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Posts Tagged ‘Shellie Thomas embroidery’

Friday, 19 June 2015

First thing in the morning, I heard an ominous hissing sound under the bathroom floor.  Allan crawled under the house to check and indeed, we had a small leak.  We called the plumber, but of course it was midmorning by then, so we were told they would call back if they could get to us.  With the house water and water heater turned off, we went to work but had to be aware of a possible phone call all day; we would have had to quickly stop our Long Beach watering mission and get back to Ilwaco.  I was so hoping for the call as I did not want to go into the weekend with a house leak.

We’d had a blessed rain shower the night before.  It had been enough to fill one third of the water bins under the gutters (plastic garbage cans), not enough to water the planters thoroughly.

On the way, I checked out my post office garden.  One allium that got fallen on last week by an unfortunate passerby is somewhat reviving.

It might get round after all...

It might get round after all…

But this one is thoroughly smashed.

But this one is thoroughly smashed.

Long Beach

I began by grooming the gardens in Long Beach’s Veterans Field, as the Columbia Pacific Farmers Market would be in session from mid afternoon till 7 PM.  The weather: blue sky, not too windy, not too hot.  Just about perfect!

Some vendors began setting up by noon-ish.

Some vendors began setting up by noon-ish.

our flag pavilion garden

our flag pavilion garden

The corner garden, new this year, still looks young.

The corner garden, new this year, still looks young.

Half a block away is a streetside cottage garden that I always admire.  It was pinker a month ago when the sea thrift was freshly in bloom.  Today, I remembered to take a photo of this gift to the street.  Lucy Hardiman would call this a “garden advance instead of a garden retreat”.

still very pretty

an admirable garden with roses, sea thrift, rose campion, daisies

I began my watering rounds of most of the main street Long Beach planters.  Allan watered the 18 street tree pocket gardens, the eight planters in the two northernmost blocks, and the Fish Alley barrels.

Lady's mantle redeeming itself in the Lewis and Clark Square planter.

Lady’s mantle redeeming itself in the Lewis and Clark Square planter.

A section of lady’s mantle, a perennial that I have mostly gone off, looks lovely right now and reminds me with its frothy charteuse flowers why I planted it in the first place.  (Its short period of bloom is why I have gone off it over the years.) I have not been able to remove it from here because it is too entwined with the sprinkler system.

As I watered the planter across from Fifth Street Park, I saw two women clearly admiring the flowers.  I read in their body language that they needed a plant ID, and went across to talk to them.  To my surprise, the ID was for Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’.  I pulled up a small side plant and gave to the woman who had fallen in love with it.  The plant in her garden will always remind her of the fun town of Long Beach. The man who was with them lay down on a bench while we talked plants for a bit.  I went back across the street to get my hose and move it to a planter on the west side of the street.  The man came up to me and insisted on giving me $5.  I demurred but he was determined, so I took it as a donation for the Ilwaco Post Office garden!

I noticed in the southwest quadrant of the park that the Super Dorothy climbing rose is looking simply splended, heavily budded without a hint of mildew.

Rose 'Super Dorothy'

Rose ‘Super Dorothy’

Meanwhile, in the northwest quadrant, plain old Dorothy Perkins rose is, as always, covered with powdery mildew.  Years ago, when parks manager Mike Kitzman and I went to Heirloom Roses and some other inland nurseries to buy plants for the parks, we were advised that Super Dorothy was a vast improvement.  (The landscape architect had already gotten the Dorothy Perkins roses into the ground on the one side.)  The rose experts were so right.

I took a break when I got to my northernmost planter at the pharmacy to go to NIVA green, my favourite shop, to get a now belated birthday present for Seattle Carol.  (Her birthday is the 19th.) On the way, I took a photo of the horsetail over-run pond garden as a reminder that we (meaning Allan) must clamber out to the waterfall soon and clean it up.

It is a mess!

It is a mess!

inside NIVA green

inside NIVA green

cute little planter

cute little planter

I knew exactly what I wanted: an embroidered tea towel.  I snagged a series of photos to slowly feed onto the NIVA green Facebook page and got back to work.

the tea towel, embroidered by local artisan Shellie Thomas

the tea towel, embroidered by local artisan Shellie Thomas

Allan and I had crossed paths while watering and I’d asked him to address the powdery mildew problem on the Dorothy Perkins rose.  By the time I got back to the park, he had the worst of the greyed, ugly canes trimmed off.  The park looked so much better.

