily identify.  Acacia, I think.

plants

grasses

display2

So far, this is only in the display garden along the parking lot.

by the (by now very welcome) sanicans

by the (by now very welcome) sanicans

driveway2

rose

On early springtime visits, I have been able to walk up this path.

On early springtime visits, I have been able to walk up this path.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

A saw a white spot; it was one of the shop cats, hiding from the sunshine.  (I had to walk in to say hi.)

A saw a white spot; it was one of the shop cats, hiding from the sunshine. (I had to walk in to say hi.)

Eryngium: Allan's photo

Eryngium: Allan’s photo

Eryngium: Allan's photo

Eryngium: Allan’s photo

entering the main greenhouse

entering the main greenhouse (Allan’s photo)

so happy to be there!

so happy to be there!

in the Big Top

in the Big Top

Allan didn't get much further than the succulents area at first.

Allan didn’t get much further than the succulents area at first.

succulents

Solanum quitoense: I used to have one and wish I still did.

Solanum quitoense: I used to have one and wish I still did.

Solanum quitoense

Solanum quitoense, such cool thorns

I could not purchase large plants, because we would have to lug them up to our hotel room for the weekend; it would be too hot to leave them in the van.

Oooh, I love brown flowers.  This was small, so I bought it.

Oooh, I love brown flowers. This was small, so I bought it.

hotchocolate

more cool plants

more cool plants

 I would have bought so many more if we were on our way home.

Acacia pravissima.

Acacia pravissima.

Oh, how I want that Acacia again.  I had it, in a pot, in my old garden, till a bunch of snow slid off the roof (a most unusual snowstorm) and crushed it.  This one was too darn big to buy and lug to the hotel room.

out of the Big Top into the sunny nursery

out of the Big Top into the sunny nursery

This I've had twice, and it's died twice.  This time, I resisted it.

This I’ve had twice, and it’s died twice. This time, I resisted it.

Pittosporum 'Marjorie Channon'.  I almost succumbed.

Pittosporum ‘Marjorie Channon’. I almost succumbed.

This reminds me that I must check and see how my Rhomneya is doing in the back garden...

This reminds me that I must check and see how my Rhomneya is doing in the back garden…

Albizia 'Summer Chocolate'...too big for this trip.

Albizia ‘Summer Chocolate’…too big for this trip.

I'm thinking of going much more drought tolerant in my front garden....Hmmm.

I’m thinking of going much more drought tolerant in my front garden….Hmmm.

I did buy a manageably sized Fremontodendron!

I did buy a manageably sized Fremontodendron, which will fit in the hotel room.

tag

zonal denial, perhaps

one of the plant sections

one of the plant sections

More Tetrapanax...

More Tetrapanax…

Perhaps my front garden could look like this.

Perhaps my front garden could look like this.

yard2

the big chicken that is the host of summer barbecues.

the big chicken that is the host of summer barbecues.

behind the sales desk

behind the sales desk

Next time I hope to be able to buy some Really Big Plants!

Next time I hope to be able to buy some Really Big Plants!

Next: Our third tour garden of the day.

 

 

 

 

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Friday, 26 June 2015

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend, Portland 2015

study

Lost Lagoon Farm, Sauvie Island

From the program: Jane Hartline and Mark Greenfield, Lost Lagoon Farm.  See what happened when two seasoned gardeners unleashed their energy and passion for gardening, wildlife and native plants on 3 acres on Sauvie Island.  A decade ago, we researched what plants were truly native to our land ecosystems, ripped out agricultural weeds around our 1/4 acre pond and planted more than 2,500 native trees, shrubs, wildflowers and ferns to provide habitat for songbirds, amphibians and other wildlife.  The self-guided tour of our habitat restoration project is the main event, but the gardens around our house are charming, with lots of interesting (non-native) plants and garden art, a rain garden, an awesome vegetable garden with a work space that will make you envious, and several cozy, verdant nooks for relaxing.

on the way into the garden

on the way into the garden

It was too hot for wearing wool coats.

It was too hot for wearing wool coats.

