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Posts Tagged ‘seaside gardens’

Saturday, 4 March 2017

In the early afternoon, we crossed the Astoria Megler Bridge and joined a roomful of like minded folk for an Indivisible North Coast Oregon meeting.

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a darling small house by where we parked (Allan’s photo).  A sunny garden in front would have no privacy, though.


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Allan’s photo, on the way

Astoria was parked up because of a winter brewery festival. We walked two blocks in the rain, passing one of my favourite little gardens on the way to the Fort George Brewery meeting room.

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Allan’s photo

This ornately fenced garden is built by piling soil (now mulched with washed dairy manure) on top of pavement.

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Allan’s photo


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Allan’s photo: tulip foliage, and pigeon pecking in the manure

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a goodly crowd


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Allan’s photo


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Allan’s photo


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a neat driftwood thing

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Some thoughts from the meeting:

Indivisible is opposed to the ABC of authoritarianism, bigotry, corruption.

A speaker advised that we send postcards to politicians…”even a picture postcard works because I think they stand out,” she said.  This made me smile because of our recent art postcard parties.

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an example from one of our postcard parties

A woman from Germany spoke, saying “who would have thought a little painter from Austria could have killed millions” and she asked, “How could my people not see this coming, how could they look away?”  She said “My life is a series of attempts to make up for the crimes of my ancestors”.  When she goes to a protest, her thought when seeing a photographer is: Is he from the newspaper or from Homeland Security?  She believes she sees the early signs of fascism.  Right here is her recommended reading on the subject.

The following speaker quoted this: “What you would be doing in 1930s Germany is what you are doing now.”

Action item: A member of KMUN radio asks that we write to or call members of the Senate Committee on Appropriations asking that public radio continue to be funded.  Small rural stations like Astoria’s KMUN depend on federal funding far more than city stations do.

Afterwards, we were encouraged to sign up if we had interest in particular topics (education, environment, immigration, health care, equal rights).DSC06882.JPG).

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Allan took the opportunity to buy a women’s march copy of the Daily Astorian.

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Afterwards, we walked by the Fort George Brewery’s lower garden, also freshly mulched.  The ornamental grasses have been cut back since last time we went to the Blue Scorcher Café next door.

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Fort George garden

We walked by the temptations of the Blue Scorcher because we wanted to try out a new restaurant in Seaside, Oregon.

In Seaside, it was too wet and miserably windy to walk around and look at Pam Fleming’s city gardens.

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drive by photo

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Allan’s photo


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a new restaurant (Allan’s photo)


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Allan’s photo

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a warm and simple place


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Allan’s photo


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something so sweet on the menu


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many choices

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I had to try the cauliflower appetizer, hoping that it would be similar to the zahra from Seattle’s Mediterranean Kitchen…and it was.

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Allan’s chicken sandwich

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The tasty baba ganoush had pickled on it; I just put them to one side because I’m not used to that.  All food is made fresh so I bet I could ask for no pickles next time, and there will be a next time.

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the turnaround at the end of Broadway


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Pam’s garden on the turnaround (Allan’s photos)

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We shopped at Costco.  Wouldn’t this elaborate plastic apple container make an interesting little seedling greenhouse?

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stormy crossing of the Columbia on the way home: freighters at anchor, waiting


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light snow and fog on the hills on the Washington side of the bridge


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in the dusk, golden daffodils that someone once planted on the hillside

According to the weather forecast, we are due for several days of bad weather, possibly even light snow.  I will not mind reprising staycation.

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Thursday, 2 June 2016

I accompanied Allan on a grocery shopping trip to Warrenton, Oregon, solely to detour into Seaside and see Pam Fleming’s public gardens.  (Checking out the plant selection at Fred Meyer would be a bonus.)

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Pam Fleming has been the public gardener for downtown Seaside for as long as I can remember, and every year her gardens get better.  The gardens run along both sides of Broadway from the main highway to the beach view turnaround.

Broadway in Seaside

Broadway in Seaside

We drove and looked at the first couple of blocks as I took photos from the passenger window.

