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Posts Tagged ‘seaside gardening’

Saturday, 20 July 2019

Gardens, Sea and Art tour

presented by the WSU Master Gardeners of Grays Harbor and Pacific Counties

Ocean Shores

garden one: On the Beach

 

Allan’s photo, front garden

I felt immediately that this garden was unique and distinctly the creation of its owners.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

path leading along the side of the house

We overheard that the home used to be waterfront, but with beach accretion (probably caused by the north jetty in Ilwaco, which has also caused accretion along the Long Beach Peninsula and erosion at Washaway Beach), it is now a half mile from the water. (Do have a look at the Washaway Beach This Week blog.) It is rare to see a garden planted this close to the dunes.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Never have I seen so many blue bottles in the garden.  The reflections and sparkle are supposed to deter the deer. Allan overheard that many were collected from the recycling center.

Allan’s photo

row of once waterfront homes

On the back porch:

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

beautiful and fragile old stepping stones in the side garden

I would like to know if the multi-hued round rocks are natural to the garden or were they imported? They were comfortable to walk on.

Returning to the front garden…

Looking at our photos, I am now strongly reminded of Derek Jarman’s garden.

Instead of the rusty bits and pieces in Jarman’s famous garden, we have blue bottles and watermelons, and who is to say which is better?    If I lived closer, I would gift them with a flat of santolina starts, silver and green, which would do well in their tough garden conditions, and a recommendation to have a look at this book.  I think they would be as pleased with the comparison as I am.

 

 

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Saturday, 29 June 2019

Surfside Yardscape Tour

We continued our tour with four gardens on one block at the north end of Surfside.  Each had a septic vault, common with new septic systems.

3. “RV lot designed for easy care, easy access. See a new septic vault installation.  Compare to the vault just across the street, to see the transformation!”

Surfside allows RV dwellers, with some restrictions. I think that one rule is that the RV can’t be left all year.

In this small lot at the north end of Seabreeze Lake, we viewed new planting on a new septic vault.

A lake view sit spot…

…..would make for wonderful birdwatching.

4. “Gorgeous front yard planted with mature, low maintenance varieties for the above ground septic vault.”

Right across the street is a mature septic vault planting.

This garden wrapped around to the back of the house.

love the driftwood fence and arch

The back garden segues into the wild woods.

a handsome gunnera
Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo
Allan’s photo
Allan’s photo

Cellophane gives the look of water. (Allan’s photo)

We like the list of questions that most gardeners answered.

I could be very happy with that woodsy back garden view.

5. “Another easy-care, low water use yard, with planted above-ground septic.”

Allan’s photo

I love the look of the boardwalk, although one of the advantages of a septic vault garden is that it is the perfect height to weed while standing next to it. It is too wide to reach the middle, though.

 

Allan’s photo

I am a little uncomfortable about the Round Up.  Let’s just say it is not what we do.

Allan’s photo

Next: Just down the block, a wonderful garden that we have visited before.  I have heard that its owner was the inspiration and helper for the septic vault gardens all down the block.

 

 

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Saturday, 29 June 2019

Surfside Yardscape Tour

Surfside is directly across from Oysterville on the ocean side of the Long Beach Peninsula  Its addresses are “Ocean Park”, which may be why it’s hard to find a map showing it by name.

We began at the Homeowners Association office.

Yay, a garden tour!

Inside, informative displays and handouts were on offer.

The neighborhood has two particular fire hazards, beach pines and dune grass.  The unamended ground is sand.

Excellent.  This was a serious garden tour.  I picked up the current Washington State noxious weed pamphlet and other useful literature and the attractive trifold tour pamphlet.

We each were given a free packet of seeds along with the tour guide.

view out the window of the Surfside canal

 I was sorry to see that Surfside resident George Miller’s garden was not on the tour. I had been sure it would be, having seen his many photos of its beauty on a local gardening Facebook group.

On to the first two gardens, one on a small lake and one on the oceanfront.

1.  “See what you can do with a small space and waterfront property.”

The north end of the peninsula is where sand dollars are to be found.

Seabreeze Lake

The owner had a Green Goddess calla lily and had hoped for a white one.

I told her I’d be happy to trade a white one for some starts of that green one!

blue and white lithodora (Allan’s photo)



2. Beautiful, owner-created front yard, easy-care, water-wise perennials, deer-resistant plantings.”

Allan’s photo

The house fronts onto the dunes.