Because of the heat and extreme contrast from sun to shade, I’ve decided not to try to fix the contrast on the photos.  Walk with us; this is the experience that we had, back and forth from deep shade to blinding sunshine.

start here

Start Here: the walk toward the house

a woodsy approach

a woodsy approach

One of several shady sit spots.

One of several shady sit spots.

arrow2

The path becomes more formal.

The path becomes more formal.

We could go this way...but...

We could go this way…but…

We turn toward the barn.

We turn toward the barn.

another sit spot

another sit spot

I like the mulch of fallen cones.

I like the mulch of fallen cones.

the barn

the barn (Looking through, you can see the resting flock of sheep.)

Inside the barn, with a few of the chicken coop

Inside the barn, with a view of the chicken coop

chicken coop view

chicken coop view

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

back to the shady path...well planted along the sides.

back to the shady path…well planted along the sides.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

We are seeking the house.

We are seeking the house.

light at the end...

light at the end…

a bright circle

a bright circle

We turn right to inspect the kitchen garden.

delicious compost!

delicious compost!

tour goers and veg

tour goers and veg

IMG_9592

 

veg

 

purple martin houses

purple martin houses on a tall pole

martin

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

purple martin pictures: Allan's photo

purple martin pictures: Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

The weather was so hot that a jug of water by the veg garden workshed was hot like from a recently boiled teakettle.

Perhaps I exaggerate slightly.

Perhaps I exaggerate slightly.

tools in the kitchen garden shed

tools in the kitchen garden shed

work area

work area

artfully screened wall

artfully screened

screen2

 

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

looking across the lawn to the house

looking across the lawn to the house

lawn surrounded by garden

lawn surrounded by garden

a familiar shed

a familiar shed

We toured this garden on the Garden Conservancy tour in 2009.

photos from 2009

photos from 2009

Redwing blackbirds were all over this.

Redwing blackbirds were all over this feeder by the kitchen garden fence.

Small birds flew all around the house patio, where many feeders served them.  They flew up onto the roof when we approached.

birds2

 

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo (hats)

the patio

the patio

The birds decided it was safe to come down.

The birds decided it was safe to come down.

They kept a close eye on us.

They kept a close eye on us.

Ah...icy cold water

Ah…icy cold water

patio corner

patio corner

 

lemon tree

lemon tree

looking back toward the veg garden

looking back toward the veg garden

Verbena bonariensis

Verbena bonariensis

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

A path leads around the house.

A path leads around the house.

shrubs

 

patio3

another example of a house with lovely, big garden embracing windows

another example of a house with lovely, big garden embracing windows

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

in a side yard: native plants for sale...

in a side yard: native plants for sale…

douglas

Darmera peltata (umbrella plant) is one that I do like to have in my garden.

Darmera peltata (umbrella plant) is one that I do like to have in my garden.

fringe

tour guests

tour guests

We’ll now leave the house gardens and walk the self-guided tour of Lost Lagoon.  As we followed the path, we made every effort to take photos that will share the experience and information with you.  We were both impressed with the high quality of the information signs.

sign2

lost

raccoon

 

Allan's photo

 (Allan’s photo)

Raccoon Camp

Raccoon Camp

snags

snags2

snags

path to Lost Lagoon

path to Lost Lagoon

path3

cottonwoods

oak

brush

warbler

Warbler Tree Bench

Warbler Tree Bench

oregon

pollinator

turtle

turtle highway

turtle highway from the farmland irrigation ditch…

to the Lost Lagoon.

to the Lost Lagoon.

lost2

Lost Lagoon

Lost Lagoon

nettles

wildlife

wildlife corridor

wildlife corridor

martins

martins2

 

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

We continue around the lagoon.

We continue around the lagoon.

chains

 

winter

 

view to the bridge from behind the pond

view to the bridge from behind the pond

As we continued our walk, we could see the Sauvie Island bridge. (This is slightly telephoto)

from the backside of the lagoon path: Sauvie Island bridge. (This is slightly telephoto)

currant

swaths

 

Allan's photo

viewing bench

viewing bench

cafe2

an idyllic life

an idyllic life

messy

prairie

The path goes under a weeping willow.

