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Posts Tagged ‘Schizostylis’

Tuesday, 13 October 2015

before work: Allan tidying in our volunteer garden at the post office

before work: Allan tidying in our volunteer garden at the post office

Schizostylis at the post office, either Viscountess Byng or Mrs. Haggerty.

Schizostylis at the post office, either Viscountess Byng or Mrs. Haggerty.

Long Beach

After my prediction that the flower show in Long Beach would be over after last weekend’s storm, I was pleased to find how sturdy my plant selections had proven to be.  Pleased and, dare I admit, just 1% disappointed, because it would have been fun and satisfying to clean all the annuals out.  Looks like this year will be the typical story of trying to plant bulbs among the cosmos, which often do last well into November.

Allan cut back some plants in Fifth Street Park while I walked around and groomed the planters.

Fifth Street Park, art tile by Renee O'Connor

Fifth Street Park, art tile by Renee O’Connor

before

before

before

before

Allan's photos: before

Allan’s photos: before

and after

and after

before

before

and after

and after

Alchemilla mollis, before

Alchemilla mollis, before

and after

and after

garden corner by restroom, SW quadrant of park

garden corner by restroom, SW quadrant of park

We won’t be cutting down the restroom garden anytime soon, because behind the restroom is a mess of nasty old pampas grass, chosen by the landscape architect way back when.  What a crazy thing to plant in a narrow passage around a building enclosed by a tall fence.  I like to keep it hidden as long as possible as I refuse to go back there and weed that stupid area!  (I used to but rebelled several years ago.)

One of two Renee O'Connor obelisks in Fifth Street Park

One of two Renee O’Connor obelisks in Fifth Street Park

Renee O'Connor tile detail

Renee O’Connor tile detail

By the Herb N Legend Smoke Shop.

By the Herb N Legend Smoke Shop.

I read somewhere recently that the smoke shop’s motto is if you don’t smoke, don’t start, and if you do, stop, but if you can’t stop, use their products which are pure and pesticide free (or something along those lines).

dahlias and Geranium 'Rozanne'

dahlias and Geranium ‘Rozanne’

Coreopsis 'Star Cluster'

Coreopsis ‘Star Cluster’

painted sage just won't give up

painted sage just won’t give up

more dahlias

more dahlias

Hebe 'Quicksilver'

Hebe ‘Quicksilver’

Salvia patens

Salvia patens

the carousel further dismantled for winter

the carousel further dismantled for winter

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Salvia viridis (painted sage); I was short on blue this year.

Salvia viridis (painted sage); I was short on blue this year.

Cosmos 'Sonata' (annual) and Cosmos atrosanguineus (chocolate cosmos, tender perennial)

Cosmos ‘Sonata’ (annual) and Cosmos atrosanguineus (chocolate cosmos, tender perennial)

Meanwhile city crewmember Paul was tidying up the town.

Meanwhile city crew member Paul was tidying up the town.

The tigridia have been blooming all summer.

The tigridia have been blooming all summer.

Chrysanthemums

Chrysanthemums

my favourite planter, a little beat up

my favourite planter, a little beat up

This daphne has been blooming for months.

This daphne has been blooming for months.

Geranium 'Rozanne' and a lush Cerinthe major purpurascens

Geranium ‘Rozanne’ and a lush Cerinthe major purpurascens

Two trees just got pulled out of the front of Coulter Park to make way for some sort of holiday display.

Two trees just got pulled out of the front of Coulter Park to make way for some sort of holiday display.

On the way to dump debris, we took the opportunity to photograph some beach cottages, all within the same block.

Kite Flyers' Cottage

Kite Flyers’ Cottage

DSC00641

a sign from the annual kite festival

a sign from the annual kite festival

DSC00642

classic picket fence cottage

classic picket fence cottage

a private porch

a private porch

a Little Free Library

a Little Free Library

DSC00643 2

I am so tempted to have a Little Free Library at my house…but I think, or know, that it would interfere with my seclusion and I don’t think I want that.

Port of Ilwaco

We finished the day by weeding at Salt Hotel and Time Enough Books curbside gardens.  I cut back a volunteer elderberry hard, against the Time Enough wall, to save them the trouble of doing it (which they do every year before holiday decorating).

made this much debris, including digging up a too tall grass to go elsewhere.

made this much debris, including digging up a too tall grass to go elsewhere.