 

ceanothus

We learned that our friend Ed Strange (now retired from landscaping) had helped design and install the hardscape.

This dwarf buddleia was much asked about.

We saw the informative handout and realized that every garden had one; we had missed it at the first garden. What an excellent idea.

As we drove on, we passed the free chipping site for residents.  It’s a good idea because it prevents flammable piles of debris.

Surfside has a somewhat controversial ordinance that all shore pines on properties on the flatland must be pruned to a certain height to preserve the view of the people on the hill. We had just missed a lecture from the knowledgeable Arbor Care arborists from Astoria.  I would be interested to know if they feel that all that topping affects the health of the trees. It must create a lot of chipping material.

Next, three septic vault gardens (or as we call it in Diane’s garden, “raised box”; now we know the real name).

 

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Saturday, 9 September 2017

Cannon Beach Cottage and Garden Tour

a benefit for the Cannon Beach History Center and Museum

For the second year, the wording of the cottage tour description included “dream homes”.

I gleaned that there were a couple of reasons for this.  In recent years, some larger homes have been featured.  It had become more difficult to find historic small cottages, as many have been remodeled and enlarged.  (I find that heart rending but I am probably in the minority. I’m an avid watcher of tiny house shows on HGTV and I appreciate the small and humble.)  I admire the tour organizers for changing the description to reflect the new reality of the tour, and I appreciate their efforts in finding as many small cottages as possible.

So far today, we been touring in the low lying neighbourhood north of the Ecola Creek estuary.

satellite view

We were about to go uphill to the ocean view ridge.  A docent at the last cottage we had viewed noticed my decrepitude and suggested we drive to the last two homes because of a steep hill.  While I have never in the past, no matter how hobbled, resorted to driving on this tour, I am glad we took his advice.

Our route took us up this hill.  Walking tour-goers took the stairs.

I saw I had a raindrop on my lens!

Then we went down a steep, gravelly street to the lowland again.

Mindy’s Cottage

You can read Mindy’s blog here.

Allan’s photo

I somehow missed noticing the garden to the north, and did not peer over the fence.

Oh, but look! Allan noticed and got a photo!

inside: Classic white, blue, and yellow beachy decor (Allan’s photo)

I met Mindy’s delightful cat.

sweet tucked in feet

a lovely sit spot

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo. I missed seeing kitty emerge onto the porch.

Allan’s photo

I wish I had gone out there and looked back.

Allan’s photo

Driving around the block took us to the wealthiest homes on the ridge.

ocean view home

beside the driveway

The east side has a cottage look.

From steps down to the dune path, north side, you can see why the house is bigger on the inside than it looks on the outside.

 

Allan’s photo

 

artful gate

The gate pivots vertically though the outer edges taper outwards. Allan admired that the offset upper hinge is the solution.

Allan’s photo

 

looking out the west window; Chapman Point and Bird Rocks to the right

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

A fireplace door handle (Allan’s photo)

Allan went to the lower level:

surfboards

on a closed door

green on green

west side patio

postscript

We walked half a block to a view point.

house next door for sale, by Sotheby’s, of course.

I sometimes wish we had put a circular drive in our front garden, so that we would not have to unhook the work trailer at night.

I peeked in.

houses continue up the hill to the north (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo nearby

DSC04630

Allan’s photo of another house nearby

public beach path half a block north

Although there be many mansions, the beaches in Oregon are public.  You can read the history, here.

Chapman Beach

We drove back through the flatlands.

a house that I would like to live in and surround with a garden

We wanted to look at Pam Fleming’s downtown Seaside gardens.  Unfortunately for us, the street was blocked off for a car show and we were out of energy to find a parking spot nearby.

a brief drive through Seaside

Pam’s diligent watering of the Seaside hanging baskets has paid off beautifully.  She stands and counts (to one minute, I think) as she waters each one daily.

The Astoria-Megler bridge seemed to disappear before reaching Washington State.

Thus ends one of the most anticipated events of our summer, and with it comes the end of tourist season.  I am already looking forward to next year’s cottage tour.

 

 

 

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Sunday, 26 July 2015

pamtour

Only for something like this would I get up at 6 AM!

Allan's photo: Todd, and I, Melissa, and Dave arrive for tour.

Allan’s photo: Todd and I and  Melissa and Dave arrive for tour.  The North Beach Garden Gang!

Other members not shown: Steve and John and Garden Tour Nancy!