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Love that dusky Phygelius; I wonder if it is 'Salmon Leap'.

Love that dusky Phygelius; I wonder if it is ‘Salmon Leap’.

Then a parking place opened up on the busy street and we decided to walk to the turnaround and back to get a close look at the gardens.  What a good decision!

One of Seaside's well designed sit spots.

One of Seaside’s well designed sit spots.

on the bridge

on the bridge

bridge

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I love gold and variegated foliage.

I love gold and variegated foliage.

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Nigella (love in a mist) (Allan's photo)

Nigella (love in a mist) (Allan’s photo)

Pam plants flowering tobacco and head-whirling type flowers in front of the Bridgetender Tavern.

Pam plants flowering tobacco and head-whirling type flowers in front of the Bridge Tender Tavern.

Nicotiana langsdorfii (a flowering tobacco)

Nicotiana langsdorfii (a flowering tobacco)

a whirly spoon leaved osteospermum; she likes the kind with more of a color pattern but it has become hard to find.

a whirly spoon leafed osteospermum; she likes the kind with more of a color pattern but it has become hard to find.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I hope no tavern patron gets thrown into this pocket garden this year.

The Bridge Tender

The Bridge Tender

As we strolled by a café with outdoor seating, a walker approaching said to two folks seated there, “Looks like the perfect life.”   “It’s our think tank,” said the sitters; “We’re solving the world’s problems.”  “How far have you gotten?”  “Not very far.”

Pam often plants culinary plants in front of restaurants, like this seafood place.

Pam often plants culinary plants in front of restaurants, like this seafood place.

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I spy parsley in the Dooger's garden.

I spy parsley in the Dooger’s garden.  Maybe sage, rosemary, and thyme, too.

by Dooger's

by Dooger’s

This is the "swinging tree" of a little local girl who has swung from the branches for years.

This is the “swinging tree” of a local girl who has swung from the branches for years.

I'd say put leatherleaf viburnum here except I don't much like it!

I’d say put leatherleaf viburnum here except I don’t much like it!

When the business storefronts change hands, sometimes Pam’s planting scheme is thrown off; she might have plants from Mexico in front of a Mexican restaurant and then have it turn into a souvenir shop instead.

another culinary garden by the Pig 'n' Pancake, with golden lemon balm.

another culinary garden by the Pig ‘n’ Pancake, with golden lemon balm.  (I think.)

Lovage, I think, on the right.

Lovage, I think, on the right.

The vigorous houttuynia was already in the gardens when she took them on.

The vigorous houttuynia was already in the gardens when she took them on.

Why don't I ever remember to mass plant like she does? Looks so much better.

Why don’t I ever remember to mass plant like she does? Looks so much better.

I just realized my own Primrose vialii may be petered out at home.

I just realized my own Primrose vialii may be petered out at home.

Unlike some people, when I see a plant that I want in a public garden (like the primrose above), I do NOT help myself.

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As always, I envy the variety of street trees...not just boring old columnar pears like we have. Here: paperbark maple.

As always, I envy the variety of street trees…not just boring old columnar pears like we have. Here: paperbark maple.

another sit spot

another sit spot

Forever is a long, long time.

Forever is a long, long time.

a wintry windowbox

a wintry window box

shop window (Allan's photo)

shop window (Allan’s photo)

There is alchemilla (lady's mantle) looking frothy and glorious.

There is alchemilla (lady’s mantle) looking frothy and glorious.

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looks like Helenium 'Sahin's Early Flowerer' being way early!

looks like Helenium ‘Sahin’s Early Flowerer’ blooming way early!

Sambucus 'Black Lace'

Sambucus ‘Black Lace’

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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I also envy the reliable sprinkler system in every pocket garden.

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Last year, Pam told us her mulch of choice was bales of Gardner and Bloome soil building compost.

Last year, Pam told us her mulch of choice was bales of Gardner and Bloome soil building compost.

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I was deeply smitten with this bed with its candelabra primroses.

I was deeply smitten with this bed with its candelabra primroses.

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I spy little statice. I've had helpful people pull them out as dandelions before they bloom.