We were invited in to see the new Salt Hotel guest lounge in progress, with windows facing the marina.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

DSC06478

DSC06479

nautical charts on the wall

nautical charts on the wall

DSC06481

the south deck

the south deck

Yellow Bluff, east of the port, end of the day

Yellow Bluff, east of the port, end of the day

 

 

 

 

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Friday, 20 February 2015

We’ve only had one day off since we started back to work on February 10th.  I’d like to think the cats miss me.

Smokey and his mom, Mary

Smokey and his mom, Mary

They seem perfectly content just to have my chair.  (It was naughty Calvin who clawed on the chair arm, not these two angels.)

They seem perfectly content just to have my chair. (It was naughty Calvin who clawed on the chair arm, not these two angels.)

I wanted the satisfaction of crossing two jobs off of the work list.  And we go to private gardens only on weekdays, so today we did The Red Barn and the private garden next door to it.

On the way, we fluffed up a couple of the Ilwaco planters with a bit of new potting soil and then made a side trip to the Depot Restaurant garden to dig up some hops roots for Chef Michael.  He wants to grow some in containers on his deck at home.  It took the big loppers to cut the roots.

Cascade Hops roots, thick and fibrous; gave him some with nice sprouts on them

Cascade Hops roots, thick and fibrous; gave him some with nice sprouts on them

The Red Barn Arena

At the barn, Red, a horsewoman’s handsome and friendly dog, came to greet me.

Red, a little camera shy

Red, a little camera shy

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

All we had to do was weed along the fence.  This was one of our last jobs last November, and I had looked at all the grassy weeds and thought “I’ll just wait till February”, so here we are.

before

before

after

after

Our parking space, on the lawn next to the hedge behind which was our next job, had turned into part of a completely fenced pasture.

pasture

Barn owner Amy told us the horse is hers, a brood mare who will be having a baby in about 40 days.

We look forward to seeing the foal in the springtime.

We look forward to seeing the foal in the springtime.

Diane’s garden

My solution was for Allan to unhook the trailer and just drive the van into Diane and Larry’s parking area, which is hard to turn around in.

Diane's front garden, before

Diane’s front garden, before, looking north

almost after, with Allan pulling a last weed or two

almost after, with Allan pulling a last weed or two

looking south, before...

looking south, before…

and after, including the planting of some pink and white California poppies ('Dusky Rose' and 'White Linen' seeds)

and after, including the planting of some pink and white California poppies (‘Dusky Rose’ and ‘White Linen’ seeds)

I will probably put a crisp edge on the lawn side of the garden next time.

west side of house, before

 side of house, before

and after

and after  (we did not make the house tilt….)

Iris reticulata in Diane's garden

Iris reticulata in Diane’s garden

We both Mapped Our Walk today:

mine

mine

Allan's

Allan’s working walk

Red Barn

Red Barn

Diane's: mine in red, Allan in blue

Diane’s garden: mine in red, Allan in blue

Allan tucked in to a few areas thoroughly while I was all over the place.  His milage for both jobs was 2.31 and mine was 3.15 miles, which just amazes me because the areas we worked in were rather small.  The map tends to put some odd loops out to the sides that I swear did not happen, so … I am assuming the GPS milage is somewhat accurate, but I have no way of knowing for sure.

Long Beach

We had a couple of hours of daylight left.  The temperature had dropped, a cold breeze had kicked up, and my original idea of finishing the day at the Port of Ilwaco no longer appealed.  We had a check to collect in Long Beach so we finished the day out there (still breezy and cold but with tasks that seemed less daunting than the entire Ilwaco boatyard garden).

Long Beach City Hall had a head start on St Patrick’s Day (which happens to be my birthday):

lb

We decided to check on the few main street planters that hadn’t had a once over yet.

The northernmost planter on the west side of Pacific Way (looking south)

The northernmost planter on the west side of Pacific Way (looking south) had some chickweed, as always

Back in volunteer days, some of the planters had lots of chickweed, and to this day, now that we are in charge, those three or four planters STILL have chickweed trying to come back.

under a street tree

under a street tree

Dennis Company’s garden department had pansies and violas on sale for a dollar.  I could not resist getting some of the orange and purple violas for planters in Long Beach and Ilwaco.

violas

violas

We next weeded and clipped trees and planters on the southernmost block of downtown planters:

looking south

looking south

I remember, when we first were caring for the planters, being asked to add primroses to brighten them up for spring break in March.  Now, with all the assorted spring bulbs that we’ve added over the years, they brighten up in a succession of flowers without having to add extra plants till annuals time in May.