You might still be able to see that the flower buds have a haze of powdery mildew.

You might still be able to see that the flower buds have a haze of powdery mildew.

The four quadrants of Fifth Street Park

The four quadrants of Fifth Street Park

Fifth Street Park, southwest quadrant

Fifth Street Park, southwest quadrant, with Captain Bob’s Chowder to the left

Close up: Sanguisorba 'Pink Elephant'

Close up: Sanguisorba ‘Pink Elephant’ entiwined with Baptisia australis

daylily and Anthriscus sylvestris 'Ravenswing'

daylily and Anthriscus sylvestris ‘Ravenswing’

While we were almost done with weeding and grooming the park, we ordered crab rolls to go from Captain Bob’s Chowder.

They get good reviews on Trip Advisor...

They get good reviews on Trip Advisor…

and have recently acquired this comfortable new seating.  I do love a restaurant booth.

and have recently acquired this comfortable new seating. I do love a restaurant booth.

The plumbing company had not called and would now not be available till Monday.  Rats.  We would have to work on Saturday instead of Monday, then, in order to be home, and this would sort of throw off the watering schedule for next week, along with my plans to have a Saturday lunch with Our Kathleen at the Portside Café.

Ilwaco

Our evening project: Watering the Ilwaco street trees and planters (Allan) and weeding and watering the Ilwaco boatyard (me).  I weeded the garden south of the gate this time.

Ilwaco boatyard garden

Ilwaco boatyard garden

boatyard2

three year old lavender

three year old lavender

pink California poppy (Eschscholzia californica 'Rosa Romantica')

pink California poppy (Eschscholzia californica ‘Rosa Romantica’)

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue' and green santolina

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ and green santolina

From the gate to the north only got water, no weeding, this evening.

From the gate to the north only got water, no weeding, this evening.

I have a pleasant view of the boats while dragging the hose around and watering from behind the fence.

The Northern Star

The Northern Star

Allan crawled under the house and managed to tape up the leaky pipe so it has but a tiny drip.  If we are lucky and it does not “blow”, we can have water this weekend during the hours we are at home and awake.  He had plumbing problems on his mind all day and took no photos.

While fretting around outside while he was enduring the unpleasantness of lying in a puddle in the crawl space, I did see a beautiful sunset.

from the front yard

from the front yard

from the back yard over the Paul's Himalayan Musk rose arbor

from the back yard over the Paul’s Himalayan Musk rose arbor

old pink rose by the house

old pink rose by the house

Hymenocallis festalis still blooming

Hymenocallis festalis still blooming

south view in the dusk

south view in the dusk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Before we begin, let me remind you of an event happening on Saturday April 11, of particular interest to vegetable gardeners:

poster***************************

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Saturday, 4 April 2015

We had a plan to start weeding the so-called berms—the parking lot gardens in Long Beach.  Several other things had to come first, most especially a trip to ….

The Basket Case Greenhouse

….as they had just gotten in their first big perennial order of the season from Blooming Nursery.  Let me recommend a few of the most awesome plants now available (although since I am publishing six days late, some might be sold out, especially if I have gotten back there again!)

Eryngium 'Jade Frost'; the foliage tends to revert to green so I plant it anew every year.  The flowers are gorgeous whatever the foliage colour is.

Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’; the foliage tends to revert to green so I plant it anew every year. The flowers are gorgeous whatever the foliage colour is.

Eryngium 'Jade Frost'

Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’ in early summer

Eryngium 'Jade Frost'

Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’ after it has coloured up into blue

Erysimum, three kinds.  This is 'Apricot Twist'.  In front is 'Winter Orchid' which is stunning right now in my garden from one I planted last year.

Erysimum, three kinds. This is ‘Apricot Twist’. In front is ‘Winter Orchid’ which is stunning right now in my garden from one I planted last year.

On the east wall:  Erysimum 'Winter Orchid'

On the east wall of the Red Barn last year: Erysimum ‘Winter Orchid’

I bought two of  the golden "Lemon Fizz' santolina after taking this photo.  A great perennial for the beach.