I spy little statice. I’ve had helpful people pull them out as dandelions before they bloom.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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almost to the turnaround

almost to the turnaround

At first, I thought this kid might be one of Pam's workers, till I realized he was playing hide and seek.

At first, I thought this kid might be one of Pam’s workers, till I realized he was playing hide and seek.

Now I had reached the turnaround.  Allan had walked back to get the van and come pick me up.

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looking east

looking east

looking west

looking west

I found these two plaques deeply touching:

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looking south

in full wind and weather...and irrigated

in full wind and weather…and irrigated

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On the way back to the highway, one block over:

a big fluffy peony under a beach pine

a big fluffy peony under a beach pine

some flying birds by a Seaside storefront

some flying birds by a Seaside café

On the way north, we had a look at the garden of an ironworks shop in Gearhart.

Gearhart Ironworks

Gearhart Ironworks

the ironworks garden

the ironworks garden

We accomplished our grocery shopping at Costco.  I miss the old, smaller store behind the Fred Meyer.  The big new one has lighting that makes me feel dizzy and disoriented.  I find myself thinking that I must visit an optometrist immediately:

too much glare

too much glare, I feel like I am seeing double.

I prefer mood lighting while shopping.

Further toward home, I succumbed to the siren call of the Fred Meyer plant department.

petunias of interesting hues

petunias of interesting hues; I bought a yellowy-pinky one.

another unusual petunia

another unusual petunia

a haul of plants for my garden (Allan's photo)

a haul of plants for my garden (Allan’s photo)

eastern view from the highest part of the 4 mile long Astoria Megler bridge over the Columbia river.

eastern view from the highest part of the 4 mile long Astoria Megler bridge over the Columbia river.

The only flaw in this excellent day (other than the lighting at Costco) was that I had not organized a visit with Pam herself.  I felt we would not have time to do that, shop, and get to our weekly dinner in time.  Oh, how wrong I was because we got home with two hours to spare.  I did spend it puttering with my new plants; however, visiting with Pam would have been better, and rare.

The Cove Restaurant

We were slightly late to our North Beach Garden Gang meeting because I found it hard to tear myself away from my new plants.

a tad bit late to the party

a tad bit late to the party

artful dinner salad

artful dinner salad

strawberry feta salad (Allan's photo)

strawberry feta salad (Allan’s photo)

prawn scampi

prawn scampi

ahi tuna

ahi tuna

Dave, Melissa and me

Dave, Melissa and me

Todd and Dave (Allan's photo)

Todd and Dave (Allan’s photo)

We usually stay until the serving staff start sweeping up and vacuuming.  Carmen made an amusing show of sweeping right by our table.

a hug from our Carmen

a hug from our Carmen

After dinner, the usual lingering in the parking lot:

The plant that got away?

The plant that got away?

Tomorrow: back to the watering rounds.


Ginger’s Garden Diaries

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from my mother’s garden diaries of two decades ago

1998 (age 74):

June 2: HOT in afternoon!!  Noon to six  I finally got those tulip bulbs (from the tubs and pots) planted in the garden area next to the onion and asparagus bed.  Boy I’m glad to have it done.  Then I planted seedlings into pots—the next move will be to plant them into the various bowls.  The next main job is to start planting the perennials that are on the picnic table.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tuesday, 12 May 2015

We woke to unexpected rain and wind.  Much as I would have liked to stay home, reading The Stations of Solitude by Alice Koller (author of An Unknown Woman), a plant expedition called to us.  We are so busy with work that we rarely get to go plant shopping off the Peninsula.  In previous less busy years, we were able to go to Joy Creek and Cistus in early May each year.  A sudden thought:  Maybe that was partly because my old garden was more or less done and did not require the time, on days off, that my newer one does.

by the driveway:  Eleagnus 'Quicksilver' bowed low by rain.  (Thanks, Todd, for IDing this plant for me.)

by the driveway: Eleagnus ‘Quicksilver’ bowed low by rain. (Thanks, Todd, for IDing this plant for me.)