I’ll close with a word of advice.  In all of our gardens, the Schizostylis (river lily) that bloomed so prettily in the fall now looks beat up and tired.

old schizostylis leaves)

old schizostylis leaves in a planter

I just grab the leaves and pull; chunks of old plant come out but enough little sprouts are left to size up for next fall’s flowers.  If the plant won’t pull out easily, I cut it back as far as I can.

Schizostylis and a little bun of a Dianthus at Wiegardts

Schizostylis flowers in autumn

We were cold and moderately miserable by the end of the day.  I was surprised that we did manage to work till five.  At home, I was able to remove two jobs from the work board and amend the task “planters” to just the ones on the Sid Snyder Drive beach approach, as all the others have had their first wake up call.

winnowing down the February work list

winnowing down the February work list

Tomorrow, if the weather permits, we might be able to erase Ilwaco and Port of Ilwaco from the list.

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Thursday, 14 November, 2013

Although we had a big bulbing day planned, we just had to make a brief stop at Olde Towne to see Luanne, who had been gone for 13 days to visit her daughter, son-in-law and grand daughters in Maine.

She's back!

She’s back!

We had the briefest of visits (she had time to sit at a table for maybe two minutes) and then we had to be on our way till a rainy day.  Soon we will be back for a proper sit down, I hope!

I had hoped that today would be the rainy day as I would have liked to have had time to sort, at home on the sorting table (with my sorting hat on?) the Long Beach bulbs into tidy batches with a bag ready for each planter.  That did not happen.  However, being able to set the boxes with easy access from the side doors of our new van made it possible to sort right on the job.  That is the main reason that this year, we are experiencing Bulb Time rather than Bulb Hell.  The new vehicle and the pleasant weather are collaborating to make it the easiest bulbs season in my experience.  Getting bulb crates into and out of Allan’s two door Saturn was not a happy time.

easy sorting

easy access

I had a little “office” set up on my passenger seat with clipboard and pen.  What luxury.

Down by the empty lot on Third Street, where the birds had view unimpeded by building of me setting tasty morsels of bulbs out on the edge of the planters, I garnered lots of attention.

These two...

These two…

and especially this one.

and especially this one.

The gull who staked out the bulbs actually did not get a single one, but it sure did want to.

gull

pacing and plotting

pacing and plotting

closer

closer

gull

acting cool near the bag of bulbs

acting cool near the bag of bulbs

Only my presence right there kept him thwarted.

Only my presence right there kept him thwarted.

Years ago, I learned not to lay out bulbs all down the length of the beach approach garden before planting them.

bulb planting on the beach approach in 2004

bulb planting on the beach approach in 2004

(Now that rugosa roses have pretty much taken over the beach approach garden and now that we have full care of the Long Beach planters, we don’t plant many new bulbs out there anymore.)

There are a few businesses with such a strong colour theme that I try to plant bulbs that sort of match.

Tulip 'White Parrot' in fron the blue and white Home at the Beach gift shop.

I planted Tulip ‘White Parrot’ in fron the blue and white Home at the Beach gift shop.

Red Parrot tulip 'Rococo' did very well last year so I planted more near this red cottage.

Red Parrot tulip ‘Rococo’ did very well last year so I planted more near this red cottage.

The lower tulip is 'Rococo', last spring.

The lower tulip is ‘Rococo’, last spring.

A couple of years ago I had the perfect colour match for the Hungry Harbour Grille:

Tulip 'Gavota' matched the paint trim perfectly.

Tulip ‘Gavota’ matched the paint trim perfectly.

The Cottage Bakery also called for red 'Rococo'.

This year, The Hungry Harbor and The Cottage Bakery both got Rococo.

Red tulips are my least favourite (except for the fabulous ‘Rococo’ with its green flames).  I always have plenty of “green” tulips as they are my favourites.  That makes it easy to plant green ones in front of Niva green.

Niva green, last spring

Niva green, last spring; this year it will get ‘Green Wave’

Maybe some year I will buy tulips in tiny (more expensive) quantities so that I can match every building!

I tried not to do any projects other than planting, but one that did need doing today was to dig out two big, old, woody Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ from a planter by the Fifth Street Park.

Allan used our cool new shovel from Back Alley Gardens in Gearhart.

