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Posts Tagged ‘scree garden’

Saturday, 25 June 2016

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend in Salem, Oregon

garden 14: woodland garden

My reading comprehension is low for garden descriptions while touring. I get over-excited, I think. I missed the part till now about being able to go onto the deck.

My reading comprehension is low for garden descriptions while touring. I get over-excited, I think. I missed the part till now about being able to go onto the deck.

walking down from the road

walking down from the road

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

shade next to and under the deck at the side of the house

shade next to and under the deck at the side of the house

Allan said "Look, an homage to watering."

Allan said “Look, an homage to watering.”

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

the back yard garden

the back yard garden

As you can see, the deck would have provided a good overview.  Darn it!

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The garden bed extends toward the woods.

The garden bed extends toward the woods.

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faces in saw blades

faces in saw blades

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This little tree caused a sensation.

This little tree caused a sensation.

the gathering

the gathering

close up

close up

Lance Wright IDed the plant and I thought I would remember it.  Not likely! Fortunately, I was able to ask him on Facebook and got the name: Betula ‘Trost’s Dwarf’.  He tells me that later that day, they were available for sale at Dancing Oaks.  If only I had thought to look!

We next walked along the woodland garden at the edge of the lawn.

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an idea I want to steal, I mean borrow (or emulate)

an idea I want to steal, I mean borrow (or emulate)

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Hardy Planters

Hardy Planters

Allan was schmoozing.  I went back around the side and to the front of the house.

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peeking round the other side of the house

peeking round the other side of the house

I sat on the front steps, tired, a little punchy from touring, and waited for Allan, thinking about how I wanted to get to the plant vendors at the evening soirée at Dancing Oaks while the pickings were still rich.

my view of the entry garden

my view of the entry garden

scree garden

scree garden

Eventually, Allan rejoined me and we went out to the last private garden of the day.

garden 15: bird and wildlife garden in Dallas, Oregon

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front garden of the house in Dallas, Oregon, near Salem

front garden of the house in Dallas, Oregon, near Salem

interwoven textures by the house

interwoven textures by the house

garden entry

garden entry

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right: well grown, perfect hostas, probably from Sebright Nursery nearby

right: well grown, perfect hostas, probably from Sebright Nursery nearby

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a tiny shed or maybe pump house

a tiny shed or maybe pump house

We'll revisit the shaded lathe house later for a cool drink.

We’ll revisit the shaded lathe house later for a cool drink.

There was no sense at all back here of any neighbours.  We could have been miles from anyone else.  I found a satellite view that explains the sense of peace; we were surrounded on two sides by pastures.

garden15

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We were invited by Kay herself to snack from the raspberry row.

We were invited by Kay herself to snack from the raspberry row.

We were also advised to smell the blossoms of the catalpa tree.

We were also advised to smell the blossoms of the catalpa tree.

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I read later that the catalpa is also known as worm tree because of the pods.

I read later that the catalpa is also known as worm tree because of the pods.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

the kitchen garden

the kitchen garden

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acreage

acreage

Hardy Planters taking shelter from the sun

Hardy Planters taking shelter from the sun

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

When I overheard Marietta O’Byrne of Northwest Garden Nursery (who had shown a slide show of her exquisite garden on Friday night) telling someone that her garden was just an hour and a half south along a beautiful country road…I was sorely tempted to try to book another night at the hotel and visit her garden open on Monday.  But then….it would be four and a half plus hours drive home, and Long Beach and Ilwaco plants needed our attention.

Marietta O'Byrne (Allan's photo)

Marietta O’Byrne (Allan’s photo)

I do hope to see her garden one day.

Our touring of private gardens had ended for the day as we departed for our much anticipated evening at Dancing Oaks Nursery.

 

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Wednesday, 28 October 2015

Smokey and Mary in the morning

Smokey and Mary in the morning

Halloween is almost here, and I am fretting because the weather is supposed to be bad with lashing rain and 30 mph wind gusts.  I tell myself there is no point in feeling bad about this prospect, as there is not a thing I can do.  Local parents say that when they suggested to their children that perhaps they could just attend a party instead of trick or treating, the children expressed determination to go trick or treating.  One loving parent said her boys would be livid if they did not get to go.  So fingers crossed we get lots of trick or treaters, as we are expecting several friends to come join the fun.

in the post office window today

in the post office window today

the new ramp to city hall, where we dropped off our quarterly B&O tax forms

the new ramp to city hall, where we dropped off our quarterly B&O tax forms (Allan’s photo)

We headed on up Sandridge Road to start today’s round of jobs.