At the post office, I saw through rain drops something ominous: new boards in the fence along which I had planted sweet peas.

through the passenger window: Unpainted new boards bode ill for my sweet peas.

through the passenger window: Unpainted new boards bode ill for my sweet peas.

While sitting in the van, I saw our client Diane approach.  She asked when we would be planting up the container down at the Peninsula Sanitation office.  I said we had not even done Long Beach yet, but soon.  Perhaps I should not tell people this, but I usually do grease the squeaky wheels ASAP so getting some plants for her business container became a priority at our next stop:

The Planter Box

Before heading south, we went north to The Planter Box to stock up on cosmos.  While we try to avoid such a waste of gas and driving time, we need, when possible, all the good weather waking time to plant rather than shop.

Allan's photo: someone's load of cow fiber

Allan’s photo: someone’s load of cow fiber ready to tractor away soon

baby chicks at the Planter Box

baby chicks at the Planter Box

soft and yellow and fuzzy

soft and yellow and fuzzy

a wide assortment of bird feeders

a wide assortment of bird feeders

Well grown Cerinthe major purpurascens are hard to find in nurseries.  I'd snap these up if I were you.

Well grown Cerinthe major purpurascens are hard to find in nurseries. I’d snap these up if I were you.

Allan's photo: a load of cosmos

Allan’s photo: a load of cosmos

Allan's photo: a van vull

Allan’s photo: a van full

Before offloading the plants at home and leaving the Peninsula, we cleaned up old bulb foliage and added four new plants to the Peninsula Sanitation planter.

more plants next week

at Pen San: will add more plants next week

Going Overseas

Off we went, east through the town of Chinook.  When we pulled in toward Chinook Coffee drive through, a tree boggled my mind.

I did not get a long shot of it.

I did not get a long shot of it.

It took me a few minutes to remember that it is a buckeye.

It took me a few minutes to remember that it is a buckeye AKA Aesculus.

Why doesn’t this glorious tree get planted more often around here?  I remember that I planted one up in our former garden at Discovery Heights.  I wonder if it is still there.

Chinook Coffee drive through window

Chinook Coffee drive through window

and window box

and window box

Someone immediately took a big bite out of my mint chocolate brownie.

brownie

heading east out of Chinook

heading east out of Chinook

mist on the hills

mist on the hills

to our right, the Columbia River rolls on.

to our right, the Columbia River rolls on.

Now for the scary bits.  We have to go through the Chinook tunnel.  My longtime friend and professional bus driver Carol dreads this tunnel, as she thinks it is too narrow after the time we were driving through it with a semi truck driver coming the other way and his mouth was open with an expression of sheer terror.

here it comes

here it comes

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AAAAAAAAAAAA!

AAAAAAAAAAAA!

whew, out the other side

whew, out the other side

When you emerge at the east end of the tunnel during a winter storm at high tide, wave spray crashes over this rock barrier onto your windshield.

Now, the always traumatizing (to people like me) 4.1 mile long Astoria-Megler bridge.

the long straight stretch on which people like to PASS.

the long straight stretch on which people like to PASS.

going up

going up; bridge work was off today because of the weather…

better a school bus than a huge logging truck

better a school bus than a huge logging truck

almost to the top

almost to the top

rollercoastering around the curve

rollercoastering around the curve

whew!

whew!

Our first fun part of our excursion was to drive up and down Broadway in Seaside, 17 miles south, to look at Seaside city gardener Pam Fleming’s gardens.

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As usual, I just took photos from my window, as we are always short on time to walk around.  I missed getting the tall lavender thalictrum.  Some photos are blurry; am including them here for my own record.

daisies and catmint

daisies and catmint

looking west on Broadway

looking west on Broadway; note the shelter on the right

by the shelter with benches: a little tree, and hydrangeas

by the shelter with benches: a little tree, and hydrangeas

my kind of bridge, across the Necanicum River in downtown Seaside

my kind of bridge, across the Necanicum River in downtown Seaside

one of Pam's tinier gardens, with lambs ears

one of Pam’s tinier gardens, with lambs ears

daylilies, and...I wonder what that tree is?

daylilies, and…I wonder what that tree is?

outside the Pagan Pancake

outside the Pagan Pancake

Let's call this one impressionistic.