The four of us were early so we took ourselves on a tour around a block’s worth of Pam’s gardens.

I love the arbor benches.

I love the arbor benches.

lobelia laxiflora

lobelia laxiflora

lobelia laxiflora and variegated houttuynia

lobelia laxiflora and variegated houttuynia

I wondered about the handsome but peskily invasive “hot tuna plant”; later, Pam said that she had inherited patches of it and that she worked with it; it looks excellent in the areas where it is allowed to appear.

Todd giving a garden a good look-over.

Todd giving a garden a good look-over.

Now I want a few big rocks in my Long Beach tree gardens.

Now I want a few big rocks in my Long Beach tree gardens.

I've never thought of using a mass of variegated annual geranium at ground level. Looks handsome and striking.

I’ve never thought of using a mass of variegated annual geranium at ground level. Looks handsome and striking.

garden3

a hebe skirting a hardy fuchsia

a hebe skirting a hardy fuchsia

One thing I already noticed and deeply envied, and continued to envy throughout the tour:  Pam is allowed to have height.  All my Ilwaco curbside gardens have to be so darn short, which cuts down on their visual impact compared to these.  There is one big different: Broadway in Seaside doesn’t have numerous driveways coming out onto the street, and most of the traffic is one way.   The other thing I immediately envied was the lushness due to irrigation (which I have in the Long Beach parks but not in the tree gardens).  Todd said that my tree gardens are also smaller without as much root run space.  All true.  But enough about me and my envy…for now.

The river that runs through Seaside. We learned that businesses have added their own baskets, inspired by the ones Pam does for the city. These baskets are put out by the businesses on the river walkway.

The river that runs through Seaside. We learned that businesses have added their own baskets, inspired by the ones Pam does for the city. These baskets are by the businesses on the river walkway.

the bridge over the river

the bridge over the river

helenium

helenium

luscious use of Stachys (lambs ears) for silver edges.

luscious use of Stachys (lambs ears) for silver edges.

more lambs ears

more lambs ears

irrigation = happy astilbe

irrigation = happy astilbe

ok...irrigation envy

ok…irrigation envy

low plants here where the sidewalk swoops out

low plants here where the sidewalk swoops out

looking south down the river

looking south down the river

also tree envy....Pam gets to use a variety of interesting small trees, as you will see during the tour.

also tree envy….Pam gets to use a variety of interesting small trees, as you will see during the tour.

tree envy!!!

tree envy!!!  Long Beach and Ilwaco both have the same tree, columnar pear, over and oever and over.

Todd, Melissa, and Dave

Todd, Melissa, and Dave

By now it was 8 AM and we entered the Beach Books store.

Right behind us, Steve and John. (Allan's photo)

Right behind us, Nancy (behind the shelves), Phil, and Steve and John. (Allan’s photo)

The lecture was in the loft of the bookstore.

The lecture was in the loft of the bookstore.

I agree with this poster on the wall.

I agree with this poster on the wall.

It was not until we had our breakfasts on our plates (yummy eggs and potatoes) and the small audience began introducing ourselves that it was realized that there were nine of us from the Long Beach Peninsula and we were asked if we were a garden club.  Well, why not?

Pam ready for her lecture

Pam ready for her lecture

lecture

my lecture notes

Pam said that she thinks of all her Seaside gardens as “managing a big estate”.  There are over 100 garden beds and the 123 baskets for which she chooses the flowers.  She is renowned for choosing garden themes based on the adjacent businesses, which is complicated when businesses change, as there is an apothecary garden in front of the bookstore that used to be a pharmacy.  For the apothecery garden, she used Phygelius (which is said to be used in voodoo) and Chaste Tree and Salix (willow) whose bark was used for headaches.  She plants edible gardens in front of restaurants and has some other themes that we will learn about on the walking tour.

“I like to honor this town.  I love my town,” she says, as she shows us slides of the history of the gardens and of the town.  One especially striking photo shows townhouse lights reflected in the river at night.

She uses mass of color on the street side of the garden beds and more intricate detail on the sidewalk side, and she uses echoing colours because the beds are small.  The gardens are not at all plagued by deer.  (I envy that!)

One year, when the lighting was redone and all the gardens ripped out and replanted, she broke her foot and had to direct and point.