The Red Barn

Allan's photo, before cutting Helianthus 'Lemon Queen'

Allan’s photos, before cutting Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’

and after. The Helianthus is much shorter than usual as it does not get much summer water here.

and after. The Helianthus is much shorter than usual as it does not get much summer water here.

Diane’s garden

Misty greets us, and Diane was home for lunch. (Allan's photo)

Misty greets us, and Diane was home for lunch. (Allan’s photo)

Diane’s garden next door got some deadheading, but not much.  At this time of year, I have started to pretty much let the cosmos go.  “Birds like the seeds” is a good excuse.  Gold finches are said to particular savour cosmos seeds.

It would take an hour to deadhead a patch of cosmos like this now. And they don't look half bad going to seed.

It would take an hour to deadhead a patch of cosmos like this now. And they don’t look half bad going to seed.

Allan dug up some seedlings of Stipa gigantea...

Allan dug up some seedlings of Stipa gigantea…

and planted one on the other side of driveway.

and planted one on the other side of driveway.

I got to pet my good (and camera shy) friend Misty.

I got to pet my good (and camera shy) friend Misty.

My Misty-Twisters.

My Misty-Twisters.

Todd stopped by while we were at Diane’s, and I am happy to report that his eye, which he poked hard with a stick from a debris pile about two weeks ago, is all better.  Gardeners have a high risk job when it comes to our eyes, and we have had many close calls.  We should all wear goggles, and we pretty much do not (although I am fierce about wearing goggled whilst using a string trimmer or mower).

As we left Diane’s, I had a brainstorm:  We could acquire some gravel for my scree garden project!

Peninsula Landscape Supply

We were lucky to get in.  I did not look at the sign to see that they are on autumn hours and now closing at one…but Mike had not remembered to close the gate and was kind enough to load our rocks anyway.

Peninsula Landscape Supply autumn hours

Peninsula Landscape Supply autumn hours (M-W-F-Sat, 9-1).

small to medium river rock

small to medium river rock

OOPS!  I had intended to get about half that much.  I delegated to Allan the task of raising a hand to stop the dumping, and had not been clear that enough rock to just cover the bottom of the trailer would be plenty.  Now we had to deal with the anxiety of hauling a too-heavy trailer.  As you can see, our rig in not exactly heavy duty.  Allan pulled over halfway to our next job to check the tires.  They were warm, so I fretted.  If they got hot, they could blow out.

Fortunately, the next job was fairly near Peninsula Landscape Supply and we were not going all the way to our garden job in Surfside today.  The big concern would be the drive home.

Klipsan Beach Cottages

Denny, Mary, and Bella (Allan's photo)

Denny, Mary, and Bella (Allan’s photo)

view in the east gate of the fenced garden

view in the east gate of the fenced garden

the weekly view southwest over the bird bath

the weekly view southwest over the bird bath

an autumn rose

an autumn rose

Allan's photo: In the thick of fall clean up

Allan’s photo: In the thick of fall clean up, with colourful blueberry foliage

more pruning and clean up in the expanded sit spot

more pruning and clean up in the expanded sit spot

Denny had sawed out a big trunk of the bay tree at my request, and today I took about a third off of the blueberries.  Remember, in your own personal garden, leaving it wilder for the winter (less raking and less removal of perennial foliage) is better for the natural order of beneficial insects and li’l critters.

Allan's photo: At my request, he dug out some pesky Geranium 'A.T .Johnson'.

Allan’s photo: At my request, he dug out some pesky Geranium ‘A.T .Johnson’.

Iris foetidissima, one of my favourites for autumn berries.

Iris foetidissima, one of my favourites for autumn berries.

Denny, observing the sky, said that a big rain was about to dump on us.  He was right.  It began just as we were left.  Allan needed pumpkin (canned) for Halloween pie and so we went north to Jack’s Country Store.  I was relieved when he said that the rain would cool the trailer tires.  (I asked him if he was serious, and he said yes.)

the scene parked next to Jack's

the scene parked next to Jack’s

dramatically increasing rain

dramatically increasing rain

Dark Sky promises it will stop before the hour is over.