Let’s call this one impressionistic.

white against glaucous foliage

white against glaucous foliage

the turnaround at the west end of Broadway, with Lewis and Clark

the turnaround at the west end of Broadway, with Lewis and Clark and a garden fully exposed to oceanside elements.

north side of the turnaround

north side of the turnaround

south side, with the headland obscured by rainy mist

south side, with the headland obscured by rainy mist

Our main destination for the day came next, a few miles south of Seaside:

SevenDees Seaside

SevenDees Seaside

I often still call this nursery Raintree, as it was when I first moved to the beach in 1992.  I miss Janice who used to work here; she was so helpful, friendly, and a plantswoman who always pointed me to something cool and new (like Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’!).

Enkianthus in a large pot by the entryway

Enkianthus in a large pot by the entryway

entry display

entry display

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

an unusual colour of calibrachoa: Coralberry Punch.

an unusual colour of calibrachoa: Coralberry Punch.  Had to have a few.

also found it necessary to get this Salvia.

also found it necessary to get this Salvia.

salvias and heucheras

salvias and heucheras

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

The angel and I ponder a cool Euphorbia

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo: part of our haul

Allan’s photo: part of our haul

Allan's photo: all ours

Allan’s photo: all ours

Allan's photo: The van could have held lots more.

Allan’s photo: The van could have held lots more.  I’m still not used to that after years of shopping in a small car.

I found the outdoor sink arrangement by the sanican to be worthy of sharing.  It would be nice to have anywhere on a garden tour where a portable loo is provided.

the sanican (a large and luxurious model)

the sanican (a large and luxurious model)

and next to it, the outdoor sink.

and next to it, the outdoor sink with a bowl of coloured glass pieces.

We had to do some necessary grocery shopping at both Costco and Fred Meyer; both stores have lighting that makes me long for escape and makes me wonder if I need to urgently see an optometrist, a feeling that lingers till I have been out in normal lighting for half an hour.  Only during plant buying season to I regularly go to these stores.  In the winter, Allan enjoys going alone as there is less kvetching that way.

my vision goes all blurry inside Costco

my vision goes all blurry inside Costco

in one of the parking lots (Fred Meyer?), rain continues

in one of the parking lots (Fred Meyer?), rain continues

now, the downhill bridge ride over the Columbia River

now, the downhill bridge ride over the Columbia River

downhill

Just to the east of the dreaded Chinook Tunnel lies a peaceful lagoon surrounded with yellow Iris pseudocaris (considered an invasive weed).  Sometimes a heron fishes there.  No parking place exists to ever see it is more than a flashing drive by glimpse.

peaceful lagoon

peaceful lagoon…whoosh, and it is gone

Ilwaco and home

Back in our town, I collected a couple of photos for the Music in the Gardens Tour page “Rhodie Driving Tour” album.

at Spruce and Maryann

at Spruce and Maryann

at Lake and Elizabeth

at Lake and Elizabeth

flowers and fireplace smoke

flowers and fireplace smoke

safely back in our own driveway

safely back in our own driveway

My cool plant acquistions:

Euphorbia, Eucomis, Salvia

Euphorbia, Eucomis, Salvia ‘Wendy’s Wish’

Eucomis 'Glow Sticks'

Eucomis ‘Glow Sticks’

Geum 'Banana Daiquiri'

Geum ‘Banana Daiquiri’

some $2.00 ferns and Agastache 'Golden Jubilee' from Fred Meyer

some $2.00 ferns and a little bright conifer and Agastache ‘Golden Jubilee’ from Fred Meyer (I’d been wanting that Agastache).

more little ferns and a sedum

more little ferns and a sedum

Heuchera 'Midnight Rose'

Heuchera ‘Midnight Rose’

Now I just need a day at home to plant them, and other ladies in waiting:

the unusual primula given to me recently by Kathleen

the unusual primula given to me recently by Kathleen

and Panicum 'North Wind'; fell in love with it last summer at Rhone Street Gardens

and Panicum ‘North Wind’; fell in love with it last summer at Rhone Street Gardens

I had time to briefly assess some good and bad by the ladies in waiting area.