Regarding the baskets, she said that the baskets themselves are much larger than at home baskets, which is why the flower displays get so large.  Smaller home baskets run out of soil for the roots sooner.  She has a water truck with which she waters the baskets daily with a mild fertilizer solution.  The baskets become hydroponic after the roots have completely filled them.  Inspired by her baskets, more of the town stepped up to beautify with their own baskets like the walkway along the river.  The baskets are taken down in mid September after the last big tourist event.

One of the audience members said “I’ve admired your gardens for years and years and thought it must be a fairy princess who planted them.”

Of course she gets a lot of the same questions we do, including “What’s that plant?’, and she knows according to the time of year which plant people will be asking about.

Now…come on Pam’s guided walk through town.

We were joined by Teresa, owner of the Planter Box garden center.

We were joined by Teresa (right, with Dave and Melissa), owner of the Planter Box garden center, making 10 of us from the Long Beach Peninsula.

Teresa's exceptionally cute shoes.

Teresa’s exceptionally cute shoes.

Pam talked about each garden bed from Beach Books all the way to the turn around.

Pam talked about each garden bed from Beach Books all the way to the turn around.

Drinking fountains incorporated into the bench gardens.

Drinking fountains incorporated into the bench gardens.

fountain

Pam has had an excellent performance out of this particular eucomis.

Pam has had an excellent performance out of this particular eucomis.

Later in the day, I bought myself one at Seaside 7 Dees.

Later in the day, I bought myself one at Seaside 7 Dees.

Nancy admires the lavender. Pam said she finds clumps of lavender missing where people picked bouquets, and of course she notices.

Nancy admires the lavender. Pam said she finds clumps of lavender flowers missing where people picked bouquets, and of course she notices.

Lavender and heucheras

Lavender and heucheras

an attentive audience

an attentive audience

a mass of red nicotiana

a mass of red nicotiana

silver lining

silver lining

She thinks about colour coordination with the buildings.

She thinks about colour coordination with the buildings.

You can bet I was experiencing envy about her wide selection of interesting small trees.

You can bet I was experiencing envy about her wide selection of interesting small trees.

Cotinus (smoke bush), as I feel envy about her being able to use tall plants!!

Cotinus (smoke bush), as I feel envy about her being able to use tall plants!!

Cotinus and rudbeckia

Cotinus and rudbeckia

audience2

rock shapes, plant shapes, echoes

rock shapes, plant shapes, echoes

Pam and her plants

Pam and her plants

Seaside architecture at the main intersection

Seaside architecture at the main intersection

annual geranium used for foliar effect.

annual geranium used for foliar effect.

I am sold on the variegated annual geranium leaves.

I am sold on the variegated annual geranium leaves.

The handsome benches are not for a bus stop, just for a good sit spot.

The handsome benches are not for a bus stop, just for a good sit spot.

a sweet windowbox at a restaurant

a sweet windowbox at a restaurant

astilbes

astilbes, made happy by irrigation

by the river bridge

by the river bridge

plants

one of the tinier gardens

one of the tinier gardens

river

looking east from the bridge

looking east from the bridge

variegation echo

variegation echo

The Bridge Tender Tavern

The Bridge Tender Tavern

Once someone repeatedly threw a bicycle onto the garden by the Bridge Tender, and then picked the bike up and threw it in the river.

She likes to plant nicotiana and thyme as plant puns by the tavern, along with an African daisy with a dizzying whirligig pattern.

She likes to plant nicotiana, smoke bush, and thyme as plant puns by the tavern, along with an African daisy with a dizzying whirligig pattern (which she was unable to acquire this year).

 

Pam and one of the gardens by the Bridge Tender

Pam and one of the gardens by the Bridge Tender

There is a barberry for plant self-defense.

In one of the beds, there is a barberry for plant self-defense.

admiring the leaves of Ballota dictamnus

Steve admiring the leaves of Ballota dictamnus

bench envy!!

bench envy!!

We are all fascinated with each and every garden bed.

We are all fascinated with each and every garden bed.

absorbed

edible plants in the restaurant garden include herbs, edible flowers)

edible plants in the restaurant garden include herbs, edible flowers

fennel

fennel and oregano

fennel and oregano

Nancy taking photos

Nancy taking photos

This girl, daughter of an adjacent business owner, has been swinging on this tree since she was little.

This girl, daughter of an adjacent business owner, has been swinging on this tree since she was little.

It's her climbing tree.

It’s her climbing tree.

treeenvy2

Monarda, one that doesn’t get mildew, under a limbed up rhododendron (pretty sure)

another good rock

another good rock

The Pig and Pancake garden must be partly edible.