The path goes under a weeping willow.

wood

Looking back through the willow: magical

Looking back through the willow: magical

willow3

lagoon

 

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

tour guests view the lagoon

tour guests view the lagoon

azolla

(Sorry all blurry, and the beaver lodge was too shady to photograph.)

(Sorry all blurry, and the beaver lodge was in shade too deep to photograph.)

dock

a bit about frogs

a bit about frogs

Having circled the lagoon, we return to the house.

Having circled the lagoon, we return to the house.

arbour at front of house

arbour at front of house

"Variegated climbing hygrandea!" said another tour guest.

“Variegated climbing hygrandea!” said another tour guest.

front door

front door

more of those enviable windows

more of those enviable windows

I think this is just a regular garage door, but painted...which I would like at our house.

I think this is just a regular garage door, but painted…which I would like at our house.

another bird feeder (Allan's photo) in an area with fewer tour guests

another bird feeder (Allan’s photo) in a front garden area with fewer tour guests

Joe Clifton was selling artwork near the Raccoon Camp

Joe Clifton was selling artwork near the Raccoon Camp

Joe Clifton

Joe Clifton: Allan bought a screwdriver flower sculpture, which would have been my pick, too.

Allan's photo

 Allan’s photo

birds on the Raccoon Camp fence

birds on the Raccoon Camp fence

As we drove out of the parking lot, we saw Todd driving in, and had a conversation through our vehicle windows.  He’d gotten a late start due to having to do watering back on the Peninsula, and was running one garden behind us.  Because Allan and I were not going to go to all five tour gardens, we had time to make a side trip to Cistus Nursery.  That will be a comparatively short bonus post tonight, since I hope, for my own sake, to get caught up to the present day before the end of summer.

 

 

 

 

 

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Friday, 26 June 2015

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend, Portland 2015

study

We were up and in the hotel restaurant by 8:30 AM, ever so early for two night owls.  I had a look at Facebook on my phone and almost burst into tears of joy.  I could hardly speak to tell Allan what I saw without flapping my hands to hold back the tears.

marriage

What a day: To begin with something so wonderful that in my 20s through 40s I never thought I would see in my lifetime, followed by garden touring, and visits to both Xera and Cistus nurseries, and closing with a lecture by Dan Hinkley.

We took our non freeway route out of Portland, heading back west down the same quiet industrial streets we had entered by last night.  Other than waiting for a long train to pass, we made good time and got to our destination only half an hour after the first garden opened.

the back roads of Portland

the back roads of Portland

our destination: Sauvie Island

our destination: Sauvie Island

Here we are just coming off the bridge onto Sauvie Island.

Here we are just coming off the bridge onto Sauvie Island.

Much of the island is farmland, both agricultural and horticultural.

Much of the island is farmland, both agricultural and horticultural.

DSC04440

farm

houseboats on the river channel

houseboats on the river channel

gravel barge on the river channel, heading to Portland

gravel barge on the river channel, heading to Portland

We arrived at our first garden, one that we had visited on the Garden Conservancy tour in 2009.

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend: Soule-Horn garden

from the program:  This is the home of George Soule and Joy Creek Nursery co-owner Maurice Horn, who will explore the evolution of this large rural island garden during his lecture on Saturday.  This country garden is located in what was once an oak savannah.  It has many borrowed views of distant mountains, oaks, hills, and a seasonal lake.  A formal knot garden near the house transitions to less formal garden rooms, terraces, and perennials borders, which transition to mown paths through open fields.  The original design was by Wallace Huntington.  Subsequent design and plant selections have been done by Sean Hogan and Maurice Horn.

The temperature was in the mid 90s, and the light glaring for photography.

By the field in which we parked, a neighboring farmer rents a space for beehives.

all abuzz

all abuzz

up the long driveway flanked with lavender

up the long driveway flanked with lavender

The driveway divides.

The driveway divides.

below the house

below the house (Allan’s photo)

to the right, a tropical island

a tropical island

Their tetrapanax was running vigorously.  I wish mine would (I think).