I bought two of the golden “Lemon Fizz’ santolina after taking this photo. A great perennial for the beach.

two kinds of pineapple sage: to the right is "Golden Delicious'

two kinds of pineapple sage: to the right is “Golden Delicious’

My good friends Shadow and Walter

My good friends Shadow and Walter

Allan's photo: Shadow

Allan’s photo: Shadow

Allan's photo: the greeters

Allan’s photo: the greeters

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

There is also a good selection of assorted Agastaches (hyssops), one of my favourite perennials.

Agastache 'Summer Glow'

Agastache ‘Summer Glow’

an Agastache.  I like spikes.

an Agastache. I like spikes.

[Edited to add that by 7-9-15 I had bought all the Cotton Candy and Summer Glow Agastaches (hyssop) but some other colours remain.]

Enough rhapsodizing about Basket Case plants!  We next had a small planting mission at

The Anchorage Cottages

where I had recently noticed an empty-ish large planter.

Chamaecyparis trees by the road at The Anchorage

Chamaecyparis trees by the road at The Anchorage

I bet those trees were chosen by Dan Hinkley, because his sister in law used to own the Anchorage, and he and his spouse, Robert Jones, designed and planted part or all of the Anchorage garden, or so I was told years ago.

This container with Tulip 'Angelique' got some 'Bowles Black' violas from the Basket Case.

This container with Tulip ‘Angelique’ got some ‘Bowles Black’ violas from the Basket Case.

And this big container got a pink Agastache.

And this big container got a pink Agastache ‘Cotton Candy’.

Camassia in the entry garden near the office

Camassia in the entry garden near the office

There were lots of little children running around, and I wondered if that explained the small tragedy by the center courtyard:

bearded iris broken before it could bloom

bearded iris broken before it could bloom

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

[Edited to add:  I later learned that a company, who shall be unnamed, who came to perform a task, dragged some of their gear through here and whacked off those irises.  The childrens’ reputation was redeemed.]

Leaving the Anchorage, we headed to Long Beach town…but when I checked my phone, I saw that I had a voicemail from Fred at The Basket Case.  I knew immediately what had happened…some plants had surely been left behind.  Remember that photo above of me with the greeting committee? When  Allan took it, he was standing right over the flat of plants in question, and that is all I will say about that.  So back we went…

Basket Case, again

I took a photo of the arbour of glorious pink Clematis montana...another plant that they carry for sale.

I took a photo of the arbour of glorious pink Clematis montana…another plant that they carry for sale.

clematis2

The plants that had been left behind had been placed on this ladder.  (Allan's photo)

The plants that had been left behind had been placed on this ladder. (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

This leaving behind sort of thing happens at least once a year, and it might be a good thing it happened on the first big day.  I am reminded to keep my mind sharp while I am there.

Long Beach

We began by planting in the Veterans Field garden three each of white Gauras ‘Whirling Butterflies’ and ‘So White’, another plant that is excellent and available at the Basket Case.  [Edited to add:  It was, till I bought them all, but surely Fred will order more.  Some of the pink foliage variety of Gaura is available at The Planter Box.] Two Phygelius ‘Cherry Red’ replaced the two tatty blue oat grasses that I hoiked out of the curved Vet field bed a few weeks ago.

Gaura in summer

Gaura last summer; Allan planted three in the new garden on the other side of Veterans Field and three more in the curved bed by the flag pavilion.

The weather had become so miserably cold, with a whipping icy wind, and the sky to the west was so dark that I said that, as soon as the plants were in, we would abort our work day and go home till dinnertime.

Allan's photo of the flag pavilion

Allan’s photo of the flag pavilion…BRRRR!

While Allan did the planting, I walked over to deadhead some spent narcissi that I’d noticed in a planter on the main street and used the opportunity to check on the four barrels in Fish Alley.

I was glad I checked Fish Alley because I found a huge dandelion in one of the barrels.

I was glad I checked Fish Alley because I found a huge dandelion in one of the barrels.

and the center plants had died...

and the center plants had died…

and some edge plants were gone and the soil was low.

and some edge plants were gone and the soil was low.