This plant from Todd has survived the slug and snail attacks....

This asarum from Todd has survived the slug and snail attacks….

that appear to have completely decimated 'Shell Shocked'.

that appear to have completely decimated ‘Shell Shocked’.

I have hopes for my Tetrapanax getting as tall as my garden tuteur.

I have hopes for my Tetrapanax getting as tall as my garden tuteur.

The view from my bedroom window shows that it will be awhile before I have a day at home to appreciate my own garden.

a patio full of plants for jobs

a patio full of plants for jobs

Because it was Tuesday night, we watched The Deadliest Catch and I pondered how wimpy I am to be so scared of a bridge and a tunnel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Saturday, 1 March 2014

Allan had gone to breakfast with J9 at the Long Beach Grange.

breakfast with J9 at the Grange

breakfast with J9 at the Grange

home

I slept longer and then took a stroll out to the bogsy wood.

It had definitely begun to dry out...

It had definitely begun to dry out…

I wanted to see some frogs in the bog but they were all hiding.

I wanted to see some frogs in the bog but they were all hiding.

Many the crab pot was stacked next door.

Many the crab pot was stacked next door.

I made another attempt at the crocus photo in the front garden.

the crocus run

the crocus run

also: narcissi

also: narcissi

crocus and hellebores

crocus and hellebores

more hellebores

more hellebores

and more

and more

tulips and narcissi

tulips and narcissi

Allan's garden

Allan’s garden

After my garden walk, I called Allan to suggest that we go overseas (to Oregon) rather than work, as the grey day’s weather was changing to drizzle. The work board still had some first time clean ups on the list (and I had forgotten to add the Red Barn).

skiving off from work

skiving off from the work board

Back Alley Gardens in Gearhart

After his breakfast, which of course had taken place at about 11 AM, Allan and I headed over the bridge toward Gearhart and our favourite north Oregon coast nursery, Back Alley Gardens.

Back Alley and The Natural Nook, formerly Fitzgeralds

Back Alley and The Natural Nook, formerly Fitzgeralds

March 1st at Back Alley

March 1st at Back Alley

plants

on the deck

a charming primula

a charming primula

double primula

double primula

inside the adjoining Natural Nook gift shop

inside the adjoining Natural Nook gift shop

The Natural Nook

The Natural Nook

We were so busy visiting with Pam and Prissy that we almost forgot our mission to buy a spare Birds Be Safe collar. Fortunately, Allan saw them after we had rung up our assortment of exciting hellebores and wee conifers.

see birdsbesafe.com

see birdsbesafe.com

Now look! There, to the left, is the new Ducly Mahar book and I did not even notice it till now.

Pam’s Gardens in Seaside

After visiting with Pamela Fleming of Back Alley, also the gardener for Seaside, Oregon, we made our usual detour down Broadway to check out her curbside gardens. The photos are strangely composed and blurred because we were on the move. We always used to tour these gardens by car even before we met Pam in person. They never fail to impress.

nicely mulched, with Heucheras

nicely mulched, with amber Heucheras

pocket

 

an impressionistic blur by the river bridge

an impressionistic blur by the river bridge

driving west on Broadway with gardens ahead

driving west on Broadway with gardens ahead

seaside

ever westward

ever westward

shrubs

one of several welcoming sit spots

one of a few big, welcoming sit spots

thick clumps of narcissi

thick clumps of narcissi

Seaside's famous Candy Man (handing out samples from the Candy Man store)

Seaside’s famous Candy Man (handing out samples from the Candy Man store)

turn

the western end

the western end

hydrangeas on the shady side, with nary a weed

hydrangeas on the shady side, with nary a weed

Seaside 7 Dees

While I had gotten some extra choice small hellebores from Back Alley that will bloom next year, I still was on a quest for larger ones in bloom now. When we arrived at 7 Dees (part of a Portland-based chain), blooming hellebores awaited us along with something very exciting, indeed, breathtaking: Edgeworthias!