The Pig and Pancake garden must be partly edible.

pig2

borage and herbs

borage and herbs

narrow one way street going toward the turn around

narrow one way street going toward the turn around

Pam embraces her gardens.

Pam embraces her gardens.

cute fire hydrant

cute fire hydrant

Verbena bonariensis towering over a garden bed (good see through plant)

Verbena bonariensis towering over a garden bed (good see through plant)

Hydrangea and rudbeckia

Hydrangea and rudbeckia

Acer griseum

Acer griseum

Paperbark maple gives me deep deep tree envy.

Paperbark maple gives me deep deep tree envy.

acer3

sigh...

sigh…

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

pam5

In Seaside, the business owners don’t seem to squawk about tall plants.

pam7

Pam and a golden Leycesteria

pam8

liatris

Sambucus (elderberry) as a small tree.

Sambucus (elderberry) as a small tree.  I love the variety.

appreciating trees

appreciating trees

I never realized before how delightfully TALL Pam’s gardens are allowed to be, because usually we only have time to look at them in early spring before they are fully leafed out and grown.

elder

clipped box next to a business that evoked a formal feeling (can’t recall why)

box2

hot colours

hot colours by a hot coloured  store

closer

closer

sanguisorba looking happy from enough moisture

sanguisorba looking happy from enough moisture

echoing the blue building

echoing the blue building

columnar barberry to defend this garden

columnar barberry to defend this garden

chocolate colours for a candy store

chocolate colours for a candy store

with chocolate cosmos

with chocolate cosmos

candy

chocolate garden with a lovely small tree

chocolate garden with a lovely small tree

view east to the hills

view east to the hills

We took a detour down a wide pedestrian side street.

a pedestrian walkway with gardens

a pedestrian walkway with gardens

Hebe and lobelia laxiflora

Hebe and lobelia laxiflora

lace cap hydrangea

lace cap hydrangea

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

garden plaza

garden plaza

plaza2

Pam told us that there was a dance hall here and back in the day, people would dance outside here.

Pam, Steve,

Pam, Steve, and some gooseneck loosestrife

Hmm, I used to have gooseneck loosestrife and this reminds me of how charming it is.  I happen to know that Steve and John have some, so when their patch of it sizes up, as it will, I will hope for a small division for my garden.

Lysimachia clethroides

Lysimachia clethroides in a contained pocket

Asclepias incarnata: I want!

Asclepias incarnata: I want!

Nancy's spouse, Phil, admires a hardy fuchsia.

Nancy’s spouse, Phil, admires a hardy fuchsia.

If Nancy wants some of these fuchsias for her garden, I have some to share.

Pam with a golden lonicera (boxleaf honeysuckle)

Pam with a golden lonicera (boxleaf honeysuckle)

Joe Pye weed

Joe Pye weed

We return to the gardens on Broadway.

We return to the gardens on Broadway.

Hydrangea Cityline Mars...Wow!

Hydrangea Cityline Mars…Wow!

Pam says it will likely be blue next year.

Pam says it will likely be blue next year.  (I believe I espy an Agastache behind it.)

Also Monarda, and an Ibiris named 'Masterpiece' which is a great doer in Pam's gardens.

Also Monarda, and an Ibiris named ‘Masterpiece’ which is a great doer in Pam’s gardens.

another gorgeous combination

another gorgeous combination

pam3

pam4

Pam describes using fun colours…

for Funland.

for Funland.

that zingy geranium again

that zingy geranium again

Basket Case Fred will be thrilled and amazed when I all of a sudden buy a bunch of those geraniums next year!

Osteospermum (African Daisy); this annual's only flaw is that it needs a lot of deadheading.

Osteospermum (African Daisy); this annual’s only flaw is that it needs a lot of deadheading.

hostas

hostas

pam5

As we walk west, Broadway widens into a two way street.

Hydrangea 'Pistachio'

Hydrangea ‘Pistachio’

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

fuchsias

fuchsias

Pam desribes how she uses bagged Gardner and Bloome Soil Building Compost nowadays, as it is quick and easy to apply and more nurturing than bulk mulch.

also known as Gardner and Bloome Soil Building Conditioner

also known as Gardner and Bloome Soil Building Conditioner

tilt

getting closer to the beach: more wind, water runoff, and erosion

getting closer to the beach: more wind, water runoff, and erosion

tough grasses where nothing else worked

tough grasses where nothing else worked

high walls of the Worldmark Resort as we are almost to the turnaround

high wall of the Worldmark Resort as we are almost to the turnaround

Out here the hydrangeas get so beat up they have to be pruned so low they might not bloom.