I am quite sure that people help themselves to the “hens and chickens” that we have planted in these barrels. It would be thoughtful if they did not take them ALL!!!   We want to go as drought tolerant as possible here because we have to bucket water these barrels and it is a longish slog.

It is a long walk with two buckets of water to get to the westernmost barrels.

It is a long walk with two buckets of water to get to the westernmost barrels.

I deadheaded and weeded the planter by Campiche Gallery at the stoplight…

Tulips in that planter...

Tulip ‘Formosa’ in that planter…

And then walked back to join Allan.  Still thinking we would go home soon, I decided to pop a pink-leaved Gaura (from The Planter Box) into the planter across from the police station; one of two had died over the winter, and I like a matched set.  Some pleasant tourists were admiring and photographing all the tulips.

They especially liked these, and so do I.

They especially liked these Tulip ‘Akebono’, and so do I.

We still thought the weather miserable enough to go home.  We had one indoor errand to run first.  Heather Ramsay of NIVA green had a book to lend to Allan:  River Horse by William Least Heat Moon.  I took the opportunity to top up my stash of photos for the NIVA green Facebook page.

NIVA green

NIVA green

a cool whirly light

a cool whirly light

beachy tea towels

beachy tea towels embroidered by local artisan Shellie Thomas

beach in a box

beach in a box

and a chance to buy a sympathy card for Susie and Bill, whose beloved cat Spanky had died a couple of days ago.

and a chance to buy a sympathy card for Susie and Bill, whose beloved cat Spanky had died a couple of days ago.

As we walked back to Veterans Field, we noticed that the wind had died down and the sky had turned blue to the west.  So we set up to weed the north parking lot garden, our main mission of the day.  The city crew and we call them “berms” even though, because they are level, they are not berms.  I will now regale you with our befores and afters.

before

before

before

before

after

after

before

before

after

after

Allan's before

Allan’s before

and after

and after

I added some seeds of red poppies to the sunnier bare areas.

after

after

every bucket filled

many buckets filled

We did not get the whole north berm done and hoped to have good enough weather to return on the next day.

After dumping our debris, we met Kathleen at the new Thai restaurant.  Dinner at 5:30 meant that we stopped work earlier than we might have otherwise.  The town was so full of tourists that we wanted to beat a potential dinner rush, and a rapidly dropping air temperature meant we were happy enough to quit early.

in the restaurant:  Allan's photo

in the restaurant: Allan’s photo

The fresh rolls were tasty and beautiful.

The fresh rolls were crispy, tasty and beautiful.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

a salmon salad delicate and light...

a salmon salad delicate and light…

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

yellow curry for Allan

yellow curry for Allan

Pad Thai for Kathleen was not quite as al dente as we all prefer.

Pad Thai for Kathleen was not quite as al dente as we all prefer.

The food tasted just fine and yet it lacked the intense spice and the four flavours that I associate with Thai food.  In the words of wikipedia:  “Thai cooking places emphasis on lightly prepared dishes with strong aromatic components and a spicy edge. It is known for its complex interplay of at least three and up to four or five fundamental taste senses in each dish or the overall meal: sour, sweet, salty, bitter and spicy.”   The names of menu items at the new restaurant’s menu were mostly Americanized and we felt that the spiciness had been toned down to appeal to everyone.  For people who usually find Thai food too spicy, these preparations would be ideal.

Our discussion beyond Thai spices was of books, and Kathleen recommended several that are now on my to-read list:

Lies my Teacher Taught Me

Dark Tide: The Great Boston Molasses Flood of 1919

The White Cascade

Product Details

The Care and Management of Lies

The Language of Houses

My book list is laughably long.  I need more reading days.

Since The Care and Management of Lies is about WWI in the UK, I recommended the Regeneration trilogy by Pat Barker, and in fact Kathleen picked it up from me to borrow the very next day on her way back to her workaday world up north.

home

At home, I remembered to photograph my Akebia that is right by where we park, in full fragrant chocolatey bloom.

akebia1

Akebia quinata

Akebia quinata

akebia3

front garden path

front garden path

Tulips and Anthriscus 'Ravenswing'

Tulips and Anthriscus ‘Ravenswing’

I spent the evening blogging about my lovely reading yesterday, which I am so glad I took, as tomorrow we hope to finish weeding the “berms”.

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