Their tetrapanax was running vigorously. I wish mine would (I think).

 the lower side of the house: a collection of plants

the lower side of the house: a collection of plants

approaching the house

along the left-hand branch of the driveway

to the left, over the lavender hedge

to the left, over the lavender hedge

(Allan's photo)

Allan’s photo

lav4

We took the lower path to a stairway farther on.

terraced garden below the house

terraced garden below the house

the sloping garden

the sloping garden

detail

detail

Maurice and George had kindly arranged to have flocks of butterflies throughout the garden.

(Allan's photo)

Allan’s photo

(Allan's photo)

Allan’s photo

staircase going up (Allan's photo)

staircase going up (Allan’s photo)

pockets of shade beside the comfortably spaced stone steps

pockets of shade beside the comfortably spaced stone steps

Hebe 'Quicksilver' spilling over

Hebe ‘Quicksilver’ spilling over

further up the steps

further up the steps

The heat had addled my brain so that I did not take a photo of the elegant stairway.  Here is a photo from 2009, when the stairway garden was just being planted.

looking down

looking down

now: mature stairway plantings in shade

now: mature stairway plantings in shade

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

how to guide a clematis up a tree (Allan's photo)

how to guide a clematis up a tree (Allan’s photo)

looking down over the hillside garden

looking down over the hillside garden

at the top of the stairs

at the top of the stairs; the house is all windows onto the garden

the knot garden

the knot garden

exuberant plants contained within the knot garden

exuberant plants contained within the knot garden

knot3

owner George, strolling with his dog

owner George, strolling with his dog

George and a tour guest (Allan's photo)

George and a tour guest (Allan’s photo)

past the knot garden

past the knot garden

some blissful shade

some blissful shade

intense contrast between sun and shade

intense contrast between sun and shade

The knot garden segues into informal gardens.

The knot garden segues into informal gardens.

Bees came from the hives, beyond the meadow, to drink from this birdbath.

Bees came from the hives, beyond the meadow, to drink from this birdbath.

We were told the ridged bottom keeps them from drowning.

We were told the ridged bottom keeps them from drowning.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

If we had entered the other way, we would have first come to patio terraces by the house.

terrace2

the same corner in 2009

the same corner in 2009

garden tour mingling

garden tour mingling

pots

on the terrace near the house

on the terrace near the house

design drawing

design drawing

map of house and garden

map of house and garden

snacks, cool water, George, and the beautiful windows (Allan's photo)

snacks, cool water, George, and the beautiful windows (Allan’s photo)

George and Maurice's adorable dog, Ricky

George and Maurice’s adorable dog, Ricky

Allan's photo. I was in love, as I am sure you can guess.

Allan’s photo. I was in love, as I am sure you can guess.

looking out over the field of green spires

view from the terrace: looking out over the field of green spires (pruned by deer)

meadow

We walked back toward the stairs we’d entered by, and passed the scree garden next to the knot garden.

scree garden

scree garden

scree2

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

the other side of the knot garden

the other side of the knot garden

Crocosmia spilling over

Crocosmia spilling over

looking back at the knot garden

looking back at the knot garden

Maurice had recently turned part of the slope past the scree garden into a rockery.  As the owner of Joy Creek Nursery, he has a ready supply of the coolest plants.

overview

rockery

their favourite sit spot

their favourite sit spot

red

red2

rockerytree

the view

the view

I found my way down via the lawn rather than the stairs.

path

intense sun as we go further afield

intense sun as we go further afield

downhill: a bed surrounding a small shed

downhill: a bed surrounding a small shed

behind the shed, a buddleia...

behind the shed, a buddleia…

...living up to its name, butterfly bush.

…living up to its name, butterfly bush.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

butterflu2

butterfly photos

butterfly photos

A rhodo for Steve and John

A rhodo for Steve and John

still further afield in the mown paths

still further afield in the mown paths

At the end of another path, access to Wapato State Park

At the end of another path, access to Wapato State Park, a bird watchers’ paradise

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

With no time to explore a state park as well, we turn back.

With no time to explore a state park as well, we turn back.

Many clever garden tourers carried parasols.

Many clever garden tourers carried parasols.

the lavender edges driveway from off in the fields

the lavender edges driveway from off in the fields

looking back on the fields

looking back on the fields

We must depart, although I would see so much more by walking around the house again.