Dark Sky promises the downpour will stop before the hour is over.

Thus our work day ended.  Golden Sands garden had been on the list.  It can wait till next week and perhaps be given a whole afternoon of fall clean up.

Dark Sky told me the rain would stop in 50 minutes.  While that would be perfect for offloading the rock at home, it seemed unlikely with the sky dark all around.

at home

The rain stopped pouring just as we got home. (Allan's photo)

The rain stopped pouring just as we got home. (Allan’s photo)

The rain did stop at just the perfect time and we got all the rocks unloaded.  What excellent timing, as just when we parked in Nora’s driveway to offload, we got a call from her granddaughter who was coming to spend the night.  We were glad to not have to unload in the rain.  (Kind Alycia wouldn’t have made us move the trailer, but we would have felt we should anyway.)

Alycia arrived with a friend and the friend’s tiny dog, Jalapeno.

Alycia's spiffing shoes, and a shy Jalapeno.

Alycia’s spiffing shoes, and a shy Jalapeno.

offloading rock (Allan's photo)

offloading rock (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan found room for the extra back in the bogsy wood swale.

some rock in the swale

some rock in the swale

hardy fuchsia (Allan's photo)

hardy fuchsia (Allan’s photo)

Now my scree garden has been expanded and I need some more scree plants.

scree garden rocks put in place but not arranged

scree garden rocks put in place but not arranged; I will make the boat stern garden scree, too, when I have time.

Note to self: I must remember to divide this gorgeous variegated iris….

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…and put some on this side to make some symmetry on the paths.

...and put some on this side to make some symmetry on the paths.

Something also to remember: I planted three little bulbs of cardiocrinum giganteum and must protect them from slugs and snails.

Cardiocrinum planted right where the soil is ruched up!

Cardiocrinum planted right where the soil is ruched up!

I had an excellent evening reading an entire book (interpersed with watching Survivor and then three episodes of Girls).

finished at 2:30 AM

finished at 2:30 AM

I recommend the Dog Lover’s Mystery series to all dog lovers.  The plots are good, the characters endearing, and the stories are full of dog treats in the form of educational information about dogs (especially malamutes).

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Tomorrow: more work, more rain.

 

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Monday, 4 August 2014

I almost felt that we could take Monday off, till I strained to remember something we were supposed to do and…oh, yes, the Depot rhododendron pruning. I forgot yet another one-off job in Long Beach that I had agreed to awhile back; that’s what happens when I neglect making a job list on the white board.

We knew the Depot would create some debris that would have to be dumped; finally, I would have time to get some rock for my scree garden! In order to make the dump trip worthwhile, I had the idea to get some of the blackberry canes off the west side of Larry and Robert’s lawn.

Larry and Robert’s garden

clipped canes at Larry and Robert's

clipped canes at Larry and Robert’s

I forgot to take a before photo. The difference was not dramatic because we found the blackberry vines covered with berries and figured there might be a possibility that Larry or Robert or friends of theirs were planning on a pie! However, as soon as berry time is over I want to cut those canes WAY back. The neighbours to the west have been cutting on their side so it would be a good time to reveal new lawn area or maybe a place for a new shrub.

draping canes covered with berries

draping canes covered with berries…and there is a fuchsia hiding under there.

On the east side of the house, the garden boat looks full and happy with the addition of some new plants last week (Cosmos ‘Antiquity’, chocolate cosmos, and Verbena bonariensis, which I fancy will grow tall like a boat mast).

east

looking south


Depot Restaurant

I was ever so pleased when Chef Michael said he did not want the rhodo against their “office” house pruned hard. I don’t like to fight a shrub’s natural form for no good reason other than to make it smaller. He just wanted it cut to make a better passage for mowing and so that it did not touch the house.

before

before

after

after


 

Peninsula Landscape Supply

We dumped our debris at Peninsula Landscape Supply and admired their selection of VERY large river rock.

rock treasures

rock treasures

rock

All we wanted was some pea gravel and a bit of slightly larger river rock to make a tiny scree garden at home. Well, ok, I WANT some of those really big river rocks but don’t have the energy to deal with them. Maybe this winter!