Allan used our cool new shovel from Back Alley Gardens in Gearhart.

old Sedum 'Autumn Joy'

old Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’

woody center

woody center

I have many Autumn Joy sedums around and so I just went to the park and got two fresh new division for the planter, after Allan added some new potting soil.  I think every Autumn Joy in every park and garden that we do on the Peninsula is a division of the one I brought down from Seattle in autumn of 1992!

While on the same block, I enjoyed seeing two peace posters in the “Herb ‘N’ Legend” smoke shop windows.

peace

peace

While Schizostylis can fill up a planter too vigourously, it can also choose to bloom in a perfect late season floral arrangement.

Schizostylis by Fifth Street

Schizostylis by Fifth Street

I had a passerby ask me about it today, but she did so when I was not by a planter than had it, or I would have yanked some up and given it to her.  Later, when I was working by The Wooden Horse gift shop, manager Linda came out and saw a blooming piece of this very Schizostylis in our trailer (accidentally pulled while planting bulbs by the lamp post) so I gave the rooted piece to her;  I should dig her up a nice clump!

outside The Wooden Horse...I like the sign with clothespins for photos or postcards.

outside The Wooden Horse…I like the sign with clothespins for photos or postcards.

Today’s easiest planter was the one by the Carousel where we had dug out vinca recently and replaced it with nice fluffy dirt.  I was glad to see no birds watching this one as the bulbs would be easy picking with no plants to protect them.

The easiest planter to plant was the one by the carousel...recently dug out vinca and replaced with fluffy soil.

The easiest planter today.

I put in two little golden marjoram starts (dug from another planter) and two little Sedumn ‘Autumn Joy’ starts (snagged from a park).

Hungry Harbor Grille

Hungry Harbor Grille

When I got as far as The Hungry Harbor Grille, I remembered that tonight is Mexican night (every Thursday offseason) and that, because I had finished the big bulb sorting, we could go after work!

It had taken, as always, what seemed an incredible long time to get just that far.  Some rain began.  I examined the sky.  Was the blue just a sucker hole?

This is what a sucker hole looks like.

This is what a sucker hole looks like.

The blue came through for me and the rain stopped.

While Allan planted the last planters on the block south of the Bolstadt stop light, I put tiny bulbs in the four Fish Alley barrels.  The tapestry effect I was trying for is still working.

Fish Alley, one of four planters

Fish Alley, one of four planters

In went some species crocus, some Iris reticulata, some snowdrops and some Narcissi ‘Baby Moon’.  I plant Baby Moon every year and am adding 410 more to the planters this year because it reliably blooms during the annual first-Satuday-in-May parade.

Moon rise over Fish Alley

Moon rise over Fish Alley

From the alley, I could see the most amazing sky to the west:  wild shapes of clouds outline in pink.  I had bulbs all placed ready to plant and could not abandon them and a building was between me and any long distance photo of the sky.  We did get out to the beach.  While the clouds still looked impressive, the outline of pink had gone.

beyond the boardwalk

beyond the boardwalk

I will scour Facebook to see if any local caught the sunset on film!

I will scour Facebook to see if any local caught the sunset on film!

It was mildly frustrating to have run out of daylight with eight planters and two trees still to do on the main street.  It always takes me by surprise what a long job it is to plant the bulbs there.

We had our comforting Mexican dinner and came home, NOT to sort bulbs.  Instead, I finally added thirteen days of time card information to the work spread sheet.  Sometimes this blog is essential to remembering what we did on a certain day.

And the cats snoozed…

Smokey and Mary

Smokey and Mary

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Tuesday, 22 October, 2013

At last a truly easy workday.  We began with a stop at our excellent accountant, Jennifer Hopkins, to discuss some figures pertaining to the Affordable Care Act.  I always appreciate how she has attractive plant containers outside her office.  In the early spring, while our Ilwaco planters are choked with bulb foliage that must be allowed to die back, her containers totally show us up!  Today we missed her dog Helen, who was taking the day off.

Hopkins office

Hopkins office

Then, on to The Red Barn.

The fence sported autumnal figures.

The fence sported autumnal figures.