Out here the hydrangeas get so beat up they have to be pruned so low they might not bloom.

the turnaround

the turnaround

The toughest of plants go out here.

The toughest of plants go out here.

view to the south

view to the south

in full beach weather

in full beach weather

pam

detail

The silver heather is 'Velvet Fascination'

The silver heather is ‘Velvet Fascination’

oh my gosh...what the beach approach garden could be with irrigation

oh my gosh…what the beach approach garden could be with irrigation

Armeria, Artemesia

Armeria, Artemisia

The Promenade

looking east

looking east

gathering for a photo

gathering for a photo

For good luck, people rub the nose of Seamam, Lewis and Clark's Newfoundland dog.

For good luck, people rub the nose of Seamam, Lewis and Clark’s Newfoundland dog.

luck

His nose is shiny.

His nose is shiny.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

statue

I am envious that this garden does not get thoroughly trampled like my beach approach garden was before I turned it over to Rugosa roses.  I wonder why?  Maybe it is because of all the eyes of the building upon it…or that is is lusher because of the irrigation.  When a tour bus drove into it, someone from one of the adjacent buildings photographed it and got the license number!

We walk east along Broadway, admiring the gardens some more along the way, as I am sure you will want to, as well.

garden

garden with a lovely irrigation spout

the clipped boxwood garden

the clipped boxwood garden

crossing the river bridge

crossing the river bridge

Pam by a store with a Chinese lucky cat in the window

Pam by a store with a Chinese lucky cat in the window

an an Asian style garden next to it.

an an Asian style garden next to it.

tree

mosaics and window boxes

mosaics and window boxes

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

another look at the Eucomis

another look at the Eucomis

I am completely gobsmacked by how good all these gardens look in summer, and despite waves of irrigation envy and tree envy, I enjoyed the tour thoroughly.

Next: an apres-tour lunch, some plant shopping, and a visit to Pam’s own garden.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Saturday, 18 July 2015

Music in the Gardens Tour, Long Beach Peninsula

a benefit for the Water Music Festival and music programs in local schools

ticket tour map

ticket tour map

Garden 3: Mimosa Garden (Holtermann Garden

Waving tropical fish flags greet you as you begin your tour of an art-filled patio garden with colorful pots, choice and well-grown plants, and a wall pocket of textured succulents. Stroll through the full-sun gardens wrapping around the this dune-facing home, which well meets all the challenges of the wind, fog and salt air.  Enjoy the many spots to sit, a working potting bench, and a small kitchen garden.

This aerial photo taken by local photographer Bob Duke with the aid of his drone show how close the garden is to the dunes:

photo by Bob Duke

photo by Bob Duke, showing the triangular shaped lot

garden tour day

garden tour day

on a pre-tour visit June 1st

on a pre-tour visit June 1st (when we just looked at the garden from here, as we were making a spontaneous drive-by)

fish

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Bob Duke

photo by Bob Duke

entrygarden

south side of house

Mimosas and lemony ice water were on offer at the welcome table.

Mimosas and lemony ice water were on offer at the welcome table.

treats (Allan's photo)

treats (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Gardener Pat's t shirt (Allan's photo)

Gardener Pat’s t shirt (Allan’s photo)

west side, photo by Kathleen Shaw

west side, photo by Kathleen Shaw

cheerful entry garden

cheerful entry garden

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

The garden had looked just as perfect when Nancy and I visited on July 3rd to get some “sneak peek” photo for the tour’s Facebook page as it did on tour day.  I noticed how well-grown the plants are.  Just two days before the tour, Pat’s husband sent us this photo captioned “Working through the pain to get ready for the garden tour.”  Pat had hurt her leg and was continuing the preparation on crutches.  Because the garden already looked so fine, it was not the disaster it would have been for someone like me whose garden is not perfected till about one day before a tour.

photo by John Holtermann

photo by John Holtermann

pre-tour visit, July 3rd

pre-tour visit, July 3rd

tour day

tour day

colour

lookback

front door

front door

pre-tour visit, July 3rd, digiplexis

pre-tour visit, July 3rd, digiplexis

digiplexis

Digiplexis ‘Illumination Flame’

pre-tour visit, July 3rd:  This little heart bench belonged to Pat's mother.