Hellebores and Edgeworthias

Hellebores and Edgeworthias

more Edgeworthias inside!

more Edgeworthias inside!

I think I got the only one of this colour:  Edgeworthia chrysantha Rubra

I think I got the only one of this colour: Edgeworthia chrysantha Rubra

(The tag says Edgeworthia c. Rubra, which I assume is chrysantha, which is I believe supposed to have larger flowers, but Google tells me it’s Edgeworthia papyrifera Rubra.)

and I got myself this Edgeworthia papyrifera

and I got myself this Edgeworthia papyrifera

I was so very chuffed to find these. I used to have a precious Edgeworthia chrysantha; it had been brought to me on the train from Seattle to a Seaside spring garden seminar by none other than my gardening idol Ann Lovejoy. I adored it in my old garden and of course had to try to move it to my new one, and killed it. All I have left is one little branch; I had used its carcass, painted purple, as garden decor till it disintegrated. While these won’t have the emotional attachment for me, at least I have the excellent winter blooming shrub again.

mine!

mine! waiting to be rung up

and a pretty and fragrant wallflower came along, too...

and a pretty and fragrant wallflower came along, too…

Last year I would not have been able to buy such shrubs as we then shopped in the small two door Saturn. Look at us now!

van

load

While shopping at 7 Dees, I’d gotten a text from our friend Jenna (Queen La De Da)informing me she was on her way to Olde Towne Café in Ilwaco. When I told her we were at 7 Dees she asked if they had any of “those swirly trees”…and so we were even able to fit THIS into the van for her new shop, along with all our plants, with room to spare.

would not have fit in the Saturn!

would not have fit in the Saturn!

Astoria

One of the glories of the day was not having to buy frozen food at Costco; Allan had shopped on his own earlier in the week. Thus we were able to have an early dinner in Astoria. We chose Blue Ocean Thai.

Blue Ocean Thai at the west end of Commercial

Blue Ocean Thai at the west end of Commercial

The ambience of the restaurant is perhaps a little lacking.

a big sparse room

a big sparse room

Allan pointed out that the chandelier’s shape reminded him of an Allium.

Allium shaped chandelier

Allium shaped chandelier

The food was exquisite. I wish the Thai restaurant that is closer to us was this good. I almost wept with joy; it had been years since I had Thai food of this quality.

so delicious

so delicious

Top left: cucumber salad… The Larb Gai (bottom) was served at a cool temperature, as it should be. The Pad Prik King (green bean dish, top right) and Allan’s dish with peanut sauce filled me with joy, and there were leftovers for later.

After dinner we had a quick look, in the uncomfortably chilly dusk, at the Garden of Surging Waves. The ropes that kept us from going in last time have been removed from the new Chinese Heritage garden and many more plants added.

waves

now open to the public

waves

view

statue

rocks

fish

my favourite part: the wall of words

my favourite part: the wall of words

words

words

More words: metal tables (or benches?) inserted into the wall inscribed with quotations:

tables

words

words

temple

The last time we had looked at this garden, a big 7 Dees truck delivery truck had been parked nearby. And here, in the garden today, we saw several Edgeworthias (Chinese paper bush, so perfect for this garden’s theme). Maybe that is why they had been available for me to buy at the Seaside garden store.

edgeworthia

Edgeworthia

Edgeworthia

home

My lovely plant haul, photographed the next day:

haul

I had just seen Ciscoe rave about the Brazleberry on telly.

Hellebores small (very collectible) and large

Hellebores small (very collectible) and large

I am still taking Pam's advice and adding more columnar conifers.

I am still taking Pam’s advice and adding more columnar conifers.

Back Alley had two tables of fabulous Xera plants.

Back Alley had two tables of fabulous Xera plants.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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July 20, 2013

from the program:  This large meadow garden on the dunes of a Butterfly Shores estate showcases the many plants that thrive in full exposure to salt, wind and winter storms.  As you wander through the meadow, notice the garden art, collected driftwood planters and sculpture, pond and fountain.  The tall fence around the back gardens protects artful bird feeders from bears, raised-bed vegetables from deer and encloses a sheltered patio.  This remarkable garden design was planted and maintained  by local gardener Diana Canto.