We weeded the narrow fence garden and the barrels.  I thought of cutting down the Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’, above, but decided it has some autumnal feeling and should stay till after Halloween.

barn

Next door at Diane’s, the roadside garden looks tidy but I wish it had filled in more.  I think that my plan to mulch it with cow fiber will give it more vigor next year.

along the road

along the road

The pale pink heathers, which were Diane’s inspiration for wanting this garden, bloomed rather briefly.  The lavenders never really took off, but the rosemary (in background, below) did well.

a short bloom period

a short bloom period

In my constant thoughts re privacy if I were to get a noisy neighbour next door, I pondered the Leyland cypress hedge (if that is what it is) between Diane and Larry’s and the Red Barn field.    There is much debate about whether this would be a good idea or a disaster, but surely it would block noise AND light.

a controversial idea

just a thought

The pots by the back porch are still looking good.

The pots by the back porch are still looking good.

Diane likes pastels, as you can see.

One of my good friends was at home there and we had a happy visit.

Misty!

Misty!

We had a brief, shall we say comfort break at the Fifth Street Park restrooms.  Next to the doors, Rose ‘Super Dorothy’ is still blooming wonderfully, while plain old Dorothy Perkins, on the other side of the park, is pitiful, flowerless, sickly and mildewed, as always.

Super Super Dorothy!

Super Super Dorothy!

The schizostylis (either ‘Viscountess Byng’ or ‘Mrs. Haggerty’) glowed in the pale sunlight on the east side of the restroom building.  We won’t cut back the Helianthus till it looks just terrible, because it hides the weedy mess behind the restrooms….a jungle of horrible unkempt pampas grass which I have made pretty clear is Not My Problem.  This garden area is exceedingly damp, and it has been hard to get anything to grow large here.

pale pink Schizostylis

pale pink Schizostylis

Yes, a pale, misty, cool sunlight made me very very happy today.  When we got to our next job, I was able to put on a flannel overshirt.  Joy and comfort indeed!

At last, we got back to Erin’s house.  We’d promised this visit back in late September, and then had company, and rain, and then catching up after the rain, and then the hydrangea job!  We worked on the garden by the cottage, not by the very big house.

house with widow's walk

house with widow’s walk; the shutters are down being painted

Erin’s cat appeared for a visit….

Felix

Felix

Felix

felix

felix

The cottage garden job was a straightforward fall cleanup.

before and after, outside the fence

before and after, outside the fence

inside the fence, before and after

inside the fence, before and after

before and after

before and after

The camera angle makes that arbour look more tilted than it was at the beginning, but it really is not.  In fact, I lightened up the honeysuckle (which really has to be removed so the arbour can be fixed, but that reality makes Erin sad, so we will leave that to the carpenter).  Note that the shiny sunshine went away over the course of our time there, and the afternoon became deliciously and gloriously cool and grey.

In the cottage garden we find two problems:  shade cast by large trees, and way too many groundcovers.  I am sure each was planted, probably by previous tenant Paul, from nice little pots looking ever so pretty, but now sweet woodruff and oxalis and Japanese anemone have become problems, all up in everyone else’s business.

oxalis pestering the nice Epimidium

Oxalis pestering the nice Epimidium

Now that Erin has the huge sunny lot of the  big house for a garden, we won’t have to keep trying to grow sun loving plants in the cottage garden.  But we will have to have another deer-friendly garden, like Marilyn’s, on the big lot…

Deer who visit daily.

Deer who visit daily.

My idea is to have two big flower beds, one running east to west where the deer are, with a wide path to walk next to the fence, and another echoing it on the other side of the enormous lot.   There will be plenty of open space in the center.   I have been wondering lately if it would be unwise to use the newspaper garden construction method if irrigation pipes for the sprinkler system ran underneath.  You can see one sprinkler head to the right, above, and I am happy to say that Erin believes there is no piping between that line of sprinklers (east to west) and the fence.  So bring on the newspapers…when we can find the time!

This project will require so much newspaper, I had better start asking my local friends to save paper for us.

On the way home, we poked at the Ilwaco planters (four of them out of…quite a few) to see if they need watering.  Oh how we do not want to have to do that job!  But we think it must be done on Thursday.  They are only faintly damp, and there is no rain in the five day forecast…

In closing, here is an evening photo from yesterday, taken by Allan outside our house.  I did not have it in time for yesterday’s blog.

spider

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Wednesday, September 18

I was so sure that autumnal weather had arrived that we took with us three Ilex ‘Sky Pencil’, thinking we would have nice cool weather in which to plant them.  Pounding rain on the roof and outside the window last night had been a soothing prelude to sleep.  In the morning, Allan heard rain and turned his alarm off, thinking we could sleep in.  Then the bright sun came in the windows.