pre-tour visit, July 3rd: This little heart bench belonged to Pat’s mother.

tour day

tour day

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

stepping stones to patio on west side of house

stepping stones to patio on west side of house

patio4

pre-tour visit, July 3rd, Scophularia vareigata (variegated figwort)

pre-tour visit, July 3rd, Scophularia vareigata (variegated figwort)

west side patio

west side patio

patio2

lower windows tip out

lower windows tip out

Our Kathleen toured the garden in the late afternoon and found Barbara Bate playing piano on the west patio.

bate

Barbara Bate

north wall of patio

north wall of patio

On a pre-tour visit on June 1st

On a pre-tour visit on June 1st

succulent pocket garden on pre-tour visit, July 3rd

succulent pocket garden on pre-tour visit, July 3rd (lower right corner: Petunia ‘Pretty Much Picasso’

July 3rd

July 3rd

and on tour day

and on tour day

pots

chair

hydrangea at gate to next area

hydrangea by the entry to the next area of the garden

window reflection with more plants inside

window reflection with more plants inside

looking back on the west side patio

looking back on the west side patio

to our left as we step through into the next area

to our left as we step through into the next area

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

The little watering can is a clever reference to the flowing shape of Hakonechloa macra 'Aureola'.

The little watering can is a clever reference to the flowing shape of Hakonechloa macra ‘Aureola’.

Or is it 'All Gold'?

Or is it ‘All Gold’?

gold3

Allan’s photo

When we were there in the morning, Barbara Bate was playing in the north side garden.  For her second set, she moved into the sun where Kathleen found her later on.

Barbara Bate

Barbara Bate

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo “They were talking Beethoven while Barbara Bate was playing him some samples by memory.”

Barbara Bate

Barbara Bate

Barbara Bate

Barbara Bate

As in all the gardens, I wished for more time to sit and enjoy the music.  I have a soft spot for Barbara, who played at my mother’s memorial at Golden Sands and who knew her favourite song, Because (you come to me with naught save love, and hold my hand, and lift mine eyes above…).

Gunnera in the triangle corner of the garden

Gunnera in the triangle corner of the garden

Every now and then, I run across a garden blogger who lists all sorts of garden descriptive phrases we are not supposed to use anymore because they’ve become passé (“architectural foliage” is one, and “garden rooms” is another).  Well, too bad, because here is a great example of architectural foliage in a garden room.  Each section of this garden is enclosed by a fence, a dense planting, or the wall of the house or a shed and it is like a series of outdoor rooms.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Barbara and the reflected garden

Barbara and the reflected garden

back

garden room with chairs and a carpet

curve

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

daisies

Here’s that aerial photo again; you can pick out the white daisies and the gunnera in the corner.

photo by Bob Duke

photo by Bob Duke

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

yellow

Crocosmia 'Lucifer'

Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’

garden room with chairs and tub

garden room with chairs and tub

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

on the north fence

on the north fence

window2

flag

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

gate to the kitchen garden

gate to the kitchen garden

kitchen garden

kitchen garden

pre-tour visit, July 3

pre-tour visit, July 3

garden shed

garden shed

hosta detail

hosta detail

diascias

diascias

looking back

looking back

east wall of house

east wall of house

another sit spot

another sit spot

Another aerial photo shows the garden shed and another enclosed nook near the front driveway.

drone photo by Bob Duke

drone photo by Bob Duke

pots2

chairs

photo by Kathleen Shaw in the afternoon

photo by Kathleen Shaw in the afternoon

hydrangea2

The weather was so scorching hot that some plants were wilting, so garden owner John began to water.

John chats with Allan while watering in the nook off the driveway.

John chats with Allan while watering in the nook off the driveway.

by the driveway

by the driveway

Waterlogue

Waterlogue

The Mimosa Garden was a close contender for my favourite 2015 tour garden because of the garden rooms, the whimsical decorations, and the selection of interesting and well grown plants.  To be a contender, a garden must have art that tells me something about the owner, must have more garden than lawn, and must not be a barkscape; the plants must touch and intermingle.

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Saturday, 19 July 2014

Music in the Gardens Tour, Long Beach Peninsula

a benefit for Water Music Festival

We had switched up the order of garden touring as we wanted to be sure to get to our friend Ed’s garden in good time, so we drove back to the ocean side and worked our way north.