A few years ago, the owner of this property asked me if we would create a garden for her.  We were simply too busy, so I referred her to local gardener Diana Canto, whose own garden I had admired.  Here is the wonderful landscape that Diana has created in front (west) of the house.

side

Bristol garden

Bristol garden

There is only one house and dune grass between this garden and the beach.

looking from the garden to the west on a pre-tour visit.

looking from the garden to the west on a pre-tour visit.

house

garden

Everything in this garden is exposed to salt wind, storms, and I am sure to deer.

beachy

beachy

daisies and ornamental grasses

daisies and ornamental grasses

detail, taken on a rainy pre-tour day in late June

detail, taken on a rainy pre-tour day in late June

also on pre-tour day

also on pre-tour day

in late June

in late June

on that rainy pre-tour day

on that rainy pre-tour day

 

in the west (front Garden), Deb sets up for a photo

in the west (front Garden), Deb sets up for a photo

It was such enormous fun touring with Debbie and Sheila.  Kathleen was touring from north to south so we did not connect with her till the end.

Perovskia (Russian Sage)

Perovskia (Russian Sage)

This is one of the prettiest Perovskias I have ever seen.

This is one of the prettiest Perovskias I have ever seen.

grasses

looking west

looking west

The house across the road is attractive indeed and is said to be built to be tsunami safe.

daisies

daisies, Allan’s photo

another daisy photo by Allan

another daisy photo by Allan

beds around the house

beds around the house

garden confab by the porch.  Left: Diana Canto, who designed the garden, and in the center, Phil, spouse of tour organizer Nancy.

garden confab by the porch. Left: Diana Canto, who designed the garden, and in the center, Phil, spouse of tour organizer Nancy and a stanch supporter of the garden tour.

a serious discussion

a serious discussion

plants by the foundation and porch steps

plants by the foundation and porch steps

lovely built in porch planters, taken late June

lovely built in porch planters, taken late June

on tour day

on tour day

garden next to porch

garden next to porch

from the porch looking west

from the porch looking west

To the north side of the front garden, a path leads into the fenced back garden.

to the back

to the back

garden near the arch path

garden near the arch path

Inside the back yard, a raised bed grows edibles.

veg

veg

back garden, taken in late June

back garden, taken in late June

on tour day

on tour day

Kathleen Shaw's photo of the north side of the back garden

Kathleen Shaw’s photo of the north side of the back garden

Our friend Kathleen Sayce's view of the back garden

Our friend Kathleen Sayce’s view of the back garden

On the porch, I greeted singer Randy Brown, the musician for this garden, who last year was the musician for our garden on the tour.  I was hoping we would be at the Bristol garden during one of his sets.

Randy Brown

Randy Brown

We reminisced for a little while; he said, “Your garden was industrial strength colour therapy!  Vietnam vets with PTSD should go there to heal.”  He would have loved Jo’s garden!

Allan's photo of Randy

Allan’s photo of Randy

Randy and his drummer.  He excels at making up songs about the moment.

Randy and his drummer. He excels at making up songs about the moment.

from the porch, looking west

from the porch, looking west

The garden tour confab had gotten bigger.  I joined it just before we left, and then Sheila and Debbie and Allan were waiting for me, after I had tried to keep them on schedule up til then!

on the back patio, a sheltered spot from wind

on the back patio, a sheltered spot from wind

The patio is on the east side of the house.

The patio is on the east side of the house.

delicious refreshments

delicious refreshments

yummy

yummy

fire circle

fire circle

patio

patio

Sheila taking a photo

Sheila taking a photo, Deb probably thinking about taking a photo

I am sure I would have snagged some Sheila photos for this blog, but she is having computer problems and has not been able to process hers yet.  Debbie’s photos will likely appear on her own Rainyside website.  In fact, it is on the Rainyside and other gardens forums that Sheila and I originally “met” even thought at the time, we both lived on the Long Beach Peninsula.

I should add that this house and property is for sale as of July 2013.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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