By the time we got to Klipsan Beach Cottages to start working, the weather was back to a hot summer day, so the Ilex just went for a ride and came back home again.

They got taken for a ride.

They got taken for a ride.

The sky was so blue.  At KBC, behind one particular tree, I often notice the sky looking bluer than anywhere else.

the bluest spot

the bluest spot

This reminds me of being a child, in a hammock, in a garden belonging to a friend of my grandmother’s, looking up at the sky and thinking I was right under the center of it.  Surrounded by a garden, that was one of the moments when I fell in love with gardening and wanted to create such a paradise for myself.

looking up at the blue spot

looking up at the blue spot

The rest of the sky was cloudless but just not as blue!

Hydrangea 'Izu No Hana'...speaking of blue...

Hydrangea ‘Izu No Hana’…speaking of blue…

Denny’s high school reunion group is coming this weekend, a tradition started a few years ago when they surprised him with Mary’s help.  He attended a small high school and had not been able to attend their reunions because of his work managing KBC, so now they come to him.

We looked for ways to make the garden look extra good at this time of year and I hit upon putting a sharp edge on Mary’s border, the one we made her for a birthday present several years back.

before

before

after

after

Garden writer Anne Wareham wrote in The Bad Tempered Gardener about how much she dislikes crisp edges between grass and a garden bed.  I don’t think she would like any of my gardens much, but I do like hers.

Schizostylis at KBC

Schizostylis at KBC

Mary's favourite rose, Jude the Obscure, against the blue, blue sky

Mary’s favourite rose, Jude the Obscure, against the blue, blue sky

another excellent rose, whose name I wish I knew...

another excellent rose, whose name I wish I knew…

Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’ is blooming up high over the greenhouse.  Every year it amuses me all to bits with its little coreopsis flowers so high up in the air.

Coreopsis 'Flower Tower' way up there

Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’ way up there

Last week, apparently I did a lousy job of trimming the Strobilanthes atropurpureus and left little stubs.

If I did this, for shame...

If I did this, for shame…

better...

better…

We checked on the garden at Oman Builders Supply and trimmed a few deadheads off the Eryisimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ and I failed to photograph the gaps that still bothers me where someone stole the Eryngium plants  in full bloom earlier this year.

At Wiegardt Gallery, I was struck as usual by how good the ornamental grasses look in the lawn.

This miscanthus has such a nice flowing shape.

This miscanthus has such a nice flowing shape.

the gallery from the street through Stipa gigantea

the gallery from the street through Stipa gigantea

and over the top of Miscanthus

and over the top of Miscanthus

looking west to the gallery sign

looking west to the gallery sign

Also am very fond of this Sanguisorba.

Also am very fond of this Sanguisorba.

Even though it was hard to photograph in the bright and rather uncomfortably hot sun, the bad aster that escaped my pulling now looks nice with the Schizostylis in bloom.

late bloomers

late bloomers

As soon as the aster is done, I’ll be trying to pull it all out again but will for sure miss a few pink roots.

Three hours at Andersen’s RV Park ended the work day.  My mind boggles with the endless deadheading of Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’.  A little jingle runs through my head as I cut about 25 deadheads each off of 20 large plants:  I’m so very very very very tired of it all, so very very tired of it all.  Where this ditty came from I have no idea, but I find myself humming it every autumn in that awkward couple of weeks before real fall project season revives my interest.

The RV park was full with lots of happy people walking cute dogs.  That helped get me through the two hours of deadheading (cosmos and sweet peas, too); the hour of weeding was not so bad.  We were pleased to see longtime staffers Ruth and Bob back for a couple of weeks.  (Hi, Ruth!!)

andersen's

Andersen’s west side, now devoid of poppy flowers

Again, the asters that I failed to eradicate now look wonderful.   By pulling as many as I can in the spring and early summer, we seem to end up with the perfect amount in the fall.

wild blue aster

wild blue aster looking like deliberate bouquets

I bet if I planted a nice clumping aster like ‘Harrington’s Pink’, the roving deer would eat it.

Andersen’s owner Lorna says the Schizostylis makes her very happy in the fall.