We must depart, although I would see so much more by walking around the house again.

a garden by the driveway

a garden by the driveway

Bees buzzed beside us all the way down the lavender-edged driveway.

Bees buzzed beside us all the way down the lavender-edged driveway.

lav5

What I learned the next day in a lecture by Maurice Horn:

The original garden design called for a belvedere.  (I had to google that.)

The windows go from knee height to over (most) human’s heights.

The house is all windows except for a central bathroom.

The garden has Buddhist iconography because George is a Buddhist.

The bolsters of shrubs are earth, the yellow and red flowers are fire, Hebe ‘Quicksilver’ is water.

Clematis integrifolia and viorn2 resist the root nibbling the moles that eat other clematis roots.

The window views remind him of Japanese woodblock prints that were in his childhood home.

Next: a wetland restoration garden

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Joy Creek

Some of these photos were taken on a trip that I made in spring with Long Beach parks manager Mike Kitzman to buy plants for the new beach approach garden and some parks, but some of the photos of later summer flowers may have been taken when Mary and I went to Sauvie Island, because I cannot imagine being that close to Joy Creek without dragging her to the nursery.

spring at Joy Creek

spring at Joy Creek

English delphiniums

English delphiniums

mixed border

mixed border

Penstemons, part of the "Kissed" series for which Joy Creek is renowned.

Penstemons, part of the “Kissed” series for which Joy Creek is renowned.

mixed border

mixed border

Penstemon

Penstemon

Canna and Brugmansia

Canna and Brugmansia

Canna and Brugmansia

Canna and Brugmansia

A couple of years before, Ann Lovejoy and Lucy Hardiman had given a workshop at Joy Creek in creating a texture garden, so that rock and gravel area was of particular interest to me.

in the texture garden

in the texture garden

in the texture garden

in the texture garden

in the texture garden

in the texture garden

in the texture garden

in the texture garden

Lobelia tupa

Lobelia tupa

Sauvie Island

My dear friend Mary (friends since age 12) had gotten a very good job and for three years in a row, she took me on a fabulous overnight trip!  The first one was to Sauvie Island, almost to Portland….a world of its own.

On the way, we passed this cute place in a little Columbia River-side Oregon town.

in a small town

in a small town

Sauvie Island is surrounded by dikes, and when we climbed over the one by the B and B we saw this huge ship on its way back from Portland…You can just see the lights of Portland in the distance, and a half moon.

Sauvie Island

Sauvie Island

Lots of ornamental plants are grown commercially there.

farm

farm

I wonder if Cistus Nursery had started up then?  If it had, I certainly don’t seem to have discovered it yet.

We stayed in kind of a funny bed and breakfast where we had the two downstairs bedrooms.  The basement was still decorated with family photos and we felt like we were the kids home from college.  It was sweet.  We heard cows mooing into the night.  Well, I did.  Mary had earplugs.   I was delighted to find by my bed a sequel to one of my favourite books ever, The Bachelor Brothers Bed and Breakfast.  The next  morning at breakfast, our host told us that the Oregon B&B Association had asked the author to give a speech, but he declined, saying he really knew nothing of B&Bs.  The books feel so real, you would think he did.

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bench, garden five

When we saw this bench at the entry to the next garden, we had a feeling we were in for something exciting.   A red door beckoned….Oh so similar to a door in my own garden and that Gearhart garden I’d so loved in summer of 2008.

through the red door, garden five

a richly planted corner…garden five

Walking alongside the house, with Tetrapanax papyrifer to the left, we approached a delightful dry creek bed with stepping stone bridge.  This brought us all to a halt as we admired the effect.

We love a creek bed; garden five

Note how the patio table has boots….

Note the boots on the patio table…

….and the cow had mysterious works inside…

…and that the garden tourists examined every detail.

Past the greenhouse patio

Past the greenhouse patio we worked our way through lushly planted beds to an enclosed vegetable garden.  I imagined how magical it must look at night with the big white lights glowing along the fence and arbour.

garden five, enclosed veg garden

I wonder how many deer are on Sauvie Island, and if they could be all sent away, or would they swim back across from the mainland?