We loaded up with a half yard of pea gravel and a few buckets of the slightly bigger rocks. It is always suspenseful to carry a heavy load like that in our little trailer. Again, we made it!


at home

The scree garden would be next to the garden boat (The Ann Lovejoy). I had several inspirations:

1. Beth Chatto’s Gravel Garden and her scree garden photos on her website.

an excellent and inspirational book

an excellent and inspirational book

2. A little scree garden that we saw on the Gearhart garden tour last year:

scree garden

scree in the Vernon garden, Gearhart

3. Robert Nold’s blog (where he points out that a mix of rock sizes is good in a scree garden).

4. The Tucker Garden in Seattle that we saw recently on the Hardy Plant Study Weekend tour.

very Beth Chatto

very Beth Chatto

5. The John Kuzma garden we had just toured in Portland, where Sean Hogan of Cistus Nursery used decomposed granite for the courtyard and perhaps the same sort of gravel for a vast gravel garden. Here, we cannot get washed gravel, so pea gravel is our only choice for a scree bed; gravel with fines would pack down and be too hard. (Anyway, that’s the theory I have.)

My scree garden is ridiculously small compared to even this small part of the Kuzma garden

My scree garden is ridiculously small compared to even this small part of the Kuzma garden

6. My Rock Garden by Reginald Farrer, one of the first serious garden books I read. I own a battered old copy. I recall Farrer being the one who said that rock gardens should not look like currant buns.

books

My own little scree patch is a bit laughable compared to those that inspired me.

before (sadly, the red poppies had to go as I had gotten impatient)

before (sadly, the red poppies had to go as I had gotten impatient)

after

after (two days later, I added some rocks from the size between pea gravel and the slightly large ones)

There is horsetail in there...the little scrimmy kind...hope it won't be too hard to pull through the gravel.

There is horsetail in there…the little scrimmy kind…hope it won’t be too hard to weed through the gravel.

This looks like a scree plant...but it is a Lost Tagii from the Hardy Plant sale so I am not sure!

This looks like a scree plant…but it is a Lost Tagii from the Hardy Plant sale so I am not sure!

scree

scree

Euphorbia myrsinites (donkey tail spurge)

Euphorbia myrsinites (donkey tail spurge)

and my little yellow penstemon

and my little yellow penstemon

and in the back, Eryngium agavifolium courtesy of Todd Wiegardt

and in the back, Eryngium agavifolium courtesy of Todd Wiegardt

Now to collect more scree plants, but not too many. There’s a little “tiny bun” dianthus at Wiegardt Gallery that I might be able to snick a piece of. If I could just figure where to put the strawberry patch that is on the other side of the boat, I could expand this whole idea.

And I could now cross off the last at home project from the work board…

erased!

erased!

but I had better start adding other work and home projects to it (like battling the bindweed back out of the east side of the bogsy woods) before I forget them all.

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July 27, 2013

Gardens by the Sea tour benefits Clatsop CASA.

interlude between gardens

We saw while driving from the first to the second garden:

a raised veg and flower garden

a raised veg and flower garden, edged, I think, with broken concrete. I like it.

(Ann Lovejoy had a garden bed edged in a tall wall of broken concrete. I liked that, too.)

next door to garden two

next door to garden two

attractive entrance to the house next door to garden two

attractive entrance to the house next door to garden two

Garden two: Al and Carol Vernon garden.

From the program: “Collectors’ picture perfect garden, tended by two who love to garden.”

I do wish that Al and Carol had been there. From Nancy Allen, who met them, I heard they are delightful, and heard the same later at Back Alley gardens. My one suggestion to improve the tour this year comes because I don’t think there was a single garden where the owner was present. Owners can cast much light on the meaning of their gardens. We heard that they went out touring each other’s gardens during the latter hours of the tour. Each garden had a ticket checker at the entrance, but those folks did not know much of anything about the gardens. Might I suggest that the Gearhart garden tour organizers encourage the garden owners to stay at home and to make pre- or post-tour visits to each other’s gardens!

I would have loved to have met the owners of the delightful second garden.

As we approached the garden entrance. we were able to peek in over a sea of cotoneaster.

a garden glimpse

a garden glimpse

from the street

from the street

sign

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

entering the garden

entering the garden

along the house, a row of hostas

along the house, a row of hostas

I heard tour guests marveling at the lack of slug or snail damage on the hosta leaves.