Schizostylis

Schizostylis at Andersen’s

I heard a tip once in a seminar by Dan Hinkley:  That this plant will not run all over the place if it is in a damp spot.  He said that if it is running rampant, it’s looking for water.  This nice clump is well watered and is behaving itself.  In South Africa, it grows on river banks.  Wikipedia informs me it is called Hesperantha now.  When did that happen??

Because the days are shorter, we were home before seven.  I find that to be absolute bliss.  I still had time to pick a bowl of tasty small tomatoes from the greenhouse, and Allan mowed the lawn.  It seemed to me he was mowing in the dark, but he said he could follow the mower’s tire tracks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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We have done a small flower bed at Seaview’s Depot Restaurant (our favourite!) for several years.  Here is how the north side garden bed looked in the mid 90s:

Depot garden before

Depot garden before

Sometime around maybe 2007 we started to garden there.  (This is the sort of moment when I really miss iPhoto and its dates in my defunct computer.  I could reload it year by year from discs but am hoping to find an expert who can extract it into my new computer in one fell swoop.)

And here is is during the first year after we made a flower garden there.

And here is is during the first year after we made a flower garden there.

I had been wanting to get rid of that strip of lawn for several years, especially since restaurant owner Nancy wanted more colour that could be seen from the street.  In 2012, we were given the go ahead and …

8 May 2012, 11:16 AM

8 May 2012, 11:16 AM

8 May 1:39 PM

8 May 1:39 PM

8 May 5:54 PM

8 May 5:54 PM

We waited til the next day to plant because the Soil Energy mulch was hot.

22 June, the garden coming on

22 June, the garden coming on

22 June, under the northeast window

22 June, under the northeast window

Above, my favourite perennials, Ergyngium ‘Sapphire Blue’, Cistus, and Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’.

22 June, early summer rain

22 June, early summer rain

28 June

28 June

The new part of the garden is planted mostly with Savlia viridis (painted sage) and assorted tall Cosmos grown at The Planter Box.

28 June

28 June

Cosmos

Cosmos

3 July

3 July

3 July

3 July

The lattice is behind the garden covered with hops.

22 July, Dierama (angel's fishing rod) on east wall

22 July, Dierama (angel’s fishing rod) on east wall

23 July

23 July

23 July

23 July

The shrub to the left is Leycesteria formosa (Himalyan honeysuckle), a particular favourite of Chef Michael’s.

12 September

12 September

12 September, exactly the way I wanted it to turn out!

12 September, exactly the way I wanted it to turn out!

12 September, cosmos and Solidago (goldenrod) 'Fireworks'

12 September, cosmos and Solidago (goldenrod) ‘Fireworks’

21 September, Salvia viridis (painted sage) overhung with Leycesteria formosa

21 September, Salvia viridis (painted sage) overhung with Leycesteria formosa

21 September

21 September

21 Sept; the hops went crazy with improved soil.

21 Sept; the hops went crazy with improved soil.

21 September

21 September

21 Sept from the NE corner of the restaurant.

21 Sept from the NE corner of the restaurant.

foreground: Schizostylis (pink, blooms late), Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ (yellow), Acidanthera (white)

On October 30th:  Here’s a first: the hops we grow at The DEPOT Restaurant were included in an ale made by Astoria’s Fort George Brewery.

30 Oct, Co-Hoperative Ale

30 Oct, Co-Hoperative Ale

drawing a glass

drawing a glass

and very delicious it was.

and very delicious it was.

Not only that, but the Fort George harvesters did an impressive job of picking the hops without trampling the garden.  Thank you!

On December 5th, the Cistus and Ageranthymum were still blooming (both from The Basket Case Greenhouse).

5 Dec, Cistus

5 Dec, Cistus

5 Dec, blooming Schizostylis

5 Dec, blooming Schizostylis

The cosmos had gone over and we pulled them, and mulched the new garden with a yard of scrumptious washed dairy manure from The Planter Box.  (Photos to be inserted, perhaps, if/when I get my iPhoto revived…if I took any that day.)

At Chef Michael’s request, we stuck some greens and some bits of Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ dried flowerheads into the windowboxes to replace dead annuals.

windowboxes

windowbox

windowbox

windowbox with holly sprigs, evergreen huckleberry, Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’, red and yellow twig dogwood

(Preview:  I am pleased to tell you these still looked passably good on February 10th 2013!)

Nancy had wanted colour that showed from the street to draw attention to the restaurant, and at the end of the season, she told us that with the new garden bed expansion, “You knocked it out the park!”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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