Meandering our way further down through rich borders….

garden five

…we came to a field with mown paths.   That’s another thing I love.  When I used to mow lawns I liked nothing better than making paths through long grass.

An odd little tree sculpture, a platform, and a yoga mat attested that the meadows did get visited by the owners, although I would have found it hard to find time for stretching on a mat with all the garden to attend to.

mat in the meadow, garden five

Approaching the house from the other side we first came upon a scree garden.

scree garden

Surrounded by shrubs and roses…

garden five

…we came upon well thought out sunny open paths and a patio.

near the house, garden five

Right next to the house is another seating area with a view of the gardens.

This is the kind of care and detail that thrills me to the core.

On the covered porch, a plush lounging area:

covered porch

Might I add that I love the dusky purple colour of the house.

details….blue globe echoing Allium albopilosum

details…a line-up of bog plants

details…a repeat of blue

leaving the fifth garden…

We would have liked to stay longer and tried out the view from every seating arrangement, but another garden called, and we were still hoping to make it to Joy Creek Nursery in Scappoose…

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Allan and I simply HAD to go on the Garden Conservancy tour on Sauvie Island because I had accidentally brought my friend Sheila‘s one gallon Stewartia tree home from the Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend 2008.  Sauvie would be an excellent place for the two of us to rendezvous (and of course to shop at Cistus and Scappoose’s Joy Creek nurseries).

I worry a bit that if I am frank about my thoughts on some of the tour gardens, I might hurt the feelings of a garden owner who happens upon this.  It takes courage to let the public into one’s garden.   So I will continue my vague policy of raving about the ones I adore.  If there’s a garden that amazes and moves me, I tend to take so many photos that it gets its own journal entry.

I apologize that three years later I can’t flash my memory back to tell you the names of the gardens….

the first garden

The second garden had metal garden art throughout.

second garden

garden art in second garden

Sheila drew my attention to the huge trunks twined around the front arbour.

arbour trunks, second garden

Here’s a plant I keep trying and failing to grow, and still want:  Impatiens omeiana.

pretty sure the middle plant is impatiens omeiana…

The third garden’s owners provided a written tour guide with clever questions and clues to guide us through the landscape.  I think the house was new.  While big and grand, it gave a pleasant impression of homey farmhouse.  The wattle fencing around garden beds and compost pile charmed me.

garden three….house and wattle fences

wattle fenced bed and compost heap

The straw bale edged beds inspired me to do the same…an inspiration I still have not followed, but mean to.

straw bale beds, garden three

We all loved the straw bale summer house.  As we drew closer, we realized it had a built in stained glass window and its own little front garden bed!

straw bale summer house, garden three

Inside: the perfect summer get-away for a nap or a reading a good book.

straw room hideaway, garden three

While the third garden was more of a casual landscape than a garden we enjoyed its special touches.

mossy bench, garden three

tiny pond, garden three

I have to break my vague rule of no complaining already….because I really must point out that garden number four was simply not ready to be on the tour.  If a garden is this new and has not somehow been given some flow and cohesiveness, in my opinion it should wait a year or two to be on the tour.  Some perennials stuck in, or even sword ferns, would have helped.

The potential was great in garden four even though parts of it made me barking mad.  It had a rawly new pond landscape.  I would very much like to have seen it just a couple of years later.  I suppose garden tours do not often come to Sauvie and the chance to be on one was irresistable.  I also imagine the garden owners had some hesitation and I apologize, if they have happened upon this….

pond, garden four

One area with mature plantings gives an idea of how lovely the entire garden must be a few years later…

garden four in maturity

Gardens five and six are going to get their own entries.  Skipping ahead here to garden seven, we found another big farming landscape with a pretty garden just around the house.  I remember now…It was a peony farm, but at the time we visited, the peonies had already bloomed.  Those fields must be spectacular in flowering time.

harvested peony field, garden seven

Closer to the house a lovely area of roses and lavender and the gardens right by the house must have been a great pleasure to the owners….especially now that the hard work of peony harvest was over.

house and porch, garden seven

lovely arbours, garden seven

lavender beds, garden seven

…Next stop Joy Creek Nursery in Scappoose.  But for the blog reader, let’s flash back to the wonderful gardens number five and six first.

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