Allan's photo of same area

Allan’s photo of same area

shade

a shady spot

artful clipping

artful clipping

We heard that the owners, a retired couple, do the work here themselves. Impressive.

Tour guests admire a scree garden area

Tour guests admire a scree garden area

tour guests

tour guests

The tour guests were discussing the ID of a certain plant. When I looked at it, I was sure that they had gotten it wrong. That is when the presence of the owners, clearly plantspeople, would have been very helpful! (I hope if they read this, they feel no regret, just the knowledge that we would have loved to meet them to tell them in person how much we liked their garden.)

scree garden

scree garden: lovely

Our rockhound friend Judy will like this detail.

Our rockhound friend Judy will like this detail.

scree garden: Reginald Farrer would love it.

scree garden: Reginald Farrer would love it.

Now I want to redo one of my front garden beds into a nice scree garden like this one.

I could have stood here for much longer!  Fascinating.

I could have stood here for much longer! Fascinating.

Allan's view

Allan’s view

curving around

curving around

where the scree garden ends

where the scree garden ends

chocolate cosmos

chocolate cosmos

On the side of the garden, bordering the neighbours, across the grass from the scree border, a planting had caught my eye so I walked back to it. With the attention to detail apparent everywhere in this garden, bergenia had been hollowed out to put another plant in its center.

cute!

cute!

Tour goers also commented that the baby’s breath (lower right) was large and well grown and unusual to see this days. It might have been Nancy Allen, organizer of the Music in the Gardens tour. By this time, I was texting back and forth with her as she was about two gardens ahead of us.

baby's breath

baby’s breath; next year, I want to get back to growing this old favourite!

Behind the scree garden and the mixed border into which it segued runs a dry creekbed of stone.

dry stream

dry stream

Allan's photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

You may have noticed a glimpse of red lava rock at the edge of one of the photos above. Usually red lava rock is anathema to me, causing instant dislike. (I just do not feel it looks right in gardens near the sea.) But in this garden….after my initial startled reaction…I realized it was perfect, as it was clearly planned to set off the rusty colour of the sculptures and the red leaves of the plants:

red on red

red on red

colour echoes

colour echoes

Allan's view of path by lava rock patio

Allan’s view of path by lava rock patio

side view

side view

side

herons

At the far end of the red patio, a lava rock path leads to the side into the flower bed.

path

path

The streambed curves around to the end of the patio.

The streambed curves around to the end of the patio.

looking back, Allan's view

where the red path curves back, Allan’s view

my view

my view

looking back

looking back

paths

As we reach the back corner of the house, we look at the red curving path from the side.

red path curve

red path curve

Now we turn to the path along the back of the house. At first glance, my impression is just of a narrow walkway.

along the back

along the back

salal and a place to put debirs

salal and a place to put debris

Later when we stopped post-tour at Back Alley Gardens, Pam Fleming (locally famous gardener for the town of Seaside, Oregon, and co-owner of wonderful Back Alley!) asked me if I had noticed the detail at the steps to the basement: a perfect arc of smooth stones. Indeed I had and had photographed it.

attention to detail

attention to detail

She commented about the attention to detail, something else I would have liked to compliment the owners about.

further along

further along

As we walked along the woodsy path behind the house, the vista opened up with a delightful and unexpected surprise: To our right, a view of a deep ravine appeared…with water at the bottom.

ravine

ravine

how beautiful a vista!

how beautiful a vista!

trees draping over the ravine

trees draping over the ravine

I would spend many hours absorbing this view if I lived here.

ravine

view

Allan's view

Allan’s view

At their edge of the ravine, the Vernons had placed bird feeders and a birdbath.

back

birdbath

birdbath

The birds hardly paused in their eating as we walked by.

bird

With three more gardens to see, we had to leave this paradise and turned up the path by the other side of the house.

exit path

exit path

Near the front of the house, this narrow space had been used to grow a few vegetables.

veg edge

veg edge

Allan's photo of the protective caging

Allan’s photo of the protective caging

We took one more look at the gorgeous garden…and would have walked around again if we had had the time.

a last look

a last look

This is in a tie with garden number four as my favourite garden of the tour. I simply could not choose between the two!

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