Seal House Garden

Seal House

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

This is too funny not to share.  In the photo below, that is me in the blue shirt walking purposely up to the garage to say that car cannot be in the middle of the garden (unless it belonged to a physically challenged guest, which it did not).

Allan's photo: I'm on a mission.  The car got moved to the side.

Allan’s photo: I’m on a mission. The car got moved to the side.

Giving the car the old fish eye.

Giving the car the old fish eye. (Allan’s photo)

The garden is on the end of a cul-de-sac.

The garden is on the end of a cul-de-sac.

The garden gets its name from these sculptures.

The garden gets its name from these sculptures.

seals

garden

a windswept landscape

a windswept landscape

shells2

crocos

looking north from the neighbours’

front

north side of driveway

north side of driveway, looking northwest

looking northwest over the beach grass

looking northwest over the beach grass

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

oyster shells

oyster shells

Susie was hosting an art exhibit in her garage.

Susie was hosting an exhibit by the Northwest Artists Guild.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

and had a refreshment table set up outside.

and had a refreshment table set up outside.

Garden Tour Nancy and I partake.  (Allan's photo)

Garden Tour Nancy and I partake. (Allan’s photo)

She offered guests a list of plants in the garden.

She offered guests a list of plants in the garden.

looking south from the driveway

looking south from the driveway

rock

looking south from the driveway

rocks

path to front porch

path to front porch

musician Jennifer Goodenberger

musician Jennifer Goodenberger

j

 

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo, looking northeast

Allan’s photo, looking northeast (you can see the car that got moved!)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

drive

by the front porch, nasturtiums and a pot with an artichoke

by the front porch, nasturtiums and a pot with an artichoke

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

a porch on the southeast corner of the house

a porch on the southeast corner of the house out of the north and the west wind

Shelter from the north wind is summer is most comforting here at the beach, because it is a cold and frequent wind.

looking north from the southeast corner

looking north

looking southeast

looking southeast

Changes in texture of paving make an interesting walk through the garden.

Changes in texture of paving make an interesting walk through the garden.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

She offered guests a list of plants in the garden.

The owner offered guests a list of plants in the garden.

She also offered a list of plants that failed to thrive.  It is always useful to know what is successful or not in a beach side garden.

plant list

I love this sort of transparency!  I think the cold winter killed her Senecio greyii (did the same to mine in a more sheltered spot).  And I usually find that poppies of all sorts do well, but this year I did not have much luck with poppies in beach side gardens.

So of course, I must now regale you with one of my favourite poems; thanks so much to Seal House Susie for reminding me of it:

Why Did My Plant Die?

Geoffrey B. Charlesworth
You walked too close. You trod on it.
You dropped a piece of sod on it.
You hoed it down. You weeded it.
You planted it the wrong way up.
You grew it in a yogurt cup
But you forgot to make a hole;
The soggy compost took its toll.
September storm. November drought.
It heaved in March, the roots popped out.
You watered it with herbicide.
You scattered bonemeal far and wide.
Attracting local omnivores,
Who ate your plant and stayed for more.
You left it baking in the sun
While you departed at a run
To find a spade, perhaps a trowel,
Meanwhile the plant threw in the towel.
You planted it with crown too high;
The soil washed off, that explains why.
Too high pH. It hated lime.
Alas it needs a gentler clime.
You left the root ball wrapped in plastic.
You broke the roots. They’re not elastic.
You walked too close. You trod on it.
You dropped a piece of sod on it.
You splashed the plant with mower oil.
You should do something to your soil.
Too rich. Too poor. Such wretched tilth.
Your soil is clay. Your soil is filth.
Your plant was eaten by a slug.
The growing point contained a bug.
These aphids are controlled by ants,
Who milk the juice, it kills the plants.
In early spring your garden’s mud.
You walked around! That’s not much good.
With heat and light you hurried it.
You worried it. You buried it.
The poor plant missed the mountain air:
No heat, no summer muggs up there.
You overfed it 10-10-10.
Forgot to water it again.
You hit it sharply with the hose.
You used a can without a rose.
Perhaps you sprinkled from above.
You should have talked to it with love.
The nursery mailed it without roots.
You killed it with those gardening boots.
You walked too close. You trod on it.
You dropped a piece of sod on it.






On the way back to our van, we saw a mallard duck in the pond fronting a neighbouring house.  She wanted to be in the blog, so Allan obligingly took these photos.

P7190072

P